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The Every Boy

by Dana Adam Shapiro

When fifteen-year-old Henry Every washes up on shore, the only clues to his shocking death are those he leaves behind in a secret ledger that someone mysteriously leaves on his parents' doorstep. Crammed full of his darkly comic confessions, the pages detail Henry's myriad misadventures on his wayward quest for self-betterment: acts of petty crime with his best friend, Jorden, a romantic obsession with the elusive Benna, and a prickly relationship with a lethal jellyfish. Quietly wise and laugh-out-loud funny, The Every Boy proves there's hope in the darkest places -- you just have to know where to look.

Wynne's War

by Aaron Gwyn

"The book's pacing is cinematic . . . adrenalized." -- New York Times "Rich in equestrian and military detail . . . It'd take wild horses to pull you away." -- Entertainment Weekly When Corporal Elijah Russell's superb horsemanship is revealed during a firefight in northern Iraq, the young army Ranger is assigned to an elite Special Forces unit preparing to stage a secret mission in eastern Afghanistan. Russell's task is to train the Green Berets -- fiercely loyal to their enigmatic commander, Captain Wynne -- to ride the horses they will use to execute this mission through treacherous mountain terrain. But as the team presses farther into enemy territory, the nature of the operation only becomes more mysterious and Wynne's charismatic power takes on a darker cast. Ultimately, Russell finds himself forced to make a choice: on one side, his best friend and his most deeply held beliefs; on the other, a commanding officer driven by a messianic zeal for his mission. This taut, action-packed novel fuses the Western and the war story into a compellingly original tale. "This novel feels like Cormac McCarthy meets Tim O'Brien. I could not stop reading it." -- Philipp Meyer, author of The Son [author photo] © Mark Fortenberry

The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

by William Goldman

William Goldman's modern fantasy classic is a simple, exceptional story about quests--for riches, revenge, power, and, of course, true love--that's thrilling and timeless. Anyone who lived through the 1980s may find it impossible--inconceivable, even--to equateThe Princess Bridewith anything other than the sweet, celluloid romance of Westley and Buttercup, but the film is only a fraction of the ingenious storytelling you'll find in these pages. Rich in character and satire, the novel is set in 1941 and framed cleverly as an "abridged" retelling of a centuries-old tale set in the fabled country of Florin that's home to "Beasts of all natures and descriptions. Pain. Death. Brave men. Coward men. Strongest men. Chases. Escapes. Lies. Truths. Passions. "

God's Harvard

by Hanna Rosin

Since 2000, America's most ambitious young evangelicals have been making their way to Patrick Henry College, a small Christian school just outside the nation's capital. Most of them are homeschoolers whose idealism and discipline put the average American teenager to shame. And God's Harvard grooms these students to be the elite of tomorrow, dispatching them to the front lines of politics, entertainment, and science, to wage the battle to take back a godless nation. Hanna Rosin spent a year and a half embedded at the college, following the students from the campus to the White House, Congress, conservative think tanks, Hollywood, and other centers of influence. Her account captures this nerve center of the evangelical movement at a moment of maximum influence and also of crisis, as it struggles to avoid the temptations of modern life and still remake the world in its own image.

Death in Venice and other Tales

by Thomas Mann Joachim Neugroschel

In this new, widely acclaimed translation that restores the controversial passages that were cut out of the original English version, "Death in Venice" tells about a ruinous quest for love and beauty amid degenerating splendor. This volume also includes eleven other stories by Mann. All of the stories collected here display Mann's inimitable use of irony, his subtle characterizations, and superb, complex plots.

The Devil's Milk: A Social History of Rubber

by John Tully

Tully tells the story of humanity's long encounter with rubber in a kaleidoscopic narrative that regards little as outside its range without losing sight of the commodity in question. He presents what amounts to a history of the modern world told through the multiple lives of rubber. John Tully shows in this book, laboring people around the globe have every reason to regard rubber as "the devil s milk."

The Frozen Republic: How the Constitution Is Paralyzing Democracy, 1st Edition

by Daniel Lazare

In this thought-provoking book, Daniel Lazare blames America's outmoded constitutional system of checks and balances for the political malaise and governmental gridlock of recent years. He is giving a call for rethinking on constitution.

