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Houseboat Days

by John Ashbery

Is poetry the act of putting something together, or the art of taking something apart? Houseboat Days, one of John Ashbery's most celebrated collections, offers its own answerRemarkable for its introspection and for the response it elicited when it was first published in 1977, Houseboat Days is Ashbery's much-discussed follow-up to his 1975 masterpiece Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror, and remains one of his most studied books to date. Houseboat Days begins with the moving, unforgettable poem "Street Musicians," an allegory of artistic and personal loss that came ten years after the death of Ashbery's friend and fellow New York poet Frank O'Hara. But while many of the poems in Houseboat Days are strikingly personal, especially when compared to Ashbery's work from the 1950s and 1960s, the collection is less about the poet than about the act of writing poetry. In such widely anthologized poems as "Wet Casements," "Syringa," "And Ut Pictura Poesis Is Her Name," and "What Is Poetry," Ashbery embraces the challenge of his own ars poetica, exploring and exploding the trusses, foundations, and underground caverns that underlie the creative act, and specifically, the act of creating a poem. Marjorie Perloff of the Washington Post Book World called Houseboat Days "the most exciting, most original book of poems to have appeared in the 1970s."

Some Trees

by John Ashbery

John Ashbery's first published book of poems, handpicked from the slush pile by none other than W. H. AudenAshbery's Some Trees narrowly beat out a manuscript by fellow New York poet Frank O'Hara to win the renowned Yale Series of Younger Poets prize in 1955--after the book had been rejected in an early screening round. Competition judge W. H. Auden was perhaps the first to note, in his original preface to Some Trees, the meditative polyphony that decades of readers have come to identify as Ashbery's unique style: "If he is to be true to nature in this world, he must accept strange juxtapositions of imagery, singular associations of ideas." But not all is strange and associative here: Some Trees includes "The Instruction Manual," one of Ashbery's most conversational and perhaps most quoted poems, as well as a number of poems that display his casually masterful handling of such traditional forms as the sonnet, the pantoum, the Italian canzone, and even, with "The Painter," the odd tricky sestina. Some Trees, an essential collection for Ashbery scholars and newbies alike, introduced one of postwar America's most enduring and provocative poetic voices, by turns conversational, discordant, haunting, and wise.

Three Poems

by John Ashbery

A provocative, challenging masterpiece by John Ashbery that set a new standard for the modern prose poem"The pathos and liveliness of ordinary human communication is poetry to me," John Ashbery has said of this controversial work, a collection of three long prose poems originally published in 1972, adding, "Three Poems tries to stay close to the way we talk and think without expecting what we say to be recorded or remembered." The effect of these prose poems is at once deeply familiar and startlingly new, something like encountering a collage made of lines clipped from every page of a beloved book--or, as Ashbery has also said of this work, like flipping through television channels and hearing an unwritten, unscriptable story told through unexpected combinations of voices, settings, and scenes. In Three Poems, Ashbery reframes prose poetry as an experience that invites the reader in through an infinite multitude of doorways, and reveals a common language made uncommonly real.

The Double Dream of Spring

by John Ashbery

One of Ashbery's most important masterworks: Widely studied, critically admired, and essential to understanding one of the modern era's most revolutionary poetsThe Double Dream of Spring, originally published in 1970, followed the critical success of John Ashbery's National Book Award-nominated collection Rivers and Mountains and introduced the signature voice--reflective, acute, and attuned to modern language as it is spoken--that just a few years later would carry Ashbery's Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror. Ashbery fans and lovers of modern poetry alike will recognize here some of the century's most anthologized and critically admired works of poetry, including "Soonest Mended," "Decoy," "Sunrise in Suburbia," "Evening in the Country," the achingly beautiful long poem "Fragment," and Ashbery's so-called Popeye poem, the mordant and witty "Farm Implements and Rutabagas in a Landscape." The Double Dream of Spring helped cement Ashbery's reputation as a must-read American poet, and no library of modern poetry is complete without it.

