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Christianity, Cults, and the Occult

by Rose Publishing

Christianity, Cults, and the Occult: Compare 11 Groups with Biblical ChristianityMany teenagers and adults know at least one person who has been involved with some sort of occult practice, whether it be reading horoscopes or being interested in astrology. A Barna Group survey reveals that nearly 75% of all U.S. teens have dabbled in some form of psychic activity or witchcraft.Christianity, Cults, and the Occult, an ebook that can be read in 30 minutes or less, takes a close look at eleven cultic movements that have a wide range of occult connections and compares them to the origins and key beliefs of Christianity.Christianity, Cults, and the Occult helps Christians understand their own beliefs and explains the backgrounds of different occults, a list of occult terms and definitions, as well as Scriptural warnings against the occult.People enjoy discussing this topic and the ebook will equip them to know how deal with the occult when it confronts them in their schools or neighborhoods. Christianity, Cults, and the Occult explains why people are attracted to occult groups like Kabbalah which include people like Madonna and Demi Moore.Christians need to understand what's behind the different cults and occult so you can express to others how and why your beliefs are different. Christianity, Cults, and the Occult addresses the following topics for each of the 11 movements:*Origins (founders, dates, headquarters)*Key writings*Key beliefs*Occultic practices*Affiliated organizations*Symbols and photos*News and controversiesThese are the 11 cults examined in Christianity, Cults, and the Occult:*Freemasonry (Masons, the Masonic Lodge)*Kabbalah*Wicca/Neopaganism *Satanism *Spiritualism *Santería*Voodoo *Theosophy*Anthroposophy*Rosicrucianism *EckankarMore than ever, you need clear, reliable information so you can speak intelligently when talking about your Christian beliefs. Christianity, Cults, and the Occult provides you with information that will help you understand, pray for, and offer help to others who are interested in the occult.

Ngondro for Our Current Day: A Short Ngondro Practice and its Instructions

by Ogyen Trinley Dorje

In this succinct teaching presented in 2006 by His Holiness the Seventeenth Gyalwang Karmapa in Bodhgaya, India, students are guided through a shortened version of the preliminaries for mahamudra practice, which His Holiness composed with the aim of benefiting practitioners from developed countries who often lead busy lives. The complete practice, in Brief Recitations, is written in English, Tibetan, and Tibetan transliteration, and complete instructions for the Four Special Preliminaries are provided, with the exception of guru yoga. His Holiness guides students through the details of each practice, including the visualizations of Refuge, Vajrasattva purification, and Mandala offerings, often punctuated with his good humor. A summary of the practice sequences and a list of precepts of the refuge vow are also included in two appendices.

What Christianity Has Done for the World

by Rose Publishing

A recent study concluded that Christianity's image is the United States is declining, especially among young people. Only 16% of non-Christians between the ages of 16 and 29 have a "good impression" of Christianity according to Barna Research. Evangelicals come under the severest criticism, with only 3% of 16-29 year olds having a favorable view of this group of Christians.This pamphlet was written to show this generation some of the "good deeds" that Christians have done over the past 2000 years.The Scriptures say that even non-Christians will glorify God when they see the kindness and good works done by Christians (Matthew 5:16; 1 Peter 2:12)It includes dozens of examples, from the abolition of slavery in England to advances in medicine and science. Includes specifics about educating the poor, feeding the hungry, caring for lepers, and reforming laws to protect the weak. This is a valuable reference guide--buy one for a skeptical friend and another for yourself. Examples are taken from art, literature, science, medicine, law, education, philosophy, charity, and equality for all people.

Party & Snack Recipe Perfection

by Ellen Argyriou

Party & Snack Recipe Perfection contains simple, delicious recipes that anyone can make. From mini pizzas and scallop puffs to delicious fruit tartlets, this collection offers exciting finger food recipes to suit every taste and occasion. Each recipe comes with fully illustrated, easy-to-follow step-by-step instructions.

Kennedy

by Allan Jay Friedman Leslie Bricusse

This is the story of John F. Kennedy, starting in 1959 with his bid for the US presidency and following events through to his assassination in November 1963. The casting is very flexible - the original production was performed entirely by young people - and large TV screens are used around the stage to display and rear project photos, film of the Kennedys, America and the world. 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of President Kennedy.