On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City

by Alice Goffman

This book is an on-the-ground account of the US prison boom: a close-up look at young men and women living in one poor and segregated Black community transformed by unprecedented levels of imprisonment and by the more hidden systems of policing and supervision that have accompanied them. Because the fear of capture and confinement has seeped into the basic activities of daily living--work, family, romance, friendship, and even much-needed medical care--it is an account of a community on the run.

With These Hands: The Hidden World of Migrant Farmworkers Today

by Daniel Rothenberg

With These Hands documents the farm labor system through the presentation of a collection of voices--workers who labor in the fields, growers who manage the multi-billion dollar agricultural industry, contractors who link workers with growers, coyotes who smuggle people across the border, union organizers, lobbyists, physicians, workers' families in Mexico, farmworker children and others. The diversity of stories presents the world of migrant farmworkers as a complex social and economic system, a network of intertwined lives, showing how all Americans are bound to the struggles and contributions of our nation's farm laborers.

Season of Blood: A Rwandan Journey

by Fergal Keane

In his powerful account of the Rwandan genocide, Fergal Keane rejects the widely held perception that the slaughter was the simple consequence of tribal antagonisms, and instead blames unscrupulous politicians for fomenting ethnic rivalry.

The Blazing World and Other Writings

by Kate Lilley

Flamboyant, theatrical and ambitious, Margaret Cavendish was one of the seventeenth century's most striking figures: a woman who ventured into the male spheres of politics, science, philosophy and literature. The Blazing World is a highly original work: part Utopian fiction, part feminist text, it tells of a lady shipwrecked on the Blazing World where she is made Empress and uses her power to ensure that it is free of war, religious division and unfair sexual discrimination. This volume also includes The Contract, a romance in which love and law work harmoniously together, and Assaulted and Pursued Chastity, which explores the power and freedom a woman can achieve in the disguise of a man.

Indigenous (In)Justice: Human Rights Law and Bedouin Arabs in the Naqab/Negev

by Ahmad Amara Ismael Abu-Saad Oren Yiftachel

The indigenous Bedouin Arab population in the Naqab/Negev desert in Israel has experienced a history of displacement, intense political conflict, and cultural disruption, along with recent rapid modernization, forced urbanization, and migration. This volume of essays highlights international, national, and comparative law perspectives and explores the legal and human rights dimensions of land, planning, and housing issues, as well as the economic, social, and cultural rights of indigenous peoples. Within this context, the essays examine the various dimensions of the âeoenegotiationsâe#157; between the Bedouin Arab population and the State of Israel. Indigenous (In)Justice locates the discussion of the Naqab/Negev question within the broader Israeli-Palestinian conflict and within key international debates among legal scholars and human rights advocates, including the application of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the formalization of traditional property rights, and the utility of restorative and reparative justice approaches. Leading international scholars and professionals, including the current United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women and the former United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, are among the contributors to this volume.

Litigating Health Rights: Can Courts Bring More Justice to Health?

by Alicia Ely Yamin Siri Gloppen

The last fifteen years have seen a tremendous growth in the number of health rights cases focusing on issues such as access to health services and essential medications. This volume examines the potential of litigation as a strategy to advance the right to health by holding governments accountable for these obligations. It includes cases studies from Costa Rica, South Africa, India, Brazil, Argentina and Colombia, as well as chapters that address cross-cutting themes. The authors analyze what types of services and interventions have been the subject of successful litigation and what remedies have been ordered by courts. Different chapters address the systemic impact of health litigation efforts, taking into account who benefits both directly and indirectly-and what the overall impacts on health equity are.

Reconsidering the Insular Cases: The Past and Future of the American Empire

by Gerald L. Neuman Tomiko Brown-Nagin

Over a century has passed since the United States Supreme Court decided a series of cases, known as the Insular Cases, that limited the applicability of constitutional rights in Puerto Rico and other overseas territories and allowed the United States to hold them indefinitely as subordinated possessions without the promise of representation or statehood. Essays in this volume, which originated in a Harvard Law School conference, reconsider the Insular Cases. Leading legal authorities examine the history and legacy of the cases, which are tinged with outdated notions of race and empire, and explore possible solutions for the dilemmas they created. Reconsidering the Insular Cases is particularly timely in light of the latest referendum in Puerto Rico expressing widespread dissatisfaction with its current form of governance, and litigation by American Samoans challenging their unequal citizenship status. This book gives voice to a neglected aspect of US history and constitutional law and provides a rich context for rethinking notions of sovereignty, citizenship, race, and place, as well as the roles of law and politics in shaping them.

