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Showing 5,826 through 5,850 of 16,760 results

Crome Yellow

by Aldous Huxley

A witty recounting of a house party, wherein Huxley satirises the fads and fashions of the time--we hear the history of the house 'Crome' from Henry Wimbush, its owner and self-appointed historian; apocalypse is prophesied, virginity is lost, and inspirational aphorisms are gained in a trance. The protagonist, Denis Stone, tries to capture it all in poetry and is disappointed in love.

What Maisie Knew

by Henry James

The story of the sensitive daughter of divorced and irresponsible parents, What Maisie Knew has great contemporary relevance as an unflinching account of a wildly dysfunctional family. The book is also a masterly technical achievement by James, as it follows the title character from earliest childhood to precocious maturity.

The Life and Opinions of Tristram Sha

by Laurence Sterne

Ostensibly Tristram's narration of his life story, one of the central jokes of the novel is that the main character cannot explain anything simply without making explanatory diversions to add context and colour to his tale, to the extent that we do not even reach Tristram's own birth until Volume III. Most of the action is concerned with domestic upsets or comic misunderstandings, which find humour in the opposing temperaments. In between such events, Tristram as narrator finds himself discoursing at length on sexual practices, insults, the influence of one's name, noses, as well as explorations of obstetrics, siege warfare and philosophy, as he struggles to marshall his material and finish the story of his life.

Martin Eden

by Jack London

London has lost nothing in power. He has gained in sweetness. There is something brutally strong in Martin Eden. Then there is a gentler background. Someone says Martin is London's self. Maybe in part. Maybe wholly. Martin Eden is concretely explicit and yet potently symbolistic. Here was a man who undertook to civilize himself and only half succeeded. And here also a woman who undertook to uncivilize herself, only half succeeded. How the spirit grew in Martin, and how the flesh grew in Ruth, will bear looked at frankly from both sides.

Martin Chuzzlewit

by Charles Dickens

Considered the last of Dickens' picaresque novels, Martin Chuzzlewit was released to the public in monthly installments. Sales of the monthly parts were disappointing, so Dickens changed the plot to send the title character to America. This satirical twist portrays America as a near wilderness, with pockets of civilization populated by deceptive, self-promoting hucksters.

Far From the Madding Crowd

by Thomas Hardy

Bathsheba Everdene, living in the quiet rural village of Weatherbury, is indeed disrupted by the 'madding crowd'. After shunning the first man to love her, the shepherd Gabriel Oak, she is courted by two others: the lonely and repressed farmer Boldwood, and the charming but faithless Sergeant Troy.

Tono-Bungay

by H. G. Wells

A semi-autobiographical satire of Edwardian advertising and patent-medicines.

Quo Vadis

by Henryk Sienkiewicz

A love story set in first-century Rome, in which the early Christians struggle against the might of the pagan Roman Empire. Translated from the Polish by Jeremiah Curtin.

The House on the Borderland

by William Hope Hodgson

A classic novel that bridges the gap between late 19th century British works in the supernatural or fantastic vein, and modern horror fiction. Listed as one of H.P. Lovecraft's favorite works.

New Grub Street

by George Gissing

This portrait of toilers in late-nineteenth-century London's literary world depicts abject professional, personal, and marital disappointment -- and the rise of one man who maneuvers to snatch the glittering prizes. Absorbing, ironic, and often extremely (if darkly) funny.

A Tale of a Tub

by Jonathan Swift

A Tale of a Tub is one of the major works by the author of the celebrated Gulliver's Travels and is considered by many critics as one of the finest satires of the English tongue. The book's structure is divided into two entities: A tale and a series of digressions that have no relationship with the main tale. As long as the tale is concerned, it centers on three brothers named Peter, Martin and Jack, who represent respectively the three branches of Western Christianity: The Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church and other dissenting protestants such as Quakers, Presbyterians, etc. The narrative symbolically speaks about a will left by their father along with three coats that they have to cherish and maintain as they are. Yet, they do the opposite and make certain changes to their coats from the very beginning. Generally, Swift starts by overtly parodying religious excesses and bigotry to come to satirizing human nature in general and its tendency towards pride, credulity, hypocrisy and enthusiasm. The numerous digressions Swift embeds in the narrative are often related to literature, theology, human behavior and politics. Since religion and the State were closely intertwined at his time, Swift's work caused him serious problems among both churchmen and political rulers and greatly affected his reputation as a writer.

