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Spectator Bird, The

by Wallace Stegner

Joe Allston is a retired literary agent who is, in his own words, "just killing time until time gets around to killing me. " His parents and his only son are long dead, leaving him with neither ancestors nor descendants, tradition nor ties. His job, trafficking the talent of others, had not been his choice. He passes through life as a spectator. A postcard from a friend causes Allston to return to the journals of a trip he had taken years before, a journey to his mother's birthplace, where he'd sought a link with the past. The memories of that trip, both grotesque and poignant, move through layers of time and meaning, and reveal that Joe Allston isn't quite spectator enough. "Elegant and entertaining . . . Every scene [is] adroitly staged and each effect precisely acomplished. " -The Atlantic .

Dark Fire

by C. J. Sansom

Book 2 in the highly acclaimed Matthew Shardlake mystery series, now available from Vintage Canada. It is 1540 and the hottest summer of the 16th century. Matthew Shardlake, believing himself out of favour with Thomas Cromwell, is busy trying to maintain his legal practice and keep a low profile. But his involvement with a murder case, defending a girl accused of brutally murdering her young cousin, brings him once again into contact with the King's chief minister--and a new assignment. . . The secret of Greek Fire, the legendary substance with which the Byzantines destroyed the Arab navies, has been lost for centuries. Now an official of the Court of Augmentations has discovered the formula in the library of a dissolved London monastery. When Shardlake is sent to recover it, he finds the official and his alchemist brother brutally murdered--the formula has disappeared. Now Shardlake must follow the trail of Greek Fire across Tudor London, while trying at the same time to prove his young client's innocence. But very soon he discovers nothing is as it seems. . .

41 Stories

by O. Henry

One of the most famous pseudonym's in history, the name O. Henry evokes wordplay that is dazzling, inventive, wry, and humorous. This anthology includes forty-one stories that continue to captivate generation after generation of readers, including "The Gift of the Magi", "The Furnished Room", and those which demonstrate the technical genius and wide range of O. Henry's world.

Time Machine, The / Invisible Man, The

by Wells H. G.

The Time Machine and The Invisible Man, by H. G. Wells, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today''s top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader''s viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences--biographical, historical, and literary--to enrich each reader''s understanding of these enduring works. The Time Machine, H. G. Wells's first novel, is a tale of Darwinian evolution taken to its extreme. Its hero, a young scientist, travels 800,000 years into the future and discovers a dying earth populated by two strange humanoid species: the brutal Morlocks and the gentle but nearly helpless Eloi. The Invisible Man mixes chilling terror, suspense, and acute psychological understanding into a tale of an equally adventurous scientist who discovers the formula for invisibility--a secret that drives him mad. Immensely popular during his lifetime, H. G. Wells, along with Jules Verne, is credited with inventing science fiction. This new volume offers two of Wells's best-loved and most critically acclaimed "scientific romances. " In each, the author grounds his fantastical imagination in scientific fact and conjecture while lacing his narrative with vibrant action, not merely to tell a "ripping yarn," but to offer a biting critique on the world around him. "The strength of Mr. Wells," wrote Arnold Bennett, "lies in the fact that he is not only a scientist, but a most talented student of character, especially quaint character. He will not only ingeniously describe for you a scientific miracle, but he will set down that miracle in the midst of a country village, sketching with excellent humour the inn-landlady, the blacksmith, the chemist's apprentice, the doctor, and all the other persons whom the miracle affects. " Alfred Mac Adam teaches literature at Barnard College-Columbia University. He is a translator and art critic.

View from the Bridge, A (Penguin Plays)

by Arthur Miller

America's greatest playwright weaves "a vivid, crackling, idiomatic psychosexual horror tale. " -Frank Rich, The New York Times In A View from the Bridge Arthur Miller explores the intersection between one man's self-delusion and the brutal trajectory of fate. Eddie Carbone is a Brooklyn longshoreman, a hard-working man whose life has been soothingly predictable. He hasn't counted on the arrival of two of his wife's relatives, illegal immigrants from Italy; nor has he recognized his true feelings for his beautiful niece, Catherine. And in due course, what Eddie doesn't know-about her, about life, about his own heart-will have devastating consequences. "The play has moments of intense power. . . . Miller plays on the audience with the skill of a master. " -Clive Barnes, New York Post .