Police Encounters: Security and Surveillance in Gaza under Egyptian Rule

by Ilana Feldman

Egypt came to govern Gaza as a result of a war, a failed effort to maintain Arab Palestine. Throughout the twenty years of its administration (1948-1967), Egyptian policing of Gaza concerned itself not only with crime and politics, but also with control of social and moral order. Through surveillance, interrogation, and a network of local informants, the police extended their reach across the public domain and into private life, seeing Palestinians as both security threats and vulnerable subjects who needed protection. Security practices produced suspicion and safety simultaneously. Police Encounters explores the paradox of Egyptian rule. Drawing on a rich and detailed archive of daily police records, the book describes an extensive security apparatus guided by intersecting concerns about national interest, social propriety, and everyday illegality. In pursuit of security, Egyptian policing established a relatively safe society, but also one that blocked independent political activity. The repressive aspects of the security society that developed in Gaza under Egyptian rule are beyond dispute. But repression does not tell the entire story about its impact on Gaza. Policing also provided opportunities for people to make claims of government, influence their neighbors, and protect their families.

Mark Twain in China

by Selina Lai-Henderson

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens, 1835-1910) has had an intriguing relationship with China that is not as widely known as it should be. Although he never visited the country, he played a significant role in speaking for the Chinese people both at home and abroad. After his death, his Chinese adventures did not come to an end, for his body of works continued to travel through China in translation throughout the twentieth century. Were Twain alive today, he would be elated to know that he is widely studied and admired there, and that Adventures of Huckleberry Finn alone has gone through no less than ninety different Chinese translations, traversing China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Looking at Twain in various Chinese contexts--his response to events involving the American Chinese community and to the Chinese across the Pacific, his posthumous journey through translation, and China's reception of the author and his work, Mark Twain in China points to the repercussions of Twain in a global theater. It highlights the cultural specificity of concepts such as "race," "nation," and "empire," and helps us rethink their alternative legacies in countries with dramatically different racial and cultural dynamics from the United States.

Rights, Deportation, and Detention in the Age of Immigration Control

by Tom K. Wong

Immigration is among the most prominent, enduring, and contentious features of our globalized world. Yet, there is little systematic, cross-national research on why countries "do what they do" when it comes to their immigration policies. Rights, Deportation, and Detention in the Age of Immigration Control addresses this gap by examining what are arguably the most contested and dynamic immigration policies--immigration control--across 25 immigrant-receiving countries, including the U. S. and most of the European Union. The book addresses head on three of the most salient aspects of immigration control: the denial of rights to non-citizens, their physical removal and exclusion from the polity through deportation, and their deprivation of liberty and freedom of movement in immigration detention. In addition to answering the question of why states do what they do, the book describes contemporary trends in what Tom K. Wong refers to as the machinery of immigration control, analyzes the determinants of these trends using a combination of quantitative analysis and fieldwork, and explores whether efforts to deter unwanted immigration are actually working.