Rivers and Mountains

by John Ashbery

From one of our most important modern poets comes an essential early collection, including the famous long poems "The Skaters" and "Clepsydra"When Rivers and Mountains was published in 1966, American poetry was in a state of radical redefinition, with John Ashbery recognized as one of the leading voices in the New York School of poets. Ashbery himself had just returned to America from ten years abroad working as an art critic in France, and Rivers and Mountains, his third published collection of poems, is now considered by many critics to represent a pivotal transition point in his artistic career. The poet who would gain widespread acclaim with his multiple-award-winning Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975) is, in this collection, still very much engaged in the intimate, personal project of taking his poetry apart and putting it back together again, interrogating not just the act of writing but poetry itself--its purpose, its composition, its fundamental parts. Nominated for a National Book Award by a panel of judges that included W. H. Auden and James Dickey, Rivers and Mountains includes two of Ashbery's most studied and admired works. "Clepsydra," which takes its name from an ancient device for measuring the passage of time, echoes both the physical form and the philosophical weight of a water clock in its contemplation of the experience of time as it passes. "The Skaters," the long poem that closes the collection, was immediately praised as a masterpiece of modern American poetry, and is the work that perhaps most clearly introduces the voice for which Ashbery is now well known and loved: generous, restless, wide-ranging, and human.

The Brooklyn Dodgers Series, Three Volumes in One

by John R. Tunis

A special edition of three of John R. Tunis's novels about the Brooklyn Dodgers, engrossing stories of integrity and strength against all oddsIn The Kid from Tomkinsville, Roy Tucker--a small-town kid from Tomkinsville, Connecticut--has quit his job at the drugstore and packed up for Dodgers training camp in Clearwater, Florida, hoping to make the team as a rookie pitcher. He expects the field to be competitive and realizes he might not pass muster, but after just one practice, he discovers just how difficult a goal he has set. But the Dodgers are an aging team, and owner Jack MacManus is getting tired of the smart remarks from sports reporters and the manager of the rival Giants, Bill Murphy. With a little coaching and encouragement from Dave Leonard, the oldest catcher in the big leagues, this kid from Tomkinsville might be just what the team needs.In Keystone Kids, the Brooklyn Dodgers have been flagging, dropping through the ranks as the Pittsburgh Pirates take the league. When a scout brings Spike and Bob Russell up from the minor leagues, the "Keystone Kids" quickly prove their worth. With Spike at shortstop and Bob at second base, the future starts to look a little brighter--but Spike sees the slumping team begin to fall apart again the following year. Exasperated and tired of being in last place, owner Jack MacManus unexpectedly promotes Spike to manager, hoping to shake his team of its losing habit.And in World Series, the Brooklyn Dodgers have finally made it to the World Series, after years of losing seasons and disappointments. Roy Tucker, the kid from Tomkinsville, is excited about the series, and also about the prospect of a little extra money to send home to his grandmother in Connecticut. The Cleveland Indians are now all that stands between the Dodgers and their first-ever championship. But this seven-game series could be the longest they've ever played, plagued by injuries, setbacks, and early losses. Will Tucker and his Brooklyn teammates finally have their moment of glory?

Clarke County, Space (Near-Space #2)

by Allen Steele

The future of an orbiting space colony is threatened by a fugitive and the assassin on her trail in this science fiction adventure from three-time Hugo Award winner Allen Steele Skycorp has always expected the near-Earth space colony Clarke County to serve as a cash cow, bringing the corporate behemoth a substantial return on its investment through food production and tourism. Now that the Church of Elvis is planning a major revival meeting on the colony, the execs anticipate that the devout and the curious alike will be rocketing to Clarke County in droves. Its residents, however, would prefer to be left alone, and there has even been some dangerous talk of freedom and independence from Earth. It's Sheriff John Bigthorn's job to keep the peace on the colony, but his work may prove more difficult than usual in the upcoming days--especially following the unexpected arrival of a frightened young woman carrying money and important data she's stolen from her gangster ex-boyfriend. With an ice-cold assassin called the Golem on the runaway's tail, the holy "Living Elvis" stirring up the faithful, and revolution in the wind, Bigthorn will have to lay off the peyote and stay particularly sharp if he hopes to prevent total chaos and bloodshed . . . and perhaps even save his floating artificial world.

