Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 6,401 through 6,425 of 9,711 results

Boys Will Be

by Bruce Brooks

In twelve essays full of wit, insight, feeling and fun, Bruce Brooks tells about boys: good and not quite bad; loud, sports-mad, and smelling of sweat; facing, in quiet moments and school-yard confrontations, the choices that make them into men. With topics like "Stink," "The Cap," "Why Ice Hockey Kicks Football's Tutu," "Bullies" and "Respect," Boys Will Be is a celebration of boyhood written for boys-and all those who want to know more about them.

Cecil in Space

by Sid Hite

Seventeen-year-old Cecil Rowe loves to write, to read, to think, and to amble about his tiny Tidewater town of Bricksburg, Virginia. Of course, if he had a driver's license, he'd rather drive. And if he could make up his mind which girl to choose, he'd want to take one along.Cecil in Space is Sid Hite's most thoughtful, romantic, and insightful coming-of-age novel. It captures that wonderful time in a young writer's life when he begins to feel the power of his own words, and the precise moment in a young man's growth when clarity can only come in a kiss.

The Distance of Hope

by Sid Hite

Fifteen-year-old Yeshe Anjur, the nearly-blind heir to the throne of Padma, undertakes a dangerous journey to far-off Tigristan to find the legendary White Bean Lama who may be able to restore his sight.

Answer My Prayer

by Sid Hite

When lovelorn Lydia Swain prays to the angel she knows is up there, she doesn't know whether the angel will answer her prayer. He's not sure either, being just a little bit lazy and something of a sleepyhead. But when he's persuaded-by an angelic kick in the rear end-he finds himself involved not only in a love story, but a political imbroglio. The adventure that follows moves from forests of towering jeefwood trees to the highest reaches of heaven. It includes shipwrecks, protest marches, greedy politicians, and art. Art? Yes. And courage, and possible ecological disaster. It includes ruminations about time and the heart and considers the nature of high ideals, angelhood, and humanity. Sid Hite evokes the imaginary nation of Korasan with such vividness that we want to visit it, and introduces us to people and angels we wish we knew. The novel is generous and funny, philosophical and irreverent, and gives us cause for reflection, even as we race to find out what happens at the end.

Raising Your Emotional Intelligence

by Jeanne S. Segal

Employing exercises, self-tests, case studies, and step-by-step instructions, Segal shows readers how to listen to their intuition and their body's messages, make those signals part of their decision-making process, and thus realize the full benefit of their emotional resources.

Gold Digger

by Constance Rosenblum

A sparkling biography of the original blonde whom gentlemen preferred, a woman who made a career of marrying millionaires and became the first tabloid celebrity.One of America's most talked about personalities during the Jazz Age, Peggy Hopkins Joyce was the quintessential gold digger, the real-life Lorelei Lee. Married six times, to several millionaires and even a count, Joyce had no discernible talent except self-promotion. A barber's daughter from Norfolk, Virginia, who rose to become a Ziegfeld Girl and, briefly, a movie star, Joyce was the precursor of the modern celebrity-a person famous for being famous. Her scandalous exploits-spending a million dollars in a week, conducting torrid love affairs with the likes of Charlie Chaplin and Walter Chrysler-were irresistible to the new breed of tabloid journalists in search of sensation and to audiences hungry for the possibilities her life seemed to promise.Joyce's march across Broadway, Hollywood, and the nation's front pages was only slowed by the true nemesis of the glamour girl: old age. She died in 1957, alone and forgotten-until now. In prose as vibrant as its subject, Constance Rosenblum's Gold Digger brings to life the woman who singularly epitomized this confident and hedonistic era.

