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In the Company of Others: The Development of Anthropology in Israel

by Orit Abuhav

In Israel, anthropologists have customarily worked in their "home"--in the company of the society that they are studying. In the Company of Others: The Development of Anthropology in Israel by Orit Abuhav details the gradual development of the field, which arrived in Israel in the early twentieth century but did not have an official place in Israeli universities until the 1960s. Through archival research, observations and interviews conducted with active Israeli anthropologists, Abuhav creates a thorough picture of the discipline from its roots in the Mandate period to its current place in the Israeli academy. Abuhav begins by examining anthropology's disciplinary borders and practices, addressing its relationships to neighboring academic fields and ties to the national setting in which it is practiced. Against the background of changes in world anthropology, she traces the development of Israeli anthropology from its pioneering first practitioners--led by Raphael Patai, Erich Brauer, and Arthur Ruppin--to its academic breakthrough in the 1960s with the foreign-funded Bernstein Israel Research Project. She goes on to consider the role and characteristics of the field's professional association, the Israeli Anthropological Association (IAA), and also presents biographical sketches of fifty significant Israeli anthropologists. While Israeli anthropology has historically been limited in the numbers of its practitioners, it has been expansive in the scope of its studies. Abuhav brings a firsthand perspective to the crises and the highs, lows, and upheavals of the discipline in Israeli anthropology, which will be of interest to anthropologists, historians of the discipline, and scholars of Israeli studies.

Life Without a Recipe: A Memoir of Food and Family

by Diana Abu-Jaber

"Diana Abu-Jaber is the Ambassador of Big-Heartedness."--Patrick Volk, on The Language of Baklava On one side, there is Grace: prize-winning author Diana Abu-Jaber's tough, independent sugar-fiend of a German grandmother, wielding a suitcase full of holiday cookies. On the other, Bud: a flamboyant, spice-obsessed Arab father, full of passionate argument. The two could not agree on anything: not about food, work, or especially about what Diana should do with her life. Grace warned her away from children. Bud wanted her married above all--even if he had to provide the ring. Caught between cultures and lavished with contradictory "advice" from both sides of her family, Diana spent years learning how to ignore others' well-intentioned prescriptions. Hilarious, gorgeously written, poignant, and wise, Life Without a Recipe is Diana's celebration of journeying without a map, of learning to ignore the script and improvise, of escaping family and making family on one's own terms. As Diana discovers, however, building confidence in one's own path sometimes takes a mistaken marriage or two--or in her case, three: to a longhaired boy-poet, to a dashing deconstructionist literary scholar, and finally to her steadfast, outdoors-loving Scott. It also takes a good deal of angst (was it possible to have a serious writing career and be a mother?) and, even when she knew what she wanted (the craziest thing, in one's late forties: a baby!), the nerve to pursue it. Finally, fearlessly independent like the Grace she's named after, Diana and Scott's daughter Gracie will heal all the old battles with Bud and, like her writer-mom, learn to cook up a life without a recipe.

The Revolution before the Revolution: Late Authoritarianism and Student Protest in Portugal

by Guya Accornero

Histories of Portugal's transition to democracy have long focused on the 1974 military coup that toppled the authoritarian Estado Novo regime and set in motion the divestment of the nation's colonial holdings. However, the events of this "Carnation Revolution" were in many ways the culmination of a much longer process of resistance and protest originating in universities and other sectors of society. Combining careful research in police, government, and student archives with insights from social movement theory, The Revolution before the Revolution broadens our understanding of Portuguese democratization by tracing the societal convulsions that preceded it over the course of the "long 1960s."

Advanced Skills for Health Care Providers

by Barbara Acello

This book was written to prepare the nursing assistant or patient care technician to provide advanced patient care procedures. The book includes content on sterile procedures, including preparing and working with a sterile field, using sterile technique, and performing sterile dressing changes, wet to dry dressings. Venipuncture technique is covered in several chapters as well as intravenous procedures and many other advanced skills. The importance of reporting information and observations to the licensed supervisor is emphasized throughout the book. To this end, most chapters contain special text boxes listing observations to be reported and recorded. Added highlights within the text narrative include safety and infection control alerts, and age related information; information that is important to the student and in keeping with the latest health care trends.