Time Loves a Hero

by Allen Steele

Earth's past and future are unintentionally and dangerously altered by time travelers from the twenty-fourth century in this masterful science fiction thriller from one of the genre's best Chrononaut Franc Lu has come a long, long way--from the twenty-fourth century, in fact--to be in New Jersey on the evening of May 6, 1937. Traveling four hundred years into the past, he and his partner have been sent by the Chronospace Research Centre to observe the infamous explosion of the zeppelin Hindenburg. But when the German airship touches down safely on the airfield in Lakehurst, Lu realizes that something has gone terribly wrong--or rather, horribly right. His presence at the landing has set in motion an alternate historical timeline, and now everything will be different, though not necessarily in a good way. The consequences of Lu's mistake could prove catastrophic for every living soul on Earth, now and forever, unless the past and the future are somehow repaired--and that is a burden destined to fall on the shoulders of visionary NASA scientist and wannabe science fiction author Dr. David Zachary Murphy. An expansion of his Hugo Award-winning novella " '. . . Where Angels Fear to Tread,' " Allen Steele's Time Loves a Hero is at once thrilling, surprising, startling, and thoughtful--a mind-blowing masterwork of speculative fiction that radically reimagines time travel, alien contact, alternate history, and a host of other well-worn science fiction tropes.

Oceanspace

by Allen Steele

Treachery, greed, and a gargantuan sea monster threaten the inhabitants of a high-tech, deep-water research station in this thrilling undersea science fiction adventure A three-time Hugo Award winner and modern master of hard science fiction now departs from outer space for a vast, unexplored realm that is equally perilous and mysterious. Allen Steele’s Oceanspace is a heart-racing near-future adventure of danger and discovery unfolding in the dark, cold, and merciless depths of the ocean. The undersea research facility Tethys is a technological wonder, self-sufficient and seemingly impervious to natural danger. Located off the coast of Florida deep beneath the surface of the water, the station supports a robotic mining operation on the ocean floor and facilitates the ongoing scientific exploration of Earth’s last frontier. But while on a routine assignment with his colleague Peter Lipscomb, submersible pilot Joe Niedzwiecki comes face to face with something incredible and alive, and only luck—and Peter’s quick actions—can save them. Peter’s wife, a marine biologist named Judith, is determined to uncover the secrets of the mysterious leviathan that destroyed Joe’s sub and nearly killed him. But the strange creature prowling the dark waters is only one of the dangers confronting Tethys.

Calico Palace

by Gwen Bristow

The captivating New York Times bestseller that brings to life the passionate, adventurous men and women who transformed San Francisco during the California gold rush Kendra comes to San Francisco, a sleepy town of nine hundred people, because her stepfather, an army colonel, is charged with overseeing its defenses during the Mexican War. Marny arrives from Honolulu to set up a gambling hall. Neither expects to be swept up in one of history's greatest adventures, which begins when tiny flakes of gold are discovered in the California hills.As both young women follow their dreams into the mining camps and back to a rapidly growing San Francisco, they encounter ambitious settlers, sailors, miners, ranchers, and mysterious drifters, men who will offer them love or friendship or will break their hearts. Yet Kendra and Marny's lives stay centered on the Calico Palace, the little gambling operation in a tent in Shiny Gulch that becomes the most opulent gambling house in California.Thrilling and rich in authentic historical detail, Calico Palace is first-rate historical fiction that informs and entertains.

Celia Garth

by Gwen Bristow

Hailed by the Chicago Tribune as "an exciting tale of love and war in the tradition of Gone with the Wind," Gwen Bristow's New York Times-bestselling novel tells the spellbinding story of a dressmaker who spies for the rebel cause in Revolutionary-era Charleston A bustling port city, Charleston, South Carolina, is the crossroads of the American Revolution where supplies and weapons for the rebel army must be unloaded and smuggled north. From the window of the dressmaker's shop where she works, lovely Celia Garth, recently engaged to the heir to a magnificent plantation, watches all of this thrilling activity.When the unthinkable occurs and the British capture and occupy Charleston, bringing fiery retribution to the surrounding countryside, Celia sees her world destroyed. The rebel cause seems lost until the Swamp Fox, American General Francis Marion, takes the fight to the British--and one of his daring young soldiers recruits Celia to spy on the rebels' behalf. From the ashes of Charleston and the Carolina countryside will rise a new nation--and a love that will change Celia Garth forever.

