Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 5,051 through 5,075 of 8,170 results

The Recombinant University: Genetic Engineering and the Emergence of Stanford Biotechnology

by Doogab Yi

The advent of recombinant DNA technology in the 1970s was a key moment in the history of both biotechnology and the commercialization of academic research. Doogab Yi's The Recombinant University draws us deeply into the academic community in the San Francisco Bay Area, where the technology was developed and adopted as the first major commercial technology for genetic engineering. In doing so, it reveals how research patronage, market forces, and legal developments from the late 1960s through the early 1980s influenced the evolution of the technology and reshaped the moral and scientific life of biomedical researchers. Bay Area scientists, university administrators, and government officials were fascinated by and increasingly engaged in the economic and political opportunities associated with the privatization of academic research. Yi uncovers how the attempts made by Stanford scientists and administrators to demonstrate the relevance of academic research were increasingly mediated by capitalistic conceptions of knowledge, medical innovation, and the public interest. Their interventions resulted in legal shifts and moral realignments that encouraged the privatization of academic research for public benefit. The Recombinant University brings to life the hybrid origin story of biotechnology and the ways the academic culture of science has changed in tandem with the early commercialization of recombinant DNA technology.

The War in American Culture: Society and Consciousness during World War II

by Lewis A. Erenberg Susan E. Hirsch

This book gives us a rich portrayal of family life, cultural images, and working-class life in addition to detailed consideration of African Americans, Latinos, and women who lived through the unsettling and rapidly altered circumstances of wartime America.

What Kinship Is--And Is Not

by Marshall Sahlins

In this pithy two-part essay, Marshall Sahlins reinvigorates the debates on what constitutes kinship, building on some of the best scholarship in the field to produce an original outlook on the deepest bond humans can have. Covering thinkers from Aristotle and Lévy- Bruhl to Émile Durkheim and David Schneider, and communities from the Maori and the English to the Korowai of New Guinea, he draws on a breadth of theory and a range of ethnographic examples to form an acute definition of kinship, what he calls the "mutuality of being. " Kinfolk are persons who are parts of one another to the extent that what happens to one is felt by the other. Meaningfully and emotionally, relatives live each other's lives and die each other's deaths. In the second part of his essay, Sahlins shows that mutuality of being is a symbolic notion of belonging, not a biological connection by "blood. " Quite apart from relations of birth, people may become kin in ways ranging from sharing the same name or the same food to helping each other survive the perils of the high seas. In a groundbreaking argument, he demonstrates that even where kinship is reckoned from births, it is because the wider kindred or the clan ancestors are already involved in procreation, so that the notion of birth is meaningfully dependent on kinship rather than kinship on birth. By formulating this reversal, Sahlins identifies what kinship truly is: not nature, but culture.

The Political Theory of The Federalist

by Epstein David F.

In The Political Theory of "The Federalist," David F. Epstein offers a guide to the fundamental principles of American government as they were understood by the framers of the Constitution. Epstein here demonstrates the remarkable depth and clarity of The Federalist's argument, reveals its specifically political (not merely economic) view of human nature, and describes how and why the American regime combines liberal and republican values. "While it is a model of scholarly care and clarity, this study deserves an audience outside the academy. . . . David F. Epstein's book is a fine demonstration of just how much a close reading can accomplish, free of any flights of theory or fancy references. "--New Republic "Epstein's strength lies in two aspects of his own approach. One is that he reads the text with uncommon closeness and sensitivity; the other is an extensive knowledge of the European political thought which itself forms an indispensable background to the minds of the authors. "--Times Literary Supplement

The Common Place of Law: Stories from Everyday Life

by Patricia Ewick Susan S. Silbey

Why do some people not hesitate to call the police to quiet a barking dog in the middle of the night, while others accept the pain and losses associated with defective products, unsuccesful surgery, and discrimination? Patricia Ewick and Susan Silbey collected accounts of the law from more than four hundred people of diverse backgrounds in order to explore the different ways that people use and experience it. Their fascinating and original study identifies three common narratives of law that are captured in the stories people tell. One narrative is based on an idea of the law as magisterial and remote. Another views the law as a game with rules that can be manipulated to one's advantage. A third narrative describes the law as an arbitrary power that is actively resisted. Drawing on these extensive case studies, Ewick and Silbey present individual experiences interwoven with an analysis that charts a coherent and compelling theory of legality. A groundbreaking study of law and narrative, The Common Place of Law depicts the institution as it is lived: strange and familiar, imperfect and ordinary, and at the center of daily life.