Riding Shotgun

by Nathan Bennett Stephen A. Miles

The role of Chief Operations Officer is clearly important. In fact, it has been argued that the number two position is the toughest job in a company. COOs are typically the key individuals responsible for the delivery of results on a day-to-day, quarter-to-quarter basis. They play a critical leadership role in executing the strategies developed by the top management team. And, in many cases, they are being groomed to be-or are actually being tested as-the firm''s CEO-elect. Despite all this, the COO role has not received much attention. Riding Shotgun: The Role of the COO provides a new understanding of this little-understood role. The authors-a scholar and a consultant-develop a framework for understanding who the COO is, why a company would want to create this position, and the challenges associated with successful performance in the COO role. Drawing heavily on a number of first-person accounts from CEOs and other top executives in major corporations, the authors have developed a set of strategies or principles to inform individuals who aspire to serve in such a position. The executives who share their experiences in this book are from some of the most established and important companies in today''s economy: AirTran; American Standard Companies; Amgen; Adobe Systems, Inc. ; Autodesk, Inc; eBay; Heidrick & Struggles; InBev; Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Company; Mattel, Inc; Motorola; PepsiCo; Raytheon Company; Starbucks; and many others. Excerpts from the Book: On focusing on success "The primary goal I set for myself on how I define what success looks like for me is am I working at a company that matters? Am I working with somebody who I think affects positive change? Am I providing a benefit to my family? Am I enjoying myself? Why would I put a limitation on my enjoyment? There is an old view on Wall Street that says, ''They love you until they don''t. '' I am going to stay happy until I am not. "-Dan Rosensweig, COO Yahoo! On the relationship between the CEO and COO "Deep down, you have to trust each other and you have to like each other. If you don''t like each other, and/or don''t trust each other, it may work, kind of, but it will be at a fifty percent level at best. "-Craig Weatherup, Director, Starbucks, and former Chairman, Pepsi On the challenges of transitioning into the COO role "If you can''t conceptualize the strategic objectives or help drive that or participate in that, I don''t think you are going to succeed. But, equally, if you can''t translate that into an executable plan, you are not going to succeed either. "-Shantanu Narayen, COO, Adobe Systems Additional Quotes: "Miles & Bennett tackle an important and drastically under-researched area: the role, personalities, fit and success factors of COOs. We''ve seen several COOs who have been total winners, but it''s striking how different the models of success can be depending on role, personal competencies, business situation/cycle/type, team strengths, and CEO strengths. The authors have done a very nice job of tying all of this together. "-Jim Williams, Partner, Texas Pacific Group "The lessons reported in this book will be very useful to Boards, Heads of Human Resources and CEOs as they consider succession planning and organizational design. "-Dale Morrison, President & Chief Executive Officer, McCain Foods Limited "The job of COO is becoming more important as companies and their boards look internally for succession alternatives. One question they face: Will the organization continue to run as the number 2 becomes the number 1? Riding Shotgun will help answer this and many more questions about the COO role in today''s corporate structure. "-John Berisford, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, The Pepsi Bottling Group "The COO plays a critical leadership role in most businesses, but its particularly true in the natural resources

Imitation

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

A Vintage Shorts "Short Story Month" SelectionNkem is living a life of wealth and security in America, until she discovers that her husband is keeping a girlfriend back home in Nigeria. In this high-intensity story of passion and the masks we all wear, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of the acclaimed novels Half of a Yellow Sun and Americanah and winner of the Orange Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award, explores the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States. "Imitation" is a selection from Adichie's collection The Thing Around Your Neck. An eBook short.

Pedigree

by Lauren A. Rivera

Americans are taught to believe that upward mobility is possible for anyone who is willing to work hard, regardless of their social status, yet it is often those from affluent backgrounds who land the best jobs. Pedigree takes readers behind the closed doors of top-tier investment banks, consulting firms, and law firms to reveal the truth about who really gets hired for the nation's highest-paying entry-level jobs, who doesn't, and why.Drawing on scores of in-depth interviews as well as firsthand observation of hiring practices at some of America's most prestigious firms, Lauren Rivera shows how, at every step of the hiring process, the ways that employers define and evaluate merit are strongly skewed to favor job applicants from economically privileged backgrounds. She reveals how decision makers draw from ideas about talent--what it is, what best signals it, and who does (and does not) have it--that are deeply rooted in social class. Displaying the "right stuff" that elite employers are looking for entails considerable amounts of economic, social, and cultural resources on the part of the applicants and their parents.Challenging our most cherished beliefs about college as a great equalizer and the job market as a level playing field, Pedigree exposes the class biases built into American notions about the best and the brightest, and shows how social status plays a significant role in determining who reaches the top of the economic ladder.

