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Who Made Early Christianity?: The Jewish Lives of the Apostle Paul

by John G. Gager

In this philosophical and theological study, John Gager undermines the Apostle Paul's rejection of Judaism, conversion to Christianity, and founding of Christian anti-Judaism. Through meticulous research and well-supported argument, he finds that the rise of Christianity occurred well after Paul's death and attributes the distortion of the Apostle's views to early and later Christians. Though these elites ascribed a rejection-replacement theology to Paul's legend, Gager shows that the Apostle was considered a loyal Jew by many of his Jesus-believing contemporaries and that later Jewish and Muslim thinkers held the same view. He holds that one of the earliest misinterpretations of Paul was to make him the founder of Christianity, and in recent times numerous Jewish and Christian readers of Paul have moved beyond this understanding.Gager also finds that Judaism did not fade away after Paul's death but continued to appeal to both Christians and pagans for centuries. Jewish synagogues remained important religious and social institutions throughout the Mediterranean world. Making use of all possible literary and archaeological sources, including Muslim texts, Gager helps recover the long pre-history of a Jewish Paul, obscured by recent, negative portrayals of the Apostle, and recognizes the enduring bond between Jews and Christians that influenced all aspects of a developing Christianity.

Grassroots Fascism: The War Experience of the Japanese People

by Yoshimi Yoshiaki

Grassroots Fascism profiles the Asia Pacific War (1941--1945) -- the most important though least understood experience of Japan's modern history -- through the lens of ordinary Japanese life. Moving deftly from the struggles of the home front to the occupied territories to the ravages of the front line, the book offers rare insight into popular experience from the war's troubled beginnings through Japan's disastrous defeat in 1945 and the new beginning it heralded.Yoshimi Yoshiaki mobilizes personal diaries, memoirs, and government documents to portray the ambivalent position of ordinary Japanese as both wartime victims and active participants. He also provides equally penetrating accounts of the war experience of Japan's imperial subjects, including Koreans and Taiwanese. This book challenges the idea that the Japanese operated as a passive, homogenous mass during the war -- a mere conduit for a military--imperial ideology imposed upon them by the political elite. Viewed from the bottom up, wartime Japan unfolds as a complex modern mass society, with a corresponding variety of popular roles and agendas. In chronicling the diversity of the Japanese social experience, Yoshimi's account elevates our understanding of Japan's war and "Japanese Fascism," and in its relation of World War II to the evolution -- and destruction -- of empire, it makes a fresh contribution to the global history of the war. Ethan Mark's translation supplements the Japanese original with explanatory annotations and an in-depth analytical introduction, drawing on personal interviews to situate the work within Japanese studies and global history.

Seducing Harry

by Judith Marks-White

Coco Plotnick Hollander Harding, a columnist for Connecticut's Seaport Gazette, relishes two things in life: food and sex. While the first can be satisfied with a delectable foie gras, her cravings for the latter leave her with hunger pangs of a different sort-particularly since her WASPy husband is not exactly a gourmand in the bedroom.While covering a Chaîne des Rôtisseurs vegetarian banquet for the Gazette, Coco finds her appetite whetted by a very charming (and very married) plastic surgeon, Harry Troutman. The two foodies quickly commence a feast of hot infidelity, but anonymous letters sent to Coco's husband and Harry's sleek, self-indulgent wife, Eclaire, hint at the torrid affair . . . and provide the crucial ingredients in a recipe for disaster. Will the lovers receive their just desserts?In this lip-smacking debut novel, Judith Marks-White whips up a five-course meal of saucy wit, steamy sex, and tantalizing scandal that will fill your plate and please your palate.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Boy Meets Boy

by David Levithan

This is the story of Paul, a sophomore at a high school like no other: The cheerleaders ride Harleys, the homecoming queen used to be a guy named Daryl (she now prefers Infinite Darlene and is also the star quarterback), and the gay-straight alliance was formed to help the straight kids learn how to dance. When Paul meets Noah, he thinks he's found the one his heart is made for. Until he blows it. The school bookie says the odds are 12-to-1 against him getting Noah back, but Paul's not giving up without playing his love really loud. His best friend Joni might be drifting away, his other best friend Tony might be dealing with ultra-religious parents, and his ex-boyfriend Kyle might not be going away anytime soon, but sometimes everything needs to fall apart before it can really fit together right.This is a happy-meaningful romantic comedy about finding love, losing love, and doing what it takes to get love back in a crazy-wonderful world.

