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Notes on My Books

by Joseph Conrad

In Notes on My Books (1920), Joseph Conrad recounts his experiences with the writing process. He recounts in detail his intentions and aspirations for each of his major works.

Notes on Life and Letters

by Joseph Conrad

I don't know whether I ought to offer an apology for this collection which has more to do with life than with letters. Its appeal is made to orderly minds. This, to be frank about it, is a process of tidying up, which, from the nature of things, cannot be regarded as premature. The fact is that I wanted to do it myself because of a feeling that had nothing to do with the considerations of worthiness or unworthiness of the small (but unbroken) pieces collected within the covers of this volume. Of course it may be said that I might have taken up a broom and used it without saying anything about it. That, certainly, is one way of tidying up. But it would have been too much to have expected me to treat all this matter as removable rubbish. All those things had a place in my life. Whether any of them deserve to have been picked up and ranged on the shelf-this shelf-I cannot say, and, frankly, I have not allowed my mind to dwell on the question. I was afraid of thinking myself into a mood that would hurt my feelings; for those pieces of writing, whatever may be the comment on their display, appertain to the character of the man. And so here they are, dusted, which was but a decent thing to do, but in no way polished, extending from the year '98 to the year '20, a thin array (for such a stretch of time) of really innocent attitudes: Conrad literary, Conrad political, Conrad reminiscent, Conrad controversial. Well, yes! A one-man show-or is it merely the show of one man? The only thing that will not be found amongst those Figures and Things that have passed away, will be Conrad en pantoufles. It is a constitutional inability. Schlafrock und pantoffeln! Not that! Never! . . .

The Nigger of the ''Narcissus'': A Tale of the Forecastle

by Joseph Conrad

The story of one voyage of the sailing-ship Narcissus from Bombay to London--a story dealing with calms and with storms, with mutiny on the high seas, with bravery and with cowardice, with tumultuous life, and with death, the releaser from toil. (Published in the U.S. as "The Children of the Sea.")

The Mirror of the Sea

by Joseph Conrad

First published in 1906, The Mirror of the Sea was the first of Joseph Conrad's two autobiographical memoirs. Discussing it, he called the book "a very intimate revelation. . . . I have attempted here to lay bare with the unreserve of a last hour's confession the terms of my relation with the sea, which beginning mysteriously, like any great passion the inscrutable Gods send to mortals, went on unreasoning and invincible, surviving the test of disillusion, defying the disenchantment that lurks in every day of a strenuous life; went on full of love's delight and love's anguish, facing them in open-eyed exultation without bitterness and without repining, from the first hour to the last."

The Inheritors: An Extravagant Story

by Joseph Conrad

This novel was conceived in the heated and controversial politics of Britain at the turn of the century. Arthur Granger, an aristocratic and unsuccessful novelist, betrays the ideals he prides himself on for the unrequited love of a young woman. And no ordinary woman, she, but an ethereal, goddess-like, nameless agent from a strange world.

Gaspar Ruiz

by Joseph Conrad

An enthralling novel of Gaspar's inspirational rise from obscurity to light. Remarkable for its irony, it marvellously presents man's capacity for self-deception. Attention-grabbing!

Falk

by Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad was a Polish novelist, writing in English, while living in England. Many critics regard him as one of the greatest novelists in the English language, despite his not having learned to speak English fluently until he was in his twenties (and then always with a strong Polish accent). He became a naturalized British subject in 1886. He wrote stories and novels, predominantly with a nautical setting, that depicted the heroism of faith before the imperatives of duty, social responsibility and honor.

Chance

by Joseph Conrad

A remarkable book, the story of Flora De Barral, daughter of the Great De Barral, a monumental swindler, and her love for the sea captain who married her. Marlow tells the story in his usual quiet manner which is so dramatic under the quiet, and shows Chance the master hand directing and interfering at any moment.

The Arrow of Gold: A Story Between Two Notes

by Joseph Conrad

Reflecting Conrad's genius for narrative that focuses on the quest for inner truths, "The Arrow of Gold" is an exploration of the dangerous appetites of men and of human vulnerability, as well as a profound meditation on the emotional boundary between people. Boasting a cast of extraordinary and eccentric personalities, including the heroine Dona Rita, this is a story of adventure on the high seas, of the revelation of love, of the crushing weight of loss, and of freedom found in the recklessness of unadorned sincerity.During the Carlist war of the early 1870s, a young sailor, the unnamed protagonist, joins the champions of Don Carlos de Bourbon, pretender to the throne of Spain. The Carlists use the eager youth's intense attraction to the sea to persuade him to run perilous enterprises for their cause, ventures he later learns have been financed by the beautiful mistress and heiress of a rich man's fortune. When he falls in love with her, he finds himself moved absolutely by this discovery, despite the fact that she is unable to return his love fully. In the end he is left alone with his first love, the sea, his brief time with the mysterious Dona Rita marking a tumultuous awakening to a life of passion, the desolation that hides in its shadow, and the possibility of rebirth in its wake.Although not as well known as his earlier novels "Lord Jim" and "Nostromo," "The Arrow of Gold" was critically acclaimed when it first appeared in 1919 and is still considered to be among the best of Conrad's later works.

