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The Valley of Fear

by Arthur Conan Doyle

Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson receive a coded message warning them that a murder will soon be committed. Following the clues, Holmes concludes that their new case has something to do with Professor Moriarty. Arthur Conan Doyle s fourth and final Sherlock Holmes novel follows the detective and his sidekick as they investigate a dangerous secret brotherhood.

The Two Covenants

by Andrew Murray

This book is a series of eighteen meditations contrasting the Old Covenant with the New Covenant. Murray shows us the blessings God has given us, along with the conditions necessary for the full and continual experience of those.

The Story of Doctor Doolittle

by Hugh Lofting

In this first book in the series, Doctor Dolittle discovers that he can talk to the animals--Jip the dog, Dab Dab the duck, Polynesia the parrot.

The Status Civilization

by Robert Sheckley

THE LIFE EXPECTANCY OF A NEW ARRIVAL ON OMEGA AVERAGED THREE EARTH YEARS Will Barrent could choose--exile on a nightmare planet, or life under the tyranny that had taken over Earth! Barrent had been tried, convicted, and memory-washed on Earth - an Earth strangely altered and stratified by fear of the radical and non-conformist. Now he was serving his sentence on Omega - a prison planet walled by a ring of hovering guard-ships from which there was no escape. Omega was a world of horror, a savage, ruthless way of life. But it was only a momentary ordeal, a prelude to a return to Earth and the subtle terrors of its own status civilization. The Status Civilization first appeared under the title Omega in Amazing Science Fiction Stories. Robert Sheckley was a Hugo- and Nebula-nominated author. His stories first appeared in science fiction magazines of the 1950s.His quick-witted stories and novels were famously unpredictable, absurdist and broadly comical. Sheckley was given the Author Emeritus honor by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America in 2001.

The Stars, My Brothers

by Edmond Hamilton

He was afraid -- not of the present or the future, but of the past. He was afraid of the thing tagged Reed Kieran, that stiff blind voiceless thing wheeling its slow orbit around the Moon, companion to dead worlds and silent space. . . .Hamilton was a thoughtful SF writer, and you can surely see that here: this is the tale of a man dead in space for centuries -- and revived by folks who approach an alien world a lot the way out nuttier environmentalists approach the defense of trees. There are creatures on this alien world, see, that look like people -- and act like chimpanzees. But chimps are animals, aren't they? Aren't they. . . ?

The Seven Against Thebes

by Aeschylus

Third play of a trilogy (the other two are lost) about the doomed family of Laius and Oedipus and his sons. After the city of Thebes has banished Oedipus, the former ruler's sons vie for the crown. The victor, Eteocles, expels his brother, Polyneices, who then recruits 7 champions to lead an assault on Thebes, with a tragic results.

The Rough Riders

by Theodore Roosevelt

Along with Colonel Leonard Wood, Theodore Roosevelt instigated the founding of the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry in 1898 at the beginning of the Spanish-American War. Nicknamed the Rough Riders by journalists, the Cavalry engaged in several battles. This is Roosevelt s best-selling account of one of the most fascinating regiments in American military history.

The Return of Sherlock Holmes

by Arthur Conan Doyle

The one and only Sherlock Holmes is back from the dead and devoting his life once more to examining the criminal complexities of England's capital city. The thirteen stories included in this masterful book tell of his return. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote of many dreadful murders, but the one which astonished and distressed readers the most was when the author, anxious to try something new, killed off Sherlock Holmes. Trapped in mortal combat with the dastardly Professor Moriarty, Holmes and his opponent plunged to their deaths in the Reichenbach Falls. For ten long years, Baker Street was without its most revered resident. Then, in 1903, Doyle took pity on his readers and brought the sagacious sleuth back to life. The thirteen stories included in this masterful book tell of his return. Cases of mysterious codes, persecuted millionaires, stalkers, abductions, and a meeting with ''the worst man in London'' are all tackled with renewed vigor. But Holmes' old enemies are watching his every move.

