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The First World War and the End of the Ottoman Order

by Kristine Brennan

The First World War and the End of the Ottoman Order examines the social and political events of the 19th and early 20th centuries that brought the Ottomans into the First World War on the side of the Central Powers, discusses the division of the empire at the 1919 Paris Peace Conference, and explains the formation of modern Turkey.

Liberty Risen: The Ultimate Triumph of Libertarian-Republicans

by Thaddeus Mccotter

In this Internet Age, is the Grand Old Party over for the Republican Establishment? If so, what individuals and ideas will ascend to meet the moment and revitalize a party that is now viewed as more of an antiquated complaint than a transcendent cause? In "Liberty Risen: The Ultimate Triumph of Libertarian-Republicans", former GOP House Republican Policy Chair - and NOT a Libertarian - Thaddeus McCotter articulates the political and cultural circumstances driving the GOP's once disdained Libertarian wing to its present prominence and predestined dominance. Yet, if Liberty is risen, when will it reign? To find out, buy the book.

Malaysia

by Barbara Aoki Poisson

By almost any standard, Malaysia has become one of the most prosperous and successful nations in the Islamic world. The Malaysian economy has grown steadily, thanks to a focus on new technology and manufacturing. Although Malaysia's government is not fully democratic, it permits an increasing degree of public participation. This book examines the economic and political issue facing Malaysia today. It provides up-to-date information about the country's geography and climate, history, society, important cities and communities, and relations with other countries.

Pakistan

by Clarissa Akroyd

When the British Empire partitioned its Indian colony in 1947, it created two independent states: India, where most people were Hindus, and Pakistan, where most were Muslims. Violence immediately broke out, during which approximately 250,000 people were killed and a million became refugees. Since then Pakistan and India have fought several wars, and tensions between the two countries during the late 1990s nearly led to another conflict-one that might have been devastating, as both countries now possess nuclear weapons. This book examines the economic and political issues facing Pakistan today. It provides up-to-date information about the country's geography and climate, history, society, important cities and communities, and relations with other countries.

The Kurds

by Leeanne Gelletly

The Kurds are considered the largest ethnic group without a state of their own. Most live in the mountainous region historically known as Kurdistan; however, this region, which includes parts of Turkey, Iraq, and Syria, never existed as a political entity. Under the rule of others, the Kurds were discriminated against and sometimes persecuted-most infamously by Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. As a result the dream of autonomy or a national home holds a powerful grip on the Kurdish imagination. This book examines the economic and political issues facing the Kurdish people today. It provides up-to-date information about the geography and climate of the areas in which the Kurds live, the history of this ethnic group and its society, important Kurdish cities and communities, and the Kurds' relations with the governments of the countries in which they live.

Islam in Asia: Facts and Figures

by Dorothy Kavanaugh

Many Westerners associate Islam primarily with the Middle East. But in fact, four countries have larger Muslim populations than Egypt, the largest Arab state. Those four countries-Indonesia, Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh-all like within Asia. This volume presents a wealth of statistical and background information on more than 20 Asian nations with significant Muslim populations. The book also provides a valuable overview of the Islamic faith and chronicles the history of Islam's spread into Asia.

Facts & Figures About the Middle East

by Lisa Mccoy

The history of the Middle East is long and complex. In the MAJOR MUSLIM NATIONS series, the term "Middle East" refers to the region encompassing 23 countries?Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.This book provides an overview of the history of the Middle Eastern countries, along with information about the region's geography, central religious beliefs, governments and economies of the various states, cultural groups, and important communities.

Yemen

by Hal Marcovitz

Like its neighbors on the Arabian Peninsula, the Republic of Yemen has a long and rich history. The southern Arabian region, which present-day Yemen shares, was once the home of the Sabaean kingdom. Led by the queen of Sheba, the kingdom formed an alliance with King Solomon, as recorded in the Old Testament. In the era of the burgeoning spice trade, the people of the Yemen region, which was advantageously located along the sea routes to Asia, had opportunities to attain great wealth. However, the British and other powers to the north eventually made their own claims on trade in the region. In the years after losing control of their great ports, the Yemenis have endured long periods of poverty and armed conflict, much of which has been waged between their rival northern and southern states. A much-needed unification between the north and south finally occurred in 1990, but Yemen still struggles to resolve its regional differences and compete with the oil-rich states of the Persian Gulf. Discusses the geography, history, economy, government, religion, people, foreign relations, and communities of Yemen.

