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Cloning Wild Life

by Carrie Friese

The natural world is marked by an ever-increasing loss of varied habitats, a growing number of species extinctions, and a full range of new kinds of dilemmas posed by global warming. At the same time, humans are also working to actively shape this natural world through contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. In Cloning Wild Life, Carrie Friese posits that cloned endangered animals in zoos sit at the apex of these two trends, as humans seek a scientific solution to environmental crisis. Often fraught with controversy, cloning technologies, Friese argues, significantly affect our conceptualizations of and engagements with wildlife and nature. By studying animals at different locations, Friese explores the human practices surrounding the cloning of endangered animals. She visits zoos--the San Diego Zoological Park, the Audubon Center in New Orleans, and the Zoological Society of London--to see cloning and related practices in action, as well as attending academic and medical conferences and interviewing scientists, conservationists, and zookeepers involved in cloning. Ultimately, she concludes that the act of recalibrating nature through science is what most disturbs us about cloning animals in captivity, revealing that debates over cloning become, in the end, a site of political struggle between different human groups. Moreover, Friese explores the implications of the social role that animals at the zoo play in the first place--how they are viewed, consumed, and used by humans for our own needs. A unique study uniting sociology and the study of science and technology, Cloning Wild Life demonstrates just how much bioscience reproduces and changes our ideas about the meaning of life itself.

A Law of Her Own

by Donna Matthews Caroline Forell

Despite the apparent progress in women's legal status, the law retains a profoundly male bias, and as such contributes to the pervasive violence and injustice against women. In A Law of Her Own, the authors propose to radically change law's fundamental paradigm by introducing a "reasonable woman standard" for measuring men's behavior. Advocating that courts apply this standard to the conduct of men-and women-in legal settings where women are overwhelmingly the injured parties, the authors seek to eliminate the victimization and objectification of women by dismantling part of the legal structure that supports their subordination. A woman-based legal standard-focusing on respect for bodily integrity, agency, and autonomy-would help rectify the imbalance in how society and its legal system view sexual and gender-based harassment, rape, stalking, battery, domestic imprisonment, violence, and death. Examining the bias of the existing "reasonable person" standard through analysis of various court cases and judicial decisions, A Law of Her Own aims to balance the law to incorporate women's values surrounding sex and violence.

The Disarticulate

by James Berger

Language is integral to our social being. But what is the status of those who stand outside of language? The mentally disabled, "wild" children, people with autism and other neurological disorders, as well as animals, infants, angels, and artificial intelligences, have all engaged with language from a position at its borders. In the intricate verbal constructions of modern literature, the 'disarticulate'--those at the edges of language--have, paradoxically, played essential, defining roles. Drawing on the disarticulate figures in modern fictional works such as Billy Budd, The Sound and the Fury, Nightwood, White Noise, and The Echo Maker, among others, James Berger shows in this intellectually bracing study how these characters mark sites at which aesthetic, philosophical, ethical, political, medical, and scientific discourses converge. It is also the place of the greatest ethical tension, as society confronts the needs and desires of "the least of its brothers." Berger argues that the disarticulate is that which is unaccountable in the discourses of modernity and thus stands as an alternative to the prevailing social order. Using literary history and theory, as well as disability and trauma theory, he examines how these disarticulate figures reveal modernity's anxieties in terms of how it constructs its others.