The Indian Equator: Mark Twain's India Revisited

by Ian Strathcarron

"Dear me! It is a strange world. Particularly the Indian division of it." Mark Twain's quip arose in the course of an around-the-world lecture tour. Driven by financial necessity, the famed humorist and student of human nature undertook a year-long series of far-flung engagements that would provide both ready cash and the material for one of his most successful books: Following the Equator, which recounts the author's experiences during a two-and-a-half-month sojourn through India.A century after the publication of Following the Equator, Ian Strathcarron re-creates Twain's itinerary. Strathcarron -- who followed Twain's journey through the Middle East in a previous travel book, Innocence and War -- begins in Bombay, faithfully retracing his predecessor's steps through Benares, Calcutta, Darjeeling, Delhi, Lahore, and other stops along the Grand Tour of 1896. The modern-day writer offers fascinating insights into the region's timeless qualities as well as the rampant changes that have occurred in the course of the past century.

A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Montreal: Updated and Expanded Second Edition

by Helen Malkin Nancy Dunton

A new edition of the popular 2008 guidebook, with updates to the previous entries and 25 new buildings added, that will have the readers exploring all of Montreal.

Four Great Restoration Comedies

by William Wycherley

When England's theaters reopened in 1660, 18 years after being closed by an act of Parliament, audiences embraced the witty and satirical dialogue spoken by "plain folks" characters--it was a new era in drama. The four comedy classics featured in this one convenient collection are typical of the works popularized during one of the most exciting and innovative periods in English theater.Brimming with bawdy and satirical comedies and rampant with notorious womanizers, amorous adventure, and marital discord are works by William Wycherley (The Country Wife), Sir George Etherege (The Man of Mode), Aphra Behn (The Rover), and Sir John Vanbrugh (The Relapse).

The Riven Shield: The Sun Sword #5

by Michelle West

In the fifth novel of the Sun Sword series, acclaimed author Michelle West returns to a war-torn world of noble houses divided and demon lords unleashed...

Cookery and Dining in Imperial Rome

by Apicius Joseph Dommers Vehling

Oldest known cookbook in existence offers readers a clear picture of what foods Romans ate, how they prepared them. Actual recipes -- from fig fed pork and salt fish balls in wine sauce to pumpkin Alexander style, nut custard turnovers and rose pie. 49 illustrations.

Becoming German: The 1709 Palatine Migration to New York

by Philip Otterness

Becoming German tells the intriguing story of the largest and earliest mass movement of German-speaking immigrants to America. The so-called Palatine migration of 1709 began in the western part of the Holy Roman Empire, where perhaps as many as thirty thousand people left their homes, lured by rumors that Britain's Queen Anne would give them free passage overseas and land in America. They journeyed down the Rhine and eventually made their way to London, where they settled in refugee camps. The rumors of free passage and land proved false, but, in an attempt to clear the camps, the British government finally agreed to send about three thousand of the immigrants to New York in exchange for several years of labor. After their arrival, the Palatines refused to work as indentured servants and eventually settled in autonomous German communities near the Iroquois of central New York. Becoming German tracks the Palatines' travels from Germany to London to New York City and into the frontier areas of New York. Philip Otterness demonstrates that the Palatines cannot be viewed as a cohesive "German" group until after their arrival in America; indeed, they came from dozens of distinct principalities in the Holy Roman Empire. It was only in refusing to assimilate to British colonial culture--instead maintaining separate German-speaking communities and mixing on friendly terms with Native American neighbors--that the Palatines became German in America.

The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director

by Thomas Chippendale

Thomas Chippendale (1718-79) was the most famous and most skilled of England's master cabinet-makers. So synonymous with excellence in design and craftsmanship was he that his name has been given to the most splendid period of English furniture design.In 1774, Chippendale issued a catalogue of all his designs, a magnificent compilation of 160 engraved plates representing the prevailing furniture styles, particularly the French (Louis XXV), Gothic, and Chinese-manner pieces for which he was best known. The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director, the most important and thorough catalogue of furniture designs that had ever been published in England, was enormously influential, spreading quickly throughout the Continent and the colonies and guiding the style and construction of furniture everywhere. A second edition was formed the following year, and a third in 1762. Today this classic collection is a very rare and highly valued work.This volume is an unaltered and unabridged republication of the 1762 edition of The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director. The articles of furniture depicted are extremely varied: chairs, sofas, canopy and dome beds, window cornices, breakfast tables, shaving tables, commodes, chamber organs, cabinets, candle stands, cisterns, chimney pieces, picture frames, frets, and other decorations. The plates contain elegant drawings that show the unique combination of solidity of construction and lightness and grace that was the Chippendale trademark, along with many construction diagrams, elevations, and enlargements of moldings and other details. In addition to the plates, this volume also includes a supplement of photographs of sixteenth-century Chippendale-style pieces, including some executed by Chippendale, complete captions to the photos, and a short biographical sketch of Chippendale by N. I. Bienenstock, editor of Furniture World.The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director is an indispensable guide for antiquarians, furniture dealers, and collectors, and a treasury of ideas for today's designers. Art lovers and other readers will also find it a delightful browsing book.

