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Air Power Versus U-Boats - Confronting Hitler’s Submarine Menace In The European Theater [Illustrated Edition]

by A. Timothy Warnock

Includes over 14 photos and mapsMore than fifty years after World War II, America's major air power contribution to the war in Europe-in efforts such as Big Week, Regensburg, and Patton's dash across Europe-live on in the memories of airmen and students of air power. Never before had air forces performed so many roles in so many different types of operations. Air power proved to be extremely flexible: wartime missions included maintaining air superiority, controlling the air space over the battlefield; strategic bombardment, destroying the enemy's industrial and logistical network; air-ground support, attacking targets on the battlefield; and military airlift, delivering war materiel to distant bases.Perhaps one of the least known but significant roles of the Army Air Forces (AAF) was in antisubmarine warfare, particularly in the European-African-Middle Eastern theater. From the coasts of Greenland, Europe, and Africa to the mid-Atlantic, AAF aircraft hunted German U-boats that sank thousands of British and American transport ships early in the war. These missions supplemented the efforts of the Royal Navy, the Royal Air Force Coastal Command, and the U.S. Navy, and helped those sea forces to wrest control of the sea lanes from German submarines.

Africa To The Alps: The Army Air Forces In The Mediterranean Theater [Illustrated Edition]

by Edward T. Russell

Includes over 14 photos and mapsBy the time the U.S. declared war on Germany and Italy on December 11, 1941, most of Europe had fallen under the domination of Adolf Hitler, dictator of Germany's Third Reich. In the west, only Great Britain, her armies expelled from the European continent, remained defiant; in the east, Hitler faced an implacable foe-the Soviet Union. While the Soviets tried to stave off a relentless German attack that had reached Moscow, Britain and her Commonwealth allies fought a series of crucial battles with Axis forces in North Africa.Initially, America's entry into the war changed nothing. The U.S. continued to supply the Allies with the tools of war, as it had since the passage of the Lend-Lease Act in March 1941. U.S. military forces, however, had to be expanded, trained, equipped, and deployed, all of which would take time.With the U.S. in the war, the Allies faced the question of where American forces could best be used. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill had already agreed that defeating first Germany and then Japan would be their policy, but that decision raised further questions.Roosevelt wanted U.S. troops in combat against German troops as soon as possible. Josef Stalin, the Soviet leader, demanded a second front in northern Europe to relieve pressure on his armed forces. Churchill, fearing German power in France, hoped for a strike at the Mediterranean periphery of Hitler's conquests-what he called the "soft underbelly" of Europe.Churchill proposed an invasion of northwest Africa for late 1942 and Roosevelt agreed...Africa to the Alps describes the participation of the Army Air Forces in the war in the Mediterranean theater of operations, as it developed a practical air-ground doctrine, established an effective interdiction strategy, and gained valuable experience in airborne operations and close air support of ground troops.

Weapon Of Denial: Air Power And The Battle For New Guinea [Illustrated Edition]

by Gary Null

Includes over 12 photos and mapsGen. Douglas MacArthur, commander of Pacific forces in World War II, viewed the Battle of the Bismarck Sea as a disaster for the Japanese and a triumph for the Allies. In that great air-sea confrontation, U.S. and Australian air forces proved that air power could be decisive in preventing the resupply of ground troops by sea. Months of torturous warfare in the jungles of New Guinea had left Japanese troops vulnerable to disease and starvation. In the end, Allied airmen were able to break Japan's grip on New Guinea and end its threat to Australia through the innovative and aggressive use of air power. MacArthur's strength lay in a dedicated and courageous band of airmen who could attack enemy ships from all directions at any time.