BLIND SPOT

by Stephanie Kane

Cold, hard evidence--a prosecutor's dream, a defense attorney's nightmare Criminal defense lawyer Jackie Flowers got what she wished for...a high-profile murder case. While defending entrepreneur Aaron Best in the grisly slaying of a millionaire's trophy wife, Jackie turns FBI profiling upside down and uncovers a string of killings that could either free or hang her client. But Jackie has one big secret of her own--and it might make her the killer's next target.Someone is stalking women along the Rocky Mountain Front Range, and posing their beheaded bodies in bizarre ways. Will Jackie's unique courtroom talents enable her to strip away the killer's facade--or will her own blind spot expose her? Either way could lead a murderer straight to her door.From the Paperback edition.

Quiet

by Susan Cain

The book that started the Quiet RevolutionAt least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over working in teams. It is to introverts--Rosa Parks, Chopin, Dr. Seuss, Steve Wozniak--that we owe many of the great contributions to society. In Quiet, Susan Cain argues that we dramatically undervalue introverts and shows how much we lose in doing so. She charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal throughout the twentieth century and explores how deeply it has come to permeate our culture. She also introduces us to successful introverts--from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.Now with Extra Libris material, including a reader's guide and bonus content

French Made Simple

by Eugene Jackson Antonio Rubio Julien Lafontant Pamela Haze

Learn to Speak French Quickly and Easily! An invaluable introduction to one of the most studied languages in America, French Made Simple is ideal for the student, business person, or tourist. Teaching the basics of grammar, vocabulary, and culture, it guides you step-by-step through the process of learning and conversing quickly. Refreshingly easy to understand, French Made Simple includes:* Basics of grammar* Modern vocabulary* Helpful verb chart* French-English Dictionary* Reading exercises* Economic information* Common expressions* Review quizzes* Complete answer keyFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

The Book Thief

by Markus Zusak

The extraordinary #1 New York Times bestseller that is now a major motion picture, Markus Zusak's unforgettable story is about the ability of books to feed the soul.It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still.Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist-books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement. In superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak, author of I Am the Messenger, has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time.

Acceptable Loss

by Kregg P. J. Jorgenson

The true-to-life story of a Ranger who volunteered to serve on a Blue Team in the Air Cavalry, racing to the aid of soldiers who faced the same dangers he had barely survived in the jungles of Vietnam. Whether enduring NVA sniper attacks, surviving "friendly" fire, or landing in hot LZs, Jorgenson discovered that in Vietnam you never knew whether you were paranoid or just painfully aware of the possibilities.From the Paperback edition.

The Seer of Egypt

by Pauline Gedge

Huy has risen from lowly origins to become the Seer of the King. Yet Amunhotep's patronage is both a blessing and a curse to Huy, who feels imprisoned by the gift Thoth has imposed on him and by the life he must live to keep it. Though rewarded with wealth and influence, Huy longs for the pleasures of those he sees around him, especially love, which seems forever lost to him. But when the King calls for his help, Huy has no choice. The life he knew is coming to an end, but his contribution to Egyptian history is just beginning.