Being Youngest

by Jim Heynen

"It's not as if grown-ups will let you be average if you're youngest. If you're not fat, they call you Skinny or Bones. If you're not skinny, they call you Hippo or Tubby."Henry and Gretchen are the youngest children in two Iowa farm families. Being youngest, they get left out, blamed, ignored, and picked on all the time. At least that's how, being youngest, they tend to see it.In a summer filled with change, Henry and Gretchen swap stories, become friends, fight with their older brothers and sister, and get to know the odd old couple down the road. Between the old fan's habit of plucking nails out of the ground and the old woman's weird "children" who are kept locked in a room upstairs, they are strange enough. But are they just strange, or could the old folks actually be dangerous?Jim Heynen's story of one farm summer has fun, humor, some scary moments, and many wonderful insights into what being youngest means."Before Henry and Gretchen went their separate ways, they didn't compare the stories they were going to tell at home. They did agree they'd tell something--but not all. They both had learned to hide the best part. They knew that to keep a secret you had to hide it down a blind alley of stories that are only part of what happened. You didn't want to pretend that nothing happened. Too much silence was like honey to a hungry bear, and grown-ups were bound to start pawing around in it. It was best to throw them a few scraps of the truth to keep them away from the real honey of what you did."

Get a Clue!

by Ellen Rosenberg

This practical companion to Reviving Ophelia and Real Boys shares the concerns of preteens in their own words and advises parents how to approach them confidently and effectively.Many parents may not want to know that their eight- to fourteen-year-olds are already facing serious issues and have questions such as:- Why do people make fun of me because I am from another country?- When will I know when puberty has struck?- How do I deal with the feeling that no matter how good I do it's not good enough for my parents?- What happens when a friend beats you up?Without support, understanding, and assistance, the anxiety these dilemmas evoke could undermine a child's confidence and self-image as he or she matures. In a reassuring style filled with practical pointers, Ellen Rosenberg, veteran educator of thirty years, tells parents how to open a discussion on the day-to-day questions their preteens have but may be reluctant to share. Handwritten queries from preteens are included in the text, and as they attest, your children do want you to know what's really going on.A communication bible that parents will return to again and again, Get a Clue! is sure to help parents and their children become closer and form a bond of trust that will last through middle school, high school, college, and beyond.

A Group of One

by Rachna Gilmore

A girl of mixed heritage discovers that both cultures are important parts of who she is.Mr. Toller grins. "I guess we plain old regular Canadians need to know the history of other places to get a real and balanced view."Plain old regular.As in white.It jolts through me like lightning. I almost bought his idea of regular--that's why I was afraid to read my grandmother's story. My heart pounds, but I have to say it."Mr. Toller, I AM a regular Canadian."Hey, Tara, what's your mother tongue?It's questions like these that make fourteen-year-old Tara Mehta boil, especially when they're asked by teachers who ought to know better. Yes, her parents were raised in India, but Tara has lived in Ottawa her whole life -- she's as Canadian as everybody else. There are much more important things than where her family came from. Jeff, for instance. He's the new guy with the blue eyes and a brain that actually works. But then she meets her grandmother for the first time. Naniji fought with Gandhi in the Indian Indepence movement, and she's horrified to learn that her grandchildren know almost nothing about their heritage. Tara resents her grandmother's attitude until she learns how Naniji came to join the fight for indepence. Shocked and angered by the history that she's never been taught in school, Tara decides to tell Naniji's story to her class. In the wake of the violently mixed reactions that follow, Tara comes to realize that most people need to expand their definition of what it means to be a "regular" Canadian -- including herself.

Athens

by Robert Kimber Christian Meier

A lively and accessible history of Athens's rise to greatness, from one of the foremost classical historians.The definitive account of Athens in the age of Pericles, Christian Meier's gripping study begins with the Greek triumph over Persia at the Battle of Salamis, one of the most significant military victories in history. Meier shows how that victory decisively established Athens's military dominance in the Mediterranean and made possible its rise to preeminence in almost every field of human eavor--commerce, science, philosophy, art, architecture, and literature. Within seventy-five years, Athens had become the most original and innovative civilization the ancient world ever produced.With elegant narrative style, Meier traces the birth of democracy and the flourishing of Greek culture in the fifth century B.C., as well as Athens' slow decline and defeat in the Peloponnesian War. The great figures--from politicians and generals like Themistocles and Alcibiades to the philosophers Socrates and Plato--emerge as flesh-and-blood human beings, firmly rooted in their times and places. This is history in the tradition of Simon Schama and Barbara Tuchman--learned, accessible, and beautifully written.