D-Day 1944 - Air Power Over The Normandy Beaches And Beyond [Illustrated Edition]

by Richard P. Hallion

Includes over 12 photos and maps of the Overlord OperationsOperation Overlord, the Normandy invasion-like William the Conqueror's before it or the Inchon landing afterwards-will long be studied as a classic in military planning, logistics, and operations. OVERLORD depended to a remarkable degree upon the use of air power in virtually all its forms. A half-century ago, aircraft were primitive vehicles of war compared to the modern attackers of the Gulf War era, with their precision weapons, advanced navigational, sensor systems, and communications. Yet, the airplane still had a profound impact upon the success of the invasion. Simply stated, without air power, Normandy would have been impossible.

Cannon Fodder Or Corps d'Elite: The American Expeditionary Force In The Great War [Illustrated Edition]

by Cdr. Jeffrey J. Bernasconi

Includes The Americans in the First World War Illustration Pack - 57 photos/illustrations and 10 mapsThe analysis of the impact of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) in the Great War has fallen into two competing camps. The first believes that the AEF was the war winning factor in coalition warfare. The opposite view holds that the AEF itself had no true impact, but rather it was the industrial might and the manpower potential of the United States (US) that was the key element to victory. The caveat to both views was that the AEF did not have enough time in combat to truly show its martial ability. This thesis attempts to analyze the combat effectiveness of the AEF by comparing its experience with that of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in 1916. The rate of change in the ability of the AEF to adapt to modern warfare will be shown to be slightly higher than that of the BEF of 1916. By November 1918, the AEF was not completely tactically combat effective, but it had dramatically improved from where it started and clearly demonstrated the potential to continue to improve at the same pace.

Building The Old Contemptibles: British Military Transformation And Tactical Development From The Boer War To The Great War, 1899-1914

by Major Andrew J. Risio

Impressed with the tactical lessons of the Boer War, the British Army reformed its doctrine and training from 1899 to 1914, deploying a combat ready force, the "Old Contemptibles" of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in 1914. Because of these changes, the BEF played a crucial role in Belgium and France in 1914. The lessons of the Boer War guided the British Army and its interwar reforms. The doctrine and training developed from 1902-1914 was a significant improvement over the pre-Boer War British colonial warfare tactics. With Haldane's organizational reforms and Robert's new doctrine, the British Army built the Old Contemptibles of the BEF. The battles of 1914 showed the BEF was the equal of any European contemporary in quality of its tactics and doctrine. The comparison of the BEF to the other combatants in 1914 does not stand in stark contrast. The BEF performed well but no better or worse than comparable German or French units did. What does stand in stark contrast is the BEF in 1914 when compared with the expedition to South Africa in 1899. The years of reform between these two expeditions were truly a crucible that built the Old Contemptibles.

Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, 1861-1865: A Study Of The Union's Treatment Of Confederate Prisoners

by Major Jack Morris Ivy Jr.

Camp Chase, four miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio, began in May 1861 as a mustering center for units entering Union service during the American Civil War. By June 1861 it picked up additional responsibilities of housing Confederate prisoners captured by Ohio units during the earliest military actions of the war. It eventually expanded to hold 9,423 prisoners in Jan. 1865, which made it one of the larger Union prison camps.The earliest prisoners were afforded extraordinary leniency by state authorities until the Union government stepped in with rules and regulations. By Oct. 1862, an effective system was in place to secure and care for prisoners. Success continued despite fluxuations in prison population, disease and a constant influx of captured wounded, until Aug. 1864 when rations were reduced in retribution for Confederate treatment of Union captives.Ration reduction caused prisoners hardships but did not markedly increase mortality. Quality medical care and sanitation kept mortality below Union Army deaths from disease.As prison population soared during the last months of the war, increasing numbers of wounded, severely exposed and weakened captives joined Camp Chase. Reduced rations continued to pose hardships but ration reduction was offset by superb medical care and sanitation which continued to keep mortality below that experienced by the Union Army from disease....Prisoners were well treated up to the time rations were reduced in retaliation for alleged Confederate cruelities to Union prisoners. In spite of this, Camp Chase officials continued to stress sanitation and provide clothing late in the war even though they were not obligated to do so. This demonstrated that officials at Camp Chase were successful in managing a prisoner of war camp, even during the period of Union retaliation.