Outcast of the Islands

by Joseph Conrad

When Willems stepped off the straight and narrow path of his own peculiar honesty he thought it would be a short episode - a sentence in brackets, so to speak - in the flowing tale of his life. But Willems was wrong, for he was about to embark on a voyage of discovery and self-discovery that would change, if not destroy, the reset of his life. Marooned by his own people on the shore of a Malayan island, Willems is caught in the grip of his own vulnerability and corruption. An Outcast of the Islands was only Conrad's second novel, but in its theme, in its impressionistic use of scenery, and, and over all, in the enormous richness and power of the writing, it predicts Conrad's position as a literary figure of the highest rank.

Amy Foster

by Joseph Conrad

The story of a dull-witted but compassionate English girl who falls in love with a strange man from Eastern Europe. This ignorant, wild, and romantic peasant from the Carpathian Mountains has been cast up by the sea, the only survivor from an emigrant ship bound for America. Unable to speak a word of English and totally mystified as to where he is--it might have been America or Hell, itself--he leads a wretched and hunted existence till the chance kindness of Amy Foster opens his eyes.

Almayer's Folly: A Story of an Eastern River

by Joseph Conrad

This is a decidedly powerful story of an uncommon type, and breaks fresh ground in fiction.... All the leading characters in the book--Almayer, his wife, his daughter, and Dain, the daughter's native lover--are well drawn, and the parting between father and daughter has a pathetic naturalness about it, unspoiled by straining after effect. (Conrad's first novel.)

Twixt Land and Sea Tales

by Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad has come into his own. The three stories contained in this volume take rank with the most mature and romantic of his work. The charming love and adventure of the life which he depicts in remote places confirm the growing belief that he is among the greatest of living creative writers.

The Makers of Canada: George Brown

by John Lewis

The title of this series, "Makers of Canada," seemed to impose on the writer the obligation to devote special attention to the part played by George Brown in fashioning the institutions of this country. From this point of view the most fruitful years of his life were spent between the time when the Globe was established to advocate responsible government, and the time when the provinces were confederated and the bounds of Canada extended from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The ordinary political contests in which Mr. Brown and his newspaper engaged have received only casual notice, and the effort of the writer has been to trace Mr. Brown's connection with the stream of events by which the old legislative union of Canada gave place to the confederated Dominion. After the establishment of responsible government, the course of this stream is not obscure. Brown is found complaining that Upper Canada is inadequately represented and is dominated by its partner. Various remedies, such as dissolution of the union, representation by population and the "double majority," are proposed; but ultimately the solution is found in federation, and to this solution, and the events leading up to it, a large part of the book is devoted. Mr. Brown was also an ardent advocate of the union with Canada of the country lying west to the Rocky Mountains, and to this work reference is made.

The Story of Electricity

by John Munro

The purpose of this little book is to present the essential facts of electrical science in a popular and interesting way, as befits the scheme of the series to which it belongs. Electrical phenomena have been observed since the first man viewed one of the most spectacular and magnificent of them all in the thunderstorm, but the services of electricity which we enjoy are the product solely of scientific achievement in the nineteenth century. It is to these services that the main part of the following discussion is devoted.

Heroes of the Telegraph

by John Munro

Prof. John Munro (1849-1930) was the author of Heroes of the Telegraph (1891), The Story of Electricity (1896) and A Trip to Venus (1897). "In plain English, at 4 a. m., a ray of light had been observed on the disc of the planet Mars in or near the "terminator"; that is to say, the zone of twilight separating day from night. The news was doubly interesting to me, because a singular dream of "Sunrise in the Moon" had quickened my imagination as to the wonders of the universe beyond our little globe, and because of a never-to-be-forgotten experience of mine with an aged astronomer several years ago."

A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future

by John Jacob Astor

What did our ancestors dream of when they gazed up at the stars and looked beyond the present? Wildly imaginative but grounded in reasoned scientific speculation, A Journey in Other Worlds races far ahead of the nineteenth century to imagine what life would be like in the year 2000. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Earth is effectively a corporate technocracy, with big businesses using incredible advances in science to improve life on the planet as a whole. Seeking other planets habitable for the growing human population, the spaceship Callisto, powered by an antigravitational force known as apergy, embarks on a momentous tour of the solar system. Jupiter proves to be a wilderness paradise, full of threatening beasts and landscapes of inspired beauty, where the explorers must fight for their lives. Dangers less tangible but equally deadly await the Callisto crew on Saturn, which yields profound secrets about their fate and the ultimate destiny of mankind. Thoughtful, adventurous, and replete with a dazzling array of futuristic devices, A Journey in Other Worlds is a classic, unforgettable story of utopias and humankind's restless exploration of the stars.