Ghost Hunters

by Deborah Blum

In Victorian Britain, a group of eminent scientists got together to found a society expressly to prove the existence of ghosts. The age of Darwin represented the greatest scientific advances known to man. The tension between science and religion was exposed by Darwin's On the Origin of the Species in 1859, which challenged the basic tenets of belief. Yet many of those in the forefront of the scientific revolution could not give up the idea of a higher reality. Life after death was the unknown frontier. Victorian society was full of mediums claiming they could communicate with the spirits of the dead. Baffling psychic phenomena occurred every day at séances: mysterious rappings were heard, furniture moved, ghostly forms appeared, the mediums spoke in the altered voices of the dead with information only their nearest could possibly know. Pyschometry involving locks of hair and watches and children's toys; telepathy; ouija boards; apparitions; astral projection: all were commonplace. In 1882 the Society of Psychical Research was founded in London to investigate all these phenomena: it was a group led by some of the greatest scientists of the age but its membership also included Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Leslie Stephen, Virginia Woolf's father, John Ruskin, the Reverend Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) and Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain). Six months later William James, Professor of Psychology at Harvard, and the brother of Henry James visited London and went on to set up American branch. Their experiments went on for years. Many mediums, like the notorious Madame Blavatsky, were exposed as charlatans yet there were some mediums who continued to communicate directly with another world, who despite every rigorous scientific test seemed to prove that souls survived death. This is the story of this group of forward thinkers: many of whom were driven to the spirit world by personal tragedy, some whose feeling of loss lead to their own suicides. It is the story of the greatest ghost hunt of any age.

The Count of Monte Cristo

by Alexandre Dumas Roger Celestin

In the post-Napoleonic era, Edmond Dantès, a young sailor from Marseilles, is poised to become captain of his own ship and to marry his beloved. But spiteful enemies provoke his arrest, condemning him to lifelong imprisonment. Then Edmond's sole companion in prison reveals his secret plan of escape and a letter with directions to hidden riches on the island of Monte Cristo--a treasure trove that will eventually fund Edmund's dream of creating a new identity for himself: the mysterious and powerful Count of Monte Cristo. In The Count of Monte Cristo, Alexandre Dumas employed all the elements of compelling drama--suspense, intrigue, love, vengeance, rousing adventure, and the triumph of good over evil--that contribute to this classic story's irresistible and timeless appeal.

My Freshman Year

by Rebekah Nathan

After more than fifteen years of teaching, Rebekah Nathan, a professor of anthropology at a large state university, realized that she no longer understood the behavior and attitudes of her students. Fewer and fewer participated in class discussion, tackled the assigned reading, or came to discuss problems during office hours. And she realized from conversations with her colleagues that they, too, were perplexed: Why were students today so different and so hard to teach? Were they, in fact, more likely to cheat, ruder, and less motivated? Did they care at all about their education, besides their grades?Nathan decided to put her wealth of experience in overseas ethnographic fieldwork to use closer to home and apply to her own university. Accepted on the strength of her high school transcript, she took a sabbatical and enrolled as a freshman for the academic year. She immersed herself in student life, moving into the dorms and taking on a full course load. She ate in the student cafeteria, joined student clubs, and played regular pick-up games of volleyball and tag football (sports at which the athletic fifty-something-year-old could hold her own). Nathan had resolved that, if asked, she would not lie about her identity; she found that her classmates, if they were curious about why she was attending college at her age, never questioned her about her personal life. Based on her interviews and conversations with fellow classmates, her interactions with professors and with other university employees and offices, and her careful day-to-day observations, My Freshman Year provides a compelling account of college life that should be read by students, parents, professors, university administrators, and anyone else concerned about the state of higher education in America today. Placing her own experiences and those of her classmates into a broader context drawn from national surveys of college life, Nathan finds that today's students face new challenges to which academic institutions have not adapted. At the end of her freshman year, she has an affection and respect for students as a whole that she had previously reserved only for certain individuals. Being a student, she discovers, is hard work. But she also identifies fundamental misperceptions, misunderstandings, and mistakes on both sides of the educational divide that negatively affect the college experience. By focusing on the actual experiences of students, My Freshman Year offers a refreshing alternative to the frequently divisive debates surrounding the political, economic, and cultural significance of higher education--as well as a novel perspective from which to look at the achievements and difficulties confronting America's colleges and universities in the twenty-first century.