Morocco

by Lynda Cohen Cassanos

Early Arab geographers referred to Morocco as Al-Maghreb al-Aqsa-"the farthest land of the setting sun." Today this country in the northwest corner of Africa-long a crossroads for trade from Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and the East-retains a distinctly exotic feel, with its colorful mix of Middle Eastern, African, and Western cultures. But Morocco is also a nation struggling to emerge from a difficult colonial past and a recent history of human-rights violations. If the country succeeds in its quest to develop stable and democratic political institutions as well as a vibrant economy-and to accomplish these goals without violence-Morocco may serve as a powerful example to the Arab world. Discusses the geography, history, economy, government, religion, people, foreign relations, and major cities of Morocco.

Libya

by Dan Harmon

For more than three decades, most countries of the world have viewed Libya as a radical, unstable nation. Under the leadership of Muammar al-Qaddafi, Libya has sponsored international terrorism and supported efforts to overthrow the governments of its African neighbors. This has led to confrontations with the West, particularly with the United States during the 1980s. Beneath the sands of Libya lies a valuable resource-vast amounts of oil. Despite this, the people of Libya have remained poor during Qaddafi's rule. Although in recent years Libyan society appears to have become more open, and Qaddafi seems to have moderated some of his extremist views, the future of the country remains uncertain. Discusses the geography, history, economy, government, religion, people, foreign relations, and major cities of Libya.

Lebanon

by Jan Mcdaniel

In the 1980s Lebanon-and particularly its capital, Beirut-was considered one of the most dangerous places in the world, particularly for Americans. Today, as the country continues to rebuild after its devastating 15-year civil war, tourists are beginning to return to Lebanon's Mediterranean resorts. Yet Lebanon has many problems. Years of political domination by Syria made progress difficult, and various political factions have struggled for control of Lebanon's government. In addition, more than 380,000 Palestinians live in Lebanon, and terrorist organizations such as Hezbollah and Hamas operate freely inside the country. As a result, Lebanon's future remains uncertain. Discusses the geography, history, economy, government, religion, people, foreign relations, and major cities of Lebanon.

Kuwait

by Hal Marcovitz

Kuwait came to the world's attention in the summer of 1990, when Iraq invaded the tiny emirate. Though Kuwait was liberated within eight months, it took more than 10 years and $160 billion for the country to recover from the devastation caused by the Iraqi occupation. The citizens of Kuwait are among the most prosperous in the world, thanks to the country's oil wealth. Beneath Kuwait's sands is an estimated 10 percent of the world's oil reserves. After the 1991 Gulf War, Kuwait's rulers spoke about the possibility of bringing democracy to their country, but this has not happened-only about one-third of Kuwaitis are eligible to vote, and the ruling al-Sabah family holds great power over the nation's elected assembly. However, Kuwait remains a key U.S. ally in the turbulent Middle East. Discusses the geography, history, economy, government, religion, people, foreign relations, and major cities of Kuwait.

Jordan

by Anna Carew-Miller

Though small and resource poor, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan plays a crucial role in the affairs of the volatile Middle East. A moderate Arab country, Jordan borders not only Israel and the West Bank, but also Syria, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia. This strategic location- along with the nuanced and forward-looking foreign policy crafted by its longtime monarch, King Hussein, and carried on by his son and successor, King Abdullah II?has made Jordan a key to peace and stability in the Middle East.Domestically, Jordan faces many of the same economic hurdles developing nations all over the world must confront. But it also enjoys a tremendous advantage: a highly educated, adaptable workforce.

Investigative Techniques of the FBI

by Alan Wachtel

The federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. In 1993, a huge explosion rocked New York's World Trade Center, killing six people, injuring hundreds more, and turning the building's basement into a deadly underground cave. FBI investigators and explosives experts tracked down the bombers and gathered the evidence that sent them to prison. The methods the FBI used to solve that crime are representative of the techniques FBI agents use in a wide assortment of criminal investigations. From old-fashioned detective work to the most advanced forensic technologies, the FBI's arsenal of investigative techniques is vast, sophisticated, and growing.

The FBI and Civil Rights

by Dale Anderson

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigating federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. For many years, the FBI avoided civil rights cases, but escalating racial violence during the 1960s forced the Bureau to begin investigating these cases. Today, the Bureau works in three key civil rights areas-hate crimes against minority groups, abuse of power by public officials, and human trafficking. These types of cases pose many challenges to the FBI, but the Bureau today is committed to stopping people who would deny others their right to be treated with fairness and equality under the law.