The Reasons For The Success Of The Sixth Coalition Against Napoleon In 1813

by Commander John Trost Kuehn

This study investigates the reasons for the success of the Sixth Coalition against Napoleon in 1813. Four critical principles emerge from U.S. joint doctrine that provide a means to examine coalition warfare: national goals, unity of effort, strategic plans, and adherence to plans. These principles illuminate the primary importance of coalition warfare in the defeat of Napoleon.The failure of an earlier coalition the Second Coalition in 1799 underscores the importance of the principles of coalition warfare to the success or failure of the coalitions against Napoleon and the French. This coalition failed because of its lack of attention to the details of coalition warfare. Its basic flaw, lack of a common coalition goal, undermined its unity and resulted in defeat.The development of a common goal, the liberation of Germany, combined with the decline of the French and reforms by Napoleon's opponents led to a level playing field 1813. The 1813 spring campaign resulted in a stalemate. The coalition used the subsequent armistice to further improve their coalition both politically and militarily. These improvements, particularly the adoption of a unified military strategy, resulted in improved unity of effort and provided the coalition the margin for ultimate victory.

The Air Campaign: Planning For Combat

by John A. Warden III

In the short history of air warfare, no nation with superior air forces has ever lost a war to the force of enemy arms. Air superiority by itself, however, no longer guarantees victory. This book, one of the first analyses of the pure art of planning the aerial dimension of war, explores the complicated connection between air superiority and victory in war.In The Air Campaign, Colonel John A. Warden III focuses on the use of air forces at the operational level in a theater of war. The most compelling task for the theater commander, he argues, is translating national war objectives into tactical plans at operational levels. He presents his case by drawing on fascinating historical examples, stressing that the mastery of operational-level strategy can be the key to winning future wars. Colonel Warden shows us how to use air power more effectively-through rough mass, concentration, and economy of forces-because, he warns, the United States no longer holds an edge in manpower, production capacity, and technology.Simply put, an air force inferior in numbers must fight better and smarter to win. This book offers planners greater understanding of how to use air power for future air campaigns against a wide variety of enemy capabilities in a wide variety of air operations. As the reader will see, the classic principles of war also apply to air combat. One of the author's important contributions is to demonstrate that perception to those whose grave responsibility one day may be to plan and carry through a victorious air campaign.

The Luftwaffe And Its War Of Attrition

by Lieutenant Colonel Patricia L. C. Priest

Over the years, the United States Air Force takes much credit for bringing World War II to closure. The strategic bomber, eventually along with long range fighter, was put in the skies over Germany to gain air superiority and to disrupt the war making abilities of Germany and, in particular, the Luftwaffe. The Luftwaffe had to be neutralized before the invasion of Normandy could take place. Granted this was a necessary step. However, the Luftwaffe had already lost its fighting ability and the war through poor strategy and judgment long before the strategic bomber and the long range fighter could become factors in the war.

To Hanoi And Back: The United States Air Force And North Vietnam 1966-1973 [Illustrated Edition]

by Dr Wayne Thompson

Includes 3 maps and 40 photographsNo experience etched itself more deeply into Air Force thinking than the air campaigns over North Vietnam. Two decades later in the deserts of Southwest Asia, American airmen were able to avoid the gradualism that cost so many lives and planes in the jungles of Southeast Asia. Readers should come away from this book with a sympathetic understanding of the men who bombed North Vietnam. Those airmen handled tough problems in ways that ultimately reshaped the Air Force into the effective instrument on display in the Gulf War.This book is a sequel to Jacob Van Staaveren's Gradual Failure: The Air War over North Vietnam, 1965-1966, which we have also declassified and are publishing. Wayne Thompson tells how the Air Force used that failure to build a more capable service-a service which got a better opportunity to demonstrate the potential of air power in 1972.Dr. Thompson began to learn about his subject when he was an Army draftee assigned to an Air Force intelligence station in Taiwan during the Vietnam War. He took time out from writing To Hanoi and Back to serve in the Checkmate group that helped plan the Operation Desert Storm air campaign against Iraq. Later he visited Air Force pilots and commanders in Italy immediately after the Operation Deliberate Force air strikes in Bosnia. During Operation Allied Force over Serbia and its Kosovo province, he returned to Checkmate. Consequently, he is keenly aware of how much the Air Force has changed in some respects-how little in others. Although he pays ample attention to context, his book is about the Air Force. He has written a well-informed account that is both lively and thoughtful.

