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Strategic Intuition

by William Duggan

How "Aha!" really happens.When do you get your best ideas? You probably answer "At night," or "In the shower," or "Stuck in traffic." You get a flash of insight. Things come together in your mind. You connect the dots. You say to yourself, "Aha! I see what to do." Brain science now reveals how these flashes of insight happen. It's a special form of intuition. We call it strategic intuition, because it gives you an idea for action-a strategy.Brain science tells us there are three kinds of intuition: ordinary, expert, and strategic. Ordinary intuition is just a feeling, a gut instinct. Expert intuition is snap judgments, when you instantly recognize something familiar, the way a tennis pro knows where the ball will go from the arc and speed of the opponent's racket. (Malcolm Gladwell wrote about this kind of intuition in Blink.) The third kind, strategic intuition, is not a vague feeling, like ordinary intuition. Strategic intuition is a clear thought. And it's not fast, like expert intuition. It's slow. That flash of insight you had last night might solve a problem that's been on your mind for a month. And it doesn't happen in familiar situations, like a tennis match. Strategic intuition works in new situations. That's when you need it most.Everyone knows you need creative thinking, or entrepreneurial thinking, or innovative thinking, or strategic thinking to succeed in the modern world. All these kinds of thinking happen through flashes of insight& mdash;strategic intuition. And now that we know how it works, you can learn to do it better. That's what this book is about. Over the past ten years, William Duggan has conducted pioneering research on strategic intuition and for the past three years has taught a popular course at Columbia Business School on the subject. He now gives us this eye-opening book that shows how strategic intuition lies at the heart of great achievements throughout human history: the scientific and computer revolutions, women's suffrage, the civil rights movement, modern art, microfinance in poor countries, and more. Considering the achievements of people and organizations, from Bill Gates to Google, Copernicus to Martin Luther King, Picasso to Patton, you'll never think the same way about strategy again.Three kinds of strategic ideas apply to human achievement:* Strategic analysis, where you study the situation you face* Strategic intuition, where you get a creative idea for what to do* Strategic planning, where you work out the details of how to do it.There is no shortage of books about strategic analysis and strategic planning. This new book by William Duggan is the first full treatment of strategic intuition. It's the missing piece of the strategy puzzle that makes essential reading for anyone interested in achieving more in any field of human endeavor.

The Once And Future Turing

by Andrew Hodges S. Barry Cooper

Alan Turing (1912-1954) made seminal contributions to mathematical logic, computation, computer science, artificial intelligence, cryptography and theoretical biology. In this volume, outstanding scientific thinkers take a fresh look at the great range of Turing's contributions, on how the subjects have developed since his time, and how they might develop still further. The contributors include Martin Davis, J. M. E. Hyland, Andrew R. Booker, Ueli Maurer, Kanti V. Mardia, S. Barry Cooper, Stephen Wolfram, Christof Teuscher, Douglas Richard Hofstadter, Philip K. Maini, Thomas E. Woolley, Eamonn A. Gaffney, Ruth E. Baker, Richard Gordon, Stuart Kauffman, Scott Aaronson, Solomon Feferman, P. D. Welch and Roger Penrose. These specially commissioned essays will provoke and engross the reader who wishes to understand better the lasting significance of one of the twentieth century's deepest thinkers.

Variational Methods for Nonlocal Fractional Problems

by Giovanni Molica Bisci Vicentiu D. Radulescu Raffaella Servadei

This book provides researchers and graduate students with a thorough introduction to the variational analysis of nonlinear problems described by nonlocal operators. The authors give a systematic treatment of the basic mathematical theory and constructive methods for these classes of nonlinear equations, plus their application to various processes arising in the applied sciences. The equations are examined from several viewpoints, with the calculus of variations as the unifying theme. Part I begins the book with some basic facts about fractional Sobolev spaces. Part II is dedicated to the analysis of fractional elliptic problems involving subcritical nonlinearities, via classical variational methods and other novel approaches. Finally, Part III contains a selection of recent results on critical fractional equations. A careful balance is struck between rigorous mathematics and physical applications, allowing readers to see how these diverse topics relate to other important areas, including topology, functional analysis, mathematical physics, and potential theory.