The Complete Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe

by Edgar Allan Poe Jay Parini April Bernard

A classic collection From the exquisite lyric "To Helen," to the immortal masterpieces "Annabel Lee," "The Bells," and "The Raven," The Complete Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe demonstrates the author's gift for the form.

Crucible, The

by Arthur Miller

From Arthur Miller, America's most celebrated playwright, a searing portrait of a community engulfed by hysteria, inspired by Senator Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist "witch-hunts" in the 1950s "I believe that the reader will discover here the essential nature of one of the strangest and most awful chapters in human history," Arthur Miller wrote in an introduction to The Crucible , his classic play about the witch-hunts and trials in seventeenth-century Salem, Massachusetts. In the rigid theocracy of Salem, rumors that women are practicing witchcraft galvanize the town's most basic fears and suspicions; and when a young girl accuses Elizabeth Proctor of being a witch, self-righteous church leaders and townspeople insist that Elizabeth be brought to trial. The ruthlessness of the prosecutors and the eagerness of neighbor to testify against neighbor brilliantly illuminate the destructive power of socially sanctioned violence. Written in 1953, just after Miller received a Pulitzer Prize for Death of a Salesman, The Crucible mirrors the anti-communist hysteria inspired by Senator Joseph McCarthy's "witch-hunts" in the United States. Within the text itself, Miller contemplates the parallels, writing "Political opposition. . . is given an inhumane overlay, which then justifies the abrogation of all normally applied customs of civilized behavior. A political policy is equated with moral right, and opposition to it with diabolical malevolence. " .

48 Laws of Power, The

by Robert Greene

Before Mastery, came The 48 Laws of Power-the New York Times bestseller that started it all Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, The 48 Laws of Power is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control. In the book that People magazine proclaimed "beguiling" and "fascinating," Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P. T. Barnum. Some laws teach the need for prudence ("Law 1: Never Outshine the Master"), others teach the value of confidence ("Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness"), and many recommend absolute self-preservation ("Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally"). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game. .

Harvesting the Heart

by Jodi Picoult

Jodi Picoult's Captivating Second Novel From the New York Times bestselling author of My Sister's Keeper, Lone Wolf, and the forthcoming The Storyteller, Harvesting the Heart is written with astonishing clarity and evocative detail, convincing in its depiction of emotional pain, love, and vulnerability, and recalls the writing of Alice Hoffman and Kristin Hannah. Paige has only a few vivid memories of her mother, who left when she was five. Now, having left her father behind in Chicago for dreams of art school and marriage to an ambitious young doctor, she finds herself with a child of her own. But her mother's absence, and shameful memories of her past, make her doubt both her maternal ability and her sense of self worth. Out of Paige's struggle to find wholeness, Jodi Picoult crafts an absorbing novel peopled by richly drawn characters and explores issues and emotions readers can relate to. "A brilliant, moving examination of motherhood, brimming with detail and emotion. " --Richmond Times-Dispatch "Jodi Picoult explores the fragile ground of ambivalent motherhood in her lush second novel. This story belongs to... the lucky reader. " --The New York Times Book Review .

Why? The War Years

by Tomie Depaola

The latest addition to the Newbery Honor award-winning 26 Fairmount Avenue series. World War II is raging in Europe, and Tomie finds that life has changed in many ways. Now he has to wear an extra sweater to school because they're trying to conserve coal. Then tragedy brings the war home to the dePaola family, and all Tomie can do is ask "Why?" Just as he did in I'm Still Scared, the first installment of The War Years, Tomie dePaola touchingly illuminates the emotional confusion of a child's life during wartime.

