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Interanimations: Receiving Modern German Philosophy

by Robert B. Pippin

In this latest book, renowned philosopher and scholar Robert B. Pippin offers the thought-provoking argument that the study of historical figures is not only an interpretation and explication of their views, but can be understood as a form of philosophy itself. In doing so, he reconceives philosophical scholarship as a kind of network of philosophical interanimations, one in which major positions in the history of philosophy, when they are themselves properly understood within their own historical context, form philosophy's lingua franca. Examining a number of philosophers to explore the nature of this interanimation, he presents an illuminating assortment of especially thoughtful examples of historical commentary that powerfully enact philosophy. After opening up his territory with an initial discussion of contemporary revisionist readings of Kant's moral theory, Pippin sets his sights on his main objects of interest: Hegel and Nietzsche. Through them, however, he offers what few others could: an astonishing synthesis of an immense and diverse set of thinkers and traditions. Deploying an almost dialogical, conversational approach, he pursues patterns of thought that both shape and, importantly, connect the major traditions: neo-Aristotelian, analytic, continental, and postmodern, bringing the likes of Heidegger, Honneth, MacIntyre, McDowell, Brandom, Strauss, Williams, and Žižek--not to mention Hegel and Nietzsche-- into the same philosophical conversation. By means of these case studies, Pippin mounts an impressive argument about a relatively under discussed issue in professional philosophy--the bearing of work in the history of philosophy on philosophy itself--and thereby he argues for the controversial thesis that no strict separation between the domains is defensible.

The Aims of Higher Education: Problems of Morality and Justice

by Harry Brighouse Michael Mcpherson

In this book, philosopher Harry Brighouse and Spencer Foundation president Michael McPherson bring together leading philosophers to think about some of the most fundamental questions that higher education faces. Looking beyond the din of arguments over how universities should be financed, how they should be run, and what their contributions to the economy are, the contributors to this volume set their sights on higher issues: ones of moral and political value. The result is an accessible clarification of the crucial concepts and goals we so often skip over--even as they underlie our educational policies and practices. The contributors tackle the biggest questions in higher education: What are the proper aims of the university? What role do the liberal arts play in fulfilling those aims? What is the justification for the humanities? How should we conceive of critical reflection, and how should we teach it to our students? How should professors approach their intellectual relationship with students, both in social interaction and through curriculum? What obligations do elite institutions have to correct for their historical role in racial and social inequality? And, perhaps most important of all: How can the university serve as a model of justice? The result is a refreshingly thoughtful approach to higher education and what it can, and should, be doing.

Golden Rules: The Origins of California Water Law in the Gold Rush

by Mark Kanazawa

Fresh water has become scarce and will become even more so in the coming years, as continued population growth places ever greater demands on the supply of fresh water. At the same time, options for increasing that supply look to be ever more limited. No longer can we rely on technological solutions to meet growing demand. What we need is better management of the available water supply to ensure it goes further toward meeting basic human needs. But better management requires that we both understand the history underlying our current water regulation regime and think seriously about what changes to the law could be beneficial. For Golden Rules, Mark Kanazawa draws on previously untapped historical sources to trace the emergence of the current framework for resolving water-rights issues to California in the 1850s, when Gold Rush miners flooded the newly formed state. The need to circumscribe water use on private property in support of broader societal objectives brought to light a number of fundamental issues about how water rights ought to be defined and enforced through a system of laws. Many of these issues reverberate in today's contentious debates about the relative merits of government and market regulation. By understanding how these laws developed across California's mining camps and common-law courts, we can also gain a better sense of the challenges associated with adopting new property-rights regimes in the twenty-first century.

Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict: Ethical, Legal, and Strategic Implications

by David Cortright Rachel Fairhurst Kristen Wall

During the past decade, armed drones have entered the American military arsenal as a core tactic for countering terrorism. When coupled with access to reliable information, they make it possible to deploy lethal force accurately across borders while keeping one s own soldiers out of harm s way. The potential to direct force with great precision also offers the possibility of reducing harm to civilians. At the same time, because drones eliminate some of the traditional constraints on the use of force like the need to gain political support for full mobilization they lower the threshold for launching military strikes. The development of drone use capacity across dozens of countries increases the need for global standards on the use of these weapons to assure that their deployment is strategically wise and ethically and legally sound. Presenting a robust conversation among leading scholars in the areas of international legal standards, counterterrorism strategy, humanitarian law, and the ethics of force, "Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict" takes account of current American drone campaigns and the developing legal, ethical, and strategic implications of this new way of warfare. Among the contributions to this volume are a thorough examination of the American government s legal justifications for the targeting of enemies using drones, an analysis of American drone campaigns notable successes and failures, and a discussion of the linked issues of human rights, freedom of information, and government accountability. "


