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Showing 3,126 through 3,150 of 11,342 results

When Lightning Strikes

by Brenda Novak

Find out how it all began with this first book in bestselling author Brenda Novak's Whiskey Creek series!Gail DeMarco left Whiskey Creek, California, to make a name for herself in Los Angeles. Her PR firm has a roster of A-list clients, including the sexy and unpredictable Simon O'Neal. But Simon, who's just been through a turbulent divorce, won't cooperate, so she drops him from her list-and he retaliates by taking the rest of her clients with him.Desperate to save her company, Gail makes a deal with Simon. What he wants is custody of his son, but that's going to require a whole new image. He needs to marry some squeaky-clean girl like Gail, who'll drag him off to some small, obscure place like Whiskey Creek.... Gail reluctantly agrees to become his wife. She isn't reluctant because he's too hard to like. It's because he's too hard not to love!For more Whiskey Creek stories, check out When Snow Falls, When Summer Comes, Home to Whiskey Creek, Take Me Home for Christmas and Come Home to Me.

Psychiatry, 2 Volume Set

by Michael B. First Jeffrey A. Lieberman Allan Tasman Michelle Riba Jerald Kay

Now in a new Fourth Edition, Psychiatry remains the leading reference on all aspects of the current practice and latest developments in psychiatry.From an international team of recognised expert editors and contributors, Psychiatry provides a truly comprehensive overview of the entire field of psychiatry in 132 chapters across two volumes. It includes two new sections, on psychosomatic medicine and collaborative care, and on emergency psychiatry, and compares Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD10) classifications for every psychiatric disorder.Psychiatry, Fourth Edition is an essential reference for psychiatrists in clinical practice and clinical research, residents in training, and for all those involved in the treatment psychiatric disorders.

Governing the Nile River Basin

by John Mbaku Mwangi Kimenyi

The effective and efficient management of water is a major problem, not just for economic growth and development in the Nile River basin, but also for the peaceful coexistence of the millions of people who live in the region. Of critical importance to the people of this part of Africa is the reasonable, equitable and sustainable management of the waters of the Nile River and its tributaries.Written by scholars trained in economics and law, and with significant experience in African political economy, this book explores new ways to deal with conflict over the allocation of the waters of the Nile River and its tributaries. The monograph provides policymakers in the Nile River riparian states and other stakeholders with practical and effective policy options for dealing with what has become a very contentious problem--the effective management of the waters of the Nile River. The analysis is quite rigorous but also extremely accessible.

The Chimes

by Anna Smaill

'The Chimes is a remarkable debut. It's inventive, beautifully written, and completely absorbing. I highly recommend it.' Kevin Powers, author of The Yellow Birds A mind-expanding literary debut composed of memory, music and imagination. A boy stands on the roadside on his way to London, alone in the rain. No memories, beyond what he can hold in his hands at any given moment. No directions, as written words have long since been forbidden. No parents - just a melody that tugs at him, a thread to follow. A song that says if he can just get to the capital, he may find some answers about what happened to them. The world around Simon sings, each movement a pulse of rhythm, each object weaving its own melody, music ringing in every drop of air. * Welcome to the world of The Chimes. Here, life is orchestrated by a vast musical instrument that renders people unable to form new memories. The past is a mystery, each new day feels the same as the last, and before is blasphony. But slowly, inexplicably, Simon is beginning to remember. He emerges from sleep each morning with a pricking feeling, and sense there is something he urgently has to do. In the city Simon meets Lucien, who has a gift for hearing, some secrets of his own, and a theory about the danger lurking in Simon's past. A stunning debut composed of memory, music, love and freedom, The Chimes pulls you into a world that will captivates, enthrals and inspires.

Code Black

by Mark Evans Andrew Sharples

Trapped in an isolated outpost on the edge of the Helmand desert, a small force of British and Afghan soldiers is holding out against hundreds of Taliban fighters. Captain Mark Evans, a junior British officer, has been sent to take command of the Afghan troops. Under brutal siege conditions, running low on food and ammunition, he experiences the full horror of combat. As the casualties begin to mount and the enemy closes in, Evans finds both his leadership and his belief in the war severely tested. Returning home, he is haunted by the memories of Afghanistan. He can't move on and his life begins to spin out of control. Code Black tells a compelling story of survival against the odds and the scars war leaves behind.