The Kings Man Trilogy Book III

by Pauline Gedge

Twelve-year-old Amunhotep III has ascended the throne, becoming king of the richest empire on earth. The boy's mother acts as regent, but she has brought to court the renowned seer, Huy, son of a humble farmer, to be scribe and counsel to her royal son. It's a position of power and responsibility--one fraught with intrigue and the lure of corruption. For it is Huy who controls the treasury, the military, all construction, and taxation--and perhaps most important, it's his task to choose the young Pharaoh's queen. His actions and premonitions, as well as his legendary past, make him very few friends and a great many enemies... The King's Man continues the story of Huy--first seen in The Twice Born and Seer of Egypt--and his rise to power and fame. With her meticulous research and compelling prose, Pauline Gedge immerses readers in the ancient and fascinating culture that was Egypt.

China's Hidden Children: Abandonment, Adoption, and the Human Costs of the One-Child Policy

by Kay Ann Johnson

In the thirty-five years since China instituted its One-Child Policy, 120,000 children--mostly girls--have left China through international adoption, including 85,000 to the United States. It's generally assumed that this diaspora is the result of China's approach to population control, but there is also the underlying belief that the majority of adoptees are daughters because the One-Child Policy often collides with the traditional preference for a son. While there is some truth to this, it does not tell the full story--a story with deep personal resonance to Kay Ann Johnson, a China scholar and mother to an adopted Chinese daughter. Johnson spent years talking with the Chinese parents driven to relinquish their daughters during the brutal birth-planning campaigns of the 1990s and early 2000s, and, with China's Hidden Children, she paints a startlingly different picture. The decision to give up a daughter, she shows, is not a facile one, but one almost always fraught with grief and dictated by fear. Were it not for the constant threat of punishment for breaching the country's stringent birth-planning policies, most Chinese parents would have raised their daughters despite the cultural preference for sons. With clear understanding and compassion for the families, Johnson describes their desperate efforts to conceal the birth of second or third daughters from the authorities. As the Chinese government cracked down on those caught concealing an out-of-plan child, strategies for surrendering children changed--from arranging adoptions or sending them to live with rural family to secret placement at carefully chosen doorsteps and, finally, abandonment in public places. In the twenty-first century, China's so-called abandoned children have increasingly become "stolen" children, as declining fertility rates have left the dwindling number of children available for adoption more vulnerable to child trafficking. In addition, government seizures of locally--but illegally--adopted children and children hidden within their birth families mean that even legal adopters have unknowingly adopted children taken from parents and sent to orphanages. The image of the "unwanted daughter" remains commonplace in Western conceptions of China. With China's Hidden Children, Johnson reveals the complex web of love, secrecy, and pain woven in the coerced decision to give one's child up for adoption and the profound negative impact China's birth-planning campaigns have on Chinese families.

The Rhapsodes: How 1940s Critics Changed American Film Culture

by David Bordwell

Pauline Kael, Andrew Sarris, and Roger Ebert were three of America's most revered and widely read film critics, more famous than many of the movies they wrote about. But their remarkable contributions to the burgeoning American film criticism of the 1960s and beyond were deeply influenced by four earlier critics: Otis Ferguson, James Agee, Manny Farber, and Parker Tyler. Throughout the 1930s and '40s, Ferguson, Agee, Farber, and Tyler scrutinized what was on the screen with an intensity not previously seen in popular reviewing. Although largely ignored by the arts media of the day, they honed the sort of serious discussion of films that would be made popular decades later by Kael, Sarris, Ebert and their contemporaries. With The Rhapsodes, renowned film scholar and critic David Bordwell--an heir to both those legacies--restores to a wider audience the work of Ferguson, Agee, Farber, and Tyler, critics he calls the "Rhapsodes" for the passionate and deliberately offbeat nature of their vernacular prose. Each broke with prevailing currents in criticism in order to find new ways to talk about the popular films that contemporaries often saw at best as trivial, at worst as a betrayal of art. Ferguson saw in Hollywood an engaging, adroit mode of popular storytelling. Agee sought in cinema the lyrical epiphanies found in romantic poetry. Farber, trained as a painter, brought a pictorial intelligence to bear on film. A surrealist, Tyler treated classic Hollywood as a collective hallucination that invited both audience and critic to find moments of subversive pleasure. With his customary clarity and brio, Bordwell takes readers through the relevant cultural and critical landscape and considers the critics' writing styles, their conceptions of films, and their quarrels. He concludes by examining the profound impact of Ferguson, Agee, Farber, and Tyler on later generations of film writers. The Rhapsodes allows readers to rediscover these remarkable critics who broke with convention to capture what they found moving, artful, or disappointing in classic Hollywood cinema and explores their robust--and continuing--influence.