Sister Carrie

by Theodore Dreiser

The story of a woman who flees country life for Chicago, Illinois and falls into a wayward life of sin. One of the most important novels America has ever produced, it ruthlessly exposes the hypocrisy and meanness of middle-class standards, and establishes a new tradition in literary realism.

The Fall of the House of Usher

by Edgar Allan Poe

The Fall of the House of Usher By Edgar Allan Poe "The Fall of the House of Usher" is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. The story begins with the unnamed narrator arriving at the house of his friend, Roderick Usher, having received a letter from him in a distant part of the country complaining of an illness and asking for his help. Although Poe wrote this short story before the invention of modern psychological science, Roderick's condition can be described according to its terminology. It includes a form of sensory overload known as hyperesthesia (hypersensitivity to light, sounds, smells, and tastes), hypochondria (an excessive preoccupation or worry about having a serious illness), and acute anxiety. It is revealed that Roderick's twin sister, Madeline, is also ill and falls into cataleptic, deathlike trances. The narrator is impressed with Roderick's paintings, and attempts to cheer him by reading with him and listening to his improvised musical compositions on the guitar. Roderick sings "The Haunted Palace", then tells the narrator that he believes the house he lives in to be alive, and that this sentience arises from the arrangement of the masonry and vegetation surrounding it.

The Collected Works Of Jules Verne

by Jules Verne

This collection includes Jules Verne's greatest works. Included is: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, A Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the World in Eighty Days, The Mysterious Island, From the Earth to the Moon, Round the Moon, A Voyage in a Balloon, Doctor Ox's Experiment, Master Zacharius, A Drama in the Air, A Winter Amid the Ice, Ascent of Mont Blanc, An Antarctic Mystery, Dick Sand; or, A Captain at Fifteen, Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon, Facing the Flag, Five Weeks in a Balloon, Godfrey Morgan, The English at the North Pole, The Field of Ice, In Search of the Castaways, Michael Strogoff, Off on a Comet, Robur the Conqueror, The Adventures of a Special Correspondent, The Blockade Runners, The Fur Country, The Master of the World, The Pearl of LIma, The Secret of the Island, The Survivors of the Chancellor, The Underground City, The Waif of the Cynthia, Ticket No. 9262, Topsy Turvy, In The Year 2889.

The Communist Manifesto

by Karl Marx

One of the world's most influential political manuscripts. Commissioned by the Communist League and written by communist theorists Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, it laid out the League's purposes and program. It presents an analytical approach to the class struggle (historical and present) and the problems of capitalism, rather than a prediction of communism's potential future forms.

Barchester Towers

by Anthony Trollope

The old bishop dies, the archdeacon, Dr. Grantly fails to succeed him and a new bishop, Dr. Proudie is appointed. Dr. Grantly gains a worthy foe, not the new bishop but his wife, Mrs. Proudie, strict sabatarian and power behind the Episcopal throne together with the bishop's chaplain, Mr. Slope.

Where Angels Fear to Tread

by E. M. Forster

Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905) is a novel by E. M. Forster, originally entitled Monteriano. The title comes from a line in Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism: "For fools rush in where angels fear to tread".

English Literature: Its History and Significance for the Life of the English-Speaking World

by William J. Long

This book, which presents the whole splendid history of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the close of the Victorian Era, has three specific aims. The first is to create or to encourage in every student the desire to read the best books, and to know literature itself rather than what has been written about literature. The second is to interpret literature both personally and historically, that is, to show how a great book generally reflects not only the author's life and thought but also the spirit of the age and the ideals of the nation's history. The third aim is to show, by a study of each successive period, how our literature has steadily developed from its first simple songs and stories to its present complexity in prose and poetry.