How to Clone a Mammoth

by Beth Shapiro

Could extinct species, like mammoths and passenger pigeons, be brought back to life? The science says yes. In How to Clone a Mammoth, Beth Shapiro, evolutionary biologist and pioneer in "ancient DNA" research, walks readers through the astonishing and controversial process of de-extinction. From deciding which species should be restored, to sequencing their genomes, to anticipating how revived populations might be overseen in the wild, Shapiro vividly explores the extraordinary cutting-edge science that is being used--today--to resurrect the past. Journeying to far-flung Siberian locales in search of ice age bones and delving into her own research--as well as those of fellow experts such as Svante Pääbo, George Church, and Craig Venter--Shapiro considers de-extinction's practical benefits and ethical challenges. Would de-extinction change the way we live? Is this really cloning? What are the costs and risks? And what is the ultimate goal? Using DNA collected from remains as a genetic blueprint, scientists aim to engineer extinct traits--traits that evolved by natural selection over thousands of years--into living organisms. But rather than viewing de-extinction as a way to restore one particular species, Shapiro argues that the overarching goal should be the revitalization and stabilization of contemporary ecosystems. For example, elephants with genes modified to express mammoth traits could expand into the Arctic, re-establishing lost productivity to the tundra ecosystem. Looking at the very real and compelling science behind an idea once seen as science fiction, How to Clone a Mammoth demonstrates how de-extinction will redefine conservation's future.

Clio's Battles

by Jeremy M. Black

To write history is to consider how to explicate the past, to weigh the myriad possible approaches to the past, and to come to terms with how the past can be and has been used. In this book, prize-winning historian Jeremy Black considers both popular and academic approaches to the past. His focus is on the interaction between the presentation of the past and current circumstances, on how history is used to validate one view of the present or to discredit another, and on readings of the past that unite and those that divide. Black opens with an account that underscores the differences and developments in traditions of writing history from the ancient world to the present. Subsequent chapters take up more recent decades, notably the post-Cold War period, discussing how different perspectives can fuel discussions of the past by individuals interested in shaping public opinion or public perceptions of the past. Black then turns to the possible future uses of the then past as a way to gain perspective on how we use the past today. Clio's Battles is an ambitious account of the engagement with the past across world history and of the clash over the content and interpretation of history and its implications for the present and future.

Llama Llama Zippity-zoom!

by Anna Dewdney

Llama Llama ZIP! Llama Llama ZOOM! Llama Llama Red Pajama VROOM, VROOM, VROOM! On the playground, Llama goes fast! Llama zips by on his scooter and swishes down the slide--whoosh! Younger audiences will love doing as Llama does in this supremely adorable fourth board book.

Quad

by C. G. Watson

Everything led up to this moment---the point when the teasing, the cruelty, the pressure all became too much. And someone finally snapped. Now six students, from six different cliques, are trapped in the student store while a shooter terrorizes their school. The shooter''s identity is teased out through the students'' flashbacks until the reader breathlessly reaches the final page. It's only there that he discovers the shocking answer to the question: Who is shooting out in the quad? This gripping thriller by educator C. G. Watson is inspired by observations made in her own high school. Quad examines in heartrending detail how even the most casual cruelties can tear people apart.

Coming to America: Immigrants from the British Isles

by Shirley Blumenthal Jerome S. Ozer

The British subjects who arrived in America in the seventeenth century to settle in Virginia and Massachusetts called themselves colonists. But they were also the first immigrants to a land already peopled by native Americans. Most of these colonists, and the Welsh and Scots who joined them later, left England to escape political and religious persecution or for economic reasons. Some had no choice: they were transported to the colonies as criminals. Together they cleared and farmed the harsh, wild land and gradually built their primitive and isolated settlements into prosperous communities. In the 1840s almost a million Irish, fleeing the disease and poverty of the potato famine, arrived in America. Though they found still more poverty and cruel discrimination in the cities, these men and women became the muscle, the labor that built the railroads and streets and worked in the factories of a young industrial nation. Liberally infused with first-person accounts, this is the absorbing story of how these peoples forged a new nation out of a tiny English colony and extended that nation to the Pacific. It is also about the history that each group left behind in the British Isles--from the Pilgrim's struggle for religious freedom, to the brutal history of English-Irish relations, to the ambitions of the immigrant disembarking from a plane today.

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