Airborne Warfare

by General James Maurice Gavin William C. Lee

To every member of the 82nd Airborne Division who dropped as part of the American paratroop landings during World War Two, they breathed a little easier knowing their commander "Jumpin' Jim" Gavin would be dropping with them. General Gavin would drop into the fierce fighting along with his men in Sicily, Normandy on D-Day and during the abortive attempt to capture the Rhine bridges during Operation Market-Garden. He shared the risks of all his men dropping into enemy territory, often only armed with his GI issue rifle and accompanied by a handful of men, leading from the front his memoirs are an outstanding addition to the literature of the Airborne in World War II.General Gavin had been at the forefront advancing the use of airborne troops in the US army, writing the first field manual for their combat use. In this volume of memoirs General Gavin recounts his many experiences in the Airborne and also writes of the need and use of airborne troops in the future.

First In The Air: The Eagle Squadrons Of World War II [Illustrated Edition]

by Kenneth C. Kan

Includes 14 illustrations of the units, planes and personnel of the Eagle SquadronsDuring the perilous years of 1940-1941, a small band of Americans joined the Royal Air Force to help England resist Nazi Germany. They did so while the United States remained a neutral power and overcame significant obstacles to accomplish their objective. Over time, the RAF formed three fighter units, known collectively as the Eagle Squadrons, around these volunteer pilots. These Americans flew alongside their British comrades in fighter and bomber escort missions until 1942, when they transferred into the United States Army Air Forces. The Eagle Squadron pilots made noteworthy contributions to the RAF, assisting them in their transition from fighting a defensive war to waging an offensive campaign against the German Luftwaffe and helping pave the way to an eventual Allied victory.

Coalition Tactics On The Napoleonic Battlefield And Their Influence On Unity Of Effort

by Commander John Trost Kuehn

The mechanism for the operation of our military forces beyond the shores of the U.S. is the modern coalition from the grand alliance of NATO to simple bilateral relationships. Understanding the dynamics of coalition warfare is important for a U.S. Military that often finds itself operating as the dominant member of any coalition it joins. One of the major considerations listed in the portion of joint doctrine which addresses multinational coalitions is the concept of unity of effort Current U.S. Army doctrine has long recognized the importance of unity of command. However, the latest drafts of the new Army keystone doctrine publication, FM 100-5, have upgraded the principle of unity of command to unity of effort. The efficacy of this change recognizes the realities of operations in a world of coalitions, trans-governmental agencies, and private organizations all which find themselves often in league with our military as we strive to reach common (not always strictly military) objectives.This monograph will examine two historical case studies from the Napoleonic Wars (1792-1815) in order to explore the relationship between tactical and doctrinal differences between different members of the same coalition. The first case study examines the coalition army of Marshal Suvorov at the battles of the Trebbia and Novi in 1799. The second example will move forward in time to the Russo-Prussian army of the spring of 1813 and its performance at the battles of Lützen and Bautzen.Although history does not provide us with exact recipes for implementing complex solutions in a complex world, it does provide a means to understand the dynamics of human behavior on a vast scale. The Napoleonic period represents a veritable laboratory of coalition warfare and provides a means of applying the lessons of a historical period to understanding the dynamics of coalitions.

