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Zoology for Kids: Understanding and Working with Animals, with 21 Activities

by Bethanie Hestermann Josh Hestermann The Kratt Brothers

An interactive introduction to working with animals Zoology for Kids invites the next generation of zoologists to discover the animal kingdom through clear, entertaining information and anecdotes, lush color photos, hands-on activities, and peer-reviewed research. Young minds are introduced to zoology as a science by discussing animals' forms, functions, and behaviors as well as the history behind zoos and aquariums. Related activities include baking edible animal cells, playing a dolphin-echolocation game, and practicing designing an exhibit. Young readers can peek into the world of zookeepers and aquarists, veterinarians, wildlife researchers, and conservationists as they "train" their friends, mold a tiger's jawbone, and perform field research in their own backyard. This engaging resource provides readers with new knowledge, a healthy respect for the animal kingdom, and the idea that they can pursue animal-related careers and make a difference to preserve and protect the natural world.

Birdology: 30 Activities and Observations for Exploring the World of Birds

by Kevin Byron Monica Russo

An engaging book that encourages young nature enthusiasts to explore the world of birds This generously illustrated, full-color book teaches kids that birds can be seen almost anywhere: in city parks and streets, zoos, farms, and backyards. Using "Try This," "Look For," and "Listen For" prompts, Birdology promotes independent observation and analysis, writing and drawing skills, and nature literacy. Kids observe the diversity of shapes, colors, patterns, and behavior of birds; listen for their songs and the clap of wings; make a juice-box feeder; plant flowers that attract hummingbirds; start a birding journal and sketchbook; and much more. Other topics that are presented in clear, kid-friendly prose include migration, nesting, food, territories, and conservation and preservation. Additional resources, such as a glossary, bird orders and scientific names, bird and wildlife organizations, and "Teacher Topics" to initiate classroom discussion and investigation, are also included.

Somebody's Daughter: The Hidden Story of America's Prostituted Children and the Battle to Save Them

by Julian Sher

Shocking and gritty, this work contains firsthand accounts of terror and abuse from prostituted children--and the law enforcement officers and community activists working to save them. While detailing the necessity for substantive legal and cultural change on the national level in regard to prostitution, pimps, and children's rights, this book also provides encouraging stories of new, pioneering law enforcement initiatives and child-recovery strategies reaping positive results in urban areas inundated with children victimized by sexual exploitation and violence, such as Las Vegas, Atlantic City, New York City, Phoenix, and Dallas. This updated paperback edition includes a new, four-page afterword by the author, with updates on new laws and initiatives and follow-ups on some of the young women discussed in the book. A call to awareness and action for parents, legislators, and educators, this examination exposes this country's dirty secret.

The Best Film You've Never Seen: 35 Directors Champion the Forgotten or Critically Savaged Movies They Love

by Robert K. Elder

Revealing a festival of guilty pleasures, almost-masterpieces, and undeniable classics in need of revival, 35 directors champion their favorite overlooked or critically savaged gems in this guide. The list includes unsung noir films The Chase and Murder by Contract, famous flops Can't Stop the Music and Joe Versus the Volcano, art films L'ange and WR: Mysteries of the Organism, theatrical adaptations The Iceman Cometh and The Homecoming, B-movies Killer Klowns from Outer Space and The Honeymoon Killers, and even Oscar-winners Breaking Away and Some Came Running. The filmmakers, including Guillermo del Toro, John Waters, John Woo, Edgar Wright, and Danny Boyle, defend their choices, wanting these films to be loved, admired, and swooned over, arguing the films deserve a larger audience and their place in movie history be reconsidered. Some were well-loved but are now faded or forgotten, others ran afoul of critics or were just buried after a dismal opening run, and still others never even got proper distribution. A few of these titles qualify as bona fide obscurata, but now most can be found on DVD or streaming from Netflix or Amazon. The filmmakers are the perfect hosts, setting the tone, managing expectations, and often being brutally honest about a film's shortcomings or the reasons why it was lost in the first place.