Jubilee Trail

by Gwen Bristow

Gwen Bristow's New York Times-bestselling novel brings the history of the American West to life in this enthralling tale of a New York debutante who marries a frontiersman and sets out on the trail of adventureOne look, and Garnet Cameron finds herself smitten with Oliver Hale. A rugged prairie trader, he has rough hands, tanned skin, and countless stories of adventure on the plains--all of which set him apart from the society dandies with whom Garnet has grown up. Captivated by the promise of life on the prairie, she marries him, and they set off toward the sunset. In New Orleans, Garnet befriends a dance hall girl named Florinda. Together, this unlikely trio travels the Jubilee Trail to California, finding danger, love, and excitement along the way--until the revelation of a terrible secret threatens to destroy all that they have endeavored to build.Briskly paced and filled with authentic historical detail and vivid characters, Jubilee Trail is a thrilling Western adventure that was made into a film in 1954.

Deep Summer

by Gwen Bristow

Bristow does "a grand job of storytelling" (the New York Times) in this memorable novel of the late eighteenth-century pioneers who settled the Louisiana wilderness, establishing a civilization of charm, luxury, and tragic injustice For his service in the king's army during the French and Indian War, Judith Sheramy's father, a Puritan New Englander, is granted a parcel of land in far-off Louisiana. As the family ventures down the Mississippi to make a new home in the wilderness, Judith meets Philip Larne, an adventurer who travels in the finest clothes Judith has ever seen. He is a rogue, a killer, and a thief--and the first thing he steals is Judith's heart.Three thousand acres of untamed jungle, overrun with jaguars, Indians, and pirates, wait for Philip in Louisiana. He and Judith will struggle with their stormy marriage and the challenges of the American Revolution as they strive to build an empire for future generations.This is the first novel in Gwen Bristow's Plantation Trilogy, which also includes The Handsome Road and This Side of Glory.

The Handsome Road

by Gwen Bristow

New York Times-bestselling author Gwen Bristow brings to life Civil War-era Louisiana in the impassioned, poignant story of a plantation mistress and a poor seamstress--and the men they love--whose lives are irrevocably changed as the Old South fallsCorrie May Upjohn stands on the levee, watching men unload the riverboats and wishing she could travel far away. A poor preacher's daughter, she is only fourteen, and her life is already laid out for her: marriage in a year or two, and then decades of drudgery. At nearby Ardeith Plantation, Ann Sheramy Larne lives in luxury, but feels just as imprisoned as Corrie May. Their lives could not be more different, but when the horrors of war and Reconstruction come to Louisiana, these two women will band together to survive.This is the second novel in Gwen Bristow's Plantation Trilogy, which also includes Deep Summer and This Side of Glory.

This Side of Glory

by Gwen Bristow

New York Times-bestselling author Gwen Bristow presents a captivating love story that dramatizes the struggle between the ways of the old Louisiana plantation families and those of the new twentieth-century SouthIn 1912, Eleanor Upjohn sits with her father near the work camp, overseeing the construction of a levee on the Mississippi. In a region shattered by war, levees mean stability, prosperity, and modernity. While Eleanor is a member of a modern clan--practical, impatient, and ready for the future--she cannot help but fall for a man steeped in the ways of the Old South.Kester Larne is the heir to Ardeith, a sprawling Louisiana plantation whose glory days are long behind it, and his antebellum charm sweeps Eleanor off her feet. Only after they marry does she learn that Ardeith is mortgaged to the hilt and she will need every ounce of her modern ingenuity to save it . . . and her marriage.This is the third novel in Gwen Bristow's Plantation Trilogy, which also includes Deep Summer and The Handsome Road.

Tomorrow Is Forever

by Gwen Bristow

Set in World War II-era Hollywood, New York Times-bestselling author Gwen Bristow's emotional tour de force about a woman haunted by the ghost of her husband who died in World War IFor two decades, Elizabeth Herlong has been a devoted Hollywood wife, watching as her husband Spratt built an empire in the budding motion picture industry. But part of her still yearns for her first husband, who perished in France during World War I. As a second great war rages in Europe, something happens that will draw Elizabeth back to the old days, awakening feelings and longings that she thought she would never experience again.One night, Spratt introduces her to a German screenwriter, a crippled veteran of the last war attempting to make a new life for himself. Something in his face stirs Elizabeth's heart, setting her on a journey of discovery about the meaning of true love and the things that war cannot destroy.Tomorrow Is Forever was made into a film starring Claudette Colbert, Orson Welles, and Natalie Wood in 1946.

