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Ranking the Wishes

by Carl Dennis

In his seventh book, Carl Dennis explores the ways in which our wishes - those in our power to fulfill at any moment and those that have no chance of ever being realized - define who we are. While some of the poems view wishing as a failure to do justice to the world we have, others regard it as a recognition that no present, however rich, can satisfy the imagination, and suggest that one of the functions of poetry is to keep significant wishes alive. In showing with moving clarity how wishes are essential to giving shape and direction to the moment, these poems make use of a rich variety of genres: elegy, advice, meditation, warning, consolation, and prophecy. .

Loba

by Diane Di Prima

Loba is a visionary epic quest for the reintegration of the femimine, hailed by many as the great female counterpart to Allen Ginsberg's Howl when the first half appeared in 1978. Now published for the first time in its completed form with new material, Loba, "she-wolf" in Spanish explores the wilderness at the heart of experience, through the archetype of the wolf goddess, elemental symbol of complete self-acceptance. .

Red Trousseau

by Carol Muske

Carol Muske has been called one of the best poets of her generation. The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, Carolyn Kizer, commented that her technical dazzle and virtuosity are one of a kind: Mozartian. The poems in her new collection, Red Trousseau, use Los Angeles as a symbol for the seduction of appearances; in the title poem, reality crosses from the Wallace Stevens notion of the sun hovering in its guise of impatient tribunal to a director's reshooting of a tarnished sunset, so that the scene, infinite, rebegins. In Carol Muske's work, red, blue, and yellow dominate, serving to link such disparate things as a soundstage's fake prie dieu, a precinct station map of gang activity, and a schoolgirl's model of the planets, all of which take on the red of Salem burnings, the self-immolation of a political dissident in Prague, and Eros itself, moving like a red shadow over the body of love. Fate in Red Trousseau is drawn by a biochemist as a chemical, recodable spiral inside us, looping back and forth like a mobius of DNA or a movie reel; like a director or a lover, a rebeginning. Muske's Hollywood, also deriving much of its spiraling energy from another modernist, Marianne Moore, circles around its version of reality, infinitely rebeginning, until it becomes wholly the form. Life is made into an object - beautiful, but no longer life. Until, of course, the writer begins a new story, spiraling around a new apprehension of the world that is dangerous, political, and most of all, erotic. Stylistically brilliant and emotionally resonant, the poems in Red Trousseau display the work of a master poet at the peak of her craft.

A Simple Story

by Elizabeth Inchbald Pamela Clemit

A Simple Story by the actress, playwright and novelist Elizabeth Inchbald has remained enduringly popular and almost continuously in print since its first publication in 1791. In scenes charged with understated erotic tension it tells the stories of the flirtatious Miss Milner who falls in love with her guardian, a Roman Catholic priest and aristocrat, and of their daughter Matilda who, banished from her father's sight, craves his love. In her use of dramatic methods--expressive gestures, delayed revelations and economical dialogues--to present these two versions of the same power-struggle between an older father-lover figure and a young girl, Inchbald achieves a psychological intensity and subtlety of characterization rarely found in other late eighteenth-century novelists.

Hiss and Tell

by Pam Johnson-Bennett

Meet Mambo, the cat who attacks his owner, but only on Sundays, and Bonsai, the cat whose dislike for the new boyfriend becomes very embarrassing. What secret does Freddie know about his owner's new wife? In this offbeat and illuminating book, feline behaviorist Pam Johnson-Bennett, takes you on the wildest house calls of her career. These stories--each of which unfolds like a mystery--will help owners better understand the ever fascinating cat psyche. Following on the success of her comprehensive book, Think Like a Cat, Johnson-Bennett sheds light on the communication breakdowns between cats and their humans. .

Let's Hear It for the Girls

by Erica Bauermeister

"Bravo! They've given adults and young girls a much-needed treasure map of heroines and 'she-roes'. . . It blazes an important path in the forest of children's literature. "-Jim Trelease. .

Highways to a War

by Koch Christopher J.

'A quite outstanding novel about the Indochina war, the best I have read since Graham Greene's THE QUIET AMERICAN. ' Richard West, LITERARY REVIEW. When Mike Langford, a war photographer with a reputation for unusual risk-taking, disappears inside Cambodia, he becomes a mythic figure in the minds of his friends. The search for him which is at the heart of this novel explores the personal highways that led him to war, and to his ultimate fate.