Encyclopedia Brown Tracks Them Down

by Donald J. Sobol

Leroy Brown is back in the next six books in the Encyclopedia Brown series. As Idaville's ten-year-old star detective, Encyclopedia has an uncanny knack for trivia. With his unconventional knowledge, he solves mysteries for the neighborhood kids through his own detective agency. But his dad also happens to be the chief of the Idaville police department, and every night around the dinner table, Encyclopedia helps him solve some of the most baffling crimes. With ten confounding mysteries in each book, not only does Encyclopedia have a chance to solve them, but readers are given all the clues as well and can chime in with their own solutions. Interactive and fun-it's classic Encyclopedia Brown!

Encyclopedia Brown Shows the Way

by Donald J. Sobol

As Idaville's ten-year-old star detective, Encyclopedia has an uncanny knack for trivia. With his unconventional knowledge, he solves mysteries for the neighborhood kids through his own detective agency. But his dad also happens to be the chief of the Idaville police department, and every night around the dinner table, Encyclopedia helps him solve some of the most baffling crimes. With ten confounding mysteries in each book, not only does Encyclopedia have a chance to solve them, but readers are given all the clues as well and can chime in with their own solutions. Interactive and fun#151;it's classic Encyclopedia Brown! #147;I loved Encyclopedia Brown as a kid. "#151;Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Encyclopedia Brown Lends a Hand

by Donald J. Sobol

Match Wits With The World's Greatest Boy Sleuth A huge footprint in the soft earth . . . counterfeit money in a bird's nest . . . a threatening letter . . . an exploding toilet . . . a missing silver dollar . . . and a stolen newspaper clipping that could be valuable! These are the only traces left at the scene of ten brain-twisting crimes that Encyclopedia Brown must solve! #147;I loved Encyclopedia Brown as a kid. "#151;Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Encyclopedia Brown and Dead Eagles

by Donald J. Sobol

Solve some more puzzling mysteries with super sleuth Encyclopedia Brown! Leroy Brown is back in the Encyclopedia Brown series. As Idaville's ten-year-old star detective, Encyclopedia has an uncanny knack for trivia. With his unconventional knowledge, he solves mysteries for the neighborhood kids through his own detective agency. But his dad also happens to be the chief of the Idaville police department, and every night around the dinner table, Encyclopedia helps him solve some of the most baffling crimes. With ten confounding mysteries, not only does Encyclopedia have a chance to solve them, but readers are given all the clues as well and can chime in with their own solutions. Interactive and fun, it's classic Encyclopedia Brown! #147;I loved Encyclopedia Brown as a kid. "#151;Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Encyclopedia Brown Keeps the Peace

by Donald J. Sobol

Encyclopedia Brown has an uncanny knack for trivia. With his unconventional knowledge, he solves mysteries for the neighborhood kids through his own detective agency. But his dad also happens to be the chief of the Idaville police department, and every night around the dinner table, Encyclopedia helps him solve some of the most baffling crimes. With ten confounding mysteries in each book, not only does Encyclopedia have a chance to solve them, but readers are given all the clues as well and can chime in with their own solutions. Interactive and fun#151;it's classic Encyclopedia Brown! #147;I loved Encyclopedia Brown as a kid. "#151;Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Encyclopedia Brown Saves the Day

by Donald J. Sobol

Ten mysteries for ten-year-old Encyclopedia Brown, his partner, Sally, and the reader to solve. Solutions are given at the back of the book.

Point Blank

by Anthony Horowitz

When an investigation into a series of mysterious deaths leads agents to an elite prep school for rebellious kids, MI6 assigns Alex Rider to the case. Before he knows it, Alex is hanging out with the sons of the rich and powerful, and something feels wrong. These former juvenile delinquents have turned well-behaved, studious--and identical--overnight. It's up to Alex to find out who is master-minding this nefarious plot, before they find him.

Ill Wind

by Nevada Barr

Lately, visitors to Mesa Verde have been bringing home more than photos--they're also carrying a strange, deadly disease. And once it strikes, park ranger Anna Pigeon must find the very human source of the evil wind.