The Music Thief

by Peni R. Griffin

In a harsh and noisy time, a young girl's key to her dreams -- music -- may be closer than she thinks.There was a new song playing in the back of Alma's head. An angry song, for Jovita and her killer, and Eddie, and everybody whose family did things that everybody had to live with. She could feel it, thumping in her brain, but couldn't hear it well enough to even hum it. Not in this house.She needed quiet, and a guitar. She needed Mrs. B's house.Alma misses many things. She misses her grandmother; her big brother Eddie back when he didn't deal drugs; the freedom she had before her baby niece Silvita was born; and now, worst of all, she misses Jovita, the singer she idolized who was recently killed in a drive-by shooting. Just when things seem hopeless, Alma discovers the cat door in her neighbor's often-empty home, and an unintended window opens into a better world, full of music.And what could be the harm in Alma's stealing (borrowing, really) a little peace and quiet, maybe even a ticket to her future?Peni R. Griffin has created a character at once bitter and optimistic. She has succeeded, even more impressively, in making the "dark" world surrounding Alma shine with small -- but life-changing -- possibility.

Arkansas Mischief

by Jim Mcdougal

Until his recent death in federal prison, Jim McDougal was the irrepressible ghost of the Clintons' Arkansas past. As Bill Clinton's political and business mentor, McDougal - with his knowledge of embarrassing real estate and banking deals, bribes, and obstructions of justice - has long haunted the White House. Jim McDougal's vivid self-portrait, completed only days before his death and coauthored by veteran journalist Curtis Wilkie, takes on the rich particularity of character and plot to reveal the hidden intersections of politics and special interests in Arkansas and the betrayals that followed. It is the story of how ambitious men and women climbed out of rural obscurity and "how friendships break down and lives are ruined."

Achilles In the Quantum Universe

by Richard Morris

Centuries ago, when the ancient philosopher Zeno proposedhis famous paradox involving Achilles and the Tortoise, he struck at the heart of one of science's most enduring and intractable problems: How do we define the infinite? From then on, our greatest natural philosophers, logicians, mathematicians, and scientists, from Aristotle to Stephen Hawking, have been stymied­-and driven-by infinity.Acclaimed Science writer Richard Morris guides us on a fascinating, literate and entertaining tour of the efforts made throughout history to make sense of the mind-bending concept of the infinite. In tracing this quest, Morris shows us how each new encounter with infinity drove the advancement of physics and mathematics. Along the way, we encounter such luminaries as Galileo and Newton, Tycho Brahe and Giordano Bruno, and the giants of modern physics: Planck, Einstein, Bohr, Feynmann, Hawking, and numerous others.Beginning with simple logical puzzles and progressing to the latest cosmological theories, Morris shows how these same infinity problems helped spawn such groundbreaking scientific developments as relativity and quantum mechanics. Though in many ways, the infinite is just as baffling today as it was in antiquity, contemporary scientists are probing ever deeper into the nature of our universe and catching fleeting glimpses of the infinite in ways the ancients could never have imagined.Ultimately, we see that hidden within the theoretical possibility of an infinite number of universes may lie the answers to some of humankind's most fundamental questions: Why is there something rather than nothing? Why are we here?

African Exodus

by Chris Stringer Robin Mckie

A Choice Outstanding Academic BookA Library Journal Best Sci-Tech BookA New York Times Notable BookOnce in a generation a book such as African Exodus emerges to transform the way we see ourselves. This landmark book, which argues that our genes betray the secret of a single racial stock shared by all of modern humanity, has set off one of the most bitter debates in contemporary science. "We emerged out of Africa," the authors cont, "less than 100,000 years ago and replaced all other human populations." Employing persuasive fossil and genetic evidence (the proof is in the blood, not just the bones) and an exceptionally readable style, Stringer and McKie challenge long-held beliefs that suggest we evolved separately as different races with genetic roots reaching back two million years.

