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Showing 176 through 200 of 11,393 results

I, Columbus

by Peter Roop Connie Roop Peter E. Hanson

A Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People: A firsthand account of Christopher Columbus's famous voyage to the East, taken directly from his journal entries Christopher Columbus had a dream--to reach the fabled lands of the East, rich with spices, jewels, silver, and especially gold. Having studied the travels of other explorers, Columbus was convinced he could reach his destination by traveling west across the seas. After convincing Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand to fund his expedition, he set sail in August of 1492. In this account, the voyage Columbus undertook is told in his own voice through his journal entries of that year. He tells of excitement, drama, and terror on the high seas, as well as the doubts he faces from his own crew, as together, they weather the path to victory.

Grace's Letter to Lincoln

by Peter Roop Connie Roop Stacey Schuett

Can the advice of an eleven-year-old girl help get Abraham Lincoln elected president? As the election of 1860 nears, eleven-year-old Grace and her family are working hard to help Abraham Lincoln win. After seeing his image on a poster, Grace decides to write to him and suggest that growing a beard might win him more votes. Much to her surprise, Lincoln answers her letter, and she becomes a neighborhood celebrity. When the president-elect's victory train passes through on its way to Washington, DC, Mr. Lincoln singles Grace out as the girl who gave him good advice. Based on true events, this story will charm young readers of historical fiction.

Sacagawea

by Peter Roop Connie Roop

Sacagawea, the Shoshoni woman who helped guide Lewis and Clark on their famed expedition, tells her life story When Sacagawea's son asks her about her life, she isn't sure where to begin. Does she start with her birth as a Shoshoni? Her kidnapping by an enemy tribe at age eleven? Or her role as the famous guide for the Lewis and Clark expedition? She's seen and experienced more in her young life than most people ever will. Told from Sacagawea's point of view, this historical novel shares the ordeals of her youth along with the memory of her long, arduous journey west with Lewis and Clark. She shares her love of nature and explains how her loyalties have changed over time. This story of Sacagawea goes beyond the legend to reveal the flesh-and-blood woman who she really was.

An Eye for an Eye

by Peter Roop Connie Roop

A teenage girl questions her principles after her brother is captured during the Revolutionary War Fourteen-year-old Samantha Byrd is an excellent shot--she's even better than her brother at providing food for her family. Although the winds of war are blowing in Virginia, she knows that she could only ever use her skill for hunting--not for hurting another person. When the Revolutionary War finally begins, her brother is captured, and Samantha sets off to rescue him. But when she comes face to face with the enemy, will she still stand by her principles, or will she pull the trigger?

Just J

by Colin Frizzell

At thirteen, Jenevieve has some life issues, some death issues, and some everything-in-between issues. Her mother is dead, she's an outcast at school, her dad's an idiot and her little brother can be pretty annoying. Aunt Guin, who appears to be a bit "reality challenged," turns up just in time to rescue J from a fate worse than death--summer camp. Aunt Guin and her friend Art take J to a decrepit beach-front house where J is expected to sleep outside, eat healthy food and help with the renovations. When she escapes to the nearby sand dunes, she meets a boy named Connor and joins him in his search for a mythical dance hall buried in the dunes.

Zee's Way (Orca Soundings)

by Kristin Butcher

Zee is torn between making a statement with graffiti and making art. (RL3.2)

Yossi's Goal

by Ellen Schwartz

Yossi Mendelsohn works hard to help his family survive after they flee Russia to find a better life in Montreal. He sells newspapers and carries bundles from the garment factory. Yossi longs to play "le hockey" with the French boys, but he has no skates. When his father falls ill and his sister and her fiancé organize a walkout at the factory, Yossi's dream of lacing on skates seems farther away than ever.

Yellow Line

by Sylvia Olsen

Vince lives in a small town, a town that is divided right down the middle. Indians on one side, Whites on the other. The unspoken rule has been there as long as Vince remembers and no one challenges it. But when Vince's friend Sherry starts seeing an Indian boy, Vince is outraged and determined to fight back -- until he notices Raedawn, a girl from the reserve. Trying to balance his community's prejudices with his shifting alliances, Vince is forced to take a stand, and see where his heart will lead him.

Wired

by Sigmund Brouwer

Keegan Bishop, championship skier, is almost injured in a dangerous trap set for one of his teammates. Snowboard tracks leading away from the trap are the only clue as to who might be responsible. Keegan teaches himself to snowboard so he can find the culprit on the snowboarding slopes. When Keegan discovers that someone has been stealing snowboards and skis at Bear Mountain resort, and the girl he's just met is somehow involved, he must face his fears and test his new snowboarding skills in a run for safety.

The Declaration of Independence

by Peter Roop Connie Roop

A young reader's history of the famous document that set America on the course to freedom Many kids have heard of the Declaration of Independence, but few know the story behind the people and events that helped forge it. They may know about Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, but do they know the roles that Patrick Henry and Thomas Gage played in setting fire to a revolution? This is the story of how the men and women of thirteen British colonies came to declare their independence on July 4, 1776. Covering major events such as the the Boston Massacre and Paul Revere's midnight ride, The Declaration of Independence brings the rich and exciting history of the Revolutionary War to young readers who want to know more about America's beginnings.