Forbidden City

by Gail Mazur

from "Mount Fuji" A draughtsman's draughtsman, Hokusai at 70 thought he'd begun to grasp the structures of birds and beasts, insects and fish, of the way plants grow, hoped that by 90 he'd have penetrated to their essential nature. And more, by 100, I will have reached the stage where every dot, every mark I make will be alive. You always loved that resolve, you'd repeat joyfully--Hokusai's utterance of faith in work's possibilities, its reward, that, at 130, he'd perhaps have learned to draw. Gail Mazur's poems in Forbidden City build an engaging meditative structure upon the elements of mortality and art, eloquently contemplating the relationship of art and life--and the dynamic possibilities of each in combination. At the collection's heart is the poet's long marriage to the artist Michael Mazur (1935-2009). A fascinating range of tone infuses the book--grieving, but clear-eyed rather than lugubrious, sometimes whimsical, even comical, and often exuberant. The note of pleasure, as in an old tradition enriched by transience, runs through the work, even in the final poem, "Grief," where "our ravenous hold on the world" is a powerful central element.

That Kind of Happy

by Maggie Dietz

October Aubade If I slept too long, forgive me. A north wind quickened the window frames so the room pitched like a moving train and the pillow's whiff of hickory and shaving soap conjured your body beside me. So I slept in the berth as the train chuffed on, unburdened by waking's cold water, ignorant of pain, estrangement, hunger and the crucial fuel the boiler burned to keep the minutes' pistons churning while I slept. Forgive me. That Kind of Happy, the long-awaited second collection by award-winning poet Maggie Dietz, explores the sharp, profound tension between a disquieted inner life and quotidian experience. Central to the book are poems that take up two major life events: becoming a mother and losing a father within a short stretch of time. Here, at the intersection of joy and grief, of persistence and attrition, Dietz wrestles with the questions posed by such conflicting experiences, revealing a mind suspicious of quick fixes and dissatisfied with easy answers. The result is a book as anguished as it is distinguished.

The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker

by Katherine J. Cramer

Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government in the wake of the Great Recession. In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. How could this happen? How is it that the very people who stand to benefit from strong government services not only vote against the candidates who support those services but are vehemently against the very idea of big government? With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the "liberal elite." Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the distinct values of their communities and allocate a fair share of resources. What can look like disagreements about basic political principles are therefore actually rooted in something even more fundamental: who we are as people and how closely a candidate's social identity matches our own. Using Scott Walker and Wisconsin's prominent and protracted debate about the appropriate role of government, Cramer illuminates the contours of rural consciousness, showing how place-based identities profoundly influence how people understand politics, regardless of whether urban politicians and their supporters really do shortchange or look down on those living in the country. The Politics of Resentment shows that rural resentment--no less than partisanship, race, or class--plays a major role in dividing America against itself.