Montana Creeds: Tyler

by Linda Lael Miller

Whether winning championship belt buckles or dealing with Hollywood types for endorsement deals, former rodeo star Tyler Creed can handle anything. Except standing on the same patch of land as his estranged brothers. Yet here they are in Stillwater Springs, barely talking but trying to restore the old Creed ranch-and family.Lily Kenyon knows all about family estrangements and secrets. The single mom has come home to set things right, to put down roots for her daughter. What she doesn't expect is Tyler Creed, whom she's loved since childhood. Now the handsome, stubborn cowboy who left home to seek his fortune just might find it was always under the Montana sky....

Emma and Co.

by Sheila Hocken

In Emma and Co readers will be delighted to renew their acquaintance with Sheila Hocken, her family and, of course, her dogs. Since the miraculous operation which restored her sight Sheila in gratitude to Emma, her devoted guide-dog, companion and best friend, has grown into a love of all dogs--and in particular chocolate-coloured Labradors. Perhaps it is because in watching them grow up she can see for the first time how Emma herself must have looked as a young dog, dancing with excitement at the prospect of going out wearing her distinctive guide-dog harness. Now, as Emma enjoys her well- earned retirement, the other dogs take up more and more time for Sheila, her husband Don and their daughter Kerensa. There is Bracken, full of fun and mischief; Buttons, whose first litter of puppies gives problems but also great pride: one of them is accepted by the Guide-Dog Association to be trained as a guide-dog. There is Mocha, beautiful but absentminded; Teak, whom she buys for Don's birthday to make a change from aftershave and socks; and Shadow, with whom she develops a great interest in Obedience Trials. All of them appear here and will certainly endear themselves to the reader as they have already done to the Hocken family. Emma and Co is full of delightful (and sometimes disastrous) anecdotes, both human and animal. But there is great sorrow in it too, for in the end Sheila must learn to live without the dog who was her 'eyes' for many years.

Assignment in Eternity

by Robert A. Heinlein

Robert A. Heinlein is widely and justly regarded as the greatest practitioner of the art of science fiction who has ever lived. Here are two of his greatest short novels: GULF, In which the greatest superspy of them all is revealed as the leader of a league of supermen and women who can't quite decide what to do with the rest of us, and LOST LEGACY, in which it is proved that we are all members of that league -- or would be, if we but had eyes to see.... PLUS TWO GREAT STORIES: Two of the Master's finest: one on the nature of Being, the other on what it means to be a Man.

Douglas Haig

by Gary Sheffield John Bourne

There's a commonly held view that Douglas Haig was a bone-headed, callous butcher, who through his incompetence as commander of the British Army in WWI, killed a generation of young men on the Somme and at Passchendaele. On the other hand, there are those who view Haig as a man who successfully struggled with appalling difficulties to produce an army which took the lead in defeating Germany in 1918.Haig's diaries, hitherto only previously available in bowdlerised form, give the C-in-C's view of Asquith and his successor Lloyd George, of whom he was highly critical. The diaries show him intriguing with the King vs. Lloyd George. Additional are his day-by-day accounts of the key battles of the war, not least the Somme campaign of 1916.

Paths of Glory

by Anthony Clayton

Anthony Clayton is an acknowledged expert on the French military, and his book is a major contribution to the study and understanding of the First World War. He reveals why and how the French army fought as it did. He profiles its senior commanders - Joffre, Petain, Nivelle and Foch - and analyses its major campaigns both on the Western Front and in the Near East and Africa. PATHS OF GLORY also considers in detail the officers, how they kept their trenches and how men from very different areas of France fought and died together. He scrutinises the make-up and performance of France's large colonial armies, and investigates the mutinies of 1917. Ultimately, he reveals how the traumatic French experience of the 1914-18 war indelibly shaped a nation.