by B. J. Daniels

Danger runs high and passions burn hot in Montana's wild country Big-city detective Bentley Jamison is a long way from home in the Beartooth wilderness when one of local rancher Maddie Conner's ranch hands goes missing. Towering mountains and a small, tight community are as unfamiliar to Jamison as herding sheep, but he's never shied away from a challenge. As the new deputy sheriff, he's sworn to protect every inch of this rough terrain-starting with unraveling a mystery that has left Maddie a wide-open target. Maddie's as beautiful-and untamable-as the land around them. Like Jamison, she won't back down from danger. But desire that flares hotter than their tempers only raises the stakes when a fierce storm traps them in the high mountains. Caught in a killer's sights, Jamison and Maddie must trust one another, because now survival...and love...are all that matter.


by B. J. Daniels

Jack French has had two long years of prison-ranch labor to focus on starting over, cleaning up his act and making things right. When he comes home to close-knit Beartooth, Montana, he's bent on leveling the score with the men who set him up. The one thing he doesn't factor into his plans is beautiful Kate LaFond.With adventure-seeking in her blood, Kate's got big dreams to chase and a troubled past to put to rest. And even though a red-hot connection to a woman with her own set of secrets isn't part of Jack's plans, he just can't resist Kate and the gold cache she's after...even if it comes at a price.But when Kate is accused of murder, he realizes she's not only a suspect, but a target. In the Montana wilderness, he'll do whatever it takes to keep her safe from a killer on a quest to rob them of their chance for a new, passionate life with each other.

Reading Clocks, Alla Turca: Time and Society in the Late Ottoman Empire

by Avner Wishnitzer

Up until the end of the eighteenth century, the way Ottomans used their clocks conformed to the inner logic of their own temporal culture. However, this began to change rather dramatically during the nineteenth century, as the Ottoman Empire was increasingly assimilated into the European-dominated global economy and the project of modern state building began to gather momentum. In Reading Clocks, Alla Turca, Avner Wishnitzer unravels the complexity of Ottoman temporal culture and for the first time tells the story of its transformation. He explains that in their attempt to attain better surveillance capabilities and higher levels of regularity and efficiency, various organs of the reforming Ottoman state developed elaborate temporal constructs in which clocks played an increasingly important role. As the reform movement spread beyond the government apparatus, emerging groups of officers, bureaucrats, and urban professionals incorporated novel time-related ideas, values, and behaviors into their self-consciously "modern" outlook and lifestyle. Acculturated in the highly regimented environment of schools and barracks, they came to identify efficiency and temporal regularity with progress and the former temporal patterns with the old political order. Drawing on a wealth of archival and literary sources, Wishnitzer's original and highly important work presents the shifting culture of time as an arena in which Ottoman social groups competed for legitimacy and a medium through which the very concept of modernity was defined. Reading Clocks, Alla Turca breaks new ground in the study of the Middle East and presents us with a new understanding of the relationship between time and modernity.

Documenting Intimate Matters: Primary Sources for a History of Sexuality in America

by Thomas A. Foster

Over time, sexuality in America has changed dramatically. Frequently redefined and often subject to different systems of regulation, it has been used as a means of control; it has been a way to understand ourselves and others; and it has been at the center of fierce political storms, including some of the most crucial changes in civil rights in the last decade. Edited by Thomas A. Foster, Documenting Intimate Matters features seventy-two documents that collectively highlight the broad diversity inherent in the history of American sexuality. Complementing the third edition of Intimate Matters, by John D'Emilio and Estelle B. Freedman--often hailed as the definitive survey of sexual history in America--the multiple narratives presented by these documents reveal the complexity of this subject in US history. The historical moments captured in this volume will show that, contrary to popular misconception, the history of sexuality is not a simple story of increased freedoms and sexual liberation, but an ongoing struggle between change and continuity.

