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Broken Government

by John W. Dean

The concluding volume of The New York Times bestselling trilogy One of today?s most outspoken and respected political commentators asks: How can our democracy function when the key institutions of government no longer operate as intended by the Constitution? Stepping back to assess three decades of nearly continuous Republican rule, John W. Dean surveys the damage done to the three branches of government and traces their decline through the presidencies of Nixon, Ford, Reagan, Bush I , and Bush II. Speaking to what the average moderate citizen can do to combat extremism, authoritarianism, incompetence, and the Republicans? deliberate focus on polarizing social issues, Broken Government is a must-have book for voters this election year. .

Ethel Merman

by Brian Kellow

More than twenty years after her death, Ethel Merman continues to set the standard for American musical theater. The stories about the supremely talented, famously strong-willed, fearsomely blunt, and terrifyingly exacting woman are stuff of legend. But who was Ethel Agnes Zimmermann, really? Brian Kellow's definitive biography of the great Merman is superb, and the first account to examine both the artist and the woman with as much critical rigor as empathy. Through dozens of interviews with her colleagues, friends, and family members, Kellow traces the arc of her life and her thirty-year singing career to reveal many surprising facts about Broadway's biggest star.

Independents Day

by Lou Dobbs

From The New York Times bestselling author of War on the Middle Class, a powerful look at the critical issues facing America on the eve of the 2008 Presidential election With up to a million viewers each day, Lou Dobbs Tonight has become one of the most popular news programs in the nation. Now Dobbs, whose last book, War on the Middle Class, captured the plight of working Americans, asks the question: What has happened to the American dream? By examining the disastrous pubic policy choices that have eroded individual liberties, reduced workers rights and pay, and led our nation into division at home as well as into conflict around the world, Dobbs charts a determined course that will restore the fundamental equality of rights and opportunity for all Americans. I n a time of acute political turmoil, this is a book of vital importance from a revered independent. .

A Life Decoded

by J. Craig Venter

The triumphant memoir of the man behind one of the greatest feats in scientific historyOf all the scientific achievements of the past century, perhaps none can match the deciphering of the human genetic code, both for its technical brilliance and for its implications for our future. In A Life Decoded, J. Craig Venter traces his rise from an uninspired student to one of the most fascinating and controversial figures in science today. Here, Venter relates the unparalleled drama of the quest to decode the human genome-a goal he predicted he could achieve years earlier and more cheaply than the government-sponsored Human Genome Project, and one that he fulfilled in 2001. A thrilling story of detection, A Life Decoded is also a revealing, and often troubling, look at how science is practiced today.

Rumpole Misbehaves

by John Mortimer

The next novel in the Rumpole series from the beloved and bestselling master of the court The Rumpole novels have garnered legions of fans who show no sign of abandoning their favorite curmudgeonly British barrister. Now in Rumpole Misbehaves, our hero takes on nothing less than the New Labour government when their ridiculous new Anti- Social Behavior Orders land a Timson child in front of the bench for playing soccer on a posh London street. However, Rumpole quickly discovers that the complainant is hiding some nefarious secrets of her own. As he investigates the murder of a prostitute with links to white slavery and unscrupulous dealings in a government department, Rumpole must also wrangle with his fellow barristers as they threaten him with an ASBO for bringing food, wine, and small cigars into his room in chambers. .

Pontoon

by Garrison Keillor

A fresh and funny Lake Wobegon novel about a woman with a secret life Evelyn was a Sanctified Brethren woman of good standing, a devoted mother, a serious quilter. Only after she dies in her sleep, as she always wished she would, do we find out that she has been living a secret life. For years she has been in love with Raoul, a Las Vegas man who took her dancing and showed her the joys of life outside Lake Wobegon. Evelyn's stunned daughter Barbara finds she's inspired by her mother's secret commitment to pleasure. She decides to finally stop drinking and thumb her nose at the Wobegon establishment by carrying out Evelyn's final wish-to be cremated and have her ashes scattered over Lake Wobegon from a pontoon boat. It is also a time of homecoming for Debbie Detmer, a veterinary aromatherapy millionaire who has returned to Wobegon from California with her uncommitted fiancé in the hope that a lavish wedding with Moët and shrimp shish kabob will save them. But Debbie's plans for a pontoon boat wedding go terribly wrong. A novel about courage and transformation in a town stuck in its ways, Eve in Wobegonis a heartfelt and comic novel by one of our greatest storytellers. Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon stories have captured the imagination of millions and become an American institution. The critically acclaimed 2006 feature film A Prairie Home Companion, written by Keillor and directed by Robert Altman, introduced new fans to the beloved and iconic Lake Wobegon.