Last War, The

by Jim Fletcher David Allen Lewis

Exclusive interview with Ariel Sharon! A probing look at the war on terrorism. Conflict in the Middle East has simmered and boiled for decades. Now, war and terrorism are global in scope. The Last War contains supremely relevant information for all concerned: Why do Islamic radicals hate the West? What is the radical Moslem's world view? Who are Osama bin Laden's allies? Who are the "Little Satan" and the "Great Satan"? Are we being told the whole truth about our enemies? Tragically, a decade of intense diplomacy and negotiation has given way to widespread violence: some analysts, aware of the real potential for catastrophic war in the region, openly wonder if this will all lead to a "last war" of sorts. After seven years of "confidence-building" measures that are the framework of the Oslo Accords - an ambitious attempt to bring Israelis and Palestinians to a final peace agreement - the whole affair is unraveling. Violence in the West Bank has accelerated dramatically since Yitzak Rabin and Yasser Afarat signed the Declaration of Principles on the White House lawn in 1993. In this indepth study of the peace process, the reader will learn little-reported facts about the peace process and the people involved, and will be able to see clearly that the latest confrontations are a prelude to a devastating conclusion.

The Answers Book for Kids Volume 5

by Ken Ham Bodie Hodge

Never short of questions, let these titles bring answers to children who may just want to know, or who may be struggling in their walk with Christ. Parents and teachers need not be afraid of hte tough questions with these solid aplogetics titles in The Answers Book for Kids series. Too many children have grown up and left the Church because they asked tough questions and no one seemed to have an answer. Now, here are those answers! What day were planets created? Is it possible that there are living things in space? What about the big bang?

The Answers Book for Kids Volume 6

by Ken Ham Bodie Hodge

Never short of questions, let these titles bring answers to children who may just want to know, or who may be struggling in their walk with Christ. Parents and teachers need not be afraid of hte tough questions with these solid aplogetics titles in The Answers Book for Kids series. Too many children have grown up and left the Church because they asked tough questions and no one seemed to have an answer. Now, here are those answers! Where was the Tower of Babel built? How many languages came from Babel? Have you ever found a frozen person from the Ice Age?

Mini Moments for Mothers

by Robert Strand

New stories, encouraging quotes, and thoughtful expressions make these Mini Moments, packaged in an elegant exterior and handsomely priced, the perfect gift item.

Travail of the Flag, The

by Shelli Jones Baker

Men and women through the decades have died and prayed that our flag would always continue to fly with honor. This is the story of our flag and a remarkable painting honoring those who have made American great!

Questions God Asks

by Israel Wayne

UNDERSTANDING THE OMNIPOTENT GOD... WHO ASKS QUESTIONS OF US Why would God ask anyone a question? We ask questions when we don't understand. Yet, the Creator of the universe who spoke all that we see into being asks questions. Unimaginable power and wisdom are already His. As strange as it may seem to us, the Bible is filled with questions God asks. He is not the one who needs answers - these questions help us to understand both God and ourselves. Delve into the answers found by Job, Adam, Cain, Moses, Joshua, Elijah, and others Examine our fundamental assumptions about God, human nature, relationships, origins, and purpose Learn about godly character and God's transforming message Find a powerful supplement for family worship, Bible study, and personal devotions in the Questions God Asks. Stop demanding answers from God and begin answering the questions He asks of us.

One Anothering

by Simon Schrock

Jesus told us that the greatest commandment is to love God with all of our heart, soul, strength, and mind and the second greatest is to love our neighbor as ourselves. We often emphasize the vertical relationship with God, while the horizontal relationships with our neighbors are neglected. Simon Schrock has written a gentle reminder to each of us about our duty to our fellow man. At one time or another, everyone needs a helping hand, an encouraging pat on the back, or simply someone to listen. One Anothering prompts us to be genuine and loving in our relationships with Christ as our example. We depend on each other and will continue to rely upon togetherness and the nurtured relationships of those we know and love in the future. This book can enrich the quality of our experience with others at home, at work, and at worship. One Anothering is an intensely practical approach to loving our neighbor, written by someone who lives by what he says and easily communicates this great need to all of us.

Taught By the Spirit

by Ron Auch

Although the Church is currently emphasizing warfare prayer and actively engaging in what is called spiritual battle, why is it that so little seems to be happening? We gather the lost in by the thousands to "break Satan's grip" on a community, but how can we help new believers become power-filled spiritual warriors? Here are solid answers about controlling spirits, the spirit of harlotry in churches, violent men, the dangers of worshiping "worship" and much more.