Enduring Truths

by Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby

Runaway slave Sojourner Truth gained fame in the nineteenth century as an abolitionist, feminist, and orator and earned a living partly by selling photographic carte de visite portraits of herself at lectures and by mail. Cartes de visite, similar in format to calling cards, were relatively inexpensive collectibles that quickly became a new mode of mass communication. Despite being illiterate, Truth copyrighted her photographs in her name and added the caption "I Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance. Sojourner Truth. " Featuring the largest collection of Truth's photographs ever published, Enduring Truths is the first book to explore how she used her image, the press, the postal service, and copyright laws to support her activism and herself. Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby establishes a range of important contexts for Truth's portraits, including the strategic role of photography and copyright for an illiterate former slave; the shared politics of Truth's cartes de visite and federal banknotes, which were both created to fund the Union cause; and the ways that photochemical limitations complicated the portrayal of different skin tones. Insightful and powerful, Enduring Truths shows how Truth made her photographic portrait worth money in order to end slavery--and also became the strategic author of her public self.

Blacked Out: Dilemmas of Race, Identity, and Success at Capital High

by Signithia Fordham

This innovative portrait of student life in an urban high school focuses on the academic success of African-American students, exploring the symbolic role of academic achievement within the Black community and investigating the price students pay for attaining it. Signithia Fordham's richly detailed ethnography reveals a deeply rooted cultural system that favors egalitarianism and group cohesion over the individualistic, competitive demands of academic success and sheds new light on the sources of academic performance. She also details the ways in which the achievements of sucessful African-Americans are "blacked out" of the public imagination and negative images are reflected onto black adolescents. A self-proclaimed "native" anthropologist, she chronicles the struggle of African-American students to construct an identity suitable to themselves, their peers, and their families within an arena of colliding ideals. This long-overdue contribution is of crucial importance to educators, policymakers, and ethnographers.

Modes of Uncertainty: Anthropological Cases

by Paul Rabinow Limor Samimian-Darah

Modes of Uncertainty offers groundbreaking ways of thinking about danger, risk, and uncertainty from an analytical and anthropological perspective. Our world, the contributors show, is increasingly populated by forms, practices, and events whose uncertainty cannot be reduced to risk--and thus it is vital to distinguish between the two. Drawing the lines between them, they argue that the study of uncertainty should not focus solely on the appearance of new risks and dangers--which no doubt abound--but also on how uncertainty itself should be defined, and what the implications might be for policy and government. Organizing contributions from various anthropological subfields--including economics, business, security, humanitarianism, health, and environment--Limor Samimian-Darash and Paul Rabinow offer new tools with which to consider uncertainty, its management, and the differing modes of subjectivity appropriate to it. Taking up policies and experiences as objects of research and analysis, the essays here seek a rigorous inquiry into a sound conceptualization of uncertainty in order to better confront contemporary problems. Ultimately, they open the way for a participatory anthropology that asks crucial questions about our contemporary state.

Teaching Artist Handbook: Volume 1: Tools, Techniques and Ideas to Help any Artist Teach

by Nick Jaffe Becca Barniskis Barbara Hackett Cox

"Teaching Artist Handbook" is based on the premise that teaching artists have the unique ability to engage students as fellow artists. In their schools and communities, teaching artists put high quality art-making at the center of their practice and open doors to powerful learning across disciplines. This book is a collection of essays, stories, lists, examples, dialogues, and ideas, all offered with the aim of helping artists create and implement effective teaching based on their own expertise and strengths. The "Handbook" addresses three core questions: "What will I teach?" "How will I teach it?" and "How will I know if my teaching is working?" It also recognizes that teaching is a dynamic process that requires critical reflection and thoughtful adjustment in order to foster a supportive artistic environment. Instead of offering rigid formulas, this book is centered on practice--the actual doing and making of teaching artist work. Experience-based and full of heart, the "Teaching Artist Handbook" will encourage artists of every experience level to create an original and innovative practice that inspires students and the artist.