The Reality of Prayer

by E. M. Bounds

Pray, Pray and Pray some more! God loves it and the Devil hates it. In The Reality of Prayer Bounds explores how prayer is A Privilege, Princely & Sacred, how it Fills Man's Poverty with God's Riches, Our Lord's Model Prayer, The Holy Spirit and Prayer and much more. The word "Prayer" expresses the largest and most comprehensive approach unto God. It gives prominence to the element of devotion. It is communion and intercourse with God. It is enjoyment of God. It is access to God. "Supplication" is a more restricted and more intense form of prayer, accompanied by a sense of personal need, limited to the seeking in an urgent manner of a supply for pressing need. "Supplication" is the very soul of prayer in the way of pleading for some one thing, greatly needed, and the need intensely felt. E. M. Bounds offered perhaps a more profound understanding of prayer than any other contemporary Christian thinker. His classic books on the personal communication with God explore how prayer must come from the whole being and strengthens faith in Christian lives. Edward McKendree Bounds was a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and author of eleven books, nine of which focused on the subject of prayer. Bounds was a practicing lawyer at age nineteen and after three years, began preaching for the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. At the time of his pastorate in Brunswick, Missouri, war was declared. Bounds became a prisoner of war after refusing to take the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government. Upon release he served as chaplain of the Fifth Missouri regiment until the close of the war.

The Rainbow

by D. H. Lawrence

The Brangwen family has lived in Nottinghamshire for generations. The Rainbow tells the story of the three generations of Brangwens who live at Marsh Farm from 1840 to the early 1900 s. In this book, D. H. Lawrence explored the impact of sexuality upon human relationships with such frankness that, shortly after its publication in 1915, it was brought to trial for obscenity.

The Rainbow and Women in Love

by D. H. Lawrence

The Rainbow by D. H. Lawrence follows three generations of the Brangwen family, focusing on the sexual dynamics of, and relations between, the characters. Lawrence's frank treatment of sexual desire and the power plays within relationships as a natural and even spiritual force of life caused The Rainbow to be prosecuted in an obscenity trial in late 1915, as a result of which all copies were seized and burnt. After this ban it was unavailable in Britain for 11 years. Women in Love is a sequel to The Rainbow. Ursula and Gudrun Brangwen are two sisters living in the Midlands of England in the 1910s. Ursula is a teacher, Gudrun an artist. They meet two men who live nearby, Rupert Birkin and Gerald Crich. The four become friends. Ursula and Birkin become involved and Gudrun eventually begins a love affair with Gerald. All four are deeply concerned with questions of society, politics, and the relationship between men and women. Birkin asks Ursula to marry him, and she agrees. Gerald and Gudrun's relationship, however, becomes stormy.

A Kiss Away

by Sherryl Woods

With her fortieth birthday looming, Jessica Warren vows to be both mature and physically fit. But her roguish new neighbor, Kevin Lawrence, stymies her on each count! Whether she's joylessly jogging or acting carefully cool, Kevin's playful goading... and gleaming pectorals... leave her palms sweaty and her heart pounding. While Kevin's erotically boyish appeal tatters Jessica's defenses, his utter disregard for "what people will think" outrages her sense of propriety. What can she do with a man who thinks a shared craving for buttered popcorn makes them a perfect pair? A man who thinks nothing worthwhile is further than a kiss away? What can she do... except love him?

The Pursuit of God

by A. W. Tozer

A.W. Tozer's classic Christian work covers: 1. Following Hard After God 2. The Blessedness of Possessing Nothing 3. Removing the Veil 4. Apprehending God 5. The Universal Presence 6. The Speaking Voice 7. The Gaze of the Soul 8. Restoring the Creator-Creature Relation 9. Meekness and Rest 10. The Sacrament of Living

The Prince and Betty

by P. G. Wodehouse

A pretty girl in a blue dress came out of the house, and began to walk slowly across the terrace to where Elsa Keith sat with Marvin Rossiter in the shade of the big sycamore. Elsa and Marvin had become engaged some few days before, and were generally to be found at this time sitting together in some shaded spot in the grounds of the Keith's Long Island home.