An Introduction to the Theory of Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces

by Vern I. Paulsen Mrinal Raghupathi

Reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces have developed into an important tool in many areas, especially statistics and machine learning, and they play a valuable role in complex analysis, probability, group representation theory, and the theory of integral operators. This unique text offers a unified overview of the topic, providing detailed examples of applications, as well as covering the fundamental underlying theory, including chapters on interpolation and approximation, Cholesky and Schur operations on kernels, and vector-valued spaces. Self-contained and accessibly written, with exercises at the end of each chapter, this unrivalled treatment of the topic serves as an ideal introduction for graduate students across mathematics, computer science, and engineering, as well as a useful reference for researchers working in functional analysis or its applications.

Passive Imaging With Ambient Noise

by Josselin Garnier George Papanicolaou

Waves generated by opportunistic or ambient noise sources and recorded by passive sensor arrays can be used to image the medium through which they travel. Spectacular results have been obtained in seismic interferometry, which open up new perspectives in acoustics, electromagnetics, and optics. The authors present, for the first time in book form, a self-contained and unified account of correlation-based and ambient noise imaging. In order to facilitate understanding of the core material, they also address a number of related topics in conventional sensor array imaging, wave propagation in random media, and high-frequency asymptotics for wave propagation. Taking a multidisciplinary approach, the book uses mathematical tools from probability, partial differential equations and asymptotic analysis, combined with the physics of wave propagation and modelling of imaging modalities. Suitable for applied mathematicians and geophysicists, it is also accessible to graduate students in applied mathematics, physics, and engineering.

Incarceration Nation

by Peter K. Enns

The rise of mass incarceration in the United States is one of the most critical outcomes of the last half-century. Incarceration Nation offers the most compelling explanation of this outcome to date. This book combines in-depth analysis of Barry Goldwater and Richard Nixon's presidential campaigns with sixty years of data analysis. The result is a sophisticated and highly accessible picture of the rise of mass incarceration. In contrast to conventional wisdom, Peter K. Enns shows that during the 1960s, 70s, 80s, and 90s, politicians responded to an increasingly punitive public by pushing policy in a more punitive direction. The book also argues that media coverage of rising crime rates helped fuel the public's punitiveness. Equally as important, a decline in public punitiveness in recent years offers a critical window into understanding current bipartisan calls for criminal justice reform.

Survival and Conscience: From the Shadows of Nazi Germany to the Jewish Boat to Gaza

by Mark Braverman Lillian Rosengarten

In 1936, Lillian Rosengarten and her family fled Nazi Germany for New York. But even there, the legacy of the Nazis' brutality continued to cast a shadow over her family for many decades. In Survival and Conscience, Rosengarten describes how she faced those challenges within her own life while gaining empathy for the struggles of others, realizing that all forms of extreme nationalism and hatred must be vigorously resisted. Like many other refugees from Nazism and survivors of the Holocaust, Rosengarten became a strong advocate of Palestinian rights. In 2010, she joined the "Jewish Boat to Gaza," designed to break Israel's punishing blockade of the Gaza Strip. Though the Israeli Navy obstructed their humanitarian mission, nothing can stop Lillian Rosengarten's inspiring story of love, self-discovery, and activism.

Karen

by Marie Killilea

Winner of two Christopher Awards and the Golden Kite Award: This national bestseller is the true story of a girl with cerebral palsy and the family that wouldn't give up on her In 1940, when Karen Killilea was born three months premature and developed cerebral palsy, doctors encouraged her parents to put her in an institution and forget about her. At the time, cerebral palsy was considered untreatable, and institutionalization was the only recourse. However, in a revolutionary act of faith and love, the Killileas never gave up hope that Karen could lead a successful life.Karen is the profound and heartwarming account of an extraordinary young girl's triumph over seemingly insurmountable odds. Written by Karen's mother, Marie, this larger-than-life story tells of a family's courage, patience, and struggle in the face of extreme difficulty. It is also a story of their achievements: Marie's activism spread awareness of the mistreatment of disabled people in America and lead to the formation of multiple foundations, including United Cerebral Palsy. Her greatest reward, however, was also her greatest miracle: Karen herself.