The Grasping Hand: "Kelo v. City of New London" and the Limits of Eminent Domain

by Ilya Somin

In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that the city of New London, Connecticut, could condemn fifteen residential properties in order to transfer them to a new private owner. Although the Fifth Amendment only permits the taking of private property for public use, the Court ruled that the transfer of condemned land to private parties for economic development is permitted by the Constitution even if the government cannot prove that the expected development will ever actually happen. The Court s decision in "Kelo v. City of New London" empowered the grasping hand of the state at the expense of the invisible hand of the market. In this detailed study of one of the most controversial Supreme Court cases in modern times, Ilya Somin argues that "Kelo" was a grave error. Economic development and blight condemnations are unconstitutional under both originalist and most living constitution theories of legal interpretation. They also victimize the poor and the politically weak for the benefit of powerful interest groups and often destroy more economic value than they create. "Kelo" itself exemplifies these patterns. The residents targeted for condemnation lacked the influence needed to combat the formidable government and corporate interests arrayed against them. Moreover, the city s poorly conceived development plan ultimately failed: the condemned land lies empty to this day, occupied only by feral cats. The Supreme Court s unpopular ruling triggered an unprecedented political reaction, with forty-five states passing new laws intended to limit the use of eminent domain. But many of the new laws impose few or no genuine constraints on takings. The "Kelo "backlash led to significant progress, but not nearly as much as it may have seemed. Despite its outcome, the closely divided 5-4 ruling shattered what many believed to be a consensus that virtually any condemnation qualifies as a public use under the Fifth Amendment. It also showed that there is widespread public opposition to eminent domain abuse. With controversy over takings sure to continue, "The Grasping Hand" offers the first book-length analysis of Kelo by a legal scholar, alongside a broader history of the dispute over public use and eminent domain and an evaluation of options for reform. "

Fatal Isolation: The Devastating Paris Heat Wave of 2003

by Richard C. Keller

In a cemetery on the southern outskirts of Paris lie the bodies of nearly a hundred of what some have called the first casualties of global climate change. They were the so-called abandoned victims of the worst natural disaster in French history, the devastating heat wave that struck in August 2003, leaving 15,000 dead. They died alone in Paris and its suburbs, and were then buried at public expense, their bodies unclaimed. They died, and to a great extent lived, unnoticed by their neighbors--their bodies undiscovered in some cases until weeks after their deaths. Fatal Isolation tells the stories of these victims and the catastrophe that took their lives. It explores the multiple narratives of disaster--the official story of the crisis and its aftermath, as presented by the media and the state; the life stories of the individual victims, which both illuminate and challenge the ways we typically perceive natural disasters; and the scientific understandings of disaster and its management. Fatal Isolation is both a social history of risk and vulnerability in the urban landscape and a story of how a city copes with emerging threats and sudden, dramatic change.

That's the Way It Is: A History of Television News in America

by Charles L. Ponce de Leon

When critics decry the current state of our public discourse, one reliably easy target is television news. It s too dumbed-down, they say; it s no longer news but entertainment, celebrity-obsessed and vapid. The critics may be right. But, as Charles L. Ponce de Leon explains in "That s the Way It Is," TV news has "always" walked a fine line between hard news and fluff. The familiar story of decline fails to acknowledge real changes in the media and Americans news-consuming habits, while also harking back to a golden age that, on closer examination, is revealed to be not so golden after all. Ponce de Leon traces the entire history of televised news, from the household names of the late 1940s and early 50s, like Eric Sevareid, Edward R. Murrow, and Walter Cronkite, through the rise of cable, the political power of Fox News, and the satirical punch of Colbert and Stewart. He shows us an industry forever in transition, where newsmagazines and celebrity profiles vie with political news and serious investigations. The need for ratings success and the lighter, human interest stories that can help bring it Ponce de Leon makes clear, has always sat uneasily alongside a real desire to report hard news. Highlighting the contradictions and paradoxes at the heart of TV news, and telling a story rich in familiar figures and fascinating anecdotes, "That s the Way It Is" will be the definitive account of how television has showed us our history as it happens. "

Holy Nation: The Transatlantic Quaker Ministry in an Age of Revolution

by Sarah Crabtree

Early American Quakers have long been perceived as retiring separatists, but in Holy Nation Sarah Crabtree transforms our historical understanding of the sect by drawing on the sermons, diaries, and correspondence of Quakers themselves. Situating Quakerism within the larger intellectual and religious undercurrents of the Atlantic World, Crabtree shows how Quakers forged a paradoxical sense of their place in the world as militant warriors fighting for peace. She argues that during the turbulent Age of Revolution and Reaction, the Religious Society of Friends forged a "holy nation," a transnational community of like-minded believers committed first and foremost to divine law and to one another. Declaring themselves citizens of their own nation served to underscore the decidedly unholy nature of the nation-state, worldly governments, and profane laws. As a result, campaigns of persecution against the Friends escalated as those in power moved to declare Quakers aliens and traitors to their home countries. Holy Nation convincingly shows that ideals and actions were inseparable for the Society of Friends, yielding an account of Quakerism that is simultaneously a history of the faith and its adherents and a history of its confrontations with the wider world. Ultimately, Crabtree argues, the conflicts experienced between obligations of church and state that Quakers faced can illuminate similar contemporary struggles.