Queer and Loathing

by David B. Feinberg

Rants and Raves of a Raging AIDS Clone

Dear Mr. Rogers, Does It Ever Rain in Your Neighborhood?

by Fred Rogers

"Every question a child or parent asks is important, and no one understands this better than the television Neighbor who has visited our homes for more than two decades. In this collection of letters and replies, Mister Rogers encourages parents, grandparents, and teachers to cherish the questions and comments that come from their children. With sincerity and sensitivity, real-life issues are addressed in chapters arranged by theme - the world, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, feelings and fears, television, family relationships, and death. Based on his lifelong studies in child development, Fred Rogers offers a thoughtful perspective on childhood and parenting. " "Dear Mister Rogers is an inspiration to parents and educators and a delight for all those interested in the unique way children see the world and wonder about it. "--BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

You Are Special

by Fred Rogers

Chock-full of the wisdom, wit, and whimsy that have made Mister Rogers a beloved friend to so many, this Miniature EditionTM is the perfect gift for any graduate -- or a nostalgic homecoming for anyone who's ever "visited" the Neighborhood.

Battling Bias

by Ruth Sidel

Politicians, philosophers, and academics have spent countless hours debating the issues of greatest concern on college campuses today: multiculturalism, political correctness, race relations, sexual politics, and gender. But what has been noticeably missing from their discussions are the voices of the students themselves. Battling Bias is one of the first books to offer an analysis of their actions and reactions on their own college campuses. In this work a wide variety of students from both public and private schools across the country share their pain and anger, their concerns and experiences and the impact on their lives of the surge of conflicts so omnipresent on campuses today. Sidel explores these issues against a backdrop of our current economic problems and polarities, our increasingly diverse society and changing patterns of immigration. She discusses the key problems for American higher education (including who should have access to it), and offers solutions. This unique contribution to the continuing debate on the role of education in a democratic society should be required reading for anyone interested in the future of our schools and of our nation. .

The Myth of Sanity

by Martha Stout

Why does a gifted psychiatrist suddenly begin to torment his own beloved wife? How can a ninety-pound woman carry a massive air conditioner to the second floor of her home, install it in a window unassisted, and then not remember how it got there? Why would a brilliant feminist law student ask her fiancé to treat her like a helpless little girl? How can an ordinary, violence-fearing businessman once have been a gun-packing vigilante prowling the crime districts for a fight? A startling new study in human consciousness, The Myth of Sanityis a landmark book about forgotten trauma, dissociated mental states, and multiple personality in everyday life. In its groundbreaking analysis of childhood trauma and dissociation and their far-reaching implications in adult life, it reveals that moderate dissociation is a normal mental reaction to pain and that even the most extreme dissociative reaction-multiple personality-is more common than we think. Through astonishing stories of people whose lives have been shattered by trauma and then remade, The Myth of Sanityshows us how to recognize these altered mental states in friends and family, even in ourselves. "We only think we're sane, says this Harvard psychologist. . . . The befuddled, normally sane masses can learn a lot from the victims of grave psychological abuse. " (The Dallas Morning News)

Five Children and It

by E. Nesbit

While exploring the environs of their summer home, five brothers and sisters find a Psammead, or Sand-fairy, in a nearby gravel pit: "Its eyes were on long horns like a snail's eyes, and it could move them in and out like telescopes; it had ears like a bat's ears, and its tubby body was shaped like a spider's and covered with thick soft fur; its legs and arms were furry too, and it had hands and feet like a monkey's. " The Psammead is magical and, every day, the ancient and irritable creature grants each of them a wish that lasts until sunset. Soon, though, they find their wishes never seem to turn out right and often have unexpected-and humorous-consequences. But when an accidental wish goes terribly wrong, the children learn that magic, like life, can be as complicated as it is exciting.

When Will the Dead Lady Sing?

by Patricia Sprinkle

When the body of a local vagrant is found dead and all signs point to MacLaren Yarbrough's old college boyfriend, Mac is caught in a murder investigation that puts her right in the spotlight.

Victoria

by Knut Hamsun

When it first appeared in 1898, this fourth novel by celebrated Norwegian writer Knut Hamsun captured instant acclaim for its poetic, psychologically intense portrayal of love's predicament in a class-bound society. Set in a coastal village of late nineteenth-century Norway, Victoria follows two doomed lovers through their thwarted lifelong romance. Johannes, the son of a miller, finds inspiration for his writing in his passionate devotion to Victoria, an impoverished aristocrat constrained by family loyalty. Separated by class barriers and social pressure, the fated pair parts ways, only to realize--too late--the grave misfortune of their lost opportunity. Elegantly rendered in this brand-new translation by Sverre Lyngstad, Victoria's haunting lyricism and emotional depth remain as timeless as ever. First time in Penguin Classics .

