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Civil Rights Activism in Milwaukee: South Side Struggles in the '60s and '70s

by Paul H. Geenen

In the early 1960s, as members of Milwaukee's growing African American population looked beyond their segregated community for better jobs and housing, they faced bitter opposition from the real estate industry and union leadership. In an era marked by the friction of racial tension, the south side of Milwaukee earned a reputation as a flashpoint for prejudice, but it also served as a staging ground for cooperative activism between members of Father Groppi's parish, representatives from the NAACP Youth Council, students at Alverno College and a group of Latino families. Paul Geenen chronicles the challenges faced by this coalition in the fight for open housing and better working conditions for Milwaukee's minority community.

Peekskill's African American History: A Hudson Valley Community's Untold Story

by John J. Curran

The first African Americans of Peekskill had no choice in making the Hudson Valley their home. What they did choose was what kind of home to make of it--choices that were to shape both their community and the course of American history. Meet the African American sharpshooterwho helped swing the balance of the American Revolution, revisit a stop on the underground railroad and catch a glimpse of Paul Robeson through the tumult of the 1949 concert riots. Then follow John J. Curran beyond the headlines and behind the scenes as he seeks out the peoplewhose quiet, consistent contributions were no less dynamic in bringing about social change.

Barn Dances and Jamborees Across Kentucky

by J. D. Wilkes

Kentuckians have been wearing out shoe leather at informal jamborees since the state was settled over two hundred years ago. Tadpole's Dew Drop Inn played host to some fifteen hundred musical shindigs in its time as a mecca of Marshall County music. A Rosine barn dance gave bluegrass founder Bill Monroe his start, and another fosters new musical talent at its weekly get-togethers. Clawhammer banjo players, Appalachian cloggers and square dance callers from Possum Trot to Rabbit Hash celebrate the unique musical culture of Kentucky. Join Grammy-nominated soundtrack artist J.D. Wilkes as he waltzes around the Bluegrass, looking for oprys, socials, porch pickins and barn dances in every holler.

Sonobeat Records: Pioneering the Austin Sound in the '60s

by Ricky Stein

The music scene in Austin is known the world over, but it can place a considerable portion of its roots in a little-known but prolific indie label: Sonobeat Records. A small, independent label founded by father-and-son duo Bill Josey Sr. and Bill Josey Jr., Sonobeat set the stage for the Capital City's musical legacy. The label's brief but powerful tenure produced an enormous amount of music and directly preceded the progressive country movement and the proliferation of a music scene that would earn Austin the nickname of "Live Music Capital of the World." Musician and author Ricky Stein explores the roots of Austin's contemporary music history through the story of one small but essential label..

Muscle Shoals Sound Studio: How the Swampers Changed American Music

by Carla Jean Whitley

An estimated four hundred gold records have been recorded in the Muscle Shoals area. Many of those are thanks to Muscle Shoals Sound Studio and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, dubbed "the Swampers." Some of the greatest names in rock, R&B and blues laid tracks in the original, iconic concrete-block building--the likes of Cher, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Rolling Stones and the Black Keys. The National Register of Historic Places now recognizes that building, where Lynyrd Skynyrd recorded the original version of "Free Bird" and the Rolling Stones wrote "Brown Sugar" and "Wild Horses." By combing through decades of articles and music reviews related to Muscle Shoals Sound, music writer Carla Jean Whitley reconstructs the fascinating history of how the Alabama studio created a sound that reverberates across generations.

Ghosts of Bobby Mackey's Music World

by Dan Smith

Over the years, Bobby Mackey's Music World has played host to countless real-life horror stories and a string of criminal activity. The site has been the location of death and destruction since the nineteenth century, including illegal lynchings and a bridge collapse killing forty-one men. Illegal gambling and liquor abounded when it later served as the Bluegrass Inn. In more recent years, mafia bosses turned it into a mafia-controlled nightclub known as the Latin Quarter. Beginning with the caretaker who fell under a demonic possession to more recent encounters between patrons and the paranormal, author Dan Smith revives the chilling stories that make it the most haunted nightclub in America.

Birmingham Foot Soldiers: Voices from the Civil Rights Movement

by Nick Patterson

Reverends Martin Luther King Jr., Andrew Young and Fred Shuttlesworth are iconic names associated with the Birmingham campaign of the civil rights movement. Credit also is due to many local residents who risked their lives for the cause. Myrna Carter Jackson holds no shame in the police record she garnered in protest of the harsh treatment of African Americans in the city. Carolyn Walker Williams, who knew the injustice blacks faced in East Birmingham even as a child, was arrested in protest for the first time while still in school. Gerald Wren grew up in the Smithfield neighborhood, part of which was nicknamed "Dynamite Hill" as a result of the bombings of blacks' houses, churches and schools. Join author Nick Patterson as he interviews some of Birmingham's foot soldiers and recounts the struggle and adversity overcome.