Something Light

by Margery Sharp

In 1950s London, a career girl decides it's high time she snared herself a husband, in Margery Sharp's high-spirited New York Times-bestselling novel Professional dog photographer Louisa Datchett is indiscriminately fond of men. And men take shocking advantage of her good nature when they need their problems listened to, their socks washed, their prescriptions filled, and employment found. But by the age of thirty, Louisa is tired of constantly being dispatched to the scene of some masculine disaster. It's all well and good to be an independent woman--and certainly better than being a "timid Victorian wife")--but the time has come for her to marry, and marry well. With admirable discipline and the dedication she displays in any endeavor involving men, Louisa sets out on her romantic quest. This vastly entertaining chronicle of the life of a single woman who is both of her time and ahead of it is Margery Sharp at her witty, satirical best.

Y.T.

by Alexei Nikitin

"I did remember: Whenever we moved our troops, advanced or retreated, we had written 'your turn,' usually just 'Y.T.,' to confirm that we'd made our final decision . . . Looking at the letters now, I felt something in the world change forever." Ukraine, 1984. The Soviet Union is creaking toward collapse, and a group of bored radiophysics students devise a strategy game to keep themselves entertained. But war games are no joke, and no sooner does their game get underway than the KGB pulls the students in for questioning. Eventually they're released, but they remain marked men. Twenty years later, capitalism is in full swing when one member of the group, Davidov, receives an e-mail with a familiar ultimatum attached, signed, eerily, "Y.T." Someone has revived the game, but it's not any of his friends from the university . . . and the consequences now feel more real than ever. The first English-language publication of a major Russian novelist, Y.T. follows an innocent-seeming game to its darkest places, and the result is a disturbing vision of war and tyranny. Y.T. is a wildly inventive novel that explores the banality deep in the heart of a paranoid totalitarian state.

The Nutmeg Tree

by Margery Sharp

Set in 1930s France, Margery Sharp's witty, warm-hearted novel tells the story of a free-spirited mother who is reunited with her very proper daughter after sixteen years, when her daughter asks her to inspect her fiancé Julia Packett has barely laid eyes on her daughter, Susan, since leaving her with her proper, well-heeled in-laws after her husband was killed in World War I. Now thirty-seven, her lack of prospects hasn't dimmed her spirit or appetite for life. So when Susan asks her to come to France for the summer to persuade her grandmother to allow her to marry her fiancé, Julia sets sail with the noblest intentions of being a paragon of motherhood. But at her mother-in-law's vacation villa in Haute Savoie, Julia sees that her priggish but lovely daughter is completely mismatched with a man who is just like herself: a charming, clever playboy. The arrival of Susan's legal guardian, the distinguished Sir William Waring, further complicates the situation. Soon Julia's efforts to pass herself off as a lady and secure her daughter's happiness spin out of control, leading to romantic entanglements and madcap adventures that challenge preconceived notions about the ultimate compatibility of any two people who fall in love.

The Innocents

by Margery Sharp

Margery Sharp's most poignant novel, set during World War II and filled with her trademark wit and warmth, tells the story of the powerful bond forged between a British spinster and the unusual little girl left in her care As the threat of war looms, Cecilia and Rab Guthrie leave their young daughter, Antoinette, with a spinster friend in East Anglia, England, so they can enjoy a holiday on the continent. Three-year-old Antoinette doesn't speak, is inordinately clumsy, and must always be spoken to in quiet tones or else she becomes frightened. Then the outbreak of World War II forces Antoinette's parents to return to America without their daughter. As the years pass, a relationship grows between the unmarried, childless woman and her innocent charge. Slowly Antoinette begins to change, becoming less frightened and delighting in objects and words, as does her foster mother. But when the war is over, Cecilia comes to collect her daughter--and take her away from the only person who has every really understood her. An insightful, unsentimental novel about the challenges of raising a mentally challenged child in 1940s England, The Innocents sweeps readers along to its shocking conclusion.

