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Showing 8,876 through 8,900 of 26,829 results

Boston Marathon: History by the Mile

by Paul C. Clerici

From Hopkinton to Boylston Street, the beloved 26.2 miles of the Boston Marathon mark historic moments and memories dating back to 1897. Town by town and step by step, follow author, journalist, and runner Paul C. Clerici as he goes deeper into each town and city along the route with firsthand descriptions of the course from the uphill climbs to the spirited sprints. Insightful anecdotes, from the naming of Heartbreak Hill to the incorporation of women runners, reveal meaningful racing heritage along the route. This comprehensive and unique journey also explores the stories behind notable landmarks, statues, and mile markers throughout the course. Woven into the course history is expert advice on how to run each leg of the race from renowned running coach Bill Squires. Whether you're a runner, spectator, or fan, "Boston Marathon History by the Mile" has it all.

Kentucky Handicap Horse Racing: A History of the Great Weight Carriers

by Melanie Greene

In a handicap, horses are assigned weights based on their past performances as a way to try to create evenly matched fields. The better the horse, the heavier the weight assigned. In the United States, handicaps once accounted for the majority of stakes races and were known to boast large purses attracting the leading horses of the day. Kentucky-bred horses such as Discovery, Equipoise and Kelso won under the heaviest of weights, dominating the handicap division year after year, and were immortalized in the hall of fame. These equine stars brought recognition to the Sport of Kings and became renowned athletes for their courage, fortitude and durability. Join author and turf historian Melanie Greene as she recounts the harrowing tales of these noble steeds.

Bend Beer: A History of Brewing in Central Oregon

by Jon Abernathy

With more breweries per capita than any other Oregon city, Bend is a beer mecca. Prior to Prohibition, the state had a burgeoning brewing industry and plenty of saloons to cater to the needs of the hardy frontiersmen who settled Central Oregon. The teetotaling '20s brought all that to a screeching halt. Fifty years later, the arrival of pioneers like Deschutes Brewery and Bend Brewing Company breathed new life into Bend's beer and brought about the booming industry for which the area is known today. Author and "The Brew Site" creator Jon Abernathy traces Bend and Central Oregon's hoppy history from early settlement to the present day, sharing the stories behind its most famous breweries and the communities that have fostered the industry.

Ghosts of Old Salem, North Carolina

by G. T. Montgomery

Hidden behind the preserved eighteenth-century colonial buildings of the Old Salem Historic District in Winston-Salem is a haunted history of spine-tingling tales. Find the harrowing stories of Salem Cemetery and the anonymous headstones of the "Strangers' Graveyard." Learn the origins of the inexplicable sounds at Salem College. Meet the tavern traveler who refuses to check out. Follow the story of Andreas Kresmer's tragic death and the subsequent appearance of the "Little Red Man." Join author G.T. Montgomery on a frightening journey to discover the most notorious haunts to wander Salem's streets.

Richmond Beer: A History of Brewing in the River City

by Lee Graves Mark A. Thompson Jennifer Pullinger

The story of beer and brewing in Richmond is a reflection of the well-documented and revered place the River City holds in the nation's history. English colonists imbibed together on the banks of the James River. During the Civil War, a brewery was adjacent to a hospital. Beyond historical brews such as the Krueger Brewing Company and Richbrau beer, Richmond is no stranger to the vibrant craft beer culture thriving across the nation. Area brewers, including Hardywood Park Craft Brewery, Legend Brewing Company, Midnight Brewery and Strangeways Brewing, make Richmond a beer lover's paradise. Grab a pint and join author and beer columnist Lee Graves as he recounts the frothy history of Richmond beer.

Legends of Old Wilmington & Cape Fear

by John Hirchak

Situated on the banks of the Cape Fear River, Wilmington is awash in unusual tales and legends. A prevalent pirate hideaway, the area harbored the infamous Blackbeard and the cunning Calico Jack Rackham. Since its initial settlement, the region has witnessed an abundance of fantastical lore, including passionately fought duels, explosive train wrecks, Revolutionary and Civil War heroes and some legends that are said to take the form of apparitions. At the local Cape Fear Wine & Beer pub, the ghost of a fallen redcoat can't seem to get enough of a frothy porter brewed from yeast salvaged from an early nineteenth-century shipwreck. Wonder at these and other fascinating and strange tales as local author John Hirchak reveals the legendary history of Wilmington and Cape Fear.