Kittanning

by Diane Acerni Armstrong County Historical Society

Kittanning, a main street presence in rural Armstrong County, takes its name from the Delaware people who inhabited western Pennsylvania. Considered the site of a pivotal conflict during the French and Indian War, Kittanning later emerged as a center for local government and commerce. Families and businesses prospered by tapping into the Allegheny River and the wealth of other natural resources around them. The Allegheny was a lifeline, carrying valuable goods and materials as it twisted along its hilly southern path to the Ohio River. Among Kittanning's more notable exports were the visible print typewriter and the adventuress Nellie Bly. Kittanning showcases that while the faces and facades of this community have changed over the years, the town has stood the tests of time, largely due to the resourcefulness of its residents and their determination and dedication to preserve their riverside home.

Morbid Symptoms: Relapse in the Arab Uprising

by Gilbert Achcar

Since the first wave of uprisings in 2011, the euphoria of the "Arab Spring" has given way to the gloom of backlash and a descent into mayhem and war. The revolution has been overwhelmed by clashes between rival counter-revolutionary forces: resilient old regimes on the one hand and Islamic fundamentalist contenders on the other. In this eagerly awaited book, foremost Arab world and international affairs specialist Gilbert Achcar analyzes the factors of the regional relapse. Focusing on Syria and Egypt, Achcar assesses the present stage of the uprising and the main obstacles, both regional and international, that prevent any resolution. In Syria, the regime's brutality has fostered the rise of jihadist forces, among which the so-called Islamic State emerged as the most ruthless and powerful. In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood's year in power was ultimately terminated by the contradictory conjunction of a second revolutionary wave and a bloody reactionary coup. Events in Syria and Egypt offer salient examples of a pattern of events happening across the Middle East. Morbid Symptoms offers a timely analysis of the ongoing Arab uprising that will engage experts and general readers alike. Drawing on a unique combination of scholarly and political knowledge of the Arab region, Achcar argues that, short of radical social change, the region will not reach stability any time soon.

Created for Wholeness

by Andrew Benedict Acheampong

This book shows you how to know and validate yourself, your purpose in life, body type, psychological personality, astrological soul personality, religious faith, spiritual path for personal transformation. It examines various approaches to self-knowledge, wholeness, elimination of bad habits, addictions and wrong beliefs, your compatibility with other souls in relationships, and practical ways for aligning body-mind-soul to awakened spirit for wholeness. The book connects knowledge of oneself to a life of wholeness and harmony with others. The author shares his personal story about how he came to understand his divided self, personality, purpose and the struggles he has encountered on the path of wholeness of self.

Theory of Approximation

by N. I. Achieser

A pioneer of many modern developments in approximation theory, N. I. Achieser designed this graduate-level text from the standpoint of functional analysis. The first two chapters address approximation problems in linear normalized spaces and the ideas of P. L. Tchebysheff. Chapter III examines the elements of harmonic analysis, and Chapter IV, integral transcendental functions of the exponential type. The final two chapters explore the best harmonic approximation of functions and Wiener's theorem on approximation. Professor Achieser concludes this exemplary text with an extensive section of problems and applications (elementary extremal problems, Szego's theorem, the Carathéodory-Fejér problem, and more).

Portsmouth Firefighting

by Steven E. Achilles

In September 1756, with only fire buckets, two hand tubs, and citizen volunteers safeguarding the Colonial seaport, Portsmouth decided to organize and regulate its fire protection. By 1852, the Portsmouth Fire Department boasted six suction engines and in 1864 entered the age of steam power when the first steam fire engine was delivered. Disastrous fires and a growing city required the department to modernize as it moved into the 20th century. The department's first motorized engine was purchased in 1912, and by 1921, there was a new central fire station along with a new gasoline-powered ladder truck. Through an exceptional collection of photographs, Portsmouth Firefighting richly illustrates the story and tradition of a fire department forever connected to its brave firefighters, their magnificent fire engines, and the spectacular blazes they fought.