The FBI and Cyber Crime

by Robert Grayson

The federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. Computers have changed the way people do business, gather information, communicate...and engage in crime. From remote locations in cyber space, criminals can break into a computer and steal valuable information, including credit card and social security numbers, leading to the theft of people's money and identities. Today, the FBI attacks cyber-crime by using sophisticated technology and developing wide-ranging partnerships with companies, academic communities, law enforcement agencies, and concerned individuals-all determined to protect the online community from scam artists, predators, and thieves.

The FBI and Public Corruption

by Robert Grayson

The federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. When people who commit bribery, extortion, or embezzlement work in local, state, or federal government, then their crimes are a form of public corruption. The perpetrators may be elected officials, judged, building and health inspectors, or even police officers. What these people have in common is a position of public trust, and they have chosen to violate that trust in exchange for money or something else of value. Rooting our corrupt officials and bringing them to justice is a task that falls to special agents of the FBI.

The FBI and White-Collar Crime

by Dale Anderson

The federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. When is a basketball signed by retired superstar Michael Jordan not worth a cent? When the autograph is a forgery, that's when. White-collar crime includes any illegal action that deceives victims to gain money or property. From its early days, the FBI was involved in investigating crimes like embezzling funds from banks. In the 1970s, the Bureau put new emphasis on investigating a wide range of white-collar crimes. Today, agents across the country target criminals who victimize innocent investors, mortgage and insurance fraud rings, and insider trading in stocks.

The FBI and Organized Crime

by Dale Anderson

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. The FBI did not enter the fight against organized crime eagerly. However, once it did-and once Congress gave the Bureau powerful weapons to use against crime families-the FBI moved with skill. By finding informants, following the paper trail of money earned illegally, and using carefully placed wiretaps, the FBI has put hundreds of mobsters behind bars. Today, the FBI's fight against mobsters often involves working with police in other countries, because organized crime has become an international problem. At the same time, the FBI has focused on breaking gangs that control the illegal drug trade.

The FBI and National Security

by Robert Grayson

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. This book shows the way the FBI operates in the post-9/11 world. By reviewing both the historical role and contemporary role of the FBI in matters of terrorism and national security, this book shows how the agency has reinvented itself into an intelligence-gathering counterterrorism force bent on stopping any and all terrorist threats against the United States. Protecting the nation from a terrorist attack is now-and for the foreseeable future-the FBI's top priority, and the agency has dedicated its resources to accomplishing this important mission.

The FBI's Most Wanted

by Alan Wachtel

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigating federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support to local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. In 1952, a young man told the police where he thought they could find the notorious bank robber Willie Sutton. Sutton was on the FBI's Ten Most wanted Fugitives list, and the young man had recognized him from an FBI bulletin. This book tells the story of some of the FBI's most dramatic cases-and how ordinary citizens have often helped agents pursue and catch their quarry. From Wanted posters to TV's America's Most Wanted, the FBI has used publicity to make it harder for criminals to hide and easier for authorities to find them.

The FBI Files: Sucessful Investigations

by Dale Anderson

The federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a national agency dedicated to investigation federal crimes. Founded as a small team of special agents on July 26, 1908, the Bureau was first charged with enforcing the growing body of federal laws covering the United States as a whole. Almost from the beginning of its 100-year history, the Bureau has been the subject of legend and controversy. It has also evolved into a vast and sophisticated national law-enforcement agency. Whether as a federal crime-fighting force or a source of investigative support of local and state police forces, the modern FBI strives to embody its ideals of fidelity, bravery, and integrity. How did the FBI capture the Oklahoma City bomber in just two days? How did it track down the killer of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in just a few weeks? Why did it take years to solve the infamous 1950 Brink's robbery? How have ordinary citizens helped bring down the nation's most wanted criminals? Whether it takes careful forensic science, years of investigative work, a carefully laid trap, or a timely tip, the FBI uses every tool at its disposal to catch the targets of its investigations.

Tensions in the Gulf, 1978-1991

by J. E. Peterson

Tensions in the Gulf, 1978-1991 examines events in the Persian Gulf region from the time Saddam Hussein came to power in Iraq through the conclusion of the 1991 Gulf War.

The Palestine Mandate and the Creation of Israel, 1920-1949

by Alan H. Luxenberg

Palestine Mandate and the Creation of Israel, 1920-1949 examines the events that led to the establishment of the state of Israel.

The Rise of Nationalism: The Arab World, Turkey, and Iran

by Jonathan Spyer

The Rise of Nationalism: The Arab World, Turkey, and Iran examines the ideological background of nationalist movements in the Middle East, including Jewish nationalism in Palestine, tracing the way these movements grew and developed.

Showing 4,451 through 4,475 of 16,219 results

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