by B. J. Daniels

In Beartooth, Montana, land and family are everything. So when Destry Grant's brother is accused of killing Rylan West's sister, high school sweethearts Destry and Rylan leave their relationship behind in order to help their families recover from tragedy.Years later, Destry is dedicated to her ranch and making plans for the future. Plans that just might include reuniting with the love of her life...until her brother returns to clear his name and the secrets of the past threaten her one chance at happiness.Rylan is done denying his feelings for Destry. But when clues begin to link her brush with death to his sister's murder, will discovering the truth finally grant them their chance at love or turn them against one another for good?

Bring Me Home for Christmas (Virgin River #16)

by Robyn Carr

This year, Becca Timm knows the number one item on her Christmas wish list-getting over Denny Cutler. Three years ago, Denny broke her heart before heading off to war. It's time she got over her silly high-school relationship and moved on.So she takes matters into her own hands and heads up to Virgin River, the rugged little mountain town that Denny calls home, as an uninvited guest on her brother's men-only hunting weekend. But when an accident turns her impromptu visit into an extended stay, Becca finds herself stranded in Virgin River. With Denny. In very close quarters.As the power of Christmas envelops the little town, Becca discovers that the boy she once loved has become a strong and confident man. And the most delicious Christmas present she can imagine.

One Cut Deeper

by Joely Sue Burkhart

Her needs are dark. His are dangerous.Charlie MacNiall has been bringing his beautiful king shepherd to the vet clinic where Ranay Killian works for the better part of a year. She doesn't realize he's been slowly wooing her. She certainly has no idea that he picked her deliberately--that she is to become his. A broken heart and a desperate desire to be dominated make her the perfect victim.His perfect victim.Charlie fixes Ranay, testing her emotional limits while pushing her sexual boundaries past anything she'd imagined possible. Pain is their shared pleasure...until Charlie disappears and Ranay is all but destroyed.The FBI says the man she loves is a serial killer. Ranay can't deny there's a darkness in Charlie, a monstrous hunger that drives him to the brink. She even believes he could kill. But Charlie's hunger is what bonds them--it's the foundation of their love. Would he actually kill her?91,000 words

Goddess With a Blade

by Lauren Dane

Rowan Summerwaite is no ordinary woman. Physical vessel to the Celtic Goddess Brigid and raised by the leader of the Vampire Nation, she's a supercharged hunter with the power to slay any vampire who violates the age-old treaty.A recent string of murders has her at odds with Las Vegas's new Scion, the arrogant and powerful Clive Stewart. The killings have the mark of Vampire all over them, and Rowan warns Clive to keep his people in line-or she'll mete out her own brand of justice.Though her dealings with Clive are adversarial to say the least, Rowan is intensely aware of her attraction to him. But she can't let it distract her from her duty-to find and battle the killer before more women die.73,000 words


by B. J. Daniels

USA TODAY bestselling author B.J. Daniels welcomes you to the town of Beartooth, Montana, for a short prequel to her new series set under Montana's big sky...Since teenager Bethany Gates was a girl, Clete Reynolds had been hers-in her heart, at least. She was devastated when he left their small ranching town of Beartooth, Montana, on a football scholarship, but then an injury brought him back. Now she's determined to get him to notice her...if her rival Ginny West doesn't get in the way. But Bethany doesn't know Ginny has a secret of her own-one that could turn out to be deadly....Return to Beartooth in Unforgiven by B.J. Daniels, available from Harlequin HQN.

Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

by Rita Mae Brown

The chase is on in New York Times bestselling author Rita Mae Brown's gripping new foxhunting mystery, featuring the irrepressible "Sister" Jane Arnold and the wily antics of her four-legged friends. In Let Sleeping Dogs Lie, a century-old crime reawakens bad will--and stirs up a scandal that chills Sister to the bone. Sister Jane and the Jefferson Hunt Club have traveled from Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains to the Bluegrass State of Kentucky to ride with the members of the Woodford Hounds--in the teeth of foul weather. Sister knows better than anyone that an ill wind blows no good. After the hunt, Sister Jane and her boyfriend, Gray Lorillard, head to a sumptuous party on a nearby estate, also home to a historic equine graveyard. The revelry is interrupted by jarring news: The discovery of grisly remains in the cemetery that are decidedly not equine. Now Sister and her hounds are on the case, digging up clues to an old murder that links three well-connected Southern families. When mayhem follows the Jefferson Hunt back to Virginia, the deadly doings become all too real: A dear friend of Sister's is found murdered. Sister and her animal friends must work fast to find a clever killer determined to keep deep-rooted secrets buried. A rollicking, riveting mystery, Let Sleeping Dogs Lie is a masterly novel full of colorful characters, gorgeous country landscapes, and the breathtaking thrill of the hunt. Praise for Rita Mae Brown Let Sleeping Dogs Lie "[Brown's] foxhunting titles are great for readers who like gentility with a wicked little twist."--Library Journal Fox Tracks "[Brown] enlivens a timely tale with . . . amusing accounts of her four-legged creations and delightful descriptions of the central Virginia countryside."--Richmond Times-Dispatch Hounded to Death "Fast-paced and filled with scenes from the world of fox hunting . . . Brown delivers the brush."--The Baltimore Sun The Tell-Tale Horse "Grabs readers from the opening scene and gallops through to the very surprising end."--Horse Illustrated The Hounds and the Fury "An intriguing story."--Associated PressFrom the Hardcover edition.


by Patricia Rosemoor

Fans of Linda Howard will love Dangerous, the story of a driven female cop who teams up with an irresistible ex-con to bring a killer to justice--and discovers that breaking the rules is hotter on the wrong side of the law. Chicago homicide detective Camille Martell will stop at nothing to track down "Angel," a sexual predator who has already butchered two young victims--even after her off-the-books investigation leads to her suspension. But when her relentless attempts to contact Angel online puts her teenage neighbor in mortal danger, Camille's worst fears are realized. Panicked and overwhelmed with guilt, Camille needs help--even if it comes from the one man she swore she'd do anything to forget. After serving time for a trumped-up charge, private investigator Drago Nance doesn't trust cops. Nothing will change that, not even the steamy weekend with Camille that burned itself into his memory. But with an innocent girl's life at stake, Drago can't ignore the need in Camille's eyes, or the heated promise in her touch. He agrees to help--if she's willing to play by his rules. He just never suspected that seducing his partner could be just as thrilling as chasing a madman.Praise for Dangerous "A sexy page-turner for these cold winter nights . . . The steamy romance that flames between Camille and Drago is enhanced only by the razor-sharp suspense of chasing down and capturing 'Angel' before he can kill again."--Library Journal "Camille and Drago have serious chemistry. . . . We sympathize with the pasts of both hero and heroine and root for them to not only catch their perp, but to catch each other."--Heroes and Heartbreakers"Smooth, sexy, and suspenseful, Dangerous has everything romantic suspense fans look for: characters with sizzling chemistry and a compelling, fast-paced plot."--New York Times bestselling author Virna DePaul "With sizzling heat and a tense hunt for a serial killer, Dangerous is a perfect marriage of romance and suspense!"--USA Today bestselling author Tina Wainscott "Intense! Seat-gripping! . . . Hard to put down once you start. I think I need to go shopping for more books from this author!"--Undercover Book Reviews "The author pulled me right into the story, with such vivid images and feelings of terror, fear, and dread."--Books and Spoons Includes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.