by Peter Hart Nigel Steel

In the autumn of 1917, after years of stalemate at Ypres, the British and French armies launched a massive offensive to take Passchendaele Ridge. Following an intensive bombardment, the Allies began their attack, but the low ground between the lines had been churned into a quagmire, and the attack was literally bogged down.All surprise had been lost, and the German defence in depth was well organised. For the first time the Germans used mustard gas, while German planes flew low to strafe the British infantry with machine guns. After two and a half months the British finally took the ridge they had been aiming for, but at the cost of over 300,000 Allied lives. German losses in the offensive were estimated at 260,000.Based on the archival holdings at the Imperial War Museum, this book gathers together a wealth of material about this horrific offensive. A history to appeal to the scholar and the general reader alike.

The Lost Chronicles Of The Maya Kings

by David Drew

A fascinating history of the Maya - drawing on a wealth of recent archaeological discoveries - whose civilisation in the jungles of Central America was for almost a thousand years hidden from the world.Over the last two centuries explorers have made the most remarkable discoveries in the tropical forests of Central America. Across much of present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize and Honduras dozens of cities - some with populations of well over 100,000 - have been unveiled, and every year fresh reports emerge of the findings of unknown Maya ruins - great temples, palaces, towering stone pyramids and the tombs of the Maya kings.What these spectacular discoveries indicate is the former presence of an exceptionally advanced, sophisticated and complex society. Recently, major developments made in the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphics have revealed that alongside the material achievements of the Maya ran intellectual accomplishments in astronomy, maths and calendrics, seemingly tied to the complexities of Maya religion, that were remarkable for a society technically in the Stone Age. From reliefs on temple walls, from magnificent hieroglyphic stairways and from stone stelae planted by Maya rulers in the plazas of their cities, has come written history: the Chronicles of the Maya Kings.David Drew looks at why they constructed their cities in the hostile setting of the jungle, the exact age of their ruins, the strange human images depicted in elaborate costume at so many Maya sites, and he asks why at the time of the Spanish conquest, all knowledge of the Mayas had been lost.

Secrets of Great Leaders: 50 Ways to Make a Difference

by Carol O'Connor

Discover the 50 secrets that great leaders know - complete with strategies for putting them into practice.What do great leaders know that the rest of us don't? Do they have a secret recipe for success? Is there a special alchemy to leading people? The Secrets of Great Leaders reveals the 50 things you need to know to motivate and inspire those around you. Each chapter outlines one of the 50 ideas and gives three strategies for putting it into practice. Some of the ideas will surprise you, all will inspire you. Put these simple strategies together and you have a recipe for professional success, a formula that will unlock your leadership potential.Whether you want to motivate your team, master public speaking or establish guiding principles and set priorities, this book provides the tools and techniques you need to be a great leader. With nuggets of wisdom gathered over years of experience, for every type of leadership situation, it gives you everything you need to know.

Communication Genius

by Tony Buon

The fast-track MBA in communicationImagine having instant access to the world's smartest thinking on human communication - and being shown exactly what to do to guarantee that all of your communication is right, every time. Communication Genius makes it easy to apply the scientific facts that researchers know about communication to the real world. 40 chapters based on cutting-edge business and psychology research projects reveal what works and what doesn't work when we interact with each other. Each of the 40 chapters is a mini-masterclass in communicating better, explaining the research and showing you how to apply it for yourself to improve your own communication skills.Too often, conventional wisdom says one thing while research says another. Communication Genius cuts through the noise to bring you proven research and techniques for applying it that will simply make you a better all-round communicator.With chapters on body language, emotional intelligence, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP), presentations, mimicry, groupthink and the latest neuroscience, Communication Genius explodes some myths and gives you the best that science has to offer on communication. Quick to read and intensely practical, this book will bring a little communication genius into your day.'A must read if you want to communicate better' Professor Sir Cary Cooper, Manchester Business School, University of Manchester'Required reading for anyone seeking to better their communication skills in the workplace and otherwise' Dr Anastasia P. Rush, Clinical Psychologist, CEO HELLAS EAP (Greece)'Calls into question accepted 'beliefs' (Maslow's hierarchy) and introduces the reader to an array of new theories from "IQ" racism to the Obama effect' Kate Nowlan, Chief Executive, CiC Employee Assistance, Fellow Royal Society of Arts (FRSA)'Tony has done a fantastic job in pulling together an amazing number of articles and scientific studies and making them understandable to the lay person' Andrew Kinder, Chartered Counselling & Chartered Occupational Psychologist, Employee Assistance Professionals Association (EAPA -UK) Chair

