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Showing 9,126 through 9,150 of 9,392 results

Mister

by Rory Smith

From its late-Victorian flowering in the mill towns of the northwest of England, football spread around the world with great speed. It was helped on its way by a series of missionaries who showed the rest of the planet the simple joys of the game. Even now, in many countries, the colloquial word for a football manager is not 'coach' or 'boss' but 'mister', as that is how the early teachers were known, because they had come from the home of the sport to help it develop in new territories. In Rory Smith's stunning new book Mister, he looks at the stories of these pioneers of the game, men who left this country to take football across the globe. Sometimes, they had been spurned in their own land, as coaching was often frowned upon in England in those days, whe players were starved of the ball during the week to make them hungry for it on matchday. So it was that the inspirations behind the 'Mighty Magyars' of the 1950s, the Dutch of the 1970s or top clubs such as Barcelona came from these shores. England, without realising it, fired the very revolution that would remove its crown, changing football's history, thanks to a handful of men who sowed the seeds of the inversion of football's natural order. This is the story of the men who taught the world to play and shaped its destiny. This is the story of the Misters.

The Amber Shadows

by Lucy Ribchester

In a place where everyone is keeping secrets all the time, how do you know who you can trust? On a delayed train, deep in the English countryside, two strangers meet. It is 1942 and they are both men of fighting age, though neither is in uniform. As strangers do in these days of war, they pass the time by sharing their stories. But walls have ears and careless talk costs lives. . . At Bletchley Park, Honey Deschamps spends her days at a type-x machine in Hut 6, transcribing decrypted signals from the German Army. One winter's night, as she walks home in the blackout, she meets a stranger in the shadows. He tells her his name is Felix, and he has a package for her. The parcel, containing a small piece of amber, postmarked from Russia and branded with two censor's stamps, is just the first of several. Someone is trying to get a message to her, but who? As a dangerous web weaves ever tighter around her, can Honey uncover who is sending these mysterious packages and why before it's too late. . . ?

The City of Beasts (Dragon Shield #3)

by Charlie Fletcher

New allies and new hope leave siblings Will and Jo ready to face the dark force that lurks in the British Museum. It has frozen London, leaving the life force of the city's inhabitants to drain away. But with nearly all the animal statues of London and a nest of dragons against them, will they be able to save their mum - and the world - before time runs out?

Katherine Howard

by Josephine Wilkinson

Looming out of the encroaching darkness of the February evening was London Bridge, still ornamented with the severed heads of Thomas Culpeper and Francis Dereham; the terrible price they had paid for suspected intimacy with the queen. Katherine now reached the Tower of London, her final destination. Katherine Howard was the fifth wife of Henry VIII and cousin to the executed Anne Boleyn. She first came to court as a young girl of fourteen, but even prior to that her fate had been sealed and she was doomed to die. She was beheaded in 1542 for crimes of adultery and treason, in one of the most sensational scandals of the Tudor age. The traditional story of Henry VIII's fifth queen dwells on her sexual exploits before she married the king, and her execution is seen as her just dessert for having led an abominable life. However, the true story of Katherine Howard could not be more different. Far from being a dark tale of court factionalism and conspiracy, Katherine's story is one of child abuse, family ambition, religious conflict and political and sexual intrigue. It is also a tragic love story. A bright, kind and intelligent young woman, Katherine was fond of clothes and dancing, yet she also had a strong sense of duty and tried to be a good wife to Henry. She handled herself with grace and queenly dignity to the end, even as the barge carrying her on her final journey drew up at the Tower of London, where she was to be executed for high treason. Little more than a child in a man's world, she was the tragic victim of those who held positions of authority over her, and from whose influence she was never able to escape.

Shtum

by Jem Lester

Ben Jewell has hit breaking point. His ten-year-old son, Jonah, has never spoken. So when Ben and Jonah are forced to move in with Ben's elderly father, three generations of men - one who can't talk; two who won't - are thrown together. As Ben battles single fatherhood, a string of well-meaning social workers and his own demons, he learns some difficult home truths. Jonah, blissful in his innocence, becomes the prism through which all the complicated strands of personal identity, family history and misunderstanding are finally untangled. Perfect for fans of David Nicholls, THE SHOCK OF THE FALL and THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME.

Beast Quest: 94: Saurex the Silent Creeper

by Adam Blade

Tom and Elenna only need one more weather crystal to reform the Broken Star. But even if they can defeat Saurex the Silent Creeper,Emperor Jeng and Evil Witch Kensa won't give up that easily...

Beast Quest: 93: Okko the Sand Monster

by Adam Blade

Tom and Elenna must find all four weather crystals before they fall into the hands of Emperor Jeng and Evil Witch Kensa. Can they get the third crystal before they're sacrificed to Okko the Sand Monster?

