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Colloquium On Geology, Mineralogy, And Human Welfare

by National Academy Of Sciences

The National Academies Press (NAP)--publisher for the National Academies--publishes more than 200 books a year offering the most authoritative views, definitive information, and groundbreaking recommendations on a wide range of topics in science, engineering, and health. Our books are unique in that they are authored by the nation's leading experts in every scientific field.

Colloquium On Protecting Our Food Supply: The Value Of Plant Genome Initiatives

by National Academy Of Sciences

The National Academies Press (NAP)--publisher for the National Academies--publishes more than 200 books a year offering the most authoritative views, definitive information, and groundbreaking recommendations on a wide range of topics in science, engineering, and health. Our books are unique in that they are authored by the nation's leading experts in every scientific field.

Colloquium On Computational Biomolecular Science

by National Academy Of Sciences

The National Academies Press (NAP)--publisher for the National Academies--publishes more than 200 books a year offering the most authoritative views, definitive information, and groundbreaking recommendations on a wide range of topics in science, engineering, and health. Our books are unique in that they are authored by the nation's leading experts in every scientific field.

STRIKING A BALANCE: Improving Stewardship of Marine Areas

by Management Committee on Marine Area Governance

America's ocean and coastal regions--which provide wildlife habitat, commercial fish stocks, mineral reserves, travelways, recreation, and more--are under increasing pressure as more and more people exploit marine resources, leaving environmental damage in their wake.Striking a Balance responds to the urgency for sound decisionmaking in the management of marine resources. An expert committee proposes principles, goals, and a framework for marine area governance, including new governance structures at the federal and regional levels and improvements for existing governing and regulatory systems.Recommendations include using tools--such as zoning and liability--for resolving conflicts between users, controlling access to marine resources, and enforcing regulations. The book describes the wide-ranging nature and value of marine resources, evaluates their current management, and explores three in-depth case studies. It also touches on the implications of newer, more flexible, less hierarchical approaches to organizational behavior.Striking a Balance will be of interest to everyone concerned about marine resource management, especially federal and state marine managers and regulators, marine scientists and policy analysts, companies and organizations with interests in marine and coastal resources, and advocacy groups.

Contaminated Sediments in Ports and Waterways: Cleanup Strategies and Technologies

by Committee on Contaminated Marine Sediments

Contaminated marine sediments threaten ecosystems, marine resources, and human health. They can have major economic impacts when controversies over risks and costs of sediment management interfere with needs to dredge major ports.Contaminated Sediments in Ports and Waterways examines management and technology issues and provides guidance that will help officials make timely decisions and use technologies effectively. The book includes recommendations with a view toward improving decision making, developing cost-effective technologies, and promoting the successful completion of cleanup projects.The volume assesses the state of practice and research and development status of both short-term and longer-term remediation methods. The committee provides a conceptual overview for risk-based contaminated sediment management that can be used to develop plans that address complex technological, political, and legal issues and the interests of various stakeholders. The book emphasizes the need for proper assessment of conditions at sediment sites and adequate control of contamination sources.

Simulated Voyages: Using Simulation Technology to, Train and License Mariners

by Committee on Ship-Bridge Simulation Training

This book assesses the state of practice and use of ship-bridge simulators in the professional development and licensing of deck officers and marine pilots. It focuses on full-mission computer-based simulators and manned models. It analyzes their use in instruction, evaluation and licensing and gives information and practical guidance on the establishment of training and licensing program standards, and on simulator and simulation validation.

Shipbuilding Technology and Education

by Committee on National Needs in Maritime Technology

The U.S. shipbuilding industry now confronts grave challenges in providing essential support of national objectives. With recent emphasis on renewal of the U.S. naval fleet, followed by the defense builddown, U.S. shipbuilders have fallen far behind in commercial ship construction, and face powerful new competition from abroad. This book examines ways to reestablish the U.S. industry, to provide a technology base and R&D infrastructure sustaining both commercial and military goals.Comparing U.S. and foreign shipbuilders in four technological areas, the authors find that U.S. builders lag most severely in business process technologies, and in technologies of new products and materials. New advances in system technologies, such as simulation, are also needed, as are continuing developments in shipyard production technologies. The report identifies roles that various government agencies, academia, and, especially, industry itself must play for the U.S. shipbuilding industry to attempt a turnaround.