The Gypsy in the Parlour

by Margery Sharp

In Victorian England, a glamorous, mysterious young woman overturns the lives of a traditional Devonshire farm family, in Margery Sharp's humorous, heartwarming New York Times-bestselling novel On a farm in Devonshire, during a long hot summer, three women await the arrival of a fourth. The corseted, petticoated Sylvesters are no ordinary females. They are as fair-tempered as they are big and strong, the wives of modestly prosperous farmers who can stand up to the heat of a parlor--their pride and joy--as well as a scorching harvest field. And the men they chose for husbands are their equals. Today is cause for celebration: The youngest Sylvester brother is arriving with his bride-to-be. But Fanny Davis will change all their lives. The slender, petite woman is given to unnamed ailments and is full of secrets. Where did she come from? What does she really want from the bumpkin she agreed to marry? None of the Sylvester ladies can imagine the tempest that will strike their peaceful farm when the deadly Miss Davis gets to work.

The Flowering Thorn

by Margery Sharp

A Jazz Age socialite impulsively adopts an orphaned boy in this humorous, heartwarming tale from New York Times-bestselling author Margery Sharp In 1929 London, twenty-eight-year-old Lesley Frewen lives a privileged, cultured life. But one thing is missing: love. When her aunt's female companion dies suddenly, leaving behind a young son, Lesley decides on a whim to adopt four-year-old Patrick--which is odd, because she doesn't have any particular affection for children. As soon as Patrick moves in with her, Lesley gets to work using her connections to enroll him in the finest boys' school. But she soon discovers that London is no place to raise a child. Relocating to the country, however, comes with its own set of daunting challenges. The tiny village of High Westover boasts a post office, a church, and a vicarage. There's an apple orchard and children for Patrick to play with, but Lesley can't imagine how she'll entertain her friends there. But life with Patrick will change her, bringing out her capacity to love and showing her the difference between pleasure and happiness.

Martha, Eric, and George

by Margery Sharp

After ten years, a successful painter returns to Paris and the son she left behind on her ex-lover's doorstep, in Margery Sharp's sparkling novel that features the artistic heroine of Martha in Paris After studying with le maître in Paris for a year, Martha returned to England to pursue her artistic destiny. Ten years later, she is an enormous success. But when she returns to Paris to attend an exhibition of her work, she must face some unfinished business she left behind: her ten-year-old son, George. Raised by his doting grandmother and his disinterested father, Eric, George attends his mother's exhibition and Martha realizes she may well have met her match--a member of the opposite sex who will not let her go through life unencumbered. Martha, Eric, and George is a witty and poignant novel about the indelible bond between mother and child, and the creative spark that can light up a life.

Martha in Paris

by Margery Sharp

A young woman sent to Paris to study painting learns lessons about life and love in Margery Sharp's sparkling novel that features the now-grown-up artistic little girl who first appeared in The Eye of Love Eighteen-year-old Martha is blessed with the opportunity of a lifetime: an all-expenses-paid trip to Paris to study where some of the world's greatest painters lived and worked. Despite her single-minded pursuit of creativity, she attracts an admirer in the City of Light. It isn't a debonair Frenchman who seduces her, but a homesick British bank clerk who offers her all the creature comforts of home. And when an unexpected complication arises, Martha deals with the consequences in her usual sensible, independent fashion. Witty, tender, and richly evocative of late 1940s Paris, Martha in Paris is a beguiling portrait of the artist as a young woman as she learns the facts of life.

The Eye of Love

by Margery Sharp

Margery Sharp's enchanting New York Times-bestselling novel about the profound ways that love can change our view of other people and the world around us Miss Dolores Diver and Harry Gibson have been passionately in love ever since they met at the Chelsea Arts Ball: He came as a brown paper parcel, she as a Spanish dancer. Only the eye of love could have transformed plain Dolores into a Spanish rose and stout Harry into the man of Dolores's dreams. But ten years later, during the Great Depression, Harry must marry his colleague's daughter in order to save his nearly bankrupt business. The course of true love never runs smoothly but with some inadvertent help from Dolores's keenly observant nine-year-old niece, Martha, Harry's grasping fiancée, and Dolores's calculating lodger, Harry might succeed in both averting financial ruin and reclaiming his beloved.