Girls' Weekend

by Cara Sue Achterberg

Dani, Meg, and Charlotte have bonded over babies, barbeques, and backyards, but when they escape for a girls' weekend away, they can't bring themselves to return to lives that don't seem to fit anymore. Harried Dani can't explain why she feels so discontented until she meets a young gallery owner who inspires her to rediscover the art that once made her happy. Dependable Meg faces up to a grief that threatens to swallow her whole and confronts a marriage built on expectations. Flamboyant Charlotte, frustrated with her stagnated life and marriage, pursues a playboy Irish singer and beachside business opportunities. All three of these women thought they would be different. None of them thought they'd be facing down forty and still wondering when life starts. What they do when they realize where they're headed is both inspiring and wildly entertaining. GIRLS' WEEKEND is a fun, yet poignant romp through the universal search of who we are, why we love, and what makes us happy by an author who is quickly emerging as one of our most incisive storytellers. PRAISE FOR CARA SUE ACHTERBERG'S FIRST NOVEL, I'M NOT HER: "Well written, sometimes light, sometimes frightening, but always intriguing, this bird's eye view of two lives intertwined among millions is certainly food for thought, especially when one walks a mile in another's shoes." - Tome Tender "What an intriguing storyline!" - Teena in Toronto "I loved this novel . . . This book had me laughing at some points, and it had me wiping away tears at others." - Comfy Reading "After about two pages I was hooked." - Glitter and Cookies "An awesome read! The theme of living the life of another no matter the situation and not judging without truly knowing is a lesson we should all take to heart." - Literarily Illumined

Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics and Precaution

by Frank Ackerman

"Cost-benefit analysis" is a term that is used so frequently we rarely stop to think about it. But relying on it can lead to some dubious conclusions, as Frank Ackerman points out in this eye-opening book. For example, some economists have argued that states should encourage--and even subsidize--cigarette smoking by citizens because smoking will shorten life spans and therefore reduce the need and expense of caring for the elderly. How did the economists reach that conclusion? The answer is cost-benefit analysis, Ackerman explains. Then in clear, understandable language, he describes an alternative, precautionary approach to making decisions under uncertainty. Once a mere theory, the precautionary principle has now been applied in practice through the European Union's REACH protocol. Citing major studies, many of which he has directed, he shows that the precautionary approach has not only worked, but has been relatively cheap. Poisoned for Pennies shows how the misuse of cost-benefit analysis is impeding efforts to clean up and protect our environment, especially in the case of toxic chemicals. According to Ackerman, conservatives--in elected office, in state and federal regulatory agencies, and in businesses of every size--have been able to successfully argue that environmental clean-up and protection are simply too expensive. But he proves, that is untrue in case after case. Ackerman is already well known for his carefully reasoned attacks on the conventional wisdom about the costs of environmental regulation. This new book, which finds Ackerman ranging from psychological research to risk analysis to the benefits of aggressive pesticide regulation, and from mad cow disease to lead paint, will further his reputation as a thought leader in environmental protection. We can't afford not to listen to him.

Why Do We Recycle?: Markets, Values, and Public Policy

by Frank Ackerman

The earnest warnings of an impending "solid waste crisis" that permeated the 1980s provided the impetus for the widespread adoption of municipal recycling programs, and since that time America has witnessed a remarkable rise in public participation in recycling activities. Recently, however, a backlash against these programs has developed. A vocal group of "anti-recyclers" has appeared, arguing that recycling is not an economically efficient strategy for addressing waste management problems. In Why Do We Recycle? Frank Ackerman examines the arguments for and against recycling, focusing on the debate surrounding the use of economic mechanisms to determine the value of recycling. Based on previously unpublished research, Ackerman presents an alternative view of the theory of market incentives, challenging the notion that setting appropriate prices and allowing unfettered competition will result in the most efficient level of recycling. Among the topics he considers are: externality issues, the landfill crisis and disposal facility siting, container deposit legislation, environmental issues that fall outside of market theory, costs and benefits of municipal recycling programs, life-cycle analysis and packaging policy, the impacts of production in extractive and manufacturing industries, composting and organic waste management, economics of conservation, and material use and long-term sustainability. Ackerman explains why purely economic approaches to recycling are incomplete and argues for a different kind of decisionmaking, one that addresses social issues, future as well as present resource needs, and non-economic values that cannot be translated into dollars and cents. Backed by empirical data and replete with specific examples, the book offers valuable guidance for planners and policymakers as well as an accessible introduction to the subject for students and citizens interested in the social, economic, and ethical underpinnings of recycling efforts.