Jack Strong

by Walter Mosley

In a Las Vegas hotel room, a man awakes to confront his destinyDreaming, Jack hears voices: a frightened child in a hospital, a woman cheating on her husband, a death-row inmate. When he wakes, the voices recede, but they do not vanish. He is in a luxurious hotel room on the Vegas strip, and his body is covered in scars. Jack Strong is a patchwork man, his flesh melded together from dozens of men and women, and his mind is the same way. Countless lifetimes are contained within him: people whose time was cut short, and who see their place in Jack as a chance to make things right.On behalf of one of them, Jack reignites a feud with corrupt casino bosses. Drawing on the skills of another, he beats the life out of two bodyguards. Jack fights for control as he lurches from impulse to impulse, certain that somewhere within him exists a soul. The answers may lie with whomever is tailing him in a sleek black car--if Jack can somehow confront him.

Someone's Been Sleeping In My Bed

by Linda Winstead Jones

Of late, life had hardly been a fairy tale for the lovely, golden-haired Maddalyn Kelly. Nearly killed in a stagecoach robbery, the beautiful blonde escaped deep into the forest of Wyoming. This was a far cry from the simple life she had planned for herself as a modest schoolteacher. Hungry, lost, and weary, Maddalyn finally came upon a cozy mountaintop cabin. There were three of everything: three delicious meals, three comfortable chairs, and three warm beds. She could not help dozing for just a moment . . . Maddalyn quickly learned that the cabin belonged to three burly and intimidating brothers: Karl, Conrad, and Eric Bartlett. She had eaten Eric's food, slept in Eric's bed. He seemed a wild animal, but did his gruff manner belie a softer side? Feisty Maddalyn was determined to find out . . .

The Lords of Creation

by Mark Crispin Miller Gretchen Morgenson Frederick Lewis Allen

An acclaimed classic detailing the economic history of America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and exposing the capitalist giants who changed the worldFrederick Lewis Allen's insightful financial history of the United States--from the late 1800s through the stock market collapse of 1929--remains a seminal work on what brought on America's worst economic disaster: the Great Depression. In the decades following the Civil War, America entered an era of unprecedented corporate expansion, with ultimate financial power in the hands of a few wealthy industrialists who exploited the capitalist system for everything it was worth. The Rockefellers, Fords, Morgans, and Vanderbilts were the "lords of creation" who, along with like-minded magnates, controlled the economic destiny of the country, unrestrained by regulations or moral imperatives. Through a combination of foresight, ingenuity, ruthlessness, and greed, America's giants of industry remolded the US economy in their own preferred image. In so doing, they established their absolute power and authority, ensuring that they--and they alone--would control the means of production, transportation, energy, and commerce--thereby setting the stage for the most devastating global financial collapse in history.As Gretchen Morgenson thoughtfully states in her introduction, "It is not immediately clear why the frequency and severity of financial scandals is increasing in the United States. What is clear is that we need to understand the origins of these disasters, as well as the policies and people that bring them on. . . . While distant actions may seem unrelated to current events, rereading about the past almost always provides surprising insights into the present."The Lords of Creation, first published in the midst of the Great Depression, when the financial catastrophe was still painfully fresh, is a fascinating story of bankers, railroad tycoons, steel magnates, speculators, scoundrels, and robber barons. It is a tale of innovation and shocking exploitation--and a sobering reminder that history can indeed repeat itself.

Spectrum

by Alan Jacobson

New York City: home to world-renowned museums, theater, restaurants, iconic sports franchises. Central Park. Wall Street. And an infamous serial killer who's terrorized the Big Apple for decades.The year is 1995 and the NYPD has just graduated a promising new patrol officer named Karen Vail. The rookie's first day on the job is anything but easy when she finds herself at the crime scene of a young woman murdered in an unusual manner. Vail is unsure of what she's looking at or what it means--but it's a case that will weigh on her mind for nearly twenty years.As the years pass, Vail's career takes unexpected twists and turns--as does the case that's come to be known as Hades. Now a skilled FBI profiler, will Vail be in a better position to catch the killer? Or will Hades prove to be Karen Vail's hell on earth?The character who has captivated readers worldwide--and who won the praise of literary giants Michael Connelly, James Patterson, and Nelson DeMille--returns in a story that captures the experiences that shaped the revered profiler and made her the top cop she is today.