Beast Quest: 92: Thoron the Living Storm

by Adam Blade

Tom and Elenna have tracked Emperor Jeng and the Evil Witch Kensa as they search for the second weather-controlling crystal. But Thoron the Walking Storm is unlike any Beast they've faced before...

Beast Quest: 91: Gryph the Feathered Fiend

by Adam Blade

Emperor Jeng and the Evil Witch Kensa have gone in search of the Broken Star - four crystals that can control the weather! But when the Good Beast guarding the first crystal mistakes them for thieves, Elenna and Tom have to fight for their lives! Can they stand up to Gryph the Arctic Falcon?

Infuse

by Paula Grainger Karen Sullivan

Lost your zest for life? Feeling tired and sluggish? Need a health boost? Reach for a soothing cup of herbal tea and harness the extraordinary power of nature's most potent healing ingredients. With more than 70 expertly formulated recipes for tasty, soothing, caffeine-free infusions, tea tips to help you get the most from your brew, and a comprehensive directory of herbal ingredients and their active properties and benefits, you can blend, brew and sip your way to wellbeing.

Eve & the New Jerusalem

by Barbara Taylor

In the early nineteenth century, radicals all over Europe and America began to conceive of a 'New Moral World', and struggled to create their own utopias, with collective family life, communal property, free love and birth control. In Britain, the visionary ideals of the Utopian Socialist, Robert Owen, attracted thousands of followers, who for more than a quarter of a century attempted to put theory into practice in their own local societies, at rousing public meetings, in trade unions and in their new Communities of Mutual Association. Barbara Taylor's brilliant study of this visionary challenge recovers the crucial connections between socialist aims and feminist aspirations. In doing so, it opens the way to an important re-interpretation of the socialist tradition as a whole, and contributes to the reforging of some of those early links between feminism and socialism.

Not As a Stranger

by Morton Thompson

Powerful novel about a young doctor who lives for medicine and sacrifices everything for his career. Describes his years at medical school, his practice in a small town and his devoted self-sacrificing wife who works to make their marriage a success.

Pillar of Light (The Work and the Glory # 1)

by Gerald N. Lund

With more than two million copies of the nine-volume series in print since its initial release in 1990, The Work and the Glory is one of the most popular historical fiction series ever published by a religious publisher. Pillar of Light, volume one, is soon to be a major motion picture and will introduce this unforgettable story to a new generation of readers. In this saga of the Benjamin Steed family, award-winning author Gerald N. Lund blends historical reality and high-powered fiction to create an enduring love story full of intrigue, suspense, betrayal, and undeniable faith.

Why Tongues?

by Kenneth E. Hagin

Kenneth Hagin believes that the infilling of the New Testament believers with the Holy Ghost should be the pattern for Christians today. In Part 1, he discusses speaking in tongues in the book of Acts of the Apostles to show that speaking in tongues was evidence of people being filled by the Holy Spirit. In Part 2, the author explains the 10 reasons why modern "Believers" should speak in tongues. To make his points, the author first quotes Biblical scriptures and then explains them in terms of his Christian, theological understanding.

Looking for a Ship

by John Mcphee

This is an extraordinary tale of life on the high seas aboard one of the last American merchant ships, the S. S. Stella Lykes, on a forty-two-day journey from Charleston down the Pacific coast of South America. With his usual interest in everything and everybody, John McPhee tells a wide-ranging story of the U.S. Merchant Marine, the ships that are a part of it, and the people who work the ships, the history and geology of the places he sees, sea tales, pirates, and the amazing variety of products that are carried by freighters.

Like a Fire is Burning (The Work and the Glory #2)

by Gerald N. Lund

The epic saga of the Steed family continues in Volume 2. Swept up in the great drama as the infant Church expands and spreads westward into Ohio and Missouri, the Steeds become eyewitnesses of miracles as well as the horrors of mob mayhem.

Time, History, and Literature : Selected Essays of Erich Auerbach

by James I. Porter Jane O. Newman

The book presents a wide selection of Auerbach's essays, many of which are little known outside the German-speaking world.

Outlaw: The Collected Works of Miguel Piñero

by Miguel Piñero

Part observer, part participant in the turbulent goings-on in his Nuyorican barrio, Miguel Piñero blasted onto the literary scene and made waves in the artistic current with his dramatic interpretations of the world around him through experimental poetry, prose, and plays. Portrayed by actor Benjamin Bratt in the 2001 feature film Piñero, the poet's works are as rough and gritty as the New York City underworld he wrote about and loved. His depictions of pimp bars, drug addiction, petty crime, prison culture and outlaw life are all drawn from first-hand experience. This long-awaited collection includes previously published and never-before-published poems; ten plays, including Short Eyes, which was later made into a film and won the 1973-1974 New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for Best American Play, The Sun Always Shines for the Cool, and Eulogy for a Small Time Thief. A co-founder of the Nuyorican Poet's Café, Piñero died at the age of 41, leaving behind a compelling legacy of poetry and plays that reveal the harsh, impoverished lives of his urban Puerto Rican community.