Patton And His Third Army

by Colonel Brenton G. Wallace

Ol' Blood and Guts' head of liaison officers tells the story of the famous general as he saw him at the head of the Third Army during World War II."THE powerful Third Army with its famous leader, General George S. Patton, Jr., which in ten months roared through France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Czechoslovakia and Austria, crushing at every turn the German war machine which in 1940-42 was considered the most powerful army in the world, have now passed into history. Before the memory of the great days of these campaigns as well as the close association with this famous American fighter grow dim, it might be interesting to jot down the story of the events as they unfolded and a few personal impressions of our leader.This therefore is the story of The Third Army and its great commander."

The Brereton Diaries: The War In The Air In The Pacific, Middle East And Europe, 3 October 1941-8 May 1945

by Lieutenant-General Lewis H. Brereton

Lieutenant-General Brereton was a long service aviator in the United States Air Force even before the advent of the Second World War, Tough and aggressive he would lead his men and air groups through the Pacific, North Africa and Europe, and saw action in more theatres than any other senior commander. Described by one of his fellow US generals "a cocky, aggressive, intelligent, experienced, pretty damn able commander.", he is a somewhat controversial character. He was in command during four of the most controversial, from an Air Force perspective, episodes of the entire war; the initial destruction of the American aerial assets in the Philippines 1941, the bombing of the oilfields in Ploesti 1943, the flattening of the German defences in Normandy 1944, and the failed attempt to capture bridges across the Rhine by airdrop 1944.His diary is very readable, enlightening and very relevant to the US Air Force effort in all of the major theaters across World War II.

Napoleon; A History Of The Art Of War,: From The Beginning Of The French Revolution To The End Of The Eighteenth Century Vol. IV [Illustrated Edition]

by Lt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Includes over 200 maps, plans, diagrams and uniform printsLt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge was a soldier of long and bloody experience, having served with the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War losing one of his legs during the battle of Gettysburg. After the end of the war he settled down in retirement to write, he produced a number of excellent works on the recently ended Civil War and his magnum opus "A History of the Art of War", tracing the advances, changes and major engagements of Western Europe. His work was split into twelve volumes, richly illustrated with cuts of uniforms, portraits and maps, each focussing on periods of history headed by the most prominent military figure; Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Frederick the Great and finally Napoleon. Napoleon and the period which he dominated received such care and attention that Dodge wrote four excellent, authoritative and detailed volumes on him.In Dodge's concluding volume on Napoleon's great career covers the battles that would lose Germany for the French cause for good; as his lieutenants are unable to follow through his plans, his tired ragged conscripts cannot match the quality and power of old and struggle blindly with the cavalry that was sacrificed on the steppes of Russia. The missed chances of Lützen and Bautzen and the crowning epic defeat at the Battle of the Emperors at Leipzig force Napoleon back to France, he conjures a brilliant campaign along the rivers of Northern France beating one opponent then another. However, the odds are too much even for Napoleon's star, and he is forced to abdicate in 1814. Just over a year later he rolls the dice one last time during the Waterloo Campaign, filled with opportunities not taken and orders misplaced, Napoleon is forced in further exile at St. Helena, his military fame undimmed even after a hundred years.A well written, expansive and excellent classic.

Napoleon; A History Of The Art Of War,: From The Beginning Of The French Revolution To The End Of The Eighteenth Century Vol. III [Illustrated Edition]