Cluny Brown

by Margery Sharp

An unconventional parlor maid upends the lives of an aristocratic family in New York Times-bestselling author Margery Sharp's delightful comedy of manners set in England before the onset of World War II Cluny Brown has committed an unforgivable sin: She refuses to know her place. Last week, she took herself to tea at the Ritz. Then she spent almost an entire day in bed eating oranges. To teach her discipline, her uncle, a plumber who has raised the orphaned Cluny since she was a baby, sends her into service to be a parlor maid at one of England's stately manor houses. At Friars Carmel in Devonshire, Cluny meets her employers: Sir Henry, the quintessential country squire, and Lady Carmel, who oversees the management of her home with unruffled calm. Their son, Andrew, newly returned from abroad with a Polish émigré writer friend, is certain that the world is once again on the brink of war. Then there's Andrew's beautiful fiancée and the priggish pharmacist. While everyone around her struggles to keep pace with a rapidly changing world, Cluny continues to be Cluny, transforming the lives of those around her with her infectious zest for life.

Britannia Mews

by Margery Sharp

With heartfelt drama, wit, and brilliant historical detail, this masterfully told family saga spans the Victorian era and World War II and features an unpredictable and passionate heroine who defies the English class system Around the corner from the elegant townhouses on Albion Place is Britannia Mews, a squalid neighborhood where servants and coachmen live. In 1875, it's no place for a young girl of fine breeding, but independent-minded Adelaide Culver is fascinated by what goes on there. Years later, Adelaide shocks her family when she falls in love with an impoverished artist and moves into the mews. But violence shatters Adelaide's dreams. In a dangerous new world, she must fend for herself--until she meets a charismatic stranger and her life takes a turn she never expected. A novel about social manners and mores reminiscent of Edith Wharton, this story of love, family, and the price one must pay for throwing off the shackles of convention is also a witty and incisive dissection of the "upstairs, downstairs" English class system of the last two centuries.

Gone to Soldiers

by Marge Piercy

Ten characters, from occupied France to the Pacific Theater and from the frontlines to the home front, are profoundly changed by the events of World War II in this New York Times bestseller Epic in scope, Marge Piercy's sweeping novel encompasses the wide range of people and places marked by the Second World War. Each of her ten narrators has a unique and compelling story that powerfully depicts his or her personality, desires, and fears. Special attention is given to the women of the war effort, like Bernice, who rebels against her domineering father to become a fighter pilot, and Naomi, a Parisian Jew sent to live with relatives in Detroit, whose twin sister, Jacqueline--still in France--joins the resistance against Nazi rule. The horrors of the concentration camps; the heroism of soldiers on the beaches of Okinawa, the skies above London, and the seas of the Mediterranean; the brilliance of code breakers; and the resilience of families waiting for the return of sons, brothers, and fathers are all conveyed through powerful, poignant prose that resonates beyond the page. Gone to Soldiers is a testament to the ordinary people, with their flaws and inner strife, who rose to defend liberty during the most extraordinary times.

Down the Darkest Street

by Alex Segura

PETE FERNANDEZ SHOULD BE DEAD.His life - professional and personal - is in ruins. His best friend is dead. His newspaper career is past tense. His ex is staying with him as her own marriage crumbles. On top of that, the former journalist finds himself in the eye of a dangerous storm; investigating a missing girl with an unexpected partner and inching closer and closer to a vicious, calculating killer cutting a swath of blood across Miami - while at the same time battling his own personal demons that refuse to be silenced.DOWN THE DARKEST STREET, the hard-boiled sequel to Alex Segura's acclaimed debut, SILENT CITY, tells a tale of redemption, survival and the sordid backstreets of Miami - while asking the question that many are too scared to answer: When faced with pure darkness, would you fold or fight?