Reducing the Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles, Phase Two: First Report

by Committee on Assessment of Technologies Approaches for Reducing the Fuel Consumption of Medium- Heavy-Duty Vehicles Phase Two

Medium- and heavy-duty trucks, motor coaches, and transit buses - collectively, "medium- and heavy-duty vehicles", or MHDVs - are used in every sector of the economy. The fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of MHDVs have become a focus of legislative and regulatory action in the past few years. Reducing the Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles, Phase Two is a follow-on to the National Research Council's 2010 report, Technologies and Approaches to Reducing the Fuel Consumption of Medium-and Heavy-Duty Vehicles. That report provided a series of findings and recommendations on the development of regulations for reducing fuel consumption of MHDVs.

Climate Change: Evidence & Causes

by National Academy Of Sciences The Royal Society

Climate Change: Evidence and Causes is a jointly produced publication of The US National Academy of Sciences and The Royal Society. Written by a UK-US team of leading climate scientists and reviewed by climate scientists and others, the publication is intended as a brief, readable reference document for decision makers, policy makers, educators, and other individuals seeking authoritative information on the some of the questions that continue to be asked.

Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks

by Carol E. H. Scott-Conner

Review of NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks 2015 Letter Report is the third in a series of five reports from the Institute of Medicine that will independently review more than 30 evidence reports that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has compiled on human health risks for long-duration and exploration space flights. This report builds on the 2008 IOM report Review of NASA's Human Research Program Evidence Books: A Letter Report, which provided an initial and brief review of the evidence reports.

Improving and Accelerating Therapeutic Development for Nervous System Disorders: Workshop Summary

by Sheena M. Posey Norris

Improving and Accelerating Therapeutic Development for Nervous System Disorders is the summary of a workshop convened by the IOM Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders to examine opportunities to accelerate early phases of drug development for nervous system drug discovery. Workshop participants discussed challenges in neuroscience research for enabling faster entry of potential treatments into first-in-human trials, explored how new and emerging tools and technologies may improve the efficiency of research, and considered mechanisms to facilitate a more effective and efficient development pipeline.

Weather Services for the Nation: Becoming Second to None

by Committee on the Assessment of the National Weather Service's Modernization Program

During the 1980s and 1990s, the National Weather Service (NWS) undertook a major program called the Modernization and Associated Restructuring (MAR). The MAR was officially completed in 2000. No comprehensive assessment of the execution of the MAR plan, or comparison of the promised benefits of the MAR to its actual impact, had ever been conducted. Therefore, Congress asked the National Academy of Sciences to conduct an end-to-end assessment. That report, The National Weather Service Modernization and Associated Restructuring: A Retrospective Assessment, concluded that the MAR was a success. Now, twelve years after the official completion of the MAR, the challenges faced by the NWS are no less important than those of the pre-MAR era. The three key challenges are: 1) Keeping Pace with accelerating scientific and technological advancement, 2) Meeting Expanding and Evolving User Needs in an increasingly information centric society, and 3) Partnering with an Increasingly Capable Enterprise that has grown considerably since the time of the MAR. Weather Services for the Nation presents three main recommendations for responding to these challenges. These recommendations will help the NWS address these challenges, making it more agile and effective. This will put it on a path to becoming second to none at integrating advances in science and technology into its operations and at meeting user needs, leading in some areas and keeping pace in others. It will have the highest quality core capabilities among national weather services. It will have a more agile organizational structure and workforce that allow it to directly or indirectly reach more end-users, save more lives, and help more businesses. And it will have leveraged these capabilities through the broader enterprise. This approach will make possible societal benefits beyond what the NWS budget alone allows.

Nineteenth Interim Report of the Committee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels: Part A

by National Research Council of the National Academies

The present report is the committee's 19th interim report. It summarizes the committee's conclusions and recommendations for improving NAC's AEGL documents for the following chemicals and chemical classes: acrylonitrile, benzonitrile, boron tribromide, BZ (3-quinuclidinyl benzilate), chloroarsenicals, chloroformates, bis-chloromethylether, chloromethylether, chlorosilanes (26 selected compounds), cyanogen, ethyl mercaptan, hexafluoroacetone, lewisites, mercury vapor, nitric acid, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen tetroxide, oleum, phenyl mercaptan, propargyl alcohol, selenium hexafluoride, silane, sulfer trioxide, sulfuric acid, tear gas, tert-octyl mercaptan, tetramethoxy silane, thionyl chloride, trimethoxysilane, trimethylbenzenes (1,2,4-; 1,2,5-;and 1,3,5-TMB), and vinyl chloride.