Louisville Beer: Derby City History on Draft

by Kevin Gibson

It's no secret that Louisville is one of America's bourbon capitals, but the Derby City once thrived as a brewing mecca as well, rivaling even St. Louis and Milwaukee with its crisp lagers and Kentucky Common Ale. German settlers arrived with centuries-old brewing traditions and beer gardens, cementing beer and barrooms in Louisville's culture. Following Prohibition, the "big three"--Falls City, Fehr's and Oertel's--kept traditions alive while ingraining iconic brands into the city's fabric and heritage. More recently, craft brewers like BBC, Apocalypse Brew Works and New Albanian Brewing Company have drawn on this rich history. Kick back with Louisville food and beverage journalist Kevin Gibson as he traces Louisville's beer history with stories from the past, interviews and plenty of photos that bring this intoxicating story to life.

Gold Rush Ghosts of Placerville, Coloma & Georgetown

by Linda J. Bottjer

Fueled by the dream to strike it rich, prospectors flocked to California during the gold rush. Yet the harsh lifestyle and backbreaking work led many to early graves. Join author Linda Bottjer on a tour through Gold Country's most chilling--and true--haunted tales. Tales such as the hangman of Placerville, whose distinctive wheeze is a sign of his continued presence. Or the Georgetown miner whose unrequited love for a much younger lady of the night finds him still pining for her in death as he did in life. And in Coloma, the ghost of James Marshall is said to dwell on the lonely hilltop where his cabin and monument now stand. These stories, and many others, capture the ghostly spirit of Gold Country.

The Battle of Allatoona Pass: Civil War Skirmish in Bartow County, Georgia

by Brad Butkovich

In the 1840s, engineers blasted through 175 feet of earth and bedrock at Allatoona Pass, Georgia, to allow passage of the Western & Atlantic Railroad. Little more than twenty years later, both the Union and Confederate armies fortified the hills and ridges surrounding the gorge to deny the other passage during the Civil War. In October 1864, the two sides met in a fierce struggle to control the iron lifeline between the North and the recently captured city of Atlanta. Though small compared to other battles of the war, this division-sized fight produced casualty rates on par with or surpassing some of the most famous clashes. Join author Brad Butkovich as he explores the controversy, innovative weapons and unwavering bravery that make the Battle of Allatoona Pass one of the war's most unique and savage battles.

Ottawa Food: A Hungry Capital

by Don Chow Jennifer Lim

An illuminating examination of the history of food in Ottawa and the National Capital Region -- an area with a culinary culture that has developed significantly in the last two decades. During the past 20 years the food scene in Ottawa has changed from a landscape of pub grub-driven dining to a vibrant environment for trendy eateries and forward-thinking chefs. The once bland and mundane culinary culture has been transformed, and the result is an array of destination restaurants and purveyors of high-quality food and drink products. Many of these new and successful players leverage the nearby farms -- nearly 2,000 in total -- and artisan food makers that can provide a huge range of ingredients and possibilities.

Hidden History of Milwaukee

by Robert Tanzilo

Join OnMilwaukee.com's Bobby Tanzilo for a behind-the-scenes tour of Milwaukee's past. Sail out to the Breakwater Lighthouse, scramble up the wings of the Milwaukee Art Museum and dig up the city's roots on the corner of Water Street and Wisconsin Avenue. Seize the chance to do a little urban spelunking and explore basilicas, burial grounds and breweries. Ring the bell in the city hall tower, and take a turn around the secret indoor track at a Montessori school. No space is off limits in these untold stories of the Cream City's most familiar places and celebrated landmarks.

Newport Baseball History: America's Pastime in the City by the Sea

by Rick Harris

The City by the Sea boasts an ambitious baseball history dating back to the early days of America's favorite pastime. In 1897, the Newport Colts became the first professional baseball team to ever tie in a playoff series. By the 1900s, baseball was being played daily on open fields and diamonds throughout Newport. The city has sported six major ball fields, including Cardines Field, host to the oldest continuously running amateur baseball team in the country. Discover the humble beginnings of players like Newport native Frank Corridon, who allegedly invented the now outlawed spitball, and the legacy of the great Trojans baseball club. Team up with baseball historian Rick Harris and walk through the history of Newport baseball from amateur games to the major leagues and all the strikes, homers and grand slams in between.

Saco Drive-In, The: Cinema Under the Maine Sky

by Camille M. Smalley

Families, teenagers, friends and sweethearts piled in their cars and filled the lot of Maine's first drive-in on opening night in 1939. A newsreel and cartoon rolled before the feature presentation, "Forbidden Music," cast the first outdoor movie spell over the town of Saco. Families came for the fresh-air movie experience, while visitors in the 1950s and '60s enjoyed the dimly lit privacy. The community rallied to save the Saco Drive-In in 2013, voting to fund the transition to digital projection. Now, families and couples of the future can continue to enjoy cinema under the Maine sky. Join local author Camille Smalley as she recounts the history, films and memories of the Saco Drive-In.