Six Days

by Ken Ham

Discover how many evangelical leaders, willingly or unwittingly, are undermining the authority of God's Word by compromising the Bible in Genesis Learn how allowing for an old/universe of billions of years unlocks a door of compromise Heed the wake-up call to the Church to return to the authority of God's Word, beginning in Genesis. Today, most Bible colleges, seminaries, K-12 Christian schools, and now even parts of the homeschool movement do not accept the first eleven chapters of Genesis as literal history. They try to fit the supposed billions of years into Genesis, and some teach evolution as fact. Our churches are largely following suit. Ken Ham, international speaker and author on biblical authority, examines how compromise starting in Genesis, particularly in regard to the six days of creation and the earth's age, have filtered down from the Bible colleges and seminaries to pastors--and finally to parents and their children. This erosive legacy is seen in generations of young people leaving the Church--2/3 of them. Get the facts, discover God's truth, and help bring a new reformation to the Church by helping to call it back to the authority of God's Word.

The New Answers Book Volume 4

by Ken Ham

What about climate change? Is there a connection between dragon legends and dinosaurs? Is evolution the bloodiest religion ever? What about cavemen? What are the 10 best evidences for a young creation? The Answers series has been a powerful tool in equipping believers to share and defend their faith. Now the newest book in this landmark series takes on hot button topics like climate change, ancient man, and many more. Too many people have walked away from their faith because they sought answers for what seemed a contradiction in Christian belief and scientific teaching. For those who desire a deeper walk and a thriving faith in the face of a growing cultural adversity, now find the answers to questions you have or others may use to genetic engineering, this powerful team of apologists is able to inspire you and those you know who may not yet believe.

Why Jury Duty Matters

by Andrew Guthrie Ferguson

It's easy to forget how important the jury really is to America. The right to be a juror is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed to all eligible citizens. The right to trial by jury helped spark the American Revolution, was quickly adopted at the Constitutional Convention, and is the only right that appears in both the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. But for most of us, a jury summons is an unwelcome inconvenience. Who has time for jury duty? We have things to do. In Why Jury Duty Matters, Andrew Guthrie Ferguson reminds us that whether we like it or not, we are all constitutional actors. Jury duty provides an opportunity to reflect on that constitutional responsibility. Combining American history, constitutional law, and personal experience, the book engages citizens in the deeper meaning of jury service. Interweaving constitutional principles into the actual jury experience, this book is a handbook for those Americans who want to enrich the jury experience. It seeks to reconnect ordinary citizens to the constitutional character of a nation by focusing on the important, and largely ignored, democratic lessons of the jury. Jury duty is a shared American tradition. It connects people across class and race, creates habits of focus and purpose, and teaches values of participation, equality, and deliberation. We know that juries are important for courts, but we don't know that jury service is important for democracy. This book inspires us to re-examine the jury experience and act on the constitutional principles that guide our country before, during, and after jury service.

Citizenship Rites

by Ilene Feinman

In the United States, the question of women in the armed services has been continuously and hotly debated. Among feminists, two fundamentally differing views of women in the military have developed. Feminist antimilitarists tell us that militarism and patriarchy have together pressed women into second class citizenship. Meanwhile, feminist soldiers and their advocates regard martial service as women's right and responsibility and the ticket to first class citizenship. Citizenship Rites investigates what is at stake for women in these debates. Exploring the perspectives of both feminist antimilitarists and feminist soldiers, Ilene Feinman situates the current combat controversy within the context of the sea change in United States politics since the 1970s-from ERA debates over drafting women to recent representations of military women such as the film GI Jane. Drawing on congressional testimony, court cases, feminist and antiracist political discourse, and antimilitarist activism, Feinman addresses our pressing need for an analysis of women's increasing inclusion in the armed forces while providing a provocative investigation of what this changing role means for women and society alike.