Hard Times

by Charles Dickens

Hard Times, one of the most widely read of Dickens' major novels, is both a captivating story and an illuminating indictment of capitalist exploitation during the Industrial Revolution. The hard lessons wrought by zealous materialism awaken characters to a new philosophy, and to hope. From fact-worshipping Mr. Gradgrind, to eternally noble Stephen Blackpool, to endearing Sissy Jupe, Martin Jarvis masterfully portrays each of the unforgettable characters. "Dickens was in the full flower of his talent when he wrote Hard Times, and this performance is a tribute to him. "-- AudioFileCharles Dickens (1812-1870) was one of the most celebrated and prolific English novelists. Many of his works first appeared in monthly installments, notably Oliver Twist (1837-39), David Copperfield (1849-50), and Great Expectations (1860-61). Hard Times (1854) was published in weekly installments in Dickens' magazine, Household Words. Martin Jarvis has been named Reader of the Year by the British Spoken Word Publishers Association, and has won Audie Awards for Carry On, Jeeves, and The Third Man. He also performs David Copperfield, Great Expectations, and The Essential King James Bible.

Libra

by Don Delillo

An unparalleled work of historical conjecture, ranging imaginatively over huge tracts of the American popular consciousness, Don DeLillo's Libra contains an introduction by the author in Penguin Modern Classics. In this powerful, eerily convincing fictional speculation on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Don DeLillo chronicles Lee Harvey Oswald's odyssey from troubled teenager to a man of precarious stability who imagines himself an agent of history. When "history" presents itself in the form of two disgruntled CIA operatives who decide that an unsuccessful attempt on the life of JFK will galvanize the nation against Communism, the scales are irrevocably tipped. Don DeLillo (b. 1936) was born and raised in New York City. Americana (1971), his first novel, announced the arrival of a major literary talent, and the novels that followed confirmed his reputation as one of the most distinctive and compelling voices in late-twentieth-century American fiction. DeLillo's comic gifts come to the fore in White Noise (1985), which won the National Book Award, Underworld (1997), hailed by Martin Amis as 'the ascension of a great writer', Cosmopolis (2003), adapted into a film by David Cronenberg, due to be released later this year, and Falling Man (2007), a novel about the aftereffects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York. If you enjoyed Libra, you might like DeLillo's Americana, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Don DeLillo's apocalyptic imagination takes on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. . . Breathtaking' Newsday

Ordinary People

by Judith Guest

The Novel that Inspired Robert Redford's Oscar Winning Film starring Donald Sutherland and Mary Tyler Moore In Ordinary People, Judith Guest's remarkable first novel, the Jarrets are a typical American family. Calvin is a determined, successful provider and Beth an organized, efficient wife. They had two sons, Conrad and Buck, but now they have one. In this memorable, moving novel, Judith Guest takes the reader into their lives to share their misunderstandings, pain. . . and ultimate healing. Judith Guest is the author of six novels, including Ordinary People, Errands, and the Tarnished Eye. .

Death of a Salesman

by Arthur Miller

Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning play that forever changed the meaning of the American Dream Willy Loman, the protagonist of Death of a Salesman, has spent his life following the American way, living out his belief in salesmanship as a way to reinvent himself. But somehow the riches and respect he covets have eluded him. At age sixty-three, he searches for the moment his life took a wrong turn, the moment of betrayal that undermined his marriage and destroyed his relationship with Biff, the son in whom he invested his faith. Willy lives in a fragile world of elaborate excuses and daydreams, conflating past and present in a desperate attempt to make sense of himself and of a world that once promised so much. Widely considered Arthur Miller's masterpiece, Death of a Salesman has steadily seen productions all over the world since its 1949 debut, including the multiple Tony-award-winning 2012 Broadway production directed by Mike Nichols and starring Philip Seymour Hoffman as Willy Loman and Andrew Garfield as his son Biff. As the noted Miller scholar Christopher Bigsby states in his introduction to this edition, "If Willy's is an American dream, it is also a dream shared by all those who are aware of the gap between what they might have been and what they are. " .

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