Ahyoka and the Talking Leaves

by Peter Roop Connie Roop Yoshi Miyake

A Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People and recipient of the Florida Sunshine Award: In this absorbing chapter book, Ahyoka helps her father, Sequoyah, unlock the mystery of "talking leaves" to create the Cherokee alphabet Ahyoka is the daughter of Sequoyah, a silversmith who has given up most of his trade to focus on his true passion. He longs for the day when the Cherokee people can communicate to one another from afar and document the history of their lives. He wants his people--the Real People--to have a written language like the white men do. When he is ostracized from his community for the "magic" he is creating, he leaves his home to pursue his quest. His young daughter, who shares his dream, joins him on his journey. They work together to create a syllabic alphabet that will tell the story of the Cherokee people.

Conduct Unbecoming: Lesbians and Gays in the U.S. Military

by Randy Shilts

The bestselling author of the definitive history of the AIDS epidemic, And the Band Played On, provides the most thorough analysis yet of the place of gay men and women in the US military <P> Published during the same year the American military instituted Don't Ask, Don't Tell, and eighteen years before President Barack Obama repealed it, Conduct Unbecoming is a landmark work of social justice and a searing indictment of the military establishment's historic bigotry toward its gay servicemen and women. Randy Shilts's eye-opening book describes the bravery, both exceptional and everyday, not only of gay soldiers throughout history, but also of gay men and women serving in our modern military. With each anecdote and investigation, Shilts systematically dismantles the arguments against allowing gays to serve in the military. <P> At once a history of the American military and an account of the gay rights movement, Conduct Unbecoming is a remarkable testament to the progress achieved for gays in the military--and a revealing look at how far we have yet to go.

Traplines

by Eden Robinson

From a writer whom the New York Times dubbed Canada's "Generation X laureate" comes a quartet of haunting, unforgettable tales of young people stuck in the inescapable prison of familyA New York Times Notable Book and winner of Britain's prestigious Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize, Traplines is the book that introduced the world to Canadian author Eden Robinson. In three stories and a novella, Robinson explodes the idea of family as a nurturing safe haven through a progression of domestic horrors experienced by her young, often helpless protagonists. With her mesmerizing, dark skill, the author ushers us into these worlds of violence and abuse, where family loyalty sometimes means turning a blind eye to murder, and survival itself can be viewed as an act of betrayal. In the title story, for a teenager named Will growing up on a Native reserve in northwestern Canada, guilt, race, and blind fidelity are the shackles chaining him to the everyday cruelty and abuse he is forced to endure. In "Dogs in Winter," a girl recalls life with her serial-killer mother and fears for her own future. A young teen and the sadistic, psychopathic cousin who comes to live with him engage in a cat-and-mouse game that soon escalates out of control in "Contact Sports," while in the final story, "Queen of the North," a young Native girl deals in her own way with sexual molestation at the hands of a pedophile uncle. Each of these tales is vivid, intense, and disturbing, and Robinson renders them unforgettable with her deft flair for storytelling and a surprising touch of humor.

Monkey Beach

by Eden Robinson

A young Native American woman remembers her volatile childhood as she searches for her lost brother in the Canadian wilds in an extraordinary, critically acclaimed debut novelAs she races along Canada's Douglas Channel in her speedboat--heading toward the place where her younger brother Jimmy, presumed drowned, was last seen--twenty-year-old Lisamarie Hill recalls her younger days. A volatile and precocious Native girl growing up in Kitamaat, the Haisla Indian reservation located five hundred miles north of Vancouver, Lisa came of age standing with her feet firmly planted in two different worlds: the spiritual realm of the Haisla and the sobering "real" world with its dangerous temptations of violence, drugs, and despair. From her beloved grandmother, Ma-ma-oo, she learned of tradition and magic; from her adored, Elvis-loving uncle Mick, a Native rights activist on a perilous course, she learned to see clearly, to speak her mind, and never to bow down. But the tragedies that have scarred her life and ultimately led her to these frigid waters cannot destroy her indomitable spirit, even though the ghosts that speak to her in the night warn her that the worst may be yet to come. Easily one of the most admired debut novels to appear in many a decade, Eden Robinson's Monkey Beach was immediately greeted with universal acclaim--called "gripping" by the San Diego Union-Tribune, "wonderful" by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, and "glorious" by the Globe and Mail, earning nominations for numerous literary awards before receiving the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. Evocative, moving, haunting, and devastatingly funny, it is an extraordinary read from a brilliant literary voice that must be heard.

Winter Hawk Star

by Sigmund Brouwer

Tyler is a good, solid hockey player, but not a great one. That honor belongs to the obnoxious Riley, a sixteen-year-old spoiled superstar who makes Tyler's life miserable. When Tyler and Riley are sent to volunteer at a local youth program, Tyler finds the passion and commitment he needs to step up his game on ice and off.

Who Owns Kelly Paddik?

by Beth Goobie

Kelly Paddik is locked up. Sent to a secure facility because she is a "danger to herself," Kelly wants only to escape. But her painful past continues to haunt her until she is forced to face up to the most painful memory of all. A searing look at one girl's struggle for self respect.