Growing Old in El Barrio

by Judith Noemi Freidenberg

What is daily life like for an elderly person whose income barely covers basic needs? How is life constrained if that person is living within the same marginal enclave to which she first migrated decades ago? How does the implementation of national policies and programs affect the daily life of those growing old in Spanish Harlem? In Growing Old in El Barrio, Judith Freidenberg addresses these questions by examining the life-course and daily experiences of the elderly residents of El Barrio. She interweaves the economy of immigrant neighborhoods with the personal experiences of Latinos aging in Harlem--such as Doña Emiliana, who lived in Spanish Harlem from her migration in 1948 to her death in 1995. Freidenberg further links policy issues to social issues critical to the daily lives of this population. Combining extensive fieldwork interviews with historical and demographic population data, Growing Old in El Barrio paints an ethnographic picture of aging in Spanish Harlem and illustrates the emergence of New York as a city divided by ethnicity and class.

Planned Obsolescence

by Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Choice's Outstanding Academic Title list for 2013Academic institutions are facing a crisis in scholarly publishing at multiple levels: presses are stressed as never before, library budgets are squeezed, faculty are having difficulty publishing their work, and promotion and tenure committees are facing a range of new ways of working without a clear sense of how to understand and evaluate them. Planned Obsolescence is both a provocation to think more broadly about the academy's future and an argument for reconceiving that future in more communally-oriented ways. Facing these issues head-on, Kathleen Fitzpatrick focuses on the technological changes--especially greater utilization of internet publication technologies, including digital archives, social networking tools, and multimedia--necessary to allow academic publishing to thrive into the future. But she goes further, insisting that the key issues that must be addressed are social and institutional in origin. Springing from original research as well as Fitzpatrick's own hands-on experiments in new modes of scholarly communication through MediaCommons, the digital scholarly network she co-founded, Planned Obsolescence explores these aspects of scholarly work, as well as issues surrounding the preservation of digital scholarship and the place of publishing within the structure of the contemporary university. Written in an approachable style designed to bring administrators and scholars into a conversation, Planned Obsolescence explores both symptom and cure to ensure that scholarly communication will remain relevant in the digital future. Check out the author's website here. For more information on MediaCommons, click here. Listen to an interview with the author on The Critical Lede podcast here. Related Articles: "Do 'the Risky Thing' in Digital Humanities" - Chronicle of Higher Education "Academic Publishing and Zombies" - Inside Higher Ed

Japan's International Agenda

by Yoichi Funabashi

What is Japan's political role in the world? Over the past decade, Japan has been increasingly pressured to assume more financial and political burdens globally. Its foreign policy has thus evolved in a piecemeal manner, around the question of managing foreign pressures. To date, policy has been largely developed by bureaucrats, who are traditionally responsible for public policy in Japan. The lack of a clear set of foreign policy objectives, however, has made it impossible for the bureaucracy to play its previous role as the arbiter of public interests. Today, there is increased recognition that in a more pluralistic society, nongovernmental public policy specialists are needed to provide a more integrated and longer-term vision of foreign policy goals. This book represents the first private and non- governmental indigenous effort to stimulate public debate of Japanese foreign policy. Japan's International Agenda makes a distinctive contribution to the foreign policy debate. Its contributors are younger Japanese non-governmental foreign affairs specialists, each with considerable international experience and committed to the belief that significant policy reforms are essential. As a statement of Japan's ability to contribute substantially to international policy debates on such broad questions of security and trade and development, Japan's International Agenda will enable scholars and experts in North America, Europe, the Asia-Pacific region, and elsewhere to engage in substantive dialogue on critical public policy issues with their Japanese counterparts. This book represents the first private, indigenous effort to stimulate public debate of Japanese foreign policy. Its contributors are young Japanese foreign affairs specialists, each with considerable international experience and a commitment to the belief that significant policy reforms are essential.