Calmer, Easier, Happier Boys

by Noël Janis-Norton

Simple strategies for bringing out the best in boys In Calmer Easier Happier Boys, parenting expert No?l Janis-Norton gives you simple strategies for the unique challenges of raising motivated, cooperative and confident boys. Using the foolproof techniques she has developed over many years of working with families, No?l shows parents how to get back in control of their sons. The book tackles: - Self-reliance and common-sense - Concentration and impulse control - Defiance or aggression - Social skills and peer relationships - Screen time - Homework and academic success - Empathy and consideration for others - Help around the home Full of practical suggestions and techniques that work, Calmer Easier Happier Boys will help transform your relationship with your boys. What parents of boys say after using the Calmer Easier Happier Parenting strategies: 'I'm so proud of the young man he's become, caring, hard-working, confident.' 'He suddenly seemed more grow-up.' 'The turnaround was almost like a miracle! It felt like we had a life again' FOR PARENTS OF BOYS AGED 3-13

Magic Soup

by Kate Adams Nicole Pisani

There is something about soup that has both the ability to revitalise and to soothe. They are packed with nutrition and offer variety, deliciousness and comfort as well as being a fantastic aid for weight-loss. Soup's versatility and health benefits are captured in MAGIC SOUP. Whether it's swapping a stale sandwich at lunchtime for a vibrant bowl full of grains and greens, or relaxing at home over a velvety blend of manuka-honeyed parsnip, cooking for a supper party or nursing a cold - there is always an occasion for soup. MAGIC SOUP features over 100 innovative recipes helping you to feel fuller and become healthier. Recipes such as salmon poached in lemongrass tea, lemon chicken and mint with quinoa, and the ultimate 'chicken soup for the soul' will redefine people's expectations and put paid to the myth that soup cannot be hearty a meal in itself. Nicole Pisani and Kate Adams have all the credentials and expertise to create recipes that are both utterly delicious and in line with a balanced way of eating.

How Good We Can Be

by Will Hutton

Britain is beset by a crisis of purpose. For a generation we have been told the route to universal well-being is to abandon the expense of justice and equity and so allow the judgments of the market to go unobstructed. What has been created is not an innovative, productive economy but instead a capitalism that extracts value rather than creates it, massive inequality, shrinking opportunity and a society organised to benefit the top 1%. The capacity to create new jobs and start-ups should not disguise that in the main the new world is one of throw away people working in throw away companies. The British are at a loss. The warnings of The State We're In have been amply justified. Will Hutton observes that the trends that so disturbed him twenty years ago have become more marked. Rather than take refuge in nativism and virulent euro-scepticism, Britain must recognize that its problems are largely made at home - and act to change them. With technological possibilities multiplying, a wholesale makeover of the state, business and the financial system is needed to seize the opportunities by being both fairer and more innovative. The aim must be to create an economy, society and democracy in which the mass of citizens flourish. In this compelling and vital new book Hutton spells out how.

Not Forgetting The Whale

by John Ironmonger

When a young man washes up, naked, on the sands of St Piran in Cornwall, he is quickly rescued by the villagers. From the retired village doctor and the schoolteacher, to the beachcomber and the owner of the local bar, the priest's wife and the romantic novelist, they take this lost soul into their midst. But what the villagers don't know is that Joe Haak has fled the City of London fearing a worldwide collapse of civilisation, a collapse forecast by Cassie, a computer program he designed. But is the end of the world really nigh? Can Joe convince the village to seal itself off from the outside world? And what of the whale that lurks in the bay? Intimate, funny and deeply moving, Not Forgetting the Whale is the story of a man on a journey to find a place he can call home.

The Two of Us

by Andy Jones

If you loved One Day and The Rosie Project, you will fall head-over-heels for The Two of Us. Falling in love is the easy part. What matters most is what happens next... Fisher and Ivy have been an item for a whole nineteen days. And they just know they are meant to be together. The fact that they know little else about each other is a minor detail. Over the course of twelve months, in which their lives will change forever, Fisher and Ivy discover that falling in love is one thing, but staying there is an entirely different story. The Two of Us is a charming, honest and heart-breaking novel about life, love, and the importance of taking neither one for granted.