Head and Heart: American Christianities

by Garry Wills

A landmark examination of Christianity's place in American life across the broad sweep of this country's history, from the Puritans to the presidential administration of George W. Bush.

Cheating at Canasta

by William Trevor

A new collection from ?the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language? (The New Yorker) The publication of a new book by William Trevor is a true literary event. One of our finest chroniclers of the human condition, Trevor?s precise and unflinching insights into the lives of ordinary people are evidenced once again in this stunning collection of twelve stories. Subtle yet powerful, these exquisitely nuanced tales of regret, deception, adultery, aging, and forgiveness are a rare pleasure, and they confirm Trevor?s reputation as a master of the form. From a chance encounter between two childhood friends to memories of a newly widowed man to a family grappling with the sale of ancestral land, Trevor examines with grace and skill the tenuous bonds of our relationships, the strengths that hold us together, and the truths that threaten to separate us. .

The Art of Woo

by G. Richard Shell Mario Moussa

Selling ideas-especially the kinds of ideas that make organizations work-is a skill shrouded in mystery. In The Art of Woo, Professors G. Richard Shell and Mario Moussa offer a self-assessment to determine which persuasion role fits you best and discuss how to make the most of your natural strengths.

Closing the Leadership Gap

by Marie C. Wilson

The defining examination of the new role of women in America?now fully revised When first published in 2004, Marie Wilson?s Closing the Leadership Gap finally drew attention to what everyone knew but no one talked about?the lack of women in America?s leadership positions, even though compelling research shows that women enhance the top decision-making process dramatically. And yet, even as our nation sits on a world spinning with crises, we have barely begun to tap that most critical natural resource. With the possibility of America?s first woman president looming large, now is the time to revisit this inspiring call to action. .

Hitler's Pope

by John Cornwell

The "explosive" (The New York Times) bestseller-now with a new introduction by the author When Hitler's Pope, the shocking story of Pope Pius XII that "redefined the history of the twentieth century" (The Washington Post ) was originally published, it sparked a firestorm of controversy both inside and outside the Catholic Church. Now, award-winning journalist John Cornwell has revisited this seminal work of history with a new introduction that both answers his critics and reaffirms his overall thesis that Pius XII, now scheduled to be canonized by the Vatican, weakened the Catholic Church with his endorsement of Hitler-and sealed the fate of the Jews in Europe. .

War Without Death

by Mark Maske

In this masterpiece of sports reportage, Washington Post staff writer Mark Maske?one of the most respected journalists working both on and off the field?draws on unprecedented access to produce a behind-the-scenes look at the NFL?s bitterest rivals: the Philadelphia Eagles, New York Giants, Washington Redskins, and Dallas Cowboys. Relentlessly reported from the leadership level, War Without Death delivers all the dramatic personality conflicts and unexpected changes in personnel and fortune, creating a complete narrative of four intensely competitive organizations locked in a steel-cage match with each other over the course of a year?nothing less than nirvana for sports fans.

The Shawnees and the War for America

by Colin G. Calloway

With the courage and resilience embodied by their legendary leader Tecumseh, the Shawnees waged a war of territorial and cultural resistance for half a century. Noted historian Colin G. Calloway details the political and legal battles and the bloody fighting on both sides for possession of the Shawnees? land, while imbuing historical figures such as warrior chief Tecumseh, Daniel Boone, and Andrew Jackson with all their ambiguity and complexity. More than defending their territory, the Shawnees went to war to preserve a way of life and their own deeply held vision of what their nation should be. .