My Three Mothers and Other Passions

by Sophie Freud

Sophie Freud- author, teacher, social worker, mother, daughter, and grand-daughter of Sigmund Freud-here offers, for the first time, a candid portrait of her struggles in her own life. Blessed and cursed with the legacy of a famous family, Dr. Freud has negotiated her way from a blissful childhood in Vienna, to Paris, to Radcliff College, to her present-day life as on one of the most respected teachers in her field. My Three Mothers and Other Passions is a remarkable story about a remarkable woman, and Dr. Freud explores with us openly and engagingly the many experiences of her life.

Race Consciousness

by Judith Jackson Fossett

Bringing together an impressive range of new scholarship deeply informed both by the legacies of the past and current intellectual trends, Race Consciousness is a veritable Who's Who of the next generation of scholars of African-American studies. This collection of original essays, representing the latest work in African-American studies, covers such trenchant topics as the culture of America as a culture of race, the politics of gender and sexuality, legacies of slavery and colonialism, crime and welfare politics, and African-American cultural studies. In his entertaining Foreword to the volume, Robin D. G. Kelley presents a startling vision of the state of African-American Studies--and the world in general--in the year 2095. Arnold Rampersad and Nell Irvin Painter, chart the different disciplinary and theoretical paths African-American Studies has taken since the 19th century in their Preface to the volume.

Mastering Slavery

by Jennifer B. Fleischner

In Mastering Slavery, Fleischner draws upon a range of disciplines, including psychoanalysis, African-American studies, literary theory, social history, and gender studies, to analyze how the slave narratives--in their engagement with one another and with white women's antislavery fiction--yield a far more amplified and complicated notion of familial dynamics and identity than they have generally been thought to reveal. Her study exposes the impact of the entangled relations among master, mistress, slave adults and slave children on the sense of identity of individual slave narrators. She explores the ways in which our of the social, psychological, biological--and literary--crossings and disruptions slavery engendered, these autobiographers created mixed, dynamic narrative selves.

Please Don't Wish Me a Merry Christmas

by Stephen M. Feldman

Whether in the form of Christmas trees in town squares or prayer in school, fierce disputes over the separation of church and state have long bedeviled this country. Both decried and celebrated, this principle is considered by many, for right or wrong, a defining aspect of American national identity. Nearly all discussions regarding the role of religion in American life build on two dominant assumptions: first, the separation of church and state is a constitutional principle that promotes democracy and equally protects the religious freedom of all Americans, especially religious outgroups; and second, this principle emerges as a uniquely American contribution to political theory. In Please Don't Wish Me a Merry Christmas, Stephen M. Feldman challenges both these assumptions. He argues that the separation of church and state primarily manifests and reinforces Christian domination in American society. Furthermore, Feldman reveals that the separation of church and state did not first arise in the United States. Rather, it has slowly evolved as a political and religious development through western history, beginning with the initial appearance of Christianity as it contentiously separated from Judaism.In tracing the historical roots of the separation of church and state within the Western world, Feldman begins with the Roman Empire and names Augustine as the first political theorist to suggest the idea. Feldman next examines how the roles of church and state variously merged and divided throughout history, during the Crusades, the Italian Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the British Civil War and Restoration, the early North American colonies, nineteenth-century America, and up to the present day. In challenging the dominant story of the separation of church and state, Feldman interprets the development of Christian social power vis--vis the state and religious minorities, particularly the prototypical religious outgroup, Jews.

