Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 76 through 100 of 16,496 results

The Power of the Spoken Word

by Florence Scovel-Shinn

Our words have the power to change our lives. By paying more attention to how we speak, and hence how we think, we can change our circumstances for the better. The Power of the Spoken Word will help you make the positive changes that you've always wanted to make.

The New Evangelism, and Other Addresses

by Henry Drummond

"The question you will naturally ask at the outset is, "What is the new Evangelism?" Now that is a question that I cannot answer. I do not know what the new Evangelism is, and it is because I do not know that I write this paper. I write because I ought to know, and am trying to know. Many here, and all the most earnest minds of our Church, are anxiously asking this question, and each who has once asked it feels it to be one of the chief objects of his life to answer it." Included here are "The New Evangelism: and its Relation to Cardinal Doctrines," "The Method of the New Theology, and some of its Applications," "Survival of the Fittest," "The Third Kingdom," "The Problem of Foreign Missions," "The Contribution of Science to Christianity," and "Spiritual Diagnosis."

The Negro Problem

by Booker T. Washington

Here are six historic essays on the state of race relations during the Reconstruction and early twentieth century, written from the African American point of view. These essays show us how far race relations have progressed, and sadly how far we have yet to go. Included are "Industrial Education for the Negro," by Booker T. Washington, "The Talented Tenth," by W.E. Burghardt DuBois, "The Disfranchisement of the Negro," by Charles W. Chesnutt, "The Negro and the Law," by Wilford H. Smith, "The Characteristics of the Negro People," by H.T. Kealing, and "Representative American Negroes" by Paul Laurence Dunbar.

The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare

by G. K. Chesterton

In The Man Who Was Thursday we are transported to a surreal turn-of-the-century London. Gabriel Syme, a poet, is recruited to a secret anti-anarchist taskforce at Scotland Yard. Lucian Gregory, an anarchist poet, is the only poet in Saffron Park, until he loses his temper in an argument over the purpose of poetry with Gabriel Syme, who takes the opposite view. After some time, the frustrated Gregory finds Syme and leads him to a local anarchist meeting-place to prove that he is a true anarchist. Instead of the anarchist Gregory getting elected, the officer Syme uses his wits and is elected as the local representative to the worldwide Central Council of Anarchists. The Council consists of seven men, each using the name of a day of the week as a code name; Syme is given the name of Thursday. In his efforts to thwart the council's intentions, however, he discovers that five of the other six members are also undercover detectives; each was just as mysteriously employed and assigned to defeat the Council of Days. They all soon find out that they are fighting each other and not a real anarchists; such was the mastermind plan of the genius Sunday. In a dizzying and surreal conclusion, the six champions of order and former anarchist ring-leaders must chase down the disturbing and whimsical Sunday, the man who calls himself "The Peace of God."

The Man Who Knew Too Much

by G. K. Chesterton

Harold March, the rising reviewer and social critic, was walking vigorously across a great tableland of moors and commons, the horizon of which was fringed with the far-off woods of the famous estate of Torwood Park. He was a good-looking young man in tweeds, with very pale curly hair and pale clear eyes. Walking in wind and sun in the very landscape of liberty, he was still young enough to remember his politics and not merely try to forget them. For his errand at Torwood Park was a political one; it was the place of appointment named by no less a person than the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir Howard Horne, then introducing his so-called Socialist budget, and prepared to expound it in an interview with so promising a penman. Harold March was the sort of man who knows everything about politics, and nothing about politicians. He also knew a great deal about art, letters, philosophy, and general culture; about almost everything, indeed, except the world he was living in.

The Law of Attraction: Fifteen Historic Perspectives

by Robert Collier

Harold March, the rising reviewer and social critic, was walking vigorously across a great tableland of moors and commons, the horizon of which was fringed with the far-off woods of the famous estate of Torwood Park. He was a good-looking young man in tweeds, with very pale curly hair and pale clear eyes. Walking in wind and sun in the very landscape of liberty, he was still young enough to remember his politics and not merely try to forget them. For his errand at Torwood Park was a political one; it was the place of appointment named by no less a person than the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir Howard Horne, then introducing his so-called Socialist budget, and prepared to expound it in an interview with so promising a penman. Harold March was the sort of man who knows everything about politics, and nothing about politicians. He also knew a great deal about art, letters, philosophy, and general culture; about almost everything, indeed, except the world he was living in.