1916: Verdun to the Somme

by Saul David

This special ebook has been created by historian Saul David from his acclaimed work 100 Days to Victory: How the Great War was Fought and Won, which was described by the Mail on Sunday as 'Inspired' and by Charles Spencer as 'A work of great originality and insight'. Through key dates from the introduction of conscription in Britain on 27 January 1916, to the first day of the Somme on 1 July 1916, Saul David's gripping narrative is an enthralling tribute to a generation of men and women whose sacrifice should never be forgotten.

Naming the Stars

by Jennifer Johnston

Flora's father has been killed in the Battle of El Alamein, one of the many victims of the Second World War. For Flora and her mother, life will never be the same again. At least they have their memories, of the love he showed them, the Desert Lullaby that he sang, the legacy of the well-stocked wine cellar lurking beneath their cavernous home.Now, it's just Flora - and Nellie, the family's life-long housekeeper - left; to reminisce in old age, to float and drift over the joys, losses and mysteries of childhood. Flora's brother, Eddie, is also gone. Who, now, will believe the story of the grey silk dress, and of what really happened between Eddie and Flora at the end of that long Irish summer?Intimate, elegiac and profoundly moving, Naming the Stars is an exquisite story of love, loss and memory from one of Ireland's best-loved writers.

The Lone Warrior

by Paul Fraser Collard

Jack Lark, once the Scarlet Thief, has fought hard for his freedom. But will he risk it all to do the right thing?Bombay, 1857. India is simmering with discontent, and Jack Lark, honourably discharged from the British Army, aims to take the first ship back to England. But before he leaves, he cannot resist the adventure of helping a young woman escape imprisonment in a gaming house. He promises to escort Aamira home, but they arrive in Delhi just as the Indian Mutiny explodes. As both sides commit horrific slaughter and the siege of Delhi begins, Jack realises that despite the danger he cannot stand by and watch. At heart, he is still a soldier...The Lone Warrior is a scintillating tale of battle and courage from the author of The Scarlet Thief.Praise for Paul Fraser Collard:'I love a writer who wears his history lightly enough for the story he's telling to blaze across the pages like this. Jack Lark is an unforgettable new hero' Anthony Riches'Sharpe fans will be delighted to welcome a swashbuckling new hero to follow... Marvellous fun' Peterborough Telegraph'A confident, rich and exciting novel that gave me all the ingredients I would want for a historical adventure of the highest order' For Winter Nights'It felt accurate, it felt real, it felt alive... The battles had me hooked, riveted to the page, there were times when I was almost as breathless as the exhausted soldiers' Parmenion Books

Start and Run a Gardening Business, 4th Edition

by Paul Power

Whether your aspirations are simply to sell a selection of home grown plants from the boot of your car or to establish a succesful all-year-round gardening business, this book will show you how. It covers: preparing your business plan; getting kitted out; how to find work - and keep it; what services to offer; book-keeping for gardeners; planning the gardening year; how to get commercial contracts; providing estimates; the top ten most profitable gardening jobs.


by Hannah Dennison

Murder is in the air when hedge-jumping champ Dave Randall accuses his arch enemy, Jack Webster, of sabotaging his dream to compete at the upcoming European Games. Vicky is used to Dave's histrionics and she turns a blind eye. After all, she has bigger fish to fry-namely solving the mysterious death of worm charming diva Ruth Reeves, whose sudden inheritance has made her very unpopular with old friends and neighbours alike. But when Jack Webster ends up dead, too, there seems to be a strange connection between the pair and Dave becomes the prime suspect. The perfect classic English village mystery but with the addition of charm, wit and a thoroughly modern touch. (Rhys Bowen)Downton Abbey was yesterday. Murder at Honeychurch Hall lifts the lid on today's grand country estate in all its tarnished, scheming, inbred, deranged glory. (Catriona McPherson)A fun read (Carola Dunn)Sparkles like a glass of Devon cider on a summer afternoon. (Elizabeth Duncan)