Letter Report Assessing the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program's Science Plan

by National Research Council of the National Academies

In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey requested that the National Research Council (NRC) review and provide guidance on the direction and priorities of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. This review would include perspective on past accomplishments and the current and future design and scope of the program as it moves into its third decade of water quality assessment (Cycle 3). The NRC has continued that advisory role authoring a letter report on the initial Cycle 3 planning document, the Science Framework (Letter Report Assessing the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Program's Science Framework). Based on advice contained in that letter report, input from stakeholders, and additional reflection from the NAWQA Cycle 3 Planning Team, the Science Framework evolved into the Cycle 3 Science Plan. The Science Plan is the high level planning document that will guide the NAWQA program through the next 10 years of water quality monitoring. The NAWQA program has matured over its two decades and is at a point where it should not simply continue its previous work but should do the dynamic water quality monitoring that is proposed for Cycle 3. This is a compelling plan for the program that the committee strongly supports; in Cycle 3 NAWQA will advance the understanding of the dynamics of water quality change and forecast likely future conditions. The committee supports the Cycle 3 priority of dynamic water quality monitoring. The Science Plan is technically sound and the NAWQA program has the scientific capability to achieve the Science Plan objectives. Yet the concept of dynamic water quality monitoring needs further development in the Science Plan. For example, a strong justification for why dynamic water quality monitoring is important, why now and why the USGS via NAWQA can achieve this remains unwritten. Further defining program outputs and potential outcomes will also help frame the significance of dynamic water quality monitoring. Moreover, thinking through a dynamic, question-driven sampling strategy to execute this concept will serve the program well.

Continuing Assistance to the National Institutes of Health on Preparation of Additional Risk Assessments for the Boston University NEIDL, Phase 2

by National Research Council of the National Academies

The National Research Council (NRC) reconvened its Committee on Technical Input on Any Additional Studies to Assess Risk Associated with Operation of the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory (NEIDL), Boston University to provide you further technical input on the scope and design of any additional studies that may be needed to assess the risks associated with the siting and operation of the NEIDL. To this end, the NRC committee met in open session with the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel on September 22, 2010 to hear presentations by NIH's contractors on the approaches they are taking to conduct the risk assessment. Following the open meeting, the NRC committee met in closed session to begin preparing this brief letter report, focusing on whether the analyses presented at that meeting are scientifically and technically sound in general and whether they address the concerns raised by the NRC in its first three letter reports. The committee reviewed the material presented by the NIH contractors on September 22 and concluded that it cannot endorse as scientifically and technically sound the illustrative analyses presented. These analyses do not, so far, represent a thorough assessment of the public health concerns raised by the committee in its previous reports. The committee understands that the analytical results discussed were incomplete and that work on additional analyses is still ongoing. Therefore, the comments provided in this letter report will be helpful to the Blue Ribbon Panel as they consider how the remainder of the work is carried out.

Eighteenth Interim Report of the Committee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels

by National Research Council of the National Academies

The present report is the committee's 18th interim report. It summarizes the committee's conclusions and recommendations for improving NAC's AEGL documents for 25 chemicals: allyl alcohol, bis-chloromethyl ether, chloromethyl methyl ether, bromine pentafluoride, bromine trifluoride, chlorine pentafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chlorosilanes (26 selected compounds), epichlorohydrin, formaldehyde, hydrogen bromide, hydrogen iodide, methyl bromide, methyl chloride, nitric acid, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen tetroxide, piperidine, titanium tetrachloride, toluene, trimethylbenzenes (1