by Lt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Includes over 200 maps, plans, diagrams and uniform printsLt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge was a soldier of long and bloody experience, having served with the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War losing one of his legs during the battle of Gettysburg. After the end of the war he settled down in retirement to write, he produced a number of excellent works on the recently ended Civil War and his magnum opus "A History of the Art of War", tracing the advances, changes and major engagements of Western Europe. His work was split into twelve volumes, richly illustrated with cuts of uniforms, portraits and maps, each focussing on periods of history headed by the most prominent military figure; Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Frederick the Great and finally Napoleon. Napoleon and the period which he dominated received such care and attention that Dodge wrote four excellent, authoritative and detailed volumes on him.This third volume begins with Napoleon's ambitious foray in Spain and Portugal in 1807-8, despite British intervention his forces are triumphant over much of Spain. Napoleon is forced to turn back to his Eastern enemies as Austria attack on the Danube, even Napoleon's great powers cannot gain him victories at all times and his repulse at Aspern hands him his first major defeat. He is able to bring the Austrians to heel after the bloody battle of Wagram, but his over vaulting ambition is beginning to become too much; as reverses in the Peninsula mount he decides on the disastrous Russian campaign of 1812. This volume concludes as the remnants of the Grande Armée trudge back through the snows of Russia and his lieutenants are roundly beaten by Wellington at Vittoria.A well written, expansive and excellent classic.

Napoleon; A History Of The Art Of War,: From The Beginning Of The French Revolution To The End Of The Eighteenth Century Vol. II [Illustrated Edition]

by Lt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Includes over 200 maps, plans, diagrams and uniform printsLt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge was a soldier of long and bloody experience, having served with the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War losing one of his legs during the battle of Gettysburg. After the end of the war he settled down in retirement to write, he produced a number of excellent works on the recently ended Civil War and his magnum opus "A History of the Art of War", tracing the advances, changes and major engagements of Western Europe. His work was split into twelve volumes, richly illustrated with cuts of uniforms, portraits and maps, each focussing on periods of history headed by the most prominent military figure; Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Frederick the Great and finally Napoleon. Napoleon and the period which he dominated received such care and attention that Dodge wrote four excellent, authoritative and detailed volumes on him.This second volume explores the beginning of Napoleon's ascension to the title of Emperor of the French and his defeat of all of the powers of Europe to his apogee of power in 1807. Napoleon's thunderous campaign in Italy in 1800, his lightning campaign that culminated at Austerlitz in 1805 see the Emperor in his full pomp scattering his Austrian and Russian foes. Concluding this volume are his campaigns against the Prussians and Russians in 1806 and 1807, despite defeating his enemies roundly in battle his own finely trained Grande Armée was starting to be bled to death.A well written, expansive and excellent classic.

Napoleon; A History Of The Art Of War,: From The Beginning Of The French Revolution To The End Of The Eighteenth Century Vol. I [Illustrated Edition]

by Lt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge

Includes over 200 maps, plans, diagrams and uniform printsLt.-Col. Theodore Ayrault Dodge was a soldier of long and bloody experience, having served with the Union Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War losing one of his legs during the battle of Gettysburg. After the end of the war he settled down in retirement to write, he produced a number of excellent works on the recently ended Civil War and his magnum opus "A History of the Art of War", tracing the advances, changes and major engagements of Western Europe. His work was split into twelve volumes, richly illustrated with cuts of uniforms, portraits and maps, each focussing on periods of history headed by the most prominent military figure; Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, Gustavus Adolphus, Frederick the Great and finally Napoleon. Napoleon and the period which he dominated received such care and attention that Dodge wrote four excellent, authoritative and detailed volumes on him.This first volume focuses on the initial wars of the French Revolution until the 1799 Allied campaign in Switzerland under the great Suwarov. Napoleon's Italian campaign in Italy in 1796-1797 fully displays his emerging genius, the battles of Montenotte, Dego, Castiglione, Arcola and Rivoli are explained with expert attention to detail.A well written, expansive and excellent classic.