The Last of the Mohicans and Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses

by James Fenimore Cooper

The Last of the Mohicans is an epic novel by James Fenimore Cooper, first published in January 1826. It was one of the most popular English-language novels of its time, and helped establish Cooper as one of the first world-famous American writers. The story takes place in 1757 during the French and Indian War, when France and Great Britain battled for control of the American and Canadian colonies. During this war, the French often allied themselves with Native American tribes in order to gain an advantage over the British, with unpredictable and often tragic results. After the Cooper text comes Mark Twain's caustic, funny, and damning "Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses." Wherein Twain takes deadly aim at the casual manner in which Cooper wrote. Together for the first time these two classics are perfect counterpoints to one another.

The Island of Doctor Moreau

by H. G. Wells

Edward Prendick finds himself adrift at sea, a lone survivor of a ship wreck. He spends more than a week drifting without food or water. Pendrick consigns himself to death, but fate intervenes and delivers him to an unknown Island. The terrors that await him on Doctor Moreau's island are far worse than what he has just been rescued from or anything that he could have imagined.

The Aeneid

by Virgil

Follow Aeneid as he flees a burning Troy with his family and sets out on a dangerous journey to found what will one day become The Roman Empire. Thrill with him as he gets caught up in conflicts between the gods, all the while striving to complete his own grand destiny. Virgil intended this book to be a sequel to the Iliad and the Odyssey, and as such it takes up with events just after the finish of the Odyssey. Inscribed here are myths and legends and tales of bravery destined to last for all time.

Your Word is Your Wand

by Florence Scovel-Shinn

Your Word is Your Wand is a book of affirmations. These affirmations will help you invite the things that you want into your life and to banish those things you do not want. There is power in words, and this book helps you unlock that power.

Wuthering Heights

by Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers. The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys both of them and many around them. Now considered a classic of English literature, the novel's innovative structure, which has been likened to a series of Matryoshka dolls, met with mixed reviews by critics when it first appeared.

What's Wrong with the World

by G. K. Chesterton

In What's Wrong With The World Chesterton rightly points out that what people see as "wrong with the world" are only the symptoms of a deeper problem. He shows that our governments, be they capitalistic or socialistic, also fail to see the deeper problem. With a keen wit and lively prose he cuts directly to the true problems that society must deal with and his solutions feel utterly correct.

What All the World's A-Seeking

by Ralph Waldo Trine

Ralph Waldo Trine was an influential member of the New Thought movement. He was one of the first people to write about the Law of Attraction. Long before Rhonda Byrne discovered the secret that one's positive thoughts are powerful magnets that attract wealth, health, and happiness, Trine already knew it.

The Booker T. Washington Reader

by Booker T. Washington

Here in one omnibus edition are Booker T. Washington's most important books. Washington was constantly, and often bitterly, criticized by his contemporaries for being too conciliatory to whites and not concerned enough about civil rights. It would not be until after his death that the world would find out that he had indeed worked a great deal for civil rights anonymously behind the scenes. Up from Slavery is one of the most influential biographies ever written. On one level it is the life story of Booker T. Washington and his rise from slavery to accomplished educator and activist. On another level it the story of how an entire race strove to better itself. Washington makes it clear just how far race relations in America have come, and to some extent, just how much further they have to go. Written with wit and clarity. In My Larger Education, Booker T. Washington explains how he came by his positions on race relations, by describing the people who influenced him during the founding of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute of Alabama. In Character Building are thirty seven addresses that Booker T. Washington gave before students, faculty, and guests at the Tuskegee Institute. These addresses take the form of timeless advice on a number of subjects. Very motivational and uplifting. Here are six historic essays on the state of race relations during the Reconstruction and early twentieth century, written from the African American point of view. Included are "Industrial Education for the Negro" by Booker T. Washington, "The Talented Tenth" by W.E. Burghardt DuBois, "The Disfranchisement of the Negro" by Charles W. Chesnutt, "The Negro and the Law" by Wilford H. Smith, "The Characteristics of the Negro People" by H.T. Kealing, and "Representative American Negroes" by Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Walden

by Henry David Thoreau

Walden is one of the best-known non-fiction books ever written by an American. It details Thoreau's sojourn in a cabin near Walden Pond, amidst woodland owned by his friend and mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson. Walden was written with expressed seasonal divisions. Thoreau hoped to isolate himself from society in order to gain a more objective understanding of it. Simplicity and self-reliance were Thoreau's other goals, and the whole project was inspired by Transcendentalist philosophy. This book is full of fascinating musings and reflections. As pertinent and relevant today as it was when it was first written.