The Clark Gable and Carole Lombard Murder Case

by George Baxt

As Gone With the Wind approaches release, all the stars but Clark Gable prepare to head for Atlanta for the big premiere. Clark and his wife, Carole Lombard, are too distressed to celebrate the opening of the biggest movie of his career because Lydia Austin, a young actress and a protege of Carole's, is missing. In fact, kidnapping paranoia is sweeping through Hollywood, and even with body-building bodyguards like the two Clark has hired to protect Carole, no one feels safe. But Carole is not a dame to take such threats lying down. Convinced that they can help, she and Clark set themselves up as amateur sleuths. Of course, there are plenty of other celebrities in the mix: W.C. Fields alternates between anxiety over the kidnappings and trying to convince David O. Selznick that he should play Rhett Butler, and Groucho Marx also gets serious (just barely) long enough to worry about the missing girl, who is his current paramour.

Maria Tallchief

by Maria Tallchief Larry Kaplan

A fascinating self-portrait of the fairy-tale life of a woman who understood that a committed talent could transform the world around her."Maria Tallchief and American ballet came of age in the same moment.... Her story will always be the story of ballet conquering America. It was and is an American romance."-Arlene Croce, The New Yorker

The Truth About Sparrows

by Marian Hale

"The Wynns are an unforgettable family. The details of their struggle to survive the Great Depression will linger long after the last page has been read."-Ann M. Martin, winner of the Newbery Honor for A Corner of the UniverseA stunning debut novel about the true meaning of homeSadie Wynn doesn't want a new life; her old one suits her just fine. But times are hard in drought-plagued Missouri, and Daddy thinks they'll be better off in Texas. Sadie hates this strange new place, where even children must work at the cannery to help make ends meet and people are rude to her disabled father.Yet when trouble comes, it is the kindness of these new neighbors that helps the family make it through. And no one helps more than Dollie, a red-headed chatterbox of a girl who just might become a good friend-if Sadie gives her half a chance.The Truth About Sparrows is a 2005 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Song of Be

by Lesley Beake

Be, a young Bushman woman searching in the desert for the peace she remembers from her childhood, realizes that she and her people must reconcile new personal and political realities with ancient traditions.

Listening for Crickets

by David Gifaldi

With ears like a bat and webbed toes, it seems as if ten-yearold Jake could fly right out of reality into the freedom of his dreams. No more worries about asthma, special reading class, or his parents' fighting-just sky. But Jake can't simply fly away. There's his little sister, Cassie, to tell stories to when the night sounds become frightening, amazing facts to learn from his best friend Luke, and a safe place-Dragon's Nest-to build in the backyard. This beautifully written middle grade novel tells the courageous story of Jake-a night watchman-a protector in the truest sense of the word who finds hope in crickets, friends, teachers, and dreams.

On Etruscan Time

by Tracy Barrett

A shadow moved in the doorway of the building. It was a boy. As he hesitated, someone must have pushes him from behind. He stumbled down the short stairway and fell heavily to his knees.He couldn't break his fall, Hector realized, because his arms were tied behind him.A mysterious talisman transports a boy back to ancient ItalyNo one ever listens to Hector. He wanted to hang out with his friends this summer, but instead he's stuck in Italy at an archaeological dig with his mom. The ancient Etruscan artifacts are interesting, but no one has time for him. Then he makes a discovery of his own-a strange, unsettling stone that looks like an eye. The stone brings nightmares about Arath, an Etruscan boy who died thousands of years ago but now begs for Hector's help. Are these just dreams, or is Arath really in danger? As Hector unearths the truth, he realizes that he can make himself heard when it counts.

Cold in Summer

by Tracy Barrett

The new girl in town meets a mysterious old-fashioned girl who can't seem to find her way home.The girl didn't say anything. Her face held no expression.Ariadne shivered. It was cool in the shade, and her hair was still wet."Hello," Ariadne said. No answer. "Um-I was just taking a walk. Is this your property?" Still nothing. She took a step toward the girl and stumbled on a fallen branch. She caught her balance and looked back at the tree, but no one was there. The girl had vanished.