The Genius of Birds

by Jennifer Ackerman

Birds are astonishingly intelligent creatures. In fact, according to revolutionary new research, some birds rival primates and even humans in their remarkable forms of intelligence. Like humans, many birds have enormous brains relative to their size. Although small, bird brains are packed with neurons that allow them to punch well above their weight. In The Genius of Birds, acclaimed author Jennifer Ackerman explores the newly discovered brilliance of birds and how it came about. As she travels around the world to the most cutting-edge frontiers of research-- the distant laboratories of Barbados and New Caledonia, the great tit communities of the United Kingdom and the bowerbird habitats of Australia, the ravaged mid-Atlantic coast after Hurricane Sandy and the warming mountains of central Virginia and the western states--Ackerman not only tells the story of the recently uncovered genius of birds but also delves deeply into the latest findings about the bird brain itself that are revolutionizing our view of what it means to be intelligent.Consider, as Ackerman does, the Clark's nutcracker, a bird that can hide as many as 30,000 seeds over dozens of square miles and remember where it put them several months later; the mockingbirds and thrashers, species that can store 200 to 2,000 different songs in a brain a thousand times smaller than ours; the well-known pigeon, which knows where it's going, even thousands of miles from familiar territory; and the New Caledonian crow, an impressive bird that makes its own tools. But beyond highlighting how birds use their unique genius in technical ways, Ackerman points out the impressive social smarts of birds. They deceive and manipulate. They eavesdrop. They display a strong sense of fairness. They give gifts. They play keep-away and tug-of-war. They tease. They share. They cultivate social networks. They vie for status. They kiss to console one another. They teach their young. They blackmail their parents. They alert one another to danger. They summon witnesses to the death of a peer. They may even grieve. This elegant scientific investigation and travelogue weaves personal anecdotes with fascinating science. Ackerman delivers an extraordinary story that will both give readers a new appreciation for the exceptional talents of birds and let them discover what birds can reveal about our changing world. Incredibly informative and beautifully written, The Genius of Birds richly celebrates the triumphs of these surprising and fiercely intelligent creatures.From the Hardcover edition.

Marymount College of Kansas: A History

by Patricia E. Ackerman

One year before the United States granted women the right to vote, the Sisters of St. Joseph broke ground on the construction of the first all-women's college in Kansas. Escalating construction costs put the school's future in jeopardy until Mother Antoinette took her plea for additional funds to Pope Benedict XV himself. Dubbed the "Million-Dollar College," the hilltop campus overlooking the Smoky Hill River finally opened its doors in 1922. The thousands who matriculated throughout its sixty-seven-year existence created a lasting legacy in the Sunflower State. Join alumnus Patricia Ackerman as she preserves the inspiring history of Marymount College.

A Force More Powerful

by Peter Ackerman Jack Duvall

This nationally-acclaimed book shows how popular movements used nonviolent action to overthrow dictators, obstruct military invaders and secure human rights in country after country, over the past century. Peter Ackerman and Jack DuVall depict how nonviolent sanctions--such as protests, strikes and boycotts--separate brutal regimes from their means of control. They tell inside stories--how Danes outmaneuvered the Nazis, Solidarity defeated Polish communism, and mass action removed a Chilean dictator--and also how nonviolent power is changing the world today, from Burma to Serbia.

C Programming Language Essentials

by Ernest C. Ackermann

REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. C Programming Language discusses fundamental notions, data types and objects, expressions, statements, declarations, function and program structure, the preprocessor, and the standard library.

Neoclassical Ornamental Designs

by Rudolph Ackermann

Graphic artists, illustrators, desktop publishers - anyone in search of elegant classical ornament - will find a wealth of usable material in this handy resource, reproduced from rare 19th-century portfolios. Readers can choose from borders, corners, vignettes, cartouches, busts, ornamental designs, and many other configurations depicting gods and goddesses, mythical animals, floral and foliate motifs, urns, chariots, helmets, angels and cherubs, columns, figures from classical mythology, and more - all in fine-line renderings that convey a sense of timeless elegance and classical ambience. Ideal for adding pictorial interest to book and magazine illustrations, advertisements, brochures, and many other projects, these designs comprise an easy-to-use, copyright-free reference that belongs at the fingertips of anyone wishing to create eye-catching graphics with a classical touch.