The Prayer Life

by Andrew Murray

In "The Prayer Life," noted Christian author Andrew Murray addresses the problem of prayerlessness, a problem that knows no generational boundaries. Murray cuts to the heart of the problem, offering suggestions which, if followed, will have a serious impact on the life of the earnest reader. Murray explains that, since prayer is an outgrowth of abiding in Christ, prayerlessness is fundamentally a lack of abiding rather than simply a lack of prayer. "The Prayer Life" is a challenging call to a deeper Christian experience, out of which will naturally flow a life of prayer. Much more than a book on how to pray, "The Prayer Life" is a book on how to have a deeper spiritual walk.

The Power of Concentration

by Theron Q. Dumont

This is a new edition of Dumont's important work on the role of concentration in achieving business and personal success.

The Possibility of Prayer

by E. M. Bounds

Pray, Pray and Pray some more! God loves it and the Devil hates it. E. M. Bounds offered perhaps a more profound understanding of prayer than any other contemporary Christian thinker. His classic books on the personal communication with God explore how prayer must come from the whole being and strengthens faith in Christian lives. It is through prayer that we share our thoughts and desires our father God. Doing good works, communion, church activities and the like, do not and should not replace prayer. Prayer must be a priority in our lives. "Prayer should be the breath of our breathing, the thought of our thinking, the soul of our feeling, and the life of our living, the sound of our hearing, the growth of our growing. Prayer in its magnitude is length without end, width without bounds, height without top, and depth without bottom. Illimitable in its breadth, exhaustless in height, fathomless in depths and infinite in extension." In The Possibilities of Prayer E. M. Bounds addresses; The Ministry of Prayer, Prayer and the Promises, Its Possibilities, Answered Prayer, Divine Providence and much more. Edward McKendree Bounds was a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and author of eleven books, nine of which focused on the subject of prayer. Bounds was a practicing lawyer at age nineteen and after three years, began preaching for the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. At the time of his pastorate in Brunswick, Missouri, war was declared. Bounds became a prisoner of war after refusing to take the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government. Upon release he served as chaplain of the Fifth Missouri regiment until the close of the war.

The People that Time Forgot

by Edgar Rice Burroughs

In uncharted Caprona, an island lost from the map of the earth, where time had stopped and all the primeval creatures of long-gone ages still prowled, Bowen Tyler was lost. To find Tyler, Thomas Billings traveled across the world to Caprona with every advantage the modern world could afford. A light hydroplane would allow him to scale the perilous wall of cliffs that surrounded the island, and rifles, pistols, and ammunition would provide protection against the monstrous prehistoric beings Tyler had so vividly described. But even stranger mysteries awaited him where that barbaric civilization hid, torn between the impassable jungle on the one side and an unknown menace on the other.

The Outlaw of Torn

by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs created one of the most iconic figures in American pop culture, Tarzan of the Apes, and it is impossible to overstate his influence on entire genres of popular literature in the decades after his enormously winning pulp novels stormed the public's imagination. The Outlaw of Torn, first published in 1927, is considered one of Burroughs' best adventure yarns, a Robin Hood-esque tale of the rescue of young Prince Richard, Henry III's son, from the nefarious clutches of Sir Jules de Vac by Norman of Torn, who becomes a great swordsman and legendary outlaw.

The New Psychology

by Charles F. Haanel

In The New Psychology by Charles F. Haanel, the author of the Master Key System, you will learn how to unlock the power of positive thinking. Haanel believe that if you learn to think in a certain way than success can be yours. The New Psychology is an important self help book by one of the most important self help authors ever. Without Haanel we would never have had The Secret or The Power of Positive Thinking.