Encyclopedia of Early Texas History: A Compendium of Texas Antiquity for the Inquisitive Mind

by Stephen P. Biles

In this age of hustle and bustle, Texans cannot afford to flounder about unawares of where to turn for information most urgent and necessary as their own history. What you want--nay, what you need--is the encyclopedia herein. The patriot will find stories of heroism and warning, the student will discover annals of valuable learning and the curious will discover purpose renewed in historical origin. With educational and entertaining illustrations, the reader will at once be transported back to historic times and doubtless become the "go-to" guy or gal for Texas trivia. From the arrival of Aguayo to the zeal of Zavala, each page contains a morsel of valuable history of the great state of Texas. Texan and scholar Stephen Biles has collected an invaluable source of information so exciting and excellent that it has been sized to fit within your pocket or purse--after all, one never knows when history might call.

World War II Cincinnati: From the Front Lines to the Home Front

by Robert Earnest Miller

World War II transformed Cincinnati from a relatively important but parochial midwestern city into a teeming bastion of military might. While thousands served in the nation's armed forces, others contributed to rationing programs, salvage drives, blackouts and war bond rallies. Scores of community-based programs blossomed as Cincinnatians on the home front threw themselves wholeheartedly into the "total war" that Washington believed necessary for victory. After answering the call to treat domestic duty as seriously as any battleground assignment, the Queen City emerged from the war as utterly changed as the nation itself. Author Robert Miller brings to life this dramatic, patriotic period in Cincinnati's history.

Birmingham Beer: A Heady History of Brewing in the Magic City

by Carla Jean Whitley

Less than fifteen years after the birth of Birmingham, its brewing history began, and soon saloons dotted nearly every corner. Prohibition, however, decimated the brewing scene for eighty-five years. Although national Prohibition began in 1920, Jefferson County voted to go dry in 1907. Alabama beer saw a brief resurgence after the Brewpub Act of 1992, as craft beer's popularity grew nationwide. But the brewpubs and breweries that emerged struggled against the state's restrictive laws, which included such stipulations as locating brewpubs in historic districts and limiting beer bottle sizes to sixteen ounces. By the time grass-roots lobbying organization Free the Hops formed in 2004 to fight those restrictive laws, every Birmingham brewery had closed. Join author Carla Jean Whitley as she uncovers the struggle to make local beer a Birmingham staple.

Alaska Beer: Liquid Gold in the Land of the Midnight Sun

by Geoff Larson Bill Howell Marcy Larson

Alaska's fermented legacy retains the fiercely independent spirit that propelled the state's beer drinkers through the gold rush and sustained them through Prohibition. Today, craft brewers produce outstanding suds in some of the harshest and most remote locations on the planet. And while the beer scene in Alaska has roots that trace back to days when spirits had to have "medicinal, mechanical, and scientific purposes," the contemporary crop of breweries can thank industry pioneers like the Alaskan Brewing Company for staying on the cutting edge of beer-making technology. Join beer columnist and historian Bill Howell on an exploration through this hop-filled history of the Last Frontier.

Toronto Theatres and the Golden Age of the Silver Screen

by Doug Taylor

The history, heritage, and architectural significance of Toronto's most notable theatres and movie houses. Movie houses first started popping up around Toronto in the 1910s and '20s, in an era without television and before radio had permeated every household. Dozens of these grand structures were built and soon became an important part of the cultural and architectural fabric of the city. A century later the surviving, defunct, and reinvented movie houses of Toronto's past are filled with captivating stories. Explore fifty historic Toronto movie houses and theaters, and discover their roles as repositories of memories for a city that continues to grow its cinema legacy. Features stunning historic photography.

Historic Amusement Parks of Long Island: 118 Miles of Memories

by Marisa L. Berman

When Long Island became a suburban paradise after World War II, ambitious entrepreneurs created dozens of amusement parks to help families unwind. The Nunley family built a park in Baldwin in 1939, and it was so successful that they opened Nunley's Happyland in Bethpage just a few years later. Westbury's Spaceland fascinated youngsters with dreams of becoming astronauts, and Frontier City in Amityville was heaven on earth to fans of the Wild West. Today, historic parks like Deno's Wonder Wheel Park in Coney Island and Adventureland in Farmingdale still delight children and remind parents of happy memories of their own. Local author Marisa Berman explores the decades of fun and laughter from Long Island's historic amusement parks.