Cubano Be, Cubano Bop: One Hundred Years of Jazz in Cuba

by Leonardo Acosta Daniel Whitesell Paquito D'Rivera

Based on unprecedented research in Cuba, the direct testimony of scores of Cuban musicians, and the author's unique experience as a prominent jazz musician, Cubano Be, Cubano Bop is destined to take its place among the classics of jazz history. The work pays tribute not only to a distinguished lineage of Cuban jazz musicians and composers, but also to the rich musical exchanges between Cuban and American jazz throughout the twentieth century.The work begins with the first encounters between Cuban music and jazz around the turn of the last century. Acosta writes about the presence of Cuban musicians in New Orleans and the "Spanish tinge" in early jazz from the city, the formation and spread of the first jazz ensembles in Cuba, the big bands of the thirties, and the inception of "Latin jazz." He explores the evolution of Bebop, Feeling, and Mambo in the forties, leading to the explosion of Cubop or Afro-Cuban jazz and the innovations of the legendary musicians and composers Machito, Mario Bauzá, Dizzy Gillespie, and Chano Pozo. The work concludes with a new generation of Cuban jazz artists, including the Grammy award-winning musicians and composers Chucho Valdés and Paquito D'Rivera.

Happy Hour at Casa Dracula

by Marta Acosta

Latina Ivy League grad Milagro de Los Santos can't find her place in the world or a man to go with it. Then one night, at a book party for her pretentious ex-boyfriend, she meets an oddly attractive man. After she is bitten while kissing him, she falls ill and is squirreled away to his family's estate to recover. Vampires don't exist in this day and age -- or do they? As Milagro falls for a fabulously inappropriate man, she finds herself caught between a family who has accepted her as one of their own and a shady organization that refuses to let the undead live and love in peace.

Real Computing Made Real: Preventing Errors in Scientific and Engineering Calculations

by Forman S. Acton

Engineers and scientists who want to avoid insidious errors in their computer-assisted calculations will welcome this concise guide to trouble-shooting. Real Computing Made Real offers practical advice on detecting and removing bugs. It also outlines techniques for preserving significant figures, avoiding extraneous solutions, and finding efficient iterative processes for solving nonlinear equations.Those who compute with real numbers (for example, floating-point numbers stored with limited precision) tend to develop techniques that increase the frequency of useful answers. But although there might be ample guidance for those addressing linear problems, little help awaits those negotiating the nonlinear world. This book, geared toward upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, helps rectify that imbalance. Its examples and exercises (with answers) help readers develop problem-formulating skills and assist them in avoiding the common pitfalls that software packages seldom detect. Some experience with standard numerical methods is assumed, but beginners will find this volume a highly practical introduction, particularly in its treatment of often-overlooked topics.

The Navajo And Pueblo Silversmiths

by John Adair

Probably no native American handicrafts are more widely admired than Navajo weaving and Navajo and Pueblo silver work. This book contains the first full and authoritative account of the Indian silver jewelry fashioned in the Southwest by the Navajo and the Zuni, Hopi, and other Pueblo peoples. It is written by John Adair, a trained ethnologist who has become a recognized expert on this craft."A volume conspicuously pleasing in its format and so strikingly handsome in its profuse illustrations as to rivet your attention once it chances to fall open. With the care of a meticulous and thorough scholar, the author has told the story of his several years' investigation of jewelry making among the Southwestern Indians. So richly decorative are the plates he uses for his numerous illustrations showing the jewelry itself, the Indians working at it and the Indians wearing it--that the conscientious narrative is surrounded by an atmosphere of genuinely exciting visual experience."--The Dallas Times HeraldThe Navajo and Pueblo Silversmiths provides a full history of the craft and the actual names and localities of the pioneer craftsmen who introduced the art of the silversmith to their people. Despite its present high stage of development, with its many subtle and often exquisite designs, the art of working silver is not an ancient one among the Navajo and Pueblo Indians. There are men still living today who remember the very first silversmiths.