The Necessity of Prayer

by E. M. Bounds

In any study of the principles and procedure of prayer, of its activities and enterprises, first place must, of necessity, be given to faith. It is the initial quality in the heart of any man who essays to talk to the Unseen. He must, out of sheer helplessness, stretch forth hands of faith. He must believe where he cannot prove. In the ultimate issue, prayer is simply faith, claiming its natural yet marvellous prerogatives - faith taking possession of its illimitable inheritance. True godliness is just as true, steady, and persevering in the realm of faith as it is in the province of prayer. Moreover: when faith ceases to pray, it ceases to live. Faith does the impossible because it brings God to undertake for us, and nothing is impossible with God.

The Mysterious Island

by Jules Verne

The Mysterious Island tells the exciting story of five Americans stranded on an uncharted island in the South Pacific. During the American Civil War, Richmond, Virginia was the capital of the Confederate States of America. Five northern prisoners of war decide to escape Richmond in a rather unusual way - by hijacking a balloon. After flying in stormy weather for several days, the group crash-lands on a unknown, cliff-bound, volcanic island. Ultimately, Captain Nemo plays an important role in the resolution of this novel.

The Mysterious Affair at Styles

by Agatha Christie

Christie's first published novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles is notable for introducing many of the character types, plot twists, and red herrings that would become commonplace during the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. Set in a remote country manor with a small handful of suspects, The Mysterious Affair at Styles is the quintessential detective story and remains one of the most significant literary works in the mystery genre.

The Monster-God of Mamurth

by Edmond Hamilton

Here is a collection of some of the finest short fiction stories penned by one of "fathers" of modern science fiction. These stories were selected (and edited) by his wife Leigh Brackett, an author and a screenwriter. Her screen-writing credits include works on such films as The Big Sleep, Rio Bravo, The Long Goodbye and Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. This collection spans nearly half a century of Edmond Hamilton's work and was selected from a repository of hundreds of stories that he had written over that period.

The Legend of King Arthur and His Knights

by Sir James Knowles

King Arthur is a legendary British leader who, according to Medieval histories and romances, led the defense of Britain against Saxon invaders in the early sixth century. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians. The sparse historical background of Arthur is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin. The legendary Arthur developed as a figure of international interest largely through the popularity of Geoffrey of Monmouth's fanciful and imaginative 12th-century Historia Regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain). However, some Welsh and Breton tales and poems relating the story of Arthur date from earlier than this work; in these works, Arthur appears either as a great warrior defending Britain from human and supernatural enemies or as a magical figure of folklore, sometimes associated with the Welsh Otherworld, Annwn. How much of Geoffrey's Historia (completed in 1138) was adapted from such earlier sources, rather than invented by Geoffrey himself, is unknown. Although the themes, events and characters of the Arthurian legend varied widely from text to text, and there is no one canonical version, Geoffrey's version of events often served as the starting point for later stories. Geoffrey depicted Arthur as a king of Britain who defeated the Saxons and established an empire over Britain, Ireland, Iceland, Norway and Gaul. In fact, many elements and incidents that are now an integral part of the Arthurian story appear in Geoffrey's Historia, including Arthur's father Uther Pendragon, the wizard Merlin, the sword Excalibur, Arthur's birth at Tintagel, his final battle against Mordred at Camlann and final rest in Avalon. The 12th-century French writer Chrétien de Troyes, who added Lancelot and the Holy Grail to the story, began the genre of Arthurian romance that became a significant strand of medieval literature. In these French stories, the narrative focus often shifts from King Arthur himself to other characters, such as various Knights of the Round Table. Arthurian literature thrived during the Middle Ages but waned in the centuries that followed until it experienced a major resurgence in the 19th century. In the 21st century, the legend lives on, not only in literature but also in adaptations for theatre, film, television, comics and other media. The Sir James Knowles version of King Arthur is considered as the most accurate and well known original story of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.

Showing 7,626 through 7,650 of 16,134 results

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