Camp Alien: Alien Novels, Book 13

by Gini Koch

The President and First Lady, aka Jeff and Kitty Katt-Martini, don't get any downtime once the Mastermind has been revealed to the world. Not only do they have myriad high-level government positions to fill, but the scrutiny and pressure on this Administration has gone into overdrive.The sudden reappearance of a long-forgotten adversary turns out to be the tip of the iceberg. New robots and androids attacking, old enemies making new alliances, and new aliens with interesting abilities almost overshadow the fact that the U.S. still has to host a peace summit at Camp David between Israel and Iraq. It's clear that while the Mastermind may be down, there are plenty of others ready to take his place--and all that stands between them and success are Kitty and Company.Kidnappings, rescues, creepy hideouts, a hidden black site, and a domestic dispute that could end Jeff and Kitty's marriage are nothing compared to finding not one but two hidden labs where dangerous and deadly things are brewing. But when the President and his entourage finally get to the peace talks, things are no better. Mossad rightly suspects something's wrong with both their Prime Minister and the President of Iraq. A hidden in-control superbeing, an android replacement, and an army of Fem-Bots turn the peace talks into a Battle Royale that the team might not actually survive. And if they don't make it, Earth won't make it, either.But no pressure.

Neo-Classical Furniture Designs: A Reprint of Thomas King's "Modern Style of Cabinet Work Exemplified," 1829

by Thomas King

Influential guide displays over 300 Grecian designs: fire screens, sofas, couches, chairs, footstools, commodes, sideboards, washstands, bedsteads,and many other items.

Engravings by Hogarth

by William Hogarth

Rake's Progress, Harlot's Progress, Ilustrations for Hudibras, Before and After, Beer Street, and Gin Lane, 96 more. Commentary by Sean Shesgreen.

Killed Strangely: The Death of Rebecca Cornell

by Elaine Forman Crane

"It was Rebecca's son, Thomas, who first realized the victim's identity. His eyes were drawn to the victim's head, and aided by the flickering light of a candle, he 'clapt his hands and cryed out, Oh Lord, it is my mother.' James Moills, a servant of Cornell . . . described Rebecca 'lying on the floore, with fire about Her, from her Lower parts neare to the Armepits.' He recognized her only 'by her shoes.'"--from Killed Strangely On a winter's evening in 1673, tragedy descended on the respectable Rhode Island household of Thomas Cornell. His 73-year-old mother, Rebecca, was found close to her bedroom's large fireplace, dead and badly burned. The legal owner of the Cornells' hundred acres along Narragansett Bay, Rebecca shared her home with Thomas and his family, a servant, and a lodger. A coroner's panel initially declared her death "an Unhappie Accident," but before summer arrived, a dark web of events--rumors of domestic abuse, allusions to witchcraft, even the testimony of Rebecca's ghost through her brother--resulted in Thomas's trial for matricide. Such were the ambiguities of the case that others would be tried for the murder as well. Rebecca is a direct ancestor of Cornell University's founder, Ezra Cornell. Elaine Forman Crane tells the compelling story of Rebecca's death and its aftermath, vividly depicting the world in which she lived. That world included a legal system where jurors were expected to be familiar with the defendant and case before the trial even began. Rebecca's strange death was an event of cataclysmic proportions, affecting not only her own community, but neighboring towns as well. The documents from Thomas's trial provide a rare glimpse into seventeenth-century life. Crane writes, "Instead of the harmony and respect that sermon literature, laws, and a hierarchical/patriarchal society attempted to impose, evidence illustrates filial insolence, generational conflict, disrespect toward the elderly, power plays between mother-in-law and daughter-in-law, [and] adult dependence on (and resentment of) aging parents who clung to purse strings." Yet even at a distance of more than three hundred years, Rebecca Cornell's story is poignantly familiar. Her complaints of domestic abuse, Crane says, went largely unheeded by friends and neighbors until, at last, their complacency was shattered by her terrible death.

Aesop's Fables - Translated by George Fyler Townsend

by Aesop

Aesop's Fables is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and story-teller believed to have lived in ancient Greece between 620 and 560 BCE. Of diverse origins, the stories associated with Aesop's name have descended to modern times through a number of sources. They continue to be reinterpreted in different verbal registers and in popular as well as artistic mediums.