Racine's Horlick Athletic Field: Drums Along the Foundries

by Steve Vickers Alan R. Karls

Launched in 1919 by William Horlick, the inventor of malted milk, Horlick Athletic Field has hosted two NFL teams, the Racine Belles professional women's baseball team (immortalized in "A League of Their Own)" and thousands of semiprofessional- and industrial-league games. But it is the drum and bugle corps shows that have made the stadium one of the most iconic landmarks in its corner of the state. From an archive of fond recollection and painstaking record, Alan Karls has pieced together a history of Horlick Athletic Field that justifies the reverence that drum and bugle corps have felt for the place for almost a century.

Guy Town by Gaslight: A History of Vice in Austin's First Ward

by Richard Zelade

Crime and vice plagued Austin after the Civil War, and Guy Town was a red-light hub with a most curious legacy. Today's pleasure-seeking visitors to the Warehouse District walk on top of Guy Town--the chic neighborhood of today is built on the most decadent and deadly area of the city's past. With the old county courthouse at its core, the district rose from the Colorado River up to Fifth Street and spanned from Congress Avenue to Shoal Creek, infesting Austin's eclectic First Ward neighborhood. Guy Town was a haven for notorious madams, prostitutes, druggies and drunkards lost to history, as well as names still remembered--Ben Thompson, O. Henry and Johnny Ringo roamed its streets looking for a good time. From murderers to con men, crooked cops and more, meet the cast of characters that gave Guy Town its reputation in author Richard Zelade's lurid account of the Capital City's historic underbelly.

Wurlitzer of Cincinnati: The Name That Means Music To Millions

by Mark Palkovic

Established in Cincinnati in 1856 by German immigrant Franz Rudolph Wurlitzer, the music dealer became the largest outlet for band instruments in the United States by 1865. During the silent film era in the early twentieth century, Wurlitzer manufactured nearly 2,250 theater organs, affectionately dubbed "Mighty Wurlitzers." Many of these instruments still provide concert music today. During the Big Band era of the 1930s to 1950s, the company's colorful coin-operated jukeboxes were such popular fixtures in bars and dance halls that the U.S. Postal Service honored them with a commemorative stamp. Although the company was sold in 1988, the Wurlitzer name continues to be held in high esteem by the city of Cincinnati.

Windsor Mountain School: A Beloved Berkshire Institution

by Roselle Kline Chartock Governor Deval Patrick

When their Jewish heritage and progressive philosophies made the Bondy family a target of the Nazi regime, they were forced to sell their school and start anew in America. Max and Gertrud Bondy first opened their innovative school in Windsor, Vermont, and moved the campus to Lenox, Massachusetts, in 1944. Windsor Mountain School was ahead of its time--the faculty honored diversity, and it became the first co-ed integrated boarding school in Berkshire County. Families like the Belafontes, Poitiers and Campanellas were attracted to the school for its multicultural and international curriculum. From its golden age to the rock-and-roll era, Windsor Mountain strived to stay true to its mission until hard financial times forced the school to close in 1975. Roselle Kline Chartock captures the spirit of this Berkshire boarding school that still lives on in the hearts of its alumni.

Lost Capitals of Alabama

by Herbert James Lewis

Alabama's capital has roots all over the state. It first emerged in St. Stephens in 1799, a small fort acquired from the Spanish atop a tall limestone bluff overlooking the Tombigbee River. Next came Huntsville in the Tennessee Valley, where the state constitution emerged. Cahawba was the capital to receive a visit from the Marquis de Lafayette, the last surviving general of the American Revolution. In 1826, Tuscaloosa took the reins for twenty years before the final move to Montgomery. Discover the leaders and events that established the state and the fates of each dynamic governmental center as author Jim Lewis traces the history of Alabama's lost capitals.

Capital Beer: A Heady History of Brewing in Washington, D.C.

by Garrett Peck

Imagine the jubilation of thirsty citizens in 1796 when the Washington Brewery--the city's first brewery--opened. Yet the English-style ales produced by the early breweries in the capital and in nearby Arlington and Alexandria sat heavy on the tongue in the oppressive Potomac summers. By the 1850s, an influx of German immigrants gave a frosty reprieve to their new home in the form of light but flavorful lagers. Brewer barons like Christian Heurich and Albert Carry dominated the taps of city saloons until production ground to a halt with the dry days of Prohibition. Only Heurich survived, and when the venerable institution closed in 1956, Washington, D.C., was without a brewery for fifty-five years. Author and beer scholar Garrett Peck taps this high-gravity history while introducing readers to the bold new brewers leading the capital's recent craft beer revival.

Showing 8,876 through 8,900 of 26,829 results

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