The Closing of the Liberal Mind: How Groupthink and Intolerance Define the Left

by Kim R. Holmes

A former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State and currently a Distinguished Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, Kim R. Holmes surveys the state of liberalism in America today and finds that it is becoming its opposite-illiberalism-abandoning the precepts of open-mindedness and respect for individual rights, liberties, and the rule of law upon which the country was founded, and becoming instead an intolerant, rigidly dogmatic ideology that abhors dissent and stifles free speech. Tracing the new illiberalism historically to the radical Enlightenment, a movement that rejected the classic liberal ideas of the moderate Enlightenment that were prominent in the American Founding, Holmes argues that today's liberalism has forsaken its American roots, incorporating instead the authoritarian, anti-clerical, and anti-capitalist prejudices of the radical and largely European Left. The result is a closing of the American liberal mind. Where once freedom of speech and expression were sacrosanct, today liberalism employs speech codes, trigger warnings, boycotts, and shaming rituals to stifle freedom of thought, expression, and action. It is no longer appropriate to call it liberalism at all, but illiberalism-a set of ideas in politics, government, and popular culture that increasingly reflects authoritarian and even anti-democratic values, and which is devising new strategies of exclusiveness to eliminate certain ideas and people from the political process. Although illiberalism has always been a temptation for American liberals, lurking in the radical fringes of the Left, it is today the dominant ideology of progressive liberal circles. This makes it a new danger not only to the once venerable tradition of liberalism, but to the American nation itself, which needs a viable liberal tradition that pursues social and economic equality while respecting individual liberties.

Holy Lands: Reviving Pluralism in the Middle East

by Nicolas Pelham

When the Ottoman Empire fell apart, colonial powers drew straight lines on the map to create a new region - the Middle East - made up of new countries filled with multiple religious sects and ethnicities. Syria, Iraq and Lebanon, for example, all contained a kaleidoscope of Sunnis, Kurds, Shias, Circassians, Druze and Armenians. Israel was the first to establish a state in which one sect and ethnicity dominated others. Sixty years later, others are following suit, like the Kurds in northern Iraq, the Sunnis with ISIS, the Alawites in Syria, and the Shias in Baghdad and northern Yemen.The rise of irredentist states threatens to condemn the region to decades of conflict along new communal fault lines. In this book, Economist correspondent and New York Review of Books contributor Nicolas Pelham looks at how and why the world's most tolerant region degenerated into its least tolerant. Pelham reports from cities in Israel, Kurdistan, Iraq and Syria on how triumphant sects treat their ethnic and sectarian minorities, and he searches for hope - for a possible path back to the beauty that the region used to and can still radiate.

Recovering Buddhism in Modern China

by Jan Kiely Jessup J. Brooks

Modern Chinese history told from a Buddhist perspective restores the vibrant, creative role of religion in postimperial China. It shows how urban Buddhist elites jockeyed for cultural dominance in the early Republican era, how Buddhist intellectuals reckoned with science, and how Buddhist media contributed to modern print cultures. It recognizes the political importance of sacred Buddhist relics and the complex processes through which Buddhists participated in and experienced religious suppression under Communist rule. Today, urban and rural communities alike engage with Buddhist practices to renegotiate class, gender, and kinship relations in post-Mao China.Using fresh archival and primary sources, along with extensive ethnographic research, this volume vividly portrays these events and more, recasting Buddhism as a critical factor in China's twentieth-century development. Each chapter connects a moment in Buddhist history to a significant theme in Chinese history, creating a new narrative of Buddhism's involvement in the emergence of urban modernity, the practice of international diplomacy, the mobilization for total war, and other transformations of state, society, and culture. Working across an extraordinary thematic range, the book reincorporates Buddhism into the formative processes and distinctive character of Chinese history.

Rules for Werewolves

by Kirk Lynn

In the tradition of Colson Whitehead's Zone One, a visionary debut novel about shelter, escape, family, violence, and dumpster-diving It's the story of a restless group of young squatters. They've run away from their families and their pasts, questing after knowledge of their most wild selves, roaming the half-empty suburbs of America, occupying the homes of the foreclosed or vacationing, never staying in one place long enough to attract attention, while shoplifting beer at the local Speedy Stop. They're building a new society with new laws, and no one will stand in their way. But utopias are hard work, and as Rules for Werewolves unfolds, these young revolutionaries discover that it's much easier to break laws than to enforce them. Narrated in the shifting perspectives of the pack, Rules for Werewolves follows a community of drifters on the move, who seek a life in a wilderness that, by definition, has no room for them, and a freedom for which they may not be entirely prepared. Kirk Lynn's debut novel is a hilarious and deeply moving story of people trying--and failing--to create a new life. At once a fractured fairy tale and a haunting vision of American disaffection, Rules for Werewolves marks the arrival of a fierce new talent.From the Hardcover edition.

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