The Lives and Times of Bernardo Brown

by Geoffrey Household

With a stroll on the beach, a young man's lifetime of adventure begins Bernardo Brown is walking along the Spanish seashore when he hears the bullets fly, and he takes shelter in the water, where he escapes the firefight in a stolen dinghy. After a treacherous journey along the rocky coastline, he falls into the hands of a Hungarian count who will do whatever it takes to keep Bernardo from ever telling his story to the police. He ships the baffled young man off to Eastern Europe, where he will get into more trouble than he ever imagined. After a lifetime working the Bilbao docks, Bernardo finds himself among monarchs and empresses, soldiers of fortune and devilish spies. As the whirlwind of adventure carries him from court to court, the fate of Europe hangs in the balance--but Bernardo just wants to stop running.

The Three Sentinels

by Geoffrey Household

For control of a South American oil field, two men go to war On the spine of the Andes Mountains, three monuments have been built to honor the god known as oil. These towering derricks, known to the Company as the three sentinels, will change a few lives for the better--and destroy one thousand more. The completion of the sentinels means closing the outdated oil field known as Cabo Desierto, which hundreds of native families call home. Those who live there are to be relocated. Some are happy to move, but most are not. For the sake of their community, these radicals will fight--and they will die. When the protests against relocation claim the life of his wife, Rafael Garay vows revenge against the Company. With his son at his side, he takes arms against the men who control the sentinels, pitting himself against a corporate troubleshooter who has never met a union he couldn't break.

Dreadful Summit

by Stanley Ellin

His father humiliated, a teenage boy vows bloody revengeEvery sports fan in New York knows Al Judge, the hard-bitten reporter whose column is the scourge of gamblers, gangsters, and corrupt players across the city. Sixteen-year-old George LaMain is Judge's biggest fan--right up until the night he decides the writer has to die. George is in his father's saloon, waiting for his dad to give him his birthday present: a trip to the fights at Madison Square Garden. They are about to leave when Judge demands George's father strip and lie down on the barroom floor. George doesn't know why, but his old man does it--and Judge beats him senseless in front of the whole bar. When he's finished crying, George takes his father's gun and sets out into the night. To avenge his disgraced father, he plans to gun Al Judge down. But before he can become a killer, this birthday boy will have to grow into a man.

House of Cards

by Stanley Ellin

Hired as a tutor for a madwoman's son, an American expatriate scraps to stay aliveA washed-up heavyweight with dreams of becoming a writer, Reno Davis is down to his last franc when he lands a job as a bouncer at a sprawling Paris discotheque. His first night, he saves a slumming beauty from a pair of café toughs, and she rewards him with a well-paid job tutoring her darling son. But what she really wants is a bodyguard to keep her precious baby safe from terrors real and imagined. Reno's new boss is a mental case, paranoid and delusional, whose lovers have a bad habit of dying violent deaths. But in this case, her paranoia may be justified. Protecting the boy draws Reno into an international conspiracy that stretches from Paris to Rome to the killing fields of northern Algeria. When the bullets start to fly, this ex-fighter begins to fear that he may be punching above his weight.

The Dark Fantastic

by Stanley Ellin

In a desolate part of Brooklyn, a retired history professor plots mass murderThe withered old man speaks into a tape recorder. This is not a confession, he explains, but a presentation. He is Charles Witter Kirwan, a former academic who has lived his whole life in the same house and watched his childhood neighborhood turn from white to black. Now, stricken with terminal cancer, Kirwan has decided to fight back against his neighbors. His may be the ravings of a lunatic racist, but the dynamite in his basement is real. He is going to blow up the apartment building next door--and take some sixty African Americans with it. Private investigator John Milano is on the trail of a stolen painting when he catches wind of Kirwan's mad plan. He has forty-eight hours to stop the bombing, and to keep those innocents from following this twisted, hateful man into death.

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