Empire’s Twin: U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism

by Jay Sexton Ian Tyrrell

Across the course of American history, imperialism and anti-imperialism have been awkwardly paired as influences on the politics, culture, and diplomacy of the United States. The Declaration of Independence, after all, is an anti-imperial document, cataloguing the sins of the metropolitan government against the colonies. With the Revolution, and again in 1812, the nation stood against the most powerful empire in the world and declared itself independent. As noted by Ian Tyrrell and Jay Sexton, however, American "anti-imperialism was clearly selective, geographically, racially, and constitutionally." Empire's Twin broadens our conception of anti-imperialist actors, ideas, and actions; it charts this story across the range of American history, from the Revolution to our own era; and it opens up the transnational and global dimensions of American anti-imperialism. By tracking the diverse manifestations of American anti-imperialism, this book highlights the different ways in which historians can approach it in their research and teaching. The contributors cover a wide range of subjects, including the discourse of anti-imperialism in the Early Republic and Civil War, anti-imperialist actions in the U.S. during the Mexican Revolution, the anti-imperial dimensions of early U.S. encounters in the Middle East, and the transnational nature of anti-imperialist public sentiment during the Cold War and beyond. Contributors: Laura Belmonte, Oklahoma State University; Robert Buzzanco, University of Houston; Julian Go, Boston University; Alan Knight, University of Oxford; Ussama Makdisi, Rice University; Erez Manela, Harvard University; Peter Onuf, Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, Monticello, and University of Virginia; Jeffrey Ostler, University of Oregon; Patricia Schechter, Portland State University; Jay Sexton, University of Oxford; Ian Tyrrell, University of New South Wales

The Built-Up Ship Model

by Charles G. Davis

This highly detailed, superbly illustrated manual introduces serious model builders to the hand crafting of ship models from the bottom up, exactly as real ships were traditionally built in shipyards. Clearly, and with painstaking care, every step of construction is explained, from laying the keel to the last details of masting and rigging.For this book, the author chose as a model the 16-gun United States brig Lexington, a merchant vessel converted to military use in 1773, and a veteran of two years of active service in the Revolution. To ensure complete accuracy and to alert readers to possible problems and pitfalls along the way, the author, a naval architect and master model builder, constructed the model as he wrote the book.Photographs illustrate the day-to-day work in progress, so that ship model builders can check their work against Davis's own replica. In addition, over 100 drawings show in detail correct implementation of the more complex instructions. In his introduction, Charles Davis chronicles the exciting career of the Lexington, and the role it played in America's fight for freedom.A classic in its field, The Built-Up Ship Model is not a book for beginners; rather, it is an expert guide aimed at model builders with experience, patience, and a passion for building "the real thing." The reward: an heirloom-quality ship model as beautiful as it is authentic in every detail.

…So Help Me God: The Stories of the Bibles, and the Inaugurations, in American History

by Michael B. Costanzo

The author tells the ultimate story of the use of the Bible in the United States with a brief glance back to its first use by Charlemagne in 800 then quickly moves to the beginning of constitutional government in the United States. He tells of the inaugurations beginning with George Washington in New York in 1791 when he placed his hand on a Bible loaned by a nearby Masonic lodge. Following Washington's inauguration, the author tells the story of each Bible, where it came from, how it was secured and where it is now. The story of each inauguration is also told showing the remarkable trajectory of growth in presidential celebrations and the American culture. Presidential inaugurations in other governments, on what is now U.S. soil such as the Republic of Texas, the Confederate States of America and the Republic of Hawaii, are also told. As a prelude to the stories, the author brings into focus the various editions and printings of the Bible to meet the satisfactory demands of different perspectives. It is a complete look at the use of the Book in United States Officialdom. Since George Washington used one in his 1789 inauguration, the Bible has become an indelible part of almost every American presidential inauguration. This book is a history of known Bibles used in every American presidential inauguration. It covers the United States, as well as other governments which had one time or another occupied territories now part of the United States, such as the Confederate States of America, and the Republic of Texas.

George Washington's Westchester Gamble: The Encampment on the Hudson and the Trapping of Cornwallis

by Richard Borkow

During the summer of 1781, the armies of Generals Washington and Rochambeau were encamped in lower Westchester County at Dobbs Ferry, Ardsley, Hartsdale, Edgemont and White Plains. It was a time of military deadlock and grim prospects for the allied Americans and French. Washington recognized that a decisive victory was needed or America would never achieve independence. In August, he marched these soldiers to Virginia to face General Cornwallis and his redcoats. Washington risked all on this march. Its success required secrecy, and he prepared an elaborate deception to convince the British that Manhattan, not Virginia, was the target of the allied armies. Local historian Richard Borkow presents this exciting story of the Westchester encampment and Washington's great gamble that saved the United States.