Blowin' Up: Rap Dreams in South Central

by Jooyoung Lee

Dr. Dre. Snoop Dogg. Ice Cube. Some of the biggest stars in hip hop made their careers in Los Angeles. And today there is a new generation of young, mostly black, men busting out rhymes and hoping to one day find themselves "blowin' up"--getting signed to a record label and becoming famous. Many of these aspiring rappers get their start in Leimart Park, home to the legendary hip hop open-mic workshop Project Blowed. In Blowin' Up, Jooyoung Lee takes us deep inside Project Blowed and the surrounding music industry, offering an unparalleled look at hip hop in the making. While most books on rap are written from the perspective of listeners and the market, Blowin' Up looks specifically at the creative side of rappers. As Lee shows, learning how to rap involves a great deal of discipline, and it takes practice to acquire the necessary skills to put on a good show. Along with Lee--who is himself a pop-locker--we watch as the rappers at Project Blowed learn the basics, from how to hold a microphone to how to control their breath amid all those words. And we meet rappers like E. Crimsin, Nocando, VerBS, and Flawliss as they freestyle and battle with each other. For the men at Project Blowed, hip hop offers a creative alternative to the gang lifestyle, substituting verbal competition for physical violence, and provides an outlet for setting goals and working toward them. Engagingly descriptive and chock-full of entertaining personalities and real-life vignettes, Blowin' Up not only delivers a behind-the-scenes view of the underground world of hip hop, but also makes a strong case for supporting the creative aspirations of young, urban, black men, who are often growing up in the shadow of gang violence and dead-end jobs.

Practicing Utopia: An Intellectual History of the New Town Movement

by Rosemary Wakeman

The typical town springs up around a natural resource--a river, an ocean, an exceptionally deep harbor--or in proximity to a larger, already thriving town. Not so with "new towns," which are created by decree rather than out of necessity and are often intended to break from the tendencies of past development. New towns aren't a new thing--ancient Phoenicians named their colonies Qart Hadasht, or New City--but these utopian developments saw a resurgence in the twentieth century. In Practicing Utopia, Rosemary Wakeman gives us a sweeping view of the new town movement as a global phenomenon. From Tapiola in Finland to Islamabad in Pakistan, Cergy-Pontoise in France to Irvine in California, Wakeman unspools a masterly account of the golden age of new towns, exploring their utopian qualities and investigating what these towns can tell us about contemporary modernization and urban planning. She presents the new town movement as something truly global, defying a Cold War East-West dichotomy or the north-south polarization of rich and poor countries. Wherever these new towns were located, whatever their size, whether famous or forgotten, they shared a utopian lineage and conception that, in each case, reveals how residents and planners imagined their ideal urban future.

Living with Moral Disagreement: The Enduring Controversy about Affirmative Action

by Michele S. Moses

How to handle affirmative action is one of the most intractable policy problems of our era, touching on controversial issues such as race-consciousness and social justice. Much has been written both for and against affirmative action policies--especially within the realm of educational opportunity. In this book, philosopher Michele S. Moses offers a crucial new pathway for thinking about the debate surrounding educational affirmative action, one that holds up the debate itself as an important emblem of the democratic process. Central to Moses's analysis is the argument that we need to understand disagreements about affirmative action as inherently moral, products of conflicts between deeply held beliefs that shape differing opinions on what justice requires of education policy. As she shows, differing opinions on affirmative action result from different conceptual values, for instance, between being treated equally and being treated as an equal or between seeing race-consciousness as a pernicious political force or as a necessary variable in political equality. As Moses shows, although moral disagreements about race-conscious policies and similar issues are often seen as symptoms of dysfunctional politics, they in fact create rich opportunities for discussions about diversity that nourish democratic thought and life.

Processual Sociology

by Andrew Abbott

For the past twenty years, noted sociologist Andrew Abbott has been developing what he calls a processual ontology for social life. In this view, the social world is constantly changing--making, remaking, and unmaking itself, instant by instant. He argues that even the units of the social world--both individuals and entities--must be explained by these series of events rather than as enduring objects, fixed in time. This radical concept, which lies at the heart of the Chicago School of Sociology, provides a means for the disciplines of history and sociology to interact with and reflect on each other. In Processual Sociology, Abbott first examines the endurance of individuals and social groups through time and then goes on to consider the question of what this means for human nature. He looks at different approaches to the passing of social time and determination, all while examining the goal of social existence, weighing the concepts of individual outcome and social order. Abbott concludes by discussing core difficulties of the practice of social science as a moral activity, arguing that it is inescapably moral and therefore we must develop normative theories more sophisticated than our current naively political normativism. Ranging broadly across disciplines and methodologies, Processual Sociology breaks new ground in its search for conceptual foundations of a rigorously processual account of social life.