Up from Slavery

by Booker T. Washington

Up from Slavery is one of the most influential biographies ever written. On one level it is the life story of Booker T. Washington and his rise from slavery to accomplished educator and activist. On another level it the story of how an entire race strove to better itself. Washington makes it clear just how far race relations in America have come, and to some extent, just how much further they have to go. Written with wit and clarity.

Twelve Years a Slave

by Solomon Northup

Here is the harrowing true story of Solomon Northup, a free black man living in New York. He was kidnaped by unscrupulous slave hunters and sold into slavery where he endured unimaginable degradation and abuse until his rescue twelve years later. A powerful and riveting condemnation of American slavery.

The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave

by Mary Prince

Mary Prince was the first woman slave to write of her experience. Her recollections are vivid, powerful, and lyrical. Upon its publication the book had a galvanizing effect on the abolitionist movement in England.

The Haunted Bookshop

by Christopher Morley

The Haunted Bookshop was a delightful place, especially of an evening, when its drowsy alcoves were kindled with the brightness of lamps shining on the rows of volumes. Many a passer-by would stumble down the steps from the street in sheer curiosity; others, familiar visitors, dropped in with the same comfortable emotion that a man feels on entering his club.

The Greatest Thing in the World and Other Addresses

by Henry Drummond

"We have been accustomed to be told that the greatest thing in the religious world is Faith. That great word has been the key-note for centuries of the popular religion; and we have easily learned to look upon it as the greatest thing in the world. Well, we are wrong. If we have been told that, we may miss the mark. In the 13th chapter of I Corinthians, Paul takes us to Christianity at its source; and there we see, 'the greatest of these is love.'" Included here are "Love: the Greatest Thing in the World," "Lessons from the Angelus," "Pax Vobiscum," "First! An Address to Boys," "The Changed Life, the Greatest Need of the World," and "Dealing with Doubt."

The Great War Syndicate

by Frank R. Stockton

In the spring of a certain year, not far from the close of the nineteenth century, when the political relations between the United States and Great Britain became so strained that careful observers on both sides of the Atlantic were forced to the belief that a serious break in these relations might be looked for at any time, the fishing schooner Eliza Drum sailed from a port in Maine for the banks of Newfoundland.

The Game of Life and How to Play It

by Florence Scovel-Shinn

In the Game of Life and How to Play It, Florence Scovel Shinn gives us the rules to the game of life. But more importantly she also gives us a manual that instructs us on how to win the game. A wonderful and simple-to-follow book on the power of right thinking.

The Creative Process in the Individual

by Thomas Troward

Thomas Troward was an early New Thought writer who had an immense impact on those who would follow. Ernest Holmes, Frederick Bailes, Joseph Murphy, and Emmett Fox cited him as a major influence, and Genevieve Behrend was his student. It is impossible to over estimate his importance to the New Thought movement. His intense fusion of Eastern and Western philosophy is unmatched. The Law and the Word explores the connection between thought energy, scientific reasoning, and creative power. Chapters include Some Facts in Nature, Some Psychic Experiences, Man's Place in the Creative Order, The Law of Wholeness, The Soul of the Subject, The Promises, and Death and Immortality. The Creative Process in the Individual scientifically explains the sequence of creative activity starting from the beginnings of life through the development of mankind. We each have a divine right of creation. Sharing in that divine power to create what is good will open up a wonderful vista of possibilities. The Edinburgh and Dore Lectures on Mental Science are required reading for anyone wishing to understand and control the power of the mind. Without these lectures, the New Thought Movement and The Science of Mind might never have been born.

The Coming Conquest of England

by August Niemann

The Coming Conquest of England is a classic utopian novel that displayed the German lust for world domination long before either of the two world wars.

The City Without a Church

by Henry Drummond

"Two very startling things arrest us in John's vision of the future. The first is that the likest thing to Heaven he could think of was a City; the second, that there was no Church in that City. Almost nothing more revolutionary could be said, even to the modern world, in the name of religion. No Church-- that is the defiance of religion; a City-- that is the antipodes of Heaven. Yet John combines these contradictions in one daring image, and holds up to the world the picture of a City without a Church as his ideal of the heavenly life."

Showing 76 through 100 of 16,496 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.