North Carolina String Music Masters: Old-Time and Bluegrass Legends

by Elizabeth A. Carlson Former Npr Brown

The roots of American music are deeply grounded in North Carolina's music history. North Carolina musicians pioneered and mastered the genres of old-time and bluegrass music. Doc Watson played mountain fiddle tunes on guitar. He emerged as the father of flatpicking and forever changed the role of the guitar in American music. Charlie Poole created techniques that eventually defined bluegrass, and folks around the state heard his banjo on some of the most important old-time recordings. Rising star Rhiannon Giddens keeps the music alive today through new interpretations of classic old-time and bluegrass songs. Elizabeth Carlson profiles these and other masters of string music in this fascinating record of North Carolina's musical past, present and future.

Man from Vermont, The: Charles Ross Taggart, the Old Country Fiddler

by Adam R. Boyce

In 1895, East Topsham's Charles Ross Taggart set his sights on becoming a traveling musical humorist. His uproarious ventriloquist and musical performances brought rave reviews in his Vermont community. He was soon thrust into the world of the lyceum and Chautauqua circuits, journeying far and wide across North America. His forty-three-year career spanned some of America's most exciting and most difficult times, and his folk performances--especially his beloved "Old Country Fiddler"--brought smiles to all who experienced them. He was also an innovator in the entertainment industry, recording his music and humor, as well as appearing in one of the first "talkie" films. Discover the remarkable story of "The Man from Vermont" who helped Americans forget their troubles when they needed it most with his mimicry, stories and fiddling.

Hollywood of the Rockies: Colorado, the West and America's Film Pioneers

by Michael J. Spencer

In the early days of the twentieth century, movies weren't made in California. As America's film pioneers traveled westward, Colorado became a beacon to them, contributing to the early motion picture business with all the relish and gusto of a western saga. The gorgeous natural scenery was perfect for the country's (and the world's) growing infatuation with the West, turning Colorado itself into a bigger star of the early cinema than any particular actor. Using rare photos and contemporary accounts, writer and filmmaker Michael J. Spencer explores the little-known filmmaking industry that flourished in the Rocky Mountains between 1895 and 1915--west of New York but east of Hollywood.

Columbus Indiana's Historic Crump Theatre

by David Sechrest Mayor Kristen Brown

Not since the construction of the Columbus courthouse had one man and his vision received as much publicity from local newspapers as John Crump and his theater, designed and built by architect Charles Sparrell in 1889. This is the story of the passion, struggles and triumphs that created the first true cultural arts center in this small town and the legacy that continues to inspire the community over a century later to protect this local landmark. It is a journey marked by first-class opera performances, flickering silent films, police intervention and arrests and, ultimately, decay and closure. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book will go to the Heritage Fund in support of the Crump Theatre building--an architectural treasure in a city that boasts many.

Frederick & Anna Douglass in Rochester, New York: Their Home Was Open to All

by Rose O'Keefe

Frederick Douglass--famed author, orator and former slave--spent twenty-five years with his family in Rochester, New York, beginning in 1848. Despite living through one of our nation's most bitter and terrifying times, Frederick and his wife, Anna, raised five children in a loving home with flower, fruit and vegetable gardens. While Frederick traveled widely, fighting for the freedom and rights of his brethren, Anna cared for their home and their family and extended circle. Their house was open to fugitives on the Underground Railroad, visiting abolitionists and house guests who stayed for weeks, months and years at a time. Local author Rose O'Keefe weaves together the story of the Douglasses' experience in Rochester and the indelible mark they left on the Flower City.

Kansas Music: Stories of a Rich Tradition

by Debra Goodrich Bisel

Despite its sparse population, Kansas is well represented in the annals of music history. The state claims some of the most popular acts from the past century, including Kansas, Count Basie, Big Joe Turner, Martina McBride, Melissa Etheridge and Charlie Parker. A wide variety of genres plays and prospers here, from blues to bluegrass. Beloved venues from mega-festivals like Walnut Valley to jam sessions just off the front porch preserve the state's tuneful heritage. Join Deb Bisel in celebrating this lyrical legacy, from "Home on the Range" to "Dust in the Wind" and beyond.