The Works in Architecture of Robert and James Adam

by James Adam Robert Adam Henry Hope Reed

The Palladian style dominated British architecture for most of the 1700s, until the rise of the Adam style, which held sway for the final decades of the eighteenth century. Brothers Robert and James Adam were almost single-handedly responsible for infusing Georgian architecture with the sensibilities and elements of classical Hellenic and Latinate design. Their elegant, sophisticated form of Neoclassicism affected not only architecture, but also interior design, furniture design, and landscaping.The Works in Architecture of Robert and James Adam, one of the most celebrated books in architectural history, consists of the brothers' own selections of illustrations from their commissions. Dating from the 1770s, these 106 illustrated plates epitomize the style that influenced generations of British and American architectural and furniture designs. Created by some of the finest commercial engravers of the age -- including four plates by Piranesi -- these illustrations are painstakingly reproduced in perfect detail and clarity. The original text imparts the Adams' own esthetic and practical aims, and an informative introduction places the brothers' work in historical perspective.

Black Women’s Christian Activism: Seeking Social Justice in a Northern Suburb

by Betty Livingston Adams

When a domestic servant named Violet Johnson moved to the affluent white suburb of Summit, New Jersey in 1897, she became one of just barely a hundred black residents in the town of six thousand. In this avowedly liberal Protestant community, the very definition of "the suburbs" depended on observance of unmarked and fluctuating race and class barriers. But Johnson did not intend to accept the status quo. Establishing a Baptist church a year later, a seemingly moderate act that would have implications far beyond weekly worship, Johnson challenged assumptions of gender and race, advocating for a politics of civic righteousness that would grant African Americans an equal place in a Christian nation. Johnson's story is powerful, but she was just one among the many working-class activists integral to the budding days of the civil rights movement. In Black Women's Christian Activism, Betty Livingston Adams examines the oft overlooked role of non-elite black women in the growth of northern suburbs and American Protestantism in the first half of the twentieth century. Focusing on the strategies and organizational models church women employed in the fight for social justice, Adams tracks the intersections of politics and religion, race and gender, and place and space in a New York City suburb, a local example that offers new insights on northern racial oppression and civil rights protest. As this book makes clear, religion made a key difference in the lives and activism of ordinary black women who lived, worked, and worshiped on the margin during this tumultuous time.

Old and New New Englanders: Immigration and Regional Identity in the Gilded Age

by Bluford Adams

In Old and New New Englanders, Bluford Adams provides a reenvisioning of New England's history and regional identity by exploring the ways the arrival of waves of immigrants from Europe and Canada transformed what it meant to be a New Englander during the Gilded Age. Adams's intervention challenges a number of long-standing conceptions of New England, offering a detailed and complex portrayal of the relations between New England's Yankees and immigrants that goes beyond nativism and assimilation. In focusing on immigration in this period, Adams provides a fresh view on New England's regional identity, moving forward from Pilgrims, Puritans, and their descendants and emphasizing the role immigrants played in shaping the region's various meanings. Furthermore, many researchers have overlooked the newcomers' relationship to the regional identities they found here. Adams argues immigrants took their ties to New England seriously. Although they often disagreed about the nature of those ties, many immigrant leaders believed identification with New England would benefit their peoples in their struggles both in the United States and back in their ancestral lands. Drawing on and contributing to work in immigration history, as well as American, gender, ethnic, and New England studies, this book is broadly concerned with the history of identity construction in the United States while its primary focus is the relationship between regional categories of identity and those based on race and ethnicity. With its interdisciplinary methodology, original research, and diverse chapter topics, the book targets both specialist and nonspecialist readers.

Point Piedras Blancas

by Carole Adams John H. Bogacki

For thousands of years, Point Piedras Blancas, located along the central coast of California, has attracted people to its rocky, windswept shores. In ancient times, it was used by Native American cultures. Since 1875, it has been the site of a First Order Lighthouse, warning ships to steer clear of its rocky shoals, a duty it continues to fulfill. Although the years have not been kind to this stunning area nor to the lighthouse, new life is being breathed into it by a partnership of enthusiastic community volunteers and government agencies. Their common goal is to restore this magnificent site to its original state while reintroducing the natural environment that was almost obliterated during the past four decades.

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