Dilly's Lass

by Rosie Goodwin

A daughter's shame, a mother's secret - a family united by loveA mother's secretOne thing unites the wealthy Farthing family and hardworking Dilly Carey - Olivia, the daughter Dilly gave to the Farthings years before. Olivia is now grown-up, beautiful and happy, but Dilly is still grieved by the choice she was forced to make to give her beloved child a future. A daughter's shameWhen unmarried Olivia arrives on Dilly's doorstep, her own baby girl in her arms, begging for help, Dilly can only say yes. Olivia's secret will be safe with her. Dilly will find a way for Olivia to keep her daughter without revealing the true circumstances of her birth. A father's hopeDilly can't tell Max Farthing, the man Olivia calls Father. For Max has problems of his own: he's married to Camilla, who has lost her senses. With so many lies between Dilly and Max, is there any chance that they could come together?Dilly's hard work has lifted her family out of poverty and hardship. But now the Great War is over, her children have new challenges to face - and Dilly will protect them with everything she has. Even if it means sacrificing her own happiness. The new novel from bestselling and much-loved Rosie Goodwin

My Funny Family Gets Funnier

by Chris Higgins

Nine-year-old Mattie is excited. Uncle Vez's brother and his wife have come to visit! With their Australian guests, life in the Butterfield household is even more chaotic than usual. Mattie just has one worry on her Worry List ... Has Grandma met her match in Aunty Sheila?

Journey into God's Heart

by Jennifer Rees Larcombe

Even Jennifer herself has in the light of severe recent tragedies found herself gaining a new understanding of all she has been through. This book looks back at the traumas and insecurities of her childhood, the joys and trials of family life through the most testing of circumstances, the confusion caused by her life-threatening illness and subsequent miracle healing, the pain of bereavement and - the most recent chapter that no-one foresaw - divorce from her husband Tony.Journey Into God's Heart is an epic saga of a unique woman's journey through the fire. An adventure that lasts a lifetime, a path strewn with heart-testing challenges.Written as compellingly as a novel, it presents a completely new perspective on the story told in Jennifer's previous autobiographical books Beyond Healing and Unexpected Healing. Her journey unfolds against the backdrop of the momentous changes undergone by the evangelical and charismatic church in the mid and late twentieth century.

Christmas Around the Village Green

by Dot May Dunn

Dot May Dunn grew up in Derbyshire, the daughter of a miner, during the wartime years. In 1951 she joined the NHS as an early recruit and went on to train as a nurse. Dot's books are full of wonderful anecdotal insight into the life that she has experienced, written with warmth, humour and vivid accounts of her surroundings - from deprivation, health problems and poverty, to personal determination, the surprises faced by midwives and the social history of the pre- and post-war years. Dot draws upon her wealth of experience and shares her life with her readers, provoking both laughter and tears along the way.Centred on Christmas during war-time, this book will focus on community spirit and the sense of coming together and suporting each other, which Dunn captures so well.

Beast Quest: Early Reader Creta the Winged Terror

by Adam Blade

Evil Wizard Malvel has conjured up Creta, a terrifying monster that can unleash thousands of vicious insects from its body! Can Tom defeat Creta before the Beast destroys the whole kingdom?Beast Quest Early Readers are perfect for children learning to read and for families to enjoy together, with text vetted by a literacy expert and bright new colour illustrations.Also available: Beast Quest Early Reader 3: Arax the Soul Stealer!

The Wrong Side of the Galaxy: 2: A Galaxy Too Far

by Jamie Thomson

Harry was just an ordinary teenage boy from Croydon when he was abducted by aliens and accidentally became the captain of their starship. His quest to get back home to Earth continues - but now he's acquired an alien 'son' and a new spacecraft, and he's being pursued by an eight-foot robot bounty hunter...Could this be a galaxy too far for Harry?Another hilarious story from the Roald Dahl Funny Prize-winning author of the DARK LORD series.

Showing 5,051 through 5,075 of 8,170 results


Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.