Location Filming in Arizona: The Screen Legacy of the Grand Canyon State

by Lili Debarbieri

The scenic natural vistas of Arizona's deserts and mountains have made it a favorite backdrop of movies and television shows. Westerns such as silent-era pictures derived from Zane Grey fiction through the John Ford-John Wayne classics "Stagecoach "and "The Searchers "benefited from the beautiful and rugged landscapes. TV classics such as "Gunsmoke" and "Little House on the Prairie" helped define Arizona's allure for Hollywood. Oscar winners "Jerry Maguire" and "Little Miss Sunshine "took advantage of the infrastructure that accumulated to lure filmmakers to Tucson, Yuma, Phoenix, Prescott, Sedona and all corners of the Grand Canyon State". Join author Lili DeBarbieri as she looks at the movies and shows shot in the state, as well as other aspects of Arizona film culture.

Famous Faces of Indy's WTTV-4, The: Sammy Terry, Cowboy Bob, Janie and More

by Julie Young

Growing up in central Indiana in the 1960s, '70s and '80s would not have been complete without our favorite hosts from WTTV-Channel 4. Sammy Terry set the spooky scene for Friday-night fright flicks. Cowboy Bob rode in on horseback with daily delights at the corral. Commander KC brought education to television. Along with Janie Hodge, Peggy Nicholson and regional characters, these local hosts were bona fide television stars before national programs began broadcasting kids' shows around the clock. WTTV's homegrown shows and endearing hosts endure in the hearts of their loyal fans. Join historian Julie Young on a journey behind the curtain of your favorite Channel 4 shows, as she offers a look at a pre-cable era when shows were live, hosts were local celebrities and anything could happen

Abolition & the Underground Railroad in Vermont

by Michelle Arnosky Sherburne

Many believe that support for the abolition of slavery was universally accepted in Vermont, but it was actually a fiercely divisive issue that rocked the Green Mountain State. In the midst of turbulence and violence, though, some brave Vermonters helped fight for the freedom of their enslaved Southern brethren. Thaddeus Stevens--one of abolition's most outspoken advocates--was a Vermont native. Delia Webster, the first woman arrested for aiding a fugitive slave, was also a Vermonter. The Rokeby house in Ferrisburgh was a busy Underground Railroad station for decades. Peacham's Oliver Johnson worked closely with William Lloyd Garrison during the abolition movement. Discover the stories of these and others in Vermont who risked their own lives to help more than four thousand slaves to freedom.

Beale Street: Resurrecting the Home of the Blues

by John A. Elkington

A vibrant tribute to the rich and unique culture of Memphis, Beale Street is the most visited tourist attractionin Tennessee. But just like the soulful blues ballads that callBeale home, the history of this downtown district echoes with hardship and heartache. From the transcendent sounds of W.C. Handy to the rubble of crumbling buildings and a miraculous rebirth, Beale Street has undergone many incarnations. In this remarkable firsthand account, author John Elkington takes readers on an incredible journey of revitalization that few believed possible when he embarked upon the task in the early 1980s. Step inside the drama ofpolitics, the exhausting planning stages, collapsing landmarks and the hunt for the great B.B. King, and witness a living testament to the power of devotion and theenchantment of revival.

Voices of Black South Carolina: Legend & Legacy

by Damon L. Fordham

Did you know that eighty-eight years before Rosa Parks's historic protest, a courageous black woman in Charleston kept her seat on a segregated streetcar? What about Robert Smalls, who steered a Confederate warship into Union waters, freeing himself and some of his family, and later served in the South Carolinastate legislature? In this inspiring collection, historian Damon L. Fordham relates story after story of notable black South Carolinians, many of whose contributions to the state's history have not been brought to light until now. From the letters of black soldiers during the Civil War to the impassioned pleas by students of "Munro's School" for their right to an education, these are the voices of protest and dissent, the voices of hope and encouragement and the voices of progress.

African Americans in Glencoe: The Little Migration

by Robert A. Sideman

The village of Glencoe has a proud history of early African American settlement. In recent years, however, this once thriving African American community has begunto disperse. Robert Sideman, a thirty-year Glencoe resident, relates this North Shore suburb's African American history through fond remembrances of Glencoe communitiessuch as the St. Paul AME Church, as well as recounting the lives of prominent African Americans. At the same time, Sideman poses a difficult question: how can the village maintainits diverse heritage throughout changing times? African Americans in Glencoe reveals an uplifting history while challenging residents to embrace a past in danger of being lost.

A History of James Island Slave Descendants & Plantation Owners: The Bloodline

by Eugene Frazier Sr.