Nuclear Forensics: A Capability at Risk - Abbreviated Version

by National Research Council of the National Academies

Nuclear forensics is important to our national security. Actions, including provision of appropriate funding, are needed now to sustain and improve the nation's nuclear forensics capabilities. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), working with cooperating agencies and national laboratories, should plan and implement a sustainable, effective nuclear forensics program. Nuclear forensics is the examination and evaluation of discovered or seized nuclear materials and devices or, in cases of nuclear explosions or radiological dispersals, of detonation signals and post-detonation debris. Nuclear forensic evidence helps law enforcement and intelligence agencies work toward preventing, mitigating, and attributing a nuclear or radiological incident. This report, requested by DHS, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the Department of Defense, makes recommendations on how to sustain and improve U.S. nuclear forensics capabilities. The United States has developed a nuclear forensics capability that has been demonstrated in real-world incidents of interdicted materials and in exercises of actions required after a nuclear detonation. The committee, however, has concerns about the program and finds that without strong leadership, careful planning, and additional funds, these capabilities will decline.

Ethical Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs: A Letter Report

by Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

The FDA requested that the IOM examine the ethical and informed consent issues that should be considered when conducting clinical trials to evaluate drug safety. This report outlines when and how the FDA should conduct clinical trials to protect the public's health and the health of trial participants.

Overview and Summary of America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation

by National Academy Of Sciences National Academy of Engineering National Research Council of the National Academies

This Overview and Summary highlights key findings and major topics discussed in America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation. It also reflects results presented in the additional three books that comprise the America's Energy Future project.

Letter Report

by National Research Council of the National Academies

The leaders of the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps have recognized the potential impact of climate change on naval forces' missions and have positioned their organizations to make adaptive changes. This report is the first component of a study to assess the implications of climate change for the U.S. Naval Services. Specifically, this report highlights issues that could have potential near-term impacts, impose a need for near-term awareness, or require near-term planning to ensure that longer-term naval capabilities are protected. The final report of this study will address all of the elements in the study's terms of reference and explore many potential implications of climate change not covered in this letter report.

Closed System

by Zach Hughes

A simple cargo run launches Pat Howe, on an uncharted course toward galaxy crushing conflagration. Pat Howe, skipper and sole crew member of the space tug Skimmer, sensed trouble as soon as he accepted the commission from the Zede businessmen. Why were they willing to pay so much for him to transport medicine to Taratwo? And why did they insist on having Skimmer, a fully armed and notoriously fast tug, bring an unnamed passenger back from Taratwo? But Pat never dreamed when he blasted off that he'd taken the first step on a journey that would bring him to an unknown corner of the universe, where the flames of a millenium-old rebellion were about to be fanned into a threat to the entire civilized universe.

Controlling the Quantum World of Atoms, Molecules, and Photons: An Interim Report

by National Research Council of the National Academies

As part of its Physics 2010 decadal survey, the NRC has undertaken a study of opportunities in atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science and technology over roughly the next decade. This study has been requested by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. They asked the NRC to assess the state of AMO science, emphasizing recent accomplishments and identifying new and compelling scientific questions. A final report on this study is expected in the summer 2006. This interim report provides a preview of the final document. It presents a summary of the key opportunities in forefront AMO science and in closely related technologies, and a discussion of some of the broad-scale conclusions of the final report. The interim report also describes how AMO science supports national R&D priorities.

Managing Technology Transfer: A Strategy for the Federal Highway Administration

by National Research Council

TRB Special Report 256 - Managing Technology Transfer: A Strategy for the Federal Highway Administration addresses how the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration selects research products for technology transfer and transfers those products to the highway industry, in particular the state and local agencies that own, operate, and maintain the nation’s highways.

Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity?: EXAMINING THE EVIDENCE

by Institute of Medicine of the National Academies Transportation Research Board

TRB Special Report 282: Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence reviews the broad trends affecting the relationships among physical activity, health, transportation, and land use; summarizes what is known about these relationships, including the strength and magnitude of any causal connections; examines implications for policy; and recommends priorities for future research.

Cooperative Research for Hazardous Materials Transportation: Defining the Need, Converging on Solutions

by Transportation Research Board of the National Academies

TRB Special Report 283: Cooperative Research for Hazardous Materials Transportation: Defining the Need, Converging on Solutions examines the feasibility of a research program to find ways to ensure the safe transport of hazardous materials. The report outlines how industry, state and local governments, and federal agencies could develop a cooperative program that would fill gaps in current research programs, and examines possible sources of funding.

Showing 4,151 through 4,175 of 8,501 results

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