Bride of the Dark One

by Florence Verbell Brown

The outcasts; the hunted of all the brighter worlds, crowded onto Yaroto. But even here was there salvation for Ransome, the jinx-scarred acolyte, when tonight was the night of Bani-tai ... the night of expiation by the photo-memoried priests of dark Darion?

The Thirty-Nine Steps

by John Buchan

Hanney, an expatriated Scot, returns from a long stay in South Africa to his flat in London. One night he is buttonholed by an American who appears to know of an anarchist plot to destabilise Europe, and claims to be in fear for his life. Hannay lets the American hide in his flat, and returns later to find that another man has been found shot dead in the same building, apparently a suicide. Four days later Hannay finds the American stabbed to death... Followed by "Greenmantle", and "Mr. Standfast".

Mr. Standfast

by John Buchan

"Mr. Standfast" is the third part of a trilogy which begins with "The Thirty-Nine Steps" and "Greenmantle". In this nail-biting adventure story, Hannay must outwit a foe far more intelligent than himself; muster the courage to propose to the lovely, clever Mary Lamington; and survive a brutal war. Although Mr. Standfast is a sequel to The Thirty-Nine Steps, it offers far more characterisation and philosophy than the earlier book. For its pace and suspense, its changes of scenery and thrilling descriptions of the last great battles against the Germans, Mr Standfast offers everything that has made its author so enduringly popular.

The House from Nowhere

by Arthur G. Stangland

Time-travel continues to exercise its mesmeric fascination upon writers, readers and editors of science fiction alike. Probably because almost all of us, at one time or another, have longed greatly to visit either the future or the past. Perhaps, in view of the dangerous paradoxes such travel must involve, it is a good thing that such horological journeys have to date been confined to the printed page. New neighbors are always exciting. But the anachronistic MacDonalds offered a bit too much.

One Red Rose

by Julie Garwood

Julie Garwood's beloved Clayborne Brides series concludes in the steamy Western romance One Red Rose, available for the first time digitally!New York Times bestselling author Julie Garwood returns to her roots in One Red Rose, the conclusion to her racy historical fiction series the Clayborne Brides. First introduced in her beloved New York Times bestseller For the Roses, the Clayborne brothers of Blue Belle, Montana, have been embraced by millions worldwide. In this finale, thoughtful loner Adam learns a powerful secret from the irrepressible Genevieve Delacroix--that true freedom only comes when you trust your heart.

Chasing the Dream

by Andrew Grey

Born with a silver spoon in his mouth, Brian Paulson has lived a life of luxury and ease. If he's been left lonely because of his family's pursuit of wealth and their own happiness, he figures it's a small price to pay for what he sees as most important: money. Cade McAllister has never had it easy. He works two jobs to support himself, his mother, and his special-needs brother. They don't have much, but to Cade, love and taking care of the people who are important to him mean more than material possessions. When Cade is mugged in the park, he can't afford to lose what little he has, and he's grateful for Brian's intervention. Cade is given a chance to return the favor when Brian's grandfather passes away and Brian's assets are frozen. Cade offers Brian a place to stay and helps him find work, and the two men grow closer as they learn the good and the bad of the very different worlds they come from. Just as Brian is starting to see there's more to life than what money can buy, a clause in his grandfather's will could send their relationship up in smoke.

Billings Food: The Flavorful Story of Montana's Trailhead

by Stella Fong

Billings' local food scene is bootstrapping and standing tall. Renowned restaurants like TEN boast menus that showcase distinctive local ingredients from trout roe to foraged mushrooms. Restaurants and artisans source from centuries-old establishments like the McGowan family farm, which provides grain to Trailhead Spirits distillery. Mingling regional cuisine with the cosmopolitan influences of far-flung cities, homegrown spots like Lilac and Field House garner national attention with their daily dishes. Teppanyaki cooking and innovative global offerings are quickly diversifying the foodscape. Food journalist Stella Fong provides an eclectic sampling of the people, restaurants, producers and suppliers that contribute to the city's growing palate.

Captain Charles Rawn and the Frontier Infantry in Montana

by Robert M. Brown Gary Glynn

Stationed in Montana during the height of the Indian Wars, Captain Charles Rawn proved an unlikely hero and an indispensable leader in numerous battles. He took command from a drunken Major Baker at the Battle of Pryor's Creek, saving the 400 soldiers from possible annihilation at the hands of 1,000 Sioux. As commander of Fort Missoula, he led 35 soldiers and 200 volunteers in an attempt to halt 850 Nez Perce warriors. When Colonel Gibbon suffered an injury at the Battle of the Big Hole, Rawn's experience and leadership of the 7th Infantry helped prevent another Custer debacle. Author Robert M. Brown catalogues the career of this outstanding officer and the transformation of the frontier army from a Civil War legacy into an elite fighting force.

Showing 5,001 through 5,025 of 16,291 results

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