Treading on Thin Air: Atmospheric Physics, Forensic Meteorology, and Climate Change: How Weather Shapes Our Everyday Lives

by Elizabeth Austin

Weather is an inescapable part of our daily lives, from the nuances of air travel to the breadth of human history. Our past, present, and future is intimately rooted is weather and climate. Weather, water, and climate. How we feel, how productive we are, even our sheer existence, depends on these three things. The United States economic activity varies annually by 1.7% due to weather--that is more than $500 billion dollars each year! Weather applications on mobile devices are the second most popular 'apps' - more popular than social networking, maps, music,and news. In Treading on Thin Air, Dr. Elizabeth Austin, a world-renowned atmospheric physicist, reveals how the climate is intimately tied to our daily lives. The effects and impacts of weather on humans, society and the planet are changing with the times. Dr. Austin will demystify climate change, revealing what is really happening with our climate and why, whether it is El Nino, tornadoes, floods or hurricanes. Weather and society are at its most fascinating at extremes, and as Dr. Austin is one of a handful of forensic meteorologists around the globe. She has been called upon to investigate plane crashes, murders, wildfires, avalanches, even bombing cases. Drawing upon her rich experiences, Austin's Treading on Thin Air promises to be an enlightening and informative journey through the wild word of weather.

Zen and Tonic: Savory and Fresh Cocktails for the Enlightened Drinker

by Jules Aron

Green drinks gone boozy Green drinks gone boozy!Create your own delicious cocktails using ingredients you can find in your own backyard, windowsill, or local farmer's market. Learn to make your own simple syrups and infusions with immune boosting fruits, herbs and veggies that will leave you feeling refreshed and energized. Lavishly illustrated with full-color photographs and offering over 100 fun, simple, and delicious cocktail recipes, Zen and Tonic lets you infuse your life and drinks with healthy, wholesome, revitalizing ingredients.Complete with a thorough introduction to today's producers of organic and quality spirits, and a spotlight on the wholesome herbs, spices and super foods featured in the recipes, Zen and Tonic, brings a fresh twist to the classic toast: "Let's drink to your health!"

The Yellow Sofa

by Eça De Queirós

A compassionate tale of marriage, manners, and betrayal, from the Portuguese master José Maria Eça de Queirós, the first great modern Portuguese novelist, wrote The Yellow Sofa with (in his own words) "no digressions, no rhetoric," creating a book where "everything is interesting and dramatic and quickly narrated." The story, a terse and seamless spoof of Victorian bourgeois morals, concerns a successful businessman who returns home to find his wife "on the yellow damask sofa, leaning in abandon on the shoulder of a man." The man is none other than his best friend and business partner. While struggling with the need to defend his honor, he fights a stronger inner desire for domestic tranquility and forgiveness. The Yellow Sofa firmly establishes Eça de Queirós in the literary pantheon that includes Dickens, Flaubert, Balzac, and Tolstoy.

The Science of Interstellar

by Kip Thorne

A journey through the otherworldly science behind Christopher Nolan's highly anticipated film, Interstellar, from executive producer and theoretical physicist Kip Thorne. Interstellar, from acclaimed filmmaker Christopher Nolan, takes us on a fantastic voyage far beyond our solar system. Yet in The Science of Interstellar, Kip Thorne, the physicist who assisted Nolan on the scientific aspects of Interstellar, shows us that the movie's jaw-dropping events and stunning, never-before-attempted visuals are grounded in real science. Thorne shares his experiences working as the science adviser on the film and then moves on to the science itself. In chapters on wormholes, black holes, interstellar travel, and much more, Thorne's scientific insights--many of them triggered during the actual scripting and shooting of Interstellar--describe the physical laws that govern our universe and the truly astounding phenomena that those laws make possible. Interstellar and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (s14).

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