A Tarnished Eagle: Napoleon's Winter Campaign In Poland, December 1806 Through February 1807

by Major Edward J. Murphy

The victories and accomplishments of Napoleon and his Grand Army were by the winter of 1806, the stuff of legend. Yet, on the bloody field of Eylau, Napoleon lost both his prestige and over one third of his Army. How did this Russian Army of notable inferior weapons, tactics, organization and leadership stave off defeat and almost achieve victory? The answer lies in that Napoleon did not only fight the Russians, but also suffered a combination of poor morale and inaccurate reconnaissance. His overextended lines of communications covered an area that was known for its harsh terrain, poor supplies and extremely bad weather.The Campaign cost Napoleon over 43,000 casualties and proved indecisive. The campaign, and Battle of Eylau, ruined Napoleon's image of invincibility and completely gutted the Grand Army of a wealth of leadership and experience. Over twenty general officers were killed or seriously wounded at Eylau. Subsequently, Napoleon would have to consistently rely on more conscripts and an ever-increasing number of foreign troops to fill his depleted ranks. Napoleon's Army would never again resemble the previously invincible Grand Army that died on the blood-soaked snows of Poland.

From Peenemünde To Canaveral

by Dieter Huzel

Dieter Huzel was an electronic engineer with his whole career ahead of him when Germany lurched into the Second World War, he was conscripted and destined for the Russian Front when fate intervened. He and many other scientists were re-assigned from combat duty to the top secret installation at Peenemünde Island off the Baltic coast as part of the Nazi search for "Wonder Weapons". Huzel describes how he became an integral part of the V weapon program which, despite the frequent Allied bombings, produced the feared V-1 and V-2 rockets that rained down on liberated parts of Europe during the later years of the war.As the tide turned against the Nazi regime, Huzel tells of the shifts in production of these weapons to central Germany and his team's rising fear that the rocket technology would fall into the hands of the Russians. However, Huzel and his team were captured by the West and offered re-location to Britain or America. Huzel and his former director, Werner Von Braun, opted for America where they would become part of the ground-breaking Rocketdyne research team and spearhead of the NASA push for space exploration.

Wooden Leg: A Warrior Who Fought Custer

by Thomas B. Marquis

"Wooden Leg was one of the sixteen hundred warriors of the Northern Cheyennes who fought with the Sioux against Custer at the legendary Battle of the Little Bighorn. As an old man in his seventies, he related his story of the battle to Thomas B. Marquis, formerly an agency physician for the Northern Cheyennes, in scores of interviews, illustrating his statements with drawings and maps. "Some aspects of Wooden Leg's account have provoked controversy, but - as Marquis points out - soon after the battle the Sioux were settled in the Dakotas while the Cheyennes were located on the reservation in the heart of the region where had been the conflicts. Thus they have kept their memories fresh or have kept each other prompted into true recollections. This advantageous condition has rendered them the best of first-hand authorities." The author checked and corroborated or corrected all points of importance with other Cheyennes - among them Limpy, Pine, Bobtail Horse, Sun Bear, Black Horse, Two Feathers, Wolf Chief, Little Sun, Blackbird, Big Beaver, Medicine Bull, and the younger Little Wolf - "all of whom were with the hostile Indians when Custer came.""-Print Ed.

The Nazi 88 Made Believers

by Henry P. Abbott

Major Harry Abbott wrote this book of his experiences as the military chaplain of Combat Command B of the 13th Armored Regiment of the 1st Armored Division during the North African campaign soon after returning Stateside. He and his fellow chaplains made ceaseless efforts to care for the spiritual and physical needs of the men in their charge. He was frequently called upon to tend to the sick and wounded, he attested to the tremendous courage displayed by the GIs of his unit as they grappled with the veteran Afrika Korps in North Africa. As alluded to in the title many of his charges faced their religious decisions differently under the fired of the deadly German 88 anti-tank gun; he assiduously noted that "there are no atheists in foxholes." Also in charge of the burial parties sent to ensure the proper respect for the fallen, he describes this lesser known part of the US military effort. Illustrated throughout with his own photographs.

How A One-Legged Rebel Lives. Reminiscences Of The Civil War: The Story Of The Campaigns Of Stonewall Jackson, Told By A High Private In The “Foot Cavalry”

by John S Robson

A veteran of the 52nd Virginia Regiment recounts his experiences under the great Stonewall Jackson in his Valley campaign and up until he lost his leg for the Southern cause at the battle of Cedar Creek.

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