Joyce's Book of the Dark: Finnegans Wake

by John Bishop

Finnegan's Wake is perhaps the most difficult and wilfully obscure piece in all of modern literature, a book written in polyglottal puns that continues to baffle not only lay readers but, in large part, Joyceans as well. Here in 12 chapters, John Bishop aims to unravel Joyce's obscurities and aims to reveal the Wake more clearly than anyone has done before.

A Reader's Guide to James Joyce

by William York Tindall

This text is designed to help readers to approach the difficult writings of James Joyce. Years of teaching Joyce's works and writing about them gave Tindall an authoritative and comprehensive knowledge about all of the pieces, from Dubliners to Finnegan's Wake. Tindall's summary and interpretation of the books in the Joyce canon emphasises allusions, relationships, and parallels in world literature and utilises his knowledge of psychology.

"Let me tell you what I've learned:" Texas Wisewomen Speak

by Pj Pierce

Barbara Jordan spoke for many Texas women when she told a reporter, "I get from the soil and spirit of Texas the feeling that I, as an individual, can accomplish whatever I want to, and that there are no limits, that you can just keep going, just keep soaring. I like that spirit." Indeed, the sense of limitless possibilities has inspired countless Texas women--sometimes in the face of daunting obstacles--to build lives rich in work, family, friends, faith, and community involvement.

Trees and Shrubs of the Trans-Pecos and Adjacent Areas: A Novel

by A. Michael Powell

First published by the Big Bend Natural History Association in 1988 as Trees & Shrubs of Trans-Pecos Texas, this book is the only keyed guide to the more than 400 species of woody plants native to the Trans-Pecos region and adjacent areas in eastern New Mexico and northern Mexico. A. Michael Powell has significantly revised and expanded this edition, including nomenclature changes for 62 genera and new distribution information for 60 genera.

Satan's Stones

by Muniru Ravanipur

Women writers occupy prominent positions in contemporary Iranian literature, despite the increased legal and cultural restrictions placed upon women since the 1978-1979 Islamic Revolution. One of these writers is Moniru Ravanipur, author of the critically acclaimed The Drowned and Heart of Steel.<P><P> Satan's Stones is the first English translation of her 1991 short story collection Sangha-ye Sheytan. Often set in the remote regions of Iran, these stories explore many facets of contemporary Iranian life, particularly the ever-shifting relations between women and men. Their bold literary experimentation marks a new style in Persian fiction akin to "magical realism."

La Gran Línea: Mapping the United States - Mexico Boundary, 1849-1857

by Paula Rebert

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hildalgo, which officially ended the U.S.-Mexican War in 1848, cost Mexico half its territory, while the United States gained land that became California, Nevada, Utah, Texas, and parts of Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Because the new United States-Mexico border ran through territory that was still incompletely mapped, the treaty also called for government commissions from both nations to locate and mark the boundary on the ground. This book documents the accomplishments of both the U.S. and the Mexican Boundary Commissions that mapped the boundary between 1849 and 1857, as well as the fifty-four pairs of maps produced by their efforts and the ongoing importance of these historical maps in current boundary administration. Paula Rebert explores how, despite the efforts of both commissions to draw neutral, scientific maps, the actual maps that resulted from their efforts reflected the differing goals and outlooks of the two countries. She also traces how the differences between the U.S. and Mexican maps have had important consequences for the history of the boundary.

The Huarochirí Manuscript: A Testament of Ancient and Colonical Andean Religion

by Frank Salomon George L. Urioste

One of the great repositories of a people's world view and religious beliefs, the Huarochirí Manuscript may bear comparison with such civilization-defining works as Gilgamesh, the Popul Vuh, and the Sagas. This translation by Frank Salomon and George L. Urioste marks the first time the Huarochirí Manuscript has been translated into English, making it available to English-speaking students of Andean culture and world mythology and religions. The Huarochirí Manuscript holds a summation of native Andean religious tradition and an image of the superhuman and human world as imagined around A.D. 1600. The tellers were provincial Indians dwelling on the west Andean slopes near Lima, Peru, aware of the Incas but rooted in peasant, rather than imperial, culture. The manuscript is thought to have been compiled at the behest of Father Francisco de Avila, the notorious "extirpator of idolatries." Yet it expresses Andean religious ideas largely from within Andean categories of thought, making it an unparalleled source for the prehispanic and early colonial myths, ritual practices, and historic self-image of the native Andeans.

Showing 9,126 through 9,150 of 9,392 results

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