Apple Pie

by John T. Edge

What could be a more fun and delicious way to celebrate American culture than through the lore of our favorite foods? That's what John T. Edge does in his smart, witty, and compulsively readable new series on the dishes everyone thinks their mom made best. If these are the best-loved American foods-ones so popular they've come to represent us-what does that tell us about ourselves? And what do the history of the dish and the regional variations reveal? There are few aspects of life that carry more emotional weight and symbolism than food, and in writing about our food icons, Edge gives us a warm and wonderful portrait of America -by way of our taste buds. After all, "What is patriotism, but nostalgia for the foods of our youth?" as a Chinese philosopher once asked. In Fried Chicken, Edge tells an immensely entertaining tale of a beloved dish with a rich history. Freed slaves cooked it to sell through the windows of train cars from railroad platforms in whistle-stop towns. Children carried it in shoe boxes on long journeys. A picnic basket isn't complete without it. It is a dish that is deeply Southern, and yet it is cooked passionately across the country. And what about the variations? John T. Edge weaves a beguiling tapestry of food and culture as he takes us from a Jersey Shore hotel to a Kansas City roadhouse, from the original Buffalo wings to KFC, from Nashville Hot Chicken to haute fried chicken at a genteel Southern inn. And, best of all, he gives us fifteen of the ultimate recipes along the way.

Murder is a Girl's Best Friend

by Amanda Matetsky

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

Optimal Muscle Performance and Recovery

by Edmund Burke

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

Charlie Chan Is Dead 2

by Jessica Hagedorn Elaine Kim

More than a decade after its initial publication, the groundbreaking anthology Charlie Chan Is Dead remains the best available source for contemporary Asian American fiction. Edited by acclaimed novelist and National Book Award nominee Jessica Hagedorn, Charlie Chan Is Dead 2: At Home in the World brings together forty-two fresh, fascinating voices in Asian American writing--from classics by Jose Garcia Villa and Wakako Yamauchi to exciting new fiction from Akhil Sharma, Ruth Ozeki, Chang-Rae Lee, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Monique Truong. Sweeping in background and literary style, from pioneering writers to newly emerging voices from the Hmong and Korean communities, these exceptional works celebrate the full spectrum of Asian American experience and identities, transcending stereotypes and revealing the strength and vitality of Asian America today.

Brown

by Richard Rodriguez

In his dazzling new memoir, Richard Rodriguez reflects on the color brown and the meaning of Hispanics to the life of America today. Rodriguez argues that America has been brown since its inception-since the moment the African and the European met within the Indian eye. But more than simply a book about race, Brown is about America in the broadest sense--a look at what our country is, full of surprising observations by a writer who is a marvelous stylist as well as a trenchant observer and thinker. .

Who Let That Killer In The House?

by Patricia Sprinkle

Years ago, a dark cloud moved over the small town of Hopemore, Georgia, after the murder of a little girl. One man was sent to prison for life - and two young boys were changed forever. Eventually, the skies cleared - and although the tragedy left its mark, the folks in Hopemore settled back into their routines. But that dark cloud seems to have returned with the apparent suicide of one of the town's most beloved citizens - Dwayne Evans, a favorite high school chemistry teacher and dedicated softball coach.

Active Wellness (rev. edition)

by Gayle Reichler

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

Everglades

by Randy Wayne White

Doc Ford returns to his stilt house on Dinkin's Bay to find an old friend and one-time lover waiting for him. Her real-estate developer husband has disappeared and been pronounced dead, and she's sure there's worse to follow-and she's right. Following the trail, Ford ends up deep in the Everglades, at the gates of a community presided over by a man named Bhagwan Shiva (formerly Jerry Singh). Shiva is big business, but that business has been a little shaky lately, and so he's come up with a scheme to enhance both his cash and his power. Of course, there's the possibility that some people could get hurt and the Everglades itself damaged, but Shiva smells a killing. And if that should turn out to be literally, as well as figuratively, true...well, that's just too damned bad. Replete with passion and rich, pungent prose and some of the best suspense characters anywhere in fiction, Everglades is the finest work yet from an extraordinary talent.

Carol for Another Christmas

by Elizabeth Ann Scarborough

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

Filthy Shakespeare

by Pauline Kiernan

The works of William Shakespeare contain at least 400 puns on male and female genitals. Despite the richness and breathtaking scope of his sexual language, too little attention has been paid to the sheer salacious inventiveness of his indecent puns - until now. His plays and poems pulsate with puns on body parts and what they do. Filthy Shakespeare presents over 70 sizzling examples of the Bard at his raciest, arranged under different categories from Balls to Buggery, from Cunnilingus to the Clap, from Homosexual to Transvestite. Each filthy Shakespearean passage is translated into modern English and the hidden sexual meanings of the words explained in a glossary. In her fascinating and lively Introduction, Pauline Kiernan shows how Shakespeare's sexual wordplay had its roots in the social and political reality of Elizabethan and Jacobean England, where the harsh facts of life were often disguised by bawdy, brutal punning, and in the era when the English secret service was born, deciphering secret codes became a national obsession.

Showing 76 through 100 of 9,421 results

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