Reading the Man

by Elizabeth Brown Pryor

To most , Robert E. Lee is a beloved tragic figure of a bygone war--remembered by history as stoic and brave but without a true emotional life. Recently, however, historian Elizabeth Brown Pryor uncovered important documents that provide a stunning personal account of Lee's military ability, his beliefs, and his time. Using dozens of previously unpublished letters as departure points, Pryor sheds new light on every aspect of this complex and contradictory general and questions our own understanding of loyalty and patriotism. This tantalizing glimpse of a legendary hero's guarded soul will astonish and fascinate not only Civil War buffs, but anyone interested in this nation's history.

The Pursuit of Glory

by Tim Blanning

In The Pursuit of Glory Tim Blanning brings to life one of the most extraordinary and dynamic periods in Europe's history: from the desolate, battered and introvert continent of the end of the Thirty Years War to the overwhelmingly dynamic one that experienced the French Revolution and the wars of Napoleon. How did people really live their lives? How did they understand their world? What did they buy? What did they eat? How did they pray? What were their loyalties and their values? From the lives of ordinary farmers and soldiers to great kings, princes and bishops and the dominant personalities of the age (Louis XIV, Frederick the Great, Napoleon); from art, leisure pursuits and garden design to the strange sport of fox-tossing, Blanning explores this era of immense change, and cultural, political and technological ferment. This was a world in which the elite were obsessed with the pursuit of glory: their own glory, that of their families and that of their countries. It was a time of immense expenditure - as much on clothes, banquets and palaces as on fortresses and artillery - which shaped the societies and economies of entire countries.

Partners in Command

by Mark Perry

A unique look at the complex relationship between two of America?s foremost World War II leaders The first book ever to explore the relationship between George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower, Partners in Command eloquently tackles a subject that has eluded historians for years. As Mark Perry charts the crucial impact of this duo on victory in World War II and later as they lay the foundation for triumph in the Cold War, he shows us an unlikely, complex collaboration at the heart of decades of successful American foreign policy?and shatters many of the myths that have evolved about these two great men and the issues that tested their alliance. As exciting to read as it is vitally informative, this work is a signal accomplishment. .

Lawrence and Aaronsohn

by Ronald Florence

The rivalry that presaged the world?s most tenacious conflict As the Arab -Israeli conflict continues to plague the Middle East, historian Ronald Florence offers extraordinary new insights on its origins. This is the story of T. E. Lawrence, the young British officer who became famous around the world as Lawrence of Arabia, Aaron Aaronsohn, an agronomist from Palestine, and the antagonism that divided them over the fate of the dying Ottoman Empire during World War I?a clash of visions that set Arab nationalism and Zionism on a direct collision course that reverberates to this day.

Justinian's Flea: The First Great Plague and the End of the Roman Empire

by William Rosen

The epic story of the collision between one of nature?s smallest organisms and history?s mightiest empire During the golden age of the Roman Empire, Emperor Justinian reigned over a territory that stretched from Italy to North Africa. It was the zenith of his achievements and the last of them. In 542 AD, the bubonic plague struck. In weeks, the glorious classical world of Justinian had been plunged into the medieval and modern Europe was born. At its height, five thousand people died every day in Constantinople. Cities were completely depopulated. It was the first pandemic the world had ever known and it left its indelible mark: when the plague finally ended, more than 25 million people were dead. Weaving together history, microbiology, ecology, jurisprudence, theology, and epidemiology, Justinian?s Flea is a unique and sweeping account of the little known event that changed the course of a continent. .

Gut Feelings

by Gerd Gigerenzer

Why is split second decision-making superior to deliberation? Gut Feelings delivers the science behind Malcolm Gladwell?s Blink Reflection and reason are overrated, according to renowned psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer. Much better qualified to help us make decisions is the cognitive, emotional, and social repertoire we call intuition?a suite of gut feelings that have evolved over the millennia specifically for making decisions. ?Gladwell drew heavily on Gigerenzer?s research. But Gigerenzer goes a step further by explaining just why our gut instincts are so often right. Intuition, it seems, is not some sort of mystical chemical reaction but a neurologically based behavior that evolved to ensure that we humans respond quickly when faced with a dilemma? (BusinessWeek). .