Dombey and Son

by Charles Dickens

Paul Dombey is a heartless London merchant who runs his domestic affairs as he runs his business. In the tight orbit of his daily life there is no room for dealing with emotions because emotion has no market value. In his son he sees the future of his firm and the continuation of his name, while he neglects his affectionate daughter, until he decides to get rid of her beloved, a lowly clerk. But Dombey's weakness is his pride, and he falls prey to the treacherous flattery of others. Combining an intricate plot, vivid language, and Dickens's customary social commentary, Dombey and Son, explores the possibility of moral and emotional redemption through familial love.

The Personal Memoirs of General U. S.

by Ulysses S. Grant

Among the autobiographies of generals and presidents, the Personal Memoirs of U.U. Grant ranks with the greatest. It is even more impressive in light of the circumstances in which it was created: Faced with terminal cancer, virtual bankruptcy, and a family he would leave without means of support, he took the advice of his publisher, mark Twain, and went to work. He completed the manuscript in eleven months-and died a week later, on July 23, 1885. Frank and unpretentious, Grant's memoirs tell the story of his boyhood in Ohio, his graduation from West Point, and the military campaigns in the West and Mexico that ended with his disgraceful resignation and a return to Illinois, where he ran the family store. Soon, however, began the rebellion that broke the Union and recast Grant's fortune, transforming him into the leader of the victorious Union armies in the War Between the States and giving him the perspective to describe intimately the capture of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, the bloody Wilderness campaign, and Appomattox. Here is Grant the tactician, the alcoholic, the plain and tough professional soldier, the ideal commander-but most of all here is Grant the writer as he assesses himself and the events that forged his character, as well as that of the nation.

The Importance of Being Earnest

by Oscar Wilde

A farce, one of the best ever written, cleverly constructed and delightfully amusing. There is only the slightest attempt at the sketching of character, while most of the personages are at best but caricatures; the Wilde's skill is brought to bear chiefly upon the situations and the lines. It so happens that this farce contains more clever lines, puns, epigrams, and deft repartees than any other of modern times, but these are after all accessory. A farce may be written without these additions--it might well be pure pantomime. Wilde has thrown them in for full measure.

Triplanetary

by E. E. Smith

Triplanetary was first serialized in Amazing Stories in 1934 and it later on formed the first of the Lensman series, where it set the stage for what is one of the greatest space-opera sagas ever written. This original publication brings us to a distant planet inhabited by a highly developed aquatic race called the Nevians. They have managed to harness the atomic power of iron and have an enormous need for the metal to generate energy, but their planet has virtually no iron reserves. They build a spaceship to venture into the universe and find iron. Eventually they discover that Earth has huge amounts of iron and the Nevians start to extract all the iron out of Pittsburgh with a special ray. This ray shoots into the city and immediately vaporizes and removes any iron from the buildings, machines, earth, and even from human blood. It is up to Conway Costigan, a mercilessly competent, two-fisted whiz agent of the military Triplanetary Service, and his colleagues to save the planet.

The Innocence of Father Brown

by G. K. Chesterton

Twelve mysteries featuring Father Brown, the short, stumpy Catholic priest with "uncanny insight into human evil."

The Wisdom of Father Brown

by G. K. Chesterton

Father Brown is an unlikely amateur detective. Short, stumpy, and angelic, he carries a huge umbrella and has a natural ability to intuit the solutions to criminal mysteries. The twelve tales in this book follow him through France, England, and Italy, as he gets caught up in cases involving everything from murder to treason.

The Club of Queer Trades

by G. K. Chesterton

The Club of Queer Trades is a collection of stories by G. K. Chesterton first published in 1905. Each story in the collection is centered on a person who is making his living by some novel and extraordinary means. To gain admittance one must have invented a unique means of earning a living and the subsequent trade being the main source of income.

Showing 5,826 through 5,850 of 16,760 results

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