We Never Asked for Wings

by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

From the beloved New York Times bestselling author of The Language of Flowers comes her much-anticipated new novel about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For fourteen years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children--Alex, now fifteen, and Luna, six--in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty's parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. Navigating this new terrain is challenging for Letty, especially as Luna desperately misses her grandparents and Alex, who is falling in love with a classmate, is unwilling to give his mother a chance. Letty comes up with a plan to help the family escape the dangerous neighborhood and heartbreaking injustice that have marked their lives, but one wrong move could jeopardize everything she's worked for and her family's fragile hopes for the future. Vanessa Diffenbaugh blends gorgeous prose with compelling themes of motherhood, undocumented immigration, and the American Dream in a powerful and prescient story about family.Advance praise for We Never Asked for Wings "I was hooked from the first breathtaking pages of We Never Asked for Wings, caring about this exquisitely vulnerable family, hoping right along with them on every page that each heart-rending, impossible choice would lead them somewhere better together."--Lisa Genova, New York Times bestselling author of Still Alice "Vanessa Diffenbaugh's We Never Asked for Wings propels us into a mother's heart as she and her family travel down a rocky path to understanding and forgiveness. With breathtaking imagery and lyrical prose, Diffenbaugh makes Letty's growth from a troubled young mother to a responsible woman who learns to put her children first, but also allows herself the possibility of love, entirely believable. Hers is a hard-won victory you will cheer even as you wish this graceful, moving book would never end."--Melanie Benjamin, New York Times bestselling author of The Aviator's Wife Praise for Vanessa Diffenbaugh's The Language of Flowers "Captivating . . . The Language of Flowers deftly weaves the sweetness of newfound love with the heartache of past mistakes."--Minneapolis Star Tribune "[An] original and brilliant first novel . . . [Diffenbaugh is] a mesmerizing storyteller."--The Washington Post "Fascinating . . . Diffenbaugh clearly knows both the human heart and her plants, and she keeps us rooting for the damaged Victoria."--O: The Oprah Magazine (book of the week) "Diffenbaugh effortlessly spins this enchanting tale, making even her prickly protagonist impossible not to love."--Entertainment Weekly "Compelling . . . immensely engaging . . . unabashedly romantic . . . an emotional arc of almost unbearable poignance."--The Boston GlobeFrom the Hardcover edition.

The Sweet Spot

by Christine Carter

Learn how to achieve more by doing less! Live in that zone you've glimpsed but can't seem to hold on to--the sweet spot where you have the greatest strength, but also the greatest ease. Not long ago, Christine Carter, a happiness expert at UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center and a speaker, writer, and mother, found herself exasperated by the busyness of modern life: too many conflicting obligations and not enough time, energy, or patience to get everything done. She tried all the standard techniques--prioritizing, multitasking, delegating, even napping--but none really worked. Determined to create a less stressful life for herself--without giving up her hard-won career success or happiness at home--she road-tested every research-based tactic that promised to bring more ease into her life. Drawing on her vast knowledge of the latest research related to happiness, productivity, and elite performance, she followed every strategy that promised to give her more energy--or that could make her more efficient, creative, or intelligent. Her trials and errors are our reward. In The Sweet Spot, Carter shares the combination of practices that transformed her life from overwhelmed and exhausting to joyful, relaxed, and productive. From instituting daily micro-habits that save time to bigger picture shifts that convert stress into productive and creative energy, The Sweet Spot shows us how to * say "no" strategically and when to say "yes" with abandon * make decisions about routine things once to free our minds to focus on higher priorities * stop multitasking and gain efficiency * "take recess" in sync with the brain's need for rest * use technology in ways that bolster, instead of sap, energy * increase your ratio of positive to negative emotions Complete with practical "easiest thing" tips for instant relief as well as stories from Carter's own experience of putting The Sweet Spot into action, this timely and inspiring book will inoculate you against "The Overwhelm," letting you in on the possibilities for joy and freedom that come when you stop trying to do everything right--and start doing the right things. Advance praise for The Sweet Spot "Illuminates the simple and sustainable path toward a precious and happy balance."--Deepak Chopra "A gift, like a good friend drawing a personal road map out of the crazy busy swirl of our overloaded lives."--Brigid Schulte, author of Overwhelmed "This book did something I thought was impossible: It seemed to give me more time."--Martha Beck, author of Finding Your Way in a Wild New World "A page-turning thriller full of proven ways to have the life you want."--Rick Hanson, Ph.D., author of Hardwiring Happiness "Timely, lively, and vital, The Sweet Spot is an immediately useful must-read."--Shawn Achor, author of The Happiness Advantage"The Sweet Spot inspired me to make immediate changes that have increased my productivity and lowered my stress."--Dan Mulhern, president, Granholm Mulhern Associates "A must-read for every overworked executive, overwrought parent, or overscheduled human being."--Jennifer Granholm, governor of Michigan, 2003-11From the Hardcover edition.

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  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.