The Arid Lands: History, Power, Knowledge

by Diana K. Davis

Deserts are commonly imagined as barren, defiled, worthless places, wastelands in need of development. This understanding has fueled extensive anti-desertification efforts -- a multimillion-dollar global campaign driven by perceptions of a looming crisis. In this book, Diana Davis argues that estimates of desertification have been significantly exaggerated and that deserts and drylands -- which constitute about 41% of the earth's landmass -- are actually resilient and biodiverse environments in which a great many indigenous people have long lived sustainably. Meanwhile, contemporary arid lands development programs and anti-desertification efforts have met with little success. As Davis explains, these environments are not governed by the equilibrium ecological dynamics that apply in most other regions. Davis shows that our notion of the arid lands as wastelands derives largely from politically motivated Anglo-European colonial assumptions that these regions had been laid waste by "traditional" uses of the land. Unfortunately, such assumptions still frequently inform policy. Drawing on political ecology and environmental history, Davis traces changes in our understanding of deserts, from the benign views of the classical era to Christian associations of the desert with sinful activities to later (neo)colonial assumptions of destruction. She further explains how our thinking about deserts is problematically related to our conceptions of forests and desiccation. Davis concludes that a new understanding of the arid lands as healthy, natural, but variable ecosystems that do not necessarily need improvement or development will facilitate a more sustainable future for the world's magnificent drylands.

The Value of Comparison

by Peter van der Veer Thomas Gibson

In The Value of Comparison Peter van der Veer makes a compelling case for using comparative approaches in the study of society and for the need to resist the simplified civilization narratives popular in public discourse and some social theory. He takes the quantitative social sciences and the broad social theories they rely on to task for their inability to question Western cultural presuppositions, demonstrating that anthropology's comparative approach provides a better means to understand societies. This capacity stems from anthropology's engagement with diversity, its fragmentary approach to studying social life, and its ability to translate difference between cultures. Through essays on topics as varied as iconoclasm, urban poverty, Muslim immigration, and social exclusion van der Veer highlights the ways that studying the particular and the unique allows for gaining a deeper knowledge of the whole without resorting to simple generalizations that elide and marginalize difference.

The First American Cookbook: A Facsimile of "American Cookery," 1796

by Amelia Simmons

This facsimile of the first American-written cookbook published in the United States is not only a first in cookbook literature, but a historic document. It reveals the rich variety of food Colonial Americans enjoyed, their tastes, cooking and eating habits, even their colorful language.Author Amelia Simmons worked as a domestic in Colonial America and gathered her cookery expertise from firsthand experience. Her book points out the best ways of judging the quality of meats, poultry, fish, vegetables, etc., and presents the best methods of preparing and cooking them. In choosing fish, poultry, and other meats, the author wisely advises, "their smell denotes their goodness." Her sound suggestions for choosing the freshest and most tender onions, potatoes, parsnips, carrots, asparagus, lettuce, cabbage, beans, and other vegetables are as timely today as they were nearly 200 years ago.Here are the first uniquely American recipes using corn meal -- Indian pudding, "Johnny cake," and Indian slapjacks -- as well as the first recipes for pumpkin pudding, winter squash pudding, and for brewing spruce beer. The words "cookie" and "slaw" made their first published appearance in this book. You'll also find the first recommended use of pearlash (the forerunner of baking powder) to lighten dough, as well as recommendations for seasoning stuffing and roasting beef, mutton, veal, and lamb -- even how to dress a turtle.Along with authentic recipes for colonial favorites, a Glossary includes definitions of antiquated cooking terms: pannikin, wallop, frumenty, emptins, and more. And Mary Tolford Wilson's informative Introductory Essay provides the culinary historical background needed to appreciate this important book fully.Anyone who uses and collects cookbooks will want to have The First American Cookbook. Cultural historians, Americana buffs, and gourmets will find this rare edition filled with interesting recipes and rich in early American flavor.

The Red and the Black

by Stendhal Horace B. Samuel

A landmark in the development of psychological realism, Stendhal's masterpiece chronicles a young man's struggles with the dualities of his nature. Julien Sorel, a young dreamer from the provinces whose imagination is afire with Napoleonic ideals, sets off to make his fortune in Parisian society of Restoration France. His encounters and experiences along the way incite constant inner conflict, drawing him back and forth between sincerity and hypocrisy, idealism and cynicism, humility and pride, love and ambition.

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