Crazy Love You

by Lisa Unger

Ian Paine has spent his life running away. He's drunk too much booze, taken too many reality warping drugs, gotten high too often to numb the painful memories of his horrific childhood. Gorging himself on food until he was unrecognizable, he hid inside himself, and to the world he was just a lonely fat boy. But Ian was lucky; he grew up and managed to escape the haunting pull of his hometown and become a successful comic book artist in New York City. There has only ever been one constant in Ian's life: Priss. She is everything he isn't - powerful, enticing, beautiful. Dangerous. She isn't afraid to confront the problems that Ian isn't strong enough to face, but she also loves to feed his addictions for drugs, for sex, for running away. And no one seems to understand the volatile Priss the way Ian does. But everything begins to change when Ian meets Megan - a kind, good-hearted woman who Ian wants to start a new life with. But Priss won't let Ian go so easily, not when she's spent a lifetime by his side. Priss is angry, and when she's angry, bad things begin to happen...

Alliance

by Jonathan Fenby

The history of the Second World War is usually told through its decisive battles and campaigns. But behind the front lines, behind even the command centres of Allied generals and military planners, a different level of strategic thinking was going on. Throughout the war the 'Big Three' -- Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin -- met in various permutations and locations to thrash out ways to defeat Nazi Germany -- and, just as importantly, to decide the way Europe would look after the war. This was the political rather than military struggle: a battle of wills and diplomacy between three men with vastly differing backgrounds, characters -- and agendas. Focusing on the riveting interplay between these three extraordinary personalities, Jonathan Fenby re-creates the major Allied conferences including Casablanca, Potsdam and Yalta to show exactly who bullied whom, who was really in control, and how the key decisions were taken. With his customary flair for narrative, character and telling detail, Fenby's account reveals what really went on in those smoke-filled rooms and shows how "jaw-jaw" as well as "war-war" led to Hitler's defeat and the shape of the post-war world.

The Sinking of the Lancastria

by Jonathan Fenby

A fortnight after the evacuation at Dunkirk some 150,000 British troops were still stuck in France. As the German advance thundered west these Allied soldiers and airmen were faced with a mad dash to the coast in the hope that a troop-ship awaited them there. One such vessel was the 'Lancastria', a 16,000-ton liner pressed into service and now anchored off the port of St-Nazaire. On 17 June 1940, ready to head for home, the ship was bombed by the Luftwaffe. As she sank, between 3,500 and 4,000 of those on board lost their lives. Re-creating this extraordinary episode with great narrative flair, Jonathan Fenby shows us not just the human stories behind the disaster but the cover-up that followed -- as Churchill ordered a blanket ban on news stories for the sake of the country's morale. Gripping and moving, LANCASTRIA tells one of the great forgotten stories of the Second World War.

Generalissimo

by Jonathan Fenby

Chiang Kai-shek was the man who lost China to the Communists. As leader of the nationalist movement, the Kuomintang, Chiang established himself as head of the government in Nanking in 1928. Yet although he laid claim to power throughout the 1930s and was the only Chinese figure of sufficient stature to attend a conference with Churchill and Roosevelt during the Second World War, his desire for unity was always thwarted by threats on two fronts. Between them, the Japanese and the Communists succeeded in undermining Chiang's power-plays, and after Hiroshima it was Mao Zedong who ended up victorious.Brilliantly re-creating pre-Communist China in all its colour, danger and complexity, Jonathan Fenby's magisterial survey of this brave but unfulfilled life is destined to become the definitive account in the English language.

The Two of Us

by Andy Jones

If you loved One Day and The Rosie Project, you will fall head-over-heels for The Two of Us. Falling in love is the easy part. What matters most is what happens next... Fisher and Ivy have been an item for a whole nineteen days. And they just know they are meant to be together. The fact that they know little else about each other is a minor detail. Over the course of twelve months, in which their lives will change forever, Fisher and Ivy discover that falling in love is one thing, but staying there is an entirely different story. The Two of Us is a charming, honest and heart-breaking novel about life, love, and the importance of taking neither one for granted. 'Frank, funny and bittersweet, The Two of Us is a love story about what happens when a relationship looks all wrong but feels all right. This is a book with its heart firmly in the right place.' Louise Candlish 'Touching, funny and real, Andy Jones's novel about what happens after the love story had me laughing one minute and crying the next. I loved it.' Jane Costello

The Mathematics of Love

by Hannah Fry

Part of the TED series: The Mathematics of Love There is no topic that attracts more attention-more energy and time and devotion- than love. Love, like most things in life, is full of patterns. And mathematics is ultimately the study of patterns. In her book The Mathematics of Love - and TEDxTalk of the same name - Dr. Hannah Fry takes the audience on a fascinating journey through the patterns that define our love lives, tackling some of the most common yet complex questions pertaining to love: What's the chance of us finding love? What's the chance that it will last? How does online dating work, exactly? When should you settle down? How can you avoid divorce? When is it right to compromise? Can game theory help us decide whether or not to call? From evaluating the best strategies for online dating to defining the nebulous concept of beauty, Dr. Fry proves-with great insight, wit and fun- that maths is a surprisingly useful tool to negotiate the complicated, often baffling, sometimes infuriating, always interesting, patterns of love.