The First Word

by Christine Kenneally

An accessible exploration of a burgeoning new field: the incredible evolution of language The first popular book to recount the exciting, very recent developments in tracing the origins of language, The First Word is at the forefront of a controversial, compelling new field. Acclaimed science writer Christine Kenneally explains how a relatively small group of scientists that include Noam Chomsky and Steven Pinker assembled the astounding narrative of how the fundamental process of evolution produced a linguistic ape?in other words, us. Infused with the wonder of discovery, this vital and engrossing book offers us all a better understanding of the story of humankind. .

Fateful Choices

by Ian Kershaw

Ian Kershaw's Fateful Choices: Ten Decisions that Changed the World, 1940-41 offers a penetrating insight into a series of momentous political decisions that shaped the course of the Second World War. The hurricane of events that marked the opening of the Second World War meant that anything could happen. For the aggressors there was no limit to their ambitions; for their victims a new Dark Age beckoned. Over the next few months their fates would be determined. In Fateful Choices Ian Kershaw re-creates the ten critical decisions taken between May 1940, when Britain chose not to surrender, and December 1941, when Hitler decided to destroy Europe's Jews, showing how these choices would recast the entire course of history. 'Powerfully argued . . . important . . . this book actually alters our perspective of the Second World War' Andrew Roberts 'This fascinating, closely-argued book adds to our understanding of a terrible war' Alan Massie 'A compelling re-examination of the conflict . . . Kershaw displays here those same qualities of scholarly rigour, careful argument and sound judgement that he brought to bear so successfully in his life of Hitler' Richard Overy 'A splendidly lucid and impeccably argued exposition of the greatest political decisions of the Second World War' Max Hastings 'How fortunate that it is Ian Kershaw bringing his immense knowledge and clarity of thought to the task . . . brilliantly explained . . . an immensely wise book' Anthony Beevor Ian Kershaw (b. 1943) was Professor of Modern History at the University of Sheffield from 1989-2008, and is one of the world's leading authorities on Hitler. His books include The 'Hitler Myth', his two volume biography Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris and Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis, and Fateful Choices: Ten Decisions that Changed the World, 1940-1941. He was knighted in 2002.

Fallen Founder

by Nancy Isenberg

A controversial challenge to the works of Ron Chernow and David McCullough With Fallen Founder , Nancy Isenberg plumbs rare and obscure sources to shed new light on everyone?s favorite founding villain. The Aaron Burr whom we meet through Isenberg?s eye-opening biography is a feminist, an Enlightenment figure on par with Jefferson, a patriot, and?most importantly?a man with powerful enemies in an age of vitriolic political fighting. Revealing the gritty reality of eighteenth-century America, Fallen Founder is the authoritative restoration of a figure who ran afoul of history and a much-needed antidote to the hagiography of the revolutionary era. .

The Day the World Ended at Little Bighorn

by Joseph M. Marshall III

The author of The Journey of Crazy Horse presents a legendary battle through the eyes of the Lakota The saga of ?Custer?s Last Stand? has become ingrained in the lore of the American West, and the key players?Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and George Armstrong Custer?have grown to larger-than-life proportions. Now, award-winning historian Joseph M. Marshall presents the revisionist view of the Battle of the Little Bighorn that has been available only in the Lakota oral tradition. Drawing on this rich source of storytelling, Marshall uncovers what really took place at the Little Big Horn and provides fresh insight into the significance of that bloody day. .

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

by Theda Perdue Michael D. Green

In the early nineteenth century, the U. S. government shifted its policy from trying to assimilate American Indians to relocating them, and proceeded to forcibly drive seventeen thousand Cherokees from their homelands. This journey of exile became known as the Trail of Tears. Historians Perdue and Green reveal the government?s betrayals and the divisions within the Cherokee Nation, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle the hardships found in the West. In its trauma and tragedy, the Cherokee diaspora has come to represent the irreparable injustice done to Native Americans in the name of nation building?and in their determined survival, it represents the resilience of the Native American spirit. .

Body of Work

by Christine Montross

The first monograph entirely dedicated to the works of interior architect Dennis T' Jampens.

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