The Lewis and Clark Companion

by Stephenie Ambrose Tubbs Clay Jenkinson

An indispensable guide to our nation's epic adventureThe years 2003-2006 mark the bicentennial of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's famous transcontinental journey between the Missouri and the Columbia River systems. They never did find the fabled Northwest Passage, but over twenty-eight months, the Corps of Discovery traveled more than eight thousand miles through eleven future states, named scores of places and rivers, met with many Native American tribes, and wrote the first descriptions of heretofore unknown plants and animals. By the end of their trip, Lewis and Clark had navigated and named two thirds of the American continent.They may have had undaunted courage, but the sheer volume of information related to their expedition can be more than a little daunting to the armchair historian. Written by two highly regarded Lewis and Clark experts, this book contains over five hundred lively and fascinating entries on everything from the members of the expedition and the places they went to the weapons and tools, trade goods, and medicines they carried, along with the food and amusements that sustained them. Highly readable and informative, it's the perfect introduction for the Lewis and Clark novice, and the comprehensive guide no buff will want to be without.

Ghost Soldier

by Elaine Marie Alphin

The ghost of a young soldier from the Civil War haunts a troubled teen."I sat up. The jagged trenches were only soft grassy depressions in the sunny battlefield park. I felt tears burn my eyes, the relief was so strong, and then the misery of losing the ghost hit me."Alexander has the ability to see ghosts. But it's been several years since his last encounter. When he reluctantly joins his father on a long trip away from home, a surprise awaits him. In the unfamiliar territory of North Carolina, Alexander is confronted by the ghost of a young soldier who lost his life in the Civil War. As an unusual friendship develops between the two, Alexander is drawn into a new reality where he comes face to face with the haunting past of his soldier friend. But can Alexander help this troubled ghost, and can he, finally, come to terms with his own disturbing past? With deftness and insight, Elaine Marie Alphin tells a gripping story that weaves the supernatural with the historical. Ghost story fans and Civil War buffs alike are in for a real treat.Ghost Soldier is a nominee for the 2002 Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery.

The Genius of the System

by Thomas Schatz

At a time when the studio is making a stunning comeback, film historian Thomas Schatz provides an indispensable account of Hollywood's tradional blend of business and art. This book lays to rest the persistent myth that businesspeople and producers stifle artistic talent and reveals instead the genius of a system of collaboration and conflict. Working from industry documents, Schatz traces the development of house styles, the rise and fall of careers, and the making-and unmaking-of movies, from Frankenstein to Spellbound to Grand Hotel. Richly illustrated and highly readable, The Genius of the System gives the definitive view of the workings of the Old Hollywood and the foundations of the New.

The Mold in Dr. Florey's Coat

by Eric Lax

The untold story of the discovery of the first wonder drug, the men who led the way, and how it changed the modern worldThe discovery of penicillin in 1928 ushered in a new age in medicine. But it took a team of Oxford scientists headed by Howard Florey and Ernst Chain four more years to develop it as the first antibiotic, and the most important family of drugs in the twentieth century. At once the world was transformed-major bacterial scourges such as blood poisoning and pneumonia, scarlet fever and diphtheria, gonorrhea and syphilis were defeated as penicillin helped to foster not only a medical revolution but a sexual one as well. In his wonderfully engaging book, acclaimed author Eric Lax tells the real story behind the discovery and why it took so long to develop the drug. He reveals the reasons why credit for penicillin was misplaced, and why this astonishing achievement garnered a Nobel Prize but no financial rewards for Alexander Fleming, Florey, and his team. The Mold in Dr. Florey's Coat is the compelling story of the passage of medicine from one era to the next and of the eccentric individuals whose participation in this extraordinary accomplishment has, until now, remained largely unknown.

Showing 6,401 through 6,425 of 9,711 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ���DAISY Text with Images���.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.