Conspiracy Girl

by Sarah Alderson

Everybody knows about the Cooper Killings. There was only one survivor - fifteen year-old Nic Preston. Now eighteen, Nic is trying hard to rebuild her life. But then one night her high-security apartment is broken into. It seems the killers are back to finish the job. Finn Carter - hacker, rule breaker, player - is the last person Nic ever wants to see again. He's the reason her mother's murderers walked free. But as the people hunting her close in, Nic has to accept that her best chance of staying alive is by staying close to Finn. And the closer they get to the truth, and to each other, the greater the danger becomes.s into her own hands and she and Jude disappear off grid trying to solve the mystery on their own.When they require a little extra hacking help however, they are forced to turn to Maggie's ex-best friend Finn Carter. Expelled in his final term at the FBI training academy for reasons he's none too keen to share, Finn operates an underground hacking and security business providing shady services to even shadier organisations. He's rebellious, hard to find and even harder to get to know, but he might just be the one person they can trust to help them.When they meet for the first time however, Jude recognises Finn instantly. He was an expert witness at the trial. He testified for the defense. Thanks to him her mother's killers are appealing their convictions and may very well overturn them.Putting her trust in Finn now is more than Jude knows how to do, especially as they seem to be on opposing sides. He believes the people who killed her mother are innocent and that Jude's eye-witness statement lacked credibility. But as the people hunting her start closing in and she and Finn are forced to collaborate in order to stay alive, things quickly move from tense to explosive between them.

The Boston Girl

by Anita Diamant

When Addie Baum's 22-year old granddaughter asks her about her childhood, Addie realises the moment has come to relive the full history that shaped her. Addie Baum was a Boston Girl, born in 1900 to immigrant Jewish parents who lived a very modest life. But Addie's intelligence and curiosity propelled her to a more modern path. Addie wanted to finish high school and to go to college. She wanted a career, to find true love. She wanted to escape the confines of her family. And she did.Told against the backdrop of World War I, and written with the same immense emotional impact that has made Diamant's previous novels bestsellers, The Boston Girl is a moving portrait of one woman's complicated life in the early 20th Century, and a window into the lives of all women seeking to understand the world around them.

ZOM-B Bride

by Darren Shan

The tenth terrifying ZOM-B installment from master of horror, Darren Shan.

The History Manifesto

by David Armitage Jo Guldi

How should historians speak truth to power - and why does it matter? Why is five hundred years better than five months or five years as a planning horizon? And why is history - especially long-term history - so essential to understanding the multiple pasts which gave rise to our conflicted present? The History Manifesto is a call to arms to everyone interested in the role of history in contemporary society. Leading historians David Armitage and Jo Guldi identify a recent shift back to longer-term narratives, which they argue is vital for the future of historical scholarship and how it is communicated. This provocative and thoughtful book, published simultaneously in print and Open Access, makes an important intervention in the debate about the role of history and the humanities in a digital age. It will provoke discussion among policymakers, activists and entrepreneurs as well as ordinary listeners, viewers, readers, students and teachers.

New Harmony, Indiana

by Jane Blaffer Owen Jane Dale Owen Nancy Mangum Mccaslin Anne Dale Owen John Philip Newell J. Pittman Mcgehee

For nearly seven decades, Jane Blaffer Owen was the driving force behind the restoration and revitalization of the town of New Harmony, Indiana. In this delightful memoir, Blaffer Owen describes the transformational effect the town had on her life. An oil heiress from Houston, she met and married Kenneth Dale Owen, great-great-grandson of Robert Owen, founder of a communal society in New Harmony. When she visited the then dilapidated town with her husband in 1941, it was love at first sight, and the story of her life and the life of the town became intertwined. Her engaging account of her journey to renew the town provides glimpses into New Harmony's past and all of its citizens--scientists, educators, and naturalists--whose influence spread far beyond the town limits. And there are fascinating stories of the artists, architects, and theologians who became part of Blaffer Owen's life at New Harmony, where, she says, "My roots could sink deeply and spread."