Whiteout

by Becky Citra

Robin can hardly wait for her cousin April and her Aunty Liz to come to the ranch for Christmas. When a devastating car accident sends Aunty Liz to the hospital for several months, Robin can't help but be overjoyed to learn that April will live with Robin and her family while her mother is recuperating. But April has changed, and Robin must deal with April's growing anger and resentment at being forced to leave her injured mother and her life in the city. Then Robin's little sister, Molly, disappears during a blizzard, and Robin and April's friendship faces the ultimate test.

When Elephants Fight

by Eric Walters Adrian Bradbury

When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers. This ancient proverb of the Kikuyu people, a tribal group in Kenya, Africa, is as true today as when the words were first spoken, perhaps thousands of years ago. Its essence is simplicity: when the large fight, it is the small who suffer most. And when it comes to war, the smallest, the most vulnerable, are the children. When Elephants Fight presents the stories of five children from five very different and distinct conflicts. Along with these very personal accounts, the book also offers brief analyses of the history and geopolitical issues that are the canvas on which these conflicts are cast. When Elephants Fight is about increasing awareness. For the future to be better than the past, better than the present, we must help equip our children with an awareness and understanding of the world around them and their ability to bring about change. Gandhi stated, "If you are going to change the world, start with the children."

What World is Left

by Monique Polak

A pampered child used to having her own way, Anneke Van Raalte lives outside Amsterdam, where her father is a cartoonist for the Amsterdam newspaper. Though Anneke's family is Jewish, her religion means little to her. Anneke's life changes in 1942 when the Nazis invade Holland, and she and her family are deported to Theresienstadt, a concentration camp in Czechoslovakia. Not only are conditions in the camp appalling, but the camp is the site of an elaborate hoax: the Nazis are determined to convince the world that Theresienstadt is an idyllic place and that European Jews are thriving under the Nazi regime. Because he is an artist, Anneke's father is compelled to help in the propaganda campaign, and Anneke finds herself torn between her loyalty to her family and her sense of what is right. What World is Left was inspired by the experiences of the author's mother, who was imprisoned in Theresienstadt during World War II.

The Psychic Power of Animals

by Bill D. Schul

Pets are more than companions. The animals we share our lives with are channels to another world. Documentation exists that proves animals do indeed possess a sixth sense. Discover the mysterious and fantastic revelations about dogs who trace their masters across vast distances; dogs who read minds; dolphins as super beings; conversations between people and animals; the strange friendship between Native Americans and rattlesnakes; animals who reside in pyramids; the German shepherd who taught meditation; the amazing ability of animals to think and reason; and much more that will forever change the way you look at animals.

How to Be an Effective Group Leader

by Bill D. Schul

Armed with Bill Schul's guidance, even the shyest person can become a powerful and effective leader. Learn goal-setting methods, keys for maximizing group participation, and the do's and don'ts of leadership. This how-to also covers the best ways to establish your group's atmosphere and tips for holding productive meetings. Whether you're in a leadership role now or expect to attain one, this straightforward text will help you achieve your ambitions. Plus, the information is equally valid for social, civic, government and business organizations.

Sun Priestess

by Judith Redman Robbins

She was a passionate priestess in the Anasazi tribe with a mysterious past and the gift of prophecy. She was called Coyote Woman, and was prepared to make every sacrifice for her people. The Majestic Mayan-Toltec Eagle warrior was determined to seduce the young priestess into his arms and onto his land until she sensed a calling by the people of her tribe and she fled to answer their needs as Sun Priestess and healer. When their endangered future seemed to be collapsing in their hands, she helped them. But when she became the source of another battle--between the warrior and a priest of her own tribe--her powers as Sun Priestess bring to her a different fate.

Coyote Woman

by Judith Redman Robbins

Shawanadese was the name bestowed on her when she was born into the prehistoric Anasazi tribe. Her fate seemed much like that of any other young girl until her magical powers began to erupt at the dawning of womanhood. It was then that a sacred name--Coyote Woman--was granted to her, a name that would come to identify her as a high priestess and draw the lustful and the faithful to her side. No one could have imagined the mystical charms of the high priestess, and nobody could have expected the force of attraction that would draw many men into her life. Shawanadese ignited a passion within the Mayan prince, the fiery rebel and the young warrior, and she engages in an epic struggle to defeat the sinister ways of man while maintaining her authority as the high priestess in the canyon of Chaco.

What a Hippopota-Mess

by Graham Ross Pat Skene

The poems in this book tell stories of animals and nature, from two sweaty hippos, a smiling lizard and some creepy crawlers to a few tricky dandelions. At the end of each poem, find out more in an interview with a key character or a list of fascinating facts.

Wave Warrior

by Lesley Choyce

Ben is determined to learn to surf. In the rough North Atlantic waters near his home, only the tough can make it on the water. His first attempt is a disaster. Then he meets Ray, a surfing veteran from California. Ray promises to teach him to surf and to face his inner demons. As Ben becomes more comfortable on his board he learns to face his fears and prove that he has what it takes to become a Wave Warrior.

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