James Island remains one of the few places in the United States where descendants of slaves can easily trace their roots to one of the seventeen slave plantations. For many African Americans, it is hard to imagine how far this small island has come. It has left them with a legacy of both the joy and the pain of living in a time and place wrought with hardship but somehow still intermingled with the happiness that comes from a community built on family, love, strength and honor. In this powerful collection, local resident and oral historian Eugene Frazier chronicles the stories of various James Island families and their descendants. Frazier has spent years collecting family and archival photographs and family remembrances to accompany the text. This book also pays homage to men and women of the United States military and African American pioneers from James Island and surrounding areas.

Rocket City Rock & Soul: Huntsville Musicians Remember the 1960s

by Jane Deneefe Frye Gaillard

In a state widely considered ground zero for civil rights struggles, Huntsville became an unlikely venue for racial reconciliation. Huntsville's recently formed NASA station drew new residents from throughout the country, and across the world, to the Rocket City. This influx of fresh perspectives informed the city's youth. Soon, dozens of vibrant rock bands and soul groups, characteristic of the era but unique in Alabama, were formed. Set against the bitter backdrop of segregation, Huntsville musicians--black and white--found common ground in rock and soul music. Whether playing to desegregated audiences, in desegregated bands or both, Huntsville musicians were boldly moving forward, ushering in a new era. Through interviews with these musicians, local author Jane DeNeefe recounts this unique and important chapter in Huntsville's history.

Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, The: More than a Century of a New Orleans Icon

by Sally Newhart

In 1910, the Tuxedo Jazz Band played its first show at the Tuxedo Dance Hall in Storyville under Oscar Celestin. The popular ensemble went on to play all over New Orleans, as well as across the South and the nation. In 1953, it became the first jazz band to play the White House. The band has punctuated jazz history and produced some of the most memorable musicians of the past century: Bob French, Albert French, William Ridgley, Octave Crosby, Louis Armstrong and more. Author Sally Newhart has written a definitive and captivating history of the band from inception to present, including oral histories, archival photos, discography and a previously unpublished complete list of members since 1910.

That's the Way it Was: Stories of Struggle, Survival and Self-Respect in Twentieth-Century Black St. Louis

by Vida 'Sister' Prince

Segregation was a way of life in St. Louis, aptly called "the most southern city in the North." These thirteen oral histories describe the daily struggle that pervasive racism demanded but also share the tradition of self-respect that the African American community of St. Louis sought to build on its own terms.

Midnight Shift

by Renee George

As a small child, Benoica Dilian is groomed to be a hunter and slayer of other world monsters, and protector of the human race. USA Today bestselling paranormal romance author Renee George pens an action packed novel of mystery, romance, and love, which will keep you turning the pages of Midnight Shift, Book 1 of her Midnight Shifters series. A scorching love story full of intrigue, hot alpha males, shifters, and things that go bump in the night!Can two alpha wolf shifters love Benie enough to put their differences aside to save her? When Other Worlder monsters start hunting slayer Benoica "Benie" Dilian, she enlists the sexy genius Ian Arent and the hot telepathic werewolf Trace Calder to help find out who is trying to kill Benie--and why. But as the investigation takes them deep into the Other Worlder community, Benie discovers a dark truth that may well destroy her. Only the love of the two very different men can help her survive and accept her ultimate destiny. This paranormal romantic suspense contains, shifters, M/F/M scenes, menage, and romance. Previously published: (2015) Renee George - Previously published as a five part serialized novel.

Forbidden Alpha

by Nina Blackman

In a world gone crazy, where the supernatural is segregated from humans, a lone vampire stands against the odds in a dystopian society, and fights for the rights of his fellow paranormals to exist. USA Today bestselling paranormal suspense author Dakota Cassidy, writing as Nina Blackman weaves a stunning tale of revenge, murder, passion, and desire, as Irish McConnell risks everything for the woman he loves.Irish McConnell would give his immortality for a taste of Claire Montgomery. But the Fangs of Anarchy leader can't risk his biker club, his vampire clan, or his tenuous truce with werewolf Gannon Dodd, Claire's pack alpha--and her intended mate. Nope. Vamps and weres don't mix, and Irish has managed to keep that in mind for five long, lust-filled years.But now Claire's gone and done something really, really (really!) bad, guaranteeing her doom if she's ever found out. Truce be damned, Irish won't leave her unprotected, despite the fact this is one murder-filled bundle of trouble he doesn't need.And unfortunately for Irish, the trouble's just beginning...This urban fantasy romance contains suspense, dystopian themes, vampires, werewolves, and biker gangs.Previously Published - (2014/2015) Dakota Cassidy - The Fangs of Anarchy 1, Forbidden Alpha Serial Part 1-Alpha Down | Part 2-Girl Most Lycan | Part 3-Were in the World is Gannon Dodd? | Part 4-In The Zone | Part 5--Revelation

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