Gadamer and the Transmission of History

by Jerome Veith

Observing that humans often deal with the past in problematic ways, Jerome Veith looks to philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer and his hermeneutics to clarify these conceptions of history and to present ways to come to terms with them. Veith fully engages Truth and Method as well as Gadamer's entire work and relationships with other German philosophers, especially Kant, Hegel, and Heidegger in this endeavor. Veith considers questions about language, ethics, cosmopolitanism, patriotism, self-identity, and the status of the humanities in the academy in this very readable application of Gadamer's philosophical practice.

The Age of the Crisis of Man

by Mark Greif

In a midcentury American cultural episode forgotten today, intellectuals of all schools shared a belief that human nature was under threat. The immediate result was a glut of dense, abstract books on the "nature of man." But the dawning "age of the crisis of man," as Mark Greif calls it, was far more than a historical curiosity. In this ambitious intellectual and literary history, Greif recovers this lost line of thought to show how it influenced society, politics, and culture before, during, and long after World War II. During the 1930s and 1940s, fears of the barbarization of humanity energized New York intellectuals, Chicago protoconservatives, European Jewish émigrés, and native-born bohemians to seek "re-enlightenment," a new philosophical account of human nature and history. After the war this effort diffused, leading to a rebirth of modern human rights and a new power for the literary arts.Critics' predictions of a "death of the novel" challenged writers to invest bloodless questions of human nature with flesh and detail. Hemingway, Faulkner, and Richard Wright wrote flawed novels of abstract man. Succeeding them, Ralph Ellison, Saul Bellow, Flannery O'Connor, and Thomas Pynchon constituted a new guard who tested philosophical questions against social realities--race, religious faith, and the rise of technology--that kept difference and diversity alive.By the 1960s, the idea of "universal man" gave way to moral antihumanism, as new sensibilities and social movements transformed what had come before. Greif's reframing of a foundational debate takes us beyond old antagonisms into a new future, and gives a prehistory to the fractures of our own era.

Sex and Unisex

by Jo B. Paoletti

Notorious as much for its fashion as for its music, the 1960s and 1970s produced provocative fashion trends that reflected the rising wave of gender politics and the sexual revolution. In an era when gender stereotypes were questioned and dismantled, and when the feminist and gay rights movements were gaining momentum and a voice, the fashion industry responded in kind. Designers from Paris to Hollywood imagined a future of equality and androgyny. The unisex movement affected all ages, with adult fashions trickling down to school-aged children and clothing for infants. Between 1965 and 1975, girls and women began wearing pants to school; boys enjoyed a brief "peacock revolution," sporting bold colors and patterns; and legal battles were fought over hair style and length. However, with the advent of Diane Von Furstenberg's wrap dress and the launch of Victoria's Secret, by the mid-1980s, unisex styles were nearly completely abandoned. Jo B. Paoletti traces the trajectory of unisex fashion against the backdrop of the popular issues of the day--from contraception access to girls' participation in sports. Combing mass-market catalogs, newspaper and magazine articles, cartoons, and trade publications for signs of the fashion debates, Paoletti provides a multigenerational study of the "white space" between (or beyond) masculine and feminine.

General Maxime Weygand, 1867-1965

by Anthony Clayton

The career of the French general Maxime Weygand offers a fascinating glimpse into the perils and politics of military leadership and loyalty in the interwar years and after France's defeat in 1940. Of obscure birth, Weygand had an outstanding career during WWI as chief of staff for Marshal Foch and served France after the war in Poland and Syria before returning home. Alarmed by Nazi Germany's rearmament, Weygand locked horns with a political leadership skeptical of the growing military threat, leading to accusations that his desire for a strong army was anti-democratic. With German invaders again threatening Paris, Weygand argued for armistice rather than face certain military defeat. No friend of the newly-installed Vichy government, Weygand was soon shuffled off to North Africa, where he plotted the army's return to the Allied cause. After the German entry into Unoccupied France, Weygand was imprisoned. Released at war's end, he was rearrested on the orders of Charles de Gaulle and afterwards fought to restore his name. In this concise biography, Anthony Clayton traces the vertiginous changes in fortune of a soldier whose loyalty to France and to the French army was unwavering.

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