Notes of a Racial Caste Baby

by Bryan K. Fair

The Constitution of the United States, writes Bryan Fair, was a series of compromises between white male propertyholders: Southern planters and Northern merchants. At the heart of their deals was a clear race-conscious intent to place the interests of whites above those of blacks. In this provocative and important book, Fair, the eighth of ten children born to a single mother on public assistance in an Ohio ghetto, combines two histories--America's and his own- -to offer a compelling defense of affirmative action. How can it be, Fair asks, that, after hundreds of years of racial apartheid during which whites were granted 100% quotas to almost all professions, we have now convinced ourselves that, after a few decades of remedial affirmative action, the playing field is now level? Centuries of racial caste, he argues, cannot be swept aside in a few short years. Fair ambitiously surveys the most common arguments for and against affirmative action. He argues that we must distinguish between America in the pre-Civil Rights Movement era--when the law of the land was explicitly anti-black--and today's affirmative action policies--which are decidedly not anti- white. He concludes that the only just and effective way in which to account for America's racial past and to negotiate current racial quagmires is to embrace a remedial affirmative action that relies neither on quotas nor fiery rhetoric, but one which takes race into account alongside other pertinent factors. Championing the model of diversity on which the United States was purportedly founded, Fair serves up a personal and persuasive account of why race-conscious policies are the most effective way to end de facto segregation and eliminate racial caste. Table of Contents A Note to the Reader Acknowledgments Preface: Telling Stories Recasting Remedies as Diseases Color-Blind Justice The Design of This Book Pt. 1. A Personal Narrative Not White Enough Dee Black Columbus Racial Poverty Man-Child Colored Matters Coded Schools Busing Going Home Equal Opportunity The Character of Color Diversity as One Factor The Deception of Color Blindness Pt. 2. White Privilege and Black Despair: The Origins of Racial Caste in America The Declaration of Inferiority Marginal Americans Inventing American Slavery The Road to Constitutional Caste Losing Second-Class Citizenship Reconstruction and Sacrifice Separate and Unequal The Color Line Critiquing Color Blindness Pt. 3. The Constitutionality of Remedial Affirmative Action The Origins of Remedial Affirmative Action The Court of Last Resort The Invention of Reverse Discrimination The Politics of Affirmative Action: Myth or Reality? Racial Realism Eliminating Caste Afterword Notes Index

Concepts of Earth Science & Chemistry Parent Lesson Plan

by John Hudson Tiner

Concepts of Earth and Chemistry Course Description This is the suggested course sequence that allows one core area of science to be studied per semester. You can change the sequence of the semesters per the needs or interests of your student; materials for each semester are independent of one another to allow flexibility. Semester 1: Earth Blending a creationism perspective of history with definitions of terms and identification of famous explorers, scientists, etc., this book gives students an excellent initial knowledge of people and places, encouraging them to continue their studies in-depth. Semester 2: Chemistry Chemistry is an amazing branch of science that affects us every day, yet few people realize it, or even give it much thought. Without chemistry, there would be nothing made of plastic, there would be no rubber tires, no tin cans, no televisions, no microwave ovens, or something as simple as wax paper. This book presents an exciting and intriguing tour through the realm of chemistry as each chapter unfolds with facts and stories about the discoveries of discoverers. Find out why pure gold is not used for jewelry or coins. Join Humphry Davy as he made many chemical discoveries, and learn how they shortened his life. See how people in the 1870s could jump over the top of the Washington Monument. Exploring the World of Chemistry brings science to life and is a wonderful learning tool with many illustrations and biographical information.

Exploring the World of Astronomy

by John Hudson Tiner

Discover how to find constellations like the Royal Family group or those near Orion the Hunter from season to season throughout the year How to use the Sea of Crises as your guidepost for further explorations on the moon's surface Investigate deep sky wonders, extra solar planets, and beyond as God's creation comes alive! Think you know all there is to know about our solar system? You might be surprised at some of the amazing details that you find when you begin Exploring the World of Astronomy! From the rugged surface of the moon to the distant and mysterious constellations, this book provides an exciting educational tour for students of different ages and skill levels. Learn about a blue moon, the 400-year storm on Jupiter, and what is meant by "the zone of life." Discussion ideas, questions, and research opportunities help expand this great resource on observational astronomy into an unforgettable educational course for middle school to high school students!

Showing 5,326 through 5,350 of 6,979 results


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