Junk Drawer Physics: 50 Awesome Experiments That Don't Cost a Thing

by Bobby Mercer

A children's instructional book on how to use readily available materials to turn the house into a science lab Physics teacher Bobby Mercer provides readers with more than 50 great hands-on experiments that can be performed for just pennies, or less. Turn a plastic cup into a pinhole camera using waxed paper, a rubber band, and a thumbtack. Build a swinging wave machine using a series of washers suspended on strings from a yardstick. Or construct your own planetarium from an empty potato chip canister, construction paper, scissors, and a pin. Each project has a materials list, detailed step-by-step instructions with illustrations, and a brief explanation of the scientific principle being demonstrated. Junk Drawer Physics also includes sidebars of fascinating physics facts, such as did you know the Eiffel Tower is six inches taller in summer than in winter because its steel structure expands in the heat? Educators and parents will find this title a handy resource to teach children about physics topics that include magnetism, electricity, force, motion, light, energy, sound, and more, and have fun at the same time.

Nine Lives of a Black Panther: A Story of Survival

by Wayne Pharr

In the early morning hours of December 8, 1969, hundreds of SWAT officers engaged in a violent battle with a handful of Los Angeles-based members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (BPP). Five hours and 5,000 rounds of ammunition later, three SWAT team members and three Black Panthers lay wounded. For the Panthers and the community that supported them, the shootout symbolized a victory, and a key reason for that victory was the actions of a 19-year-old rank-and-file member of the BPP: Wayne Pharr. Nine Lives of a Black Panther tells Pharr's riveting story of life in the Los Angeles branch of the BPP and gives a blow-by-blow account of how it prepared for and survived the massive attack. He illuminates the history of one of the most dedicated, dynamic, vilified, and targeted chapters of the BPP, filling in a missing piece of Black Panther history and, in the process, creating an engaging and hard-to-put-down memoir about a time and place that holds tremendous fascination for readers interested in African American militancy.

Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine

by Tim Hanley

With her golden lasso and her bullet-deflecting bracelets, Wonder Woman is a beloved icon of female strength in a world of male superheroes. But this close look at her history portrays a complicated heroine who is more than just a female Superman. The original Wonder Woman was ahead of her time, advocating female superiority and the benefits of matriarchy in the 1940s. At the same time, her creator filled the comics with titillating bondage imagery, and Wonder Woman was tied up as often as she saved the world. In the 1950s, Wonder Woman begrudgingly continued her superheroic mission, wishing she could settle down with her boyfriend instead, all while continually hinting at hidden lesbian leanings. While other female characters stepped forward as women's lib took off in the late 1960s, Wonder Woman fell backwards, losing her superpowers and flitting from man to man. Ms. magazine and Lynda Carter restored Wonder Woman's feminist strength in the 1970s, turning her into a powerful symbol as her checkered past was quickly forgotten. Exploring this lost history as well as her modern incarnations adds new dimensions to the world's most beloved female character, and Wonder Woman Unbound delves into her comic book and its spin-offs as well as the myriad motivations of her creators to showcase the peculiar journey that led to Wonder Woman's iconic status.

How the Gringos Stole Tequila: The Modern Age of Mexico's Most Traditional Spirit

by Chantal Martineau

Once little more than party fuel, for years tequila in the U.S. market was dominated by a crude hybrid, aptly called "mixto," but of late, it has graduated to the status of fine sipping spirit. Now growth in sales of real tequila, made from 100 percent agave, is outpacing that of the cheap stuff by some threefold. But there's more to the story of tequila than its popularity, and How the Gringos Stole Tequila traces the spirit's evolution in America from frat-house firewater to luxury good. Author Chantal Martineau immersed herself in the world of tequila over the last five years--traveling to visit distillers in Mexico, attending tastings and seminars around the United States, and meeting with tequila experts and even academics who have studied the spirit--and the result is a book that offers readers a glimpse into the social history and ongoing impact of this one-of-a-kind spirit. In addition to discussing the history and politics of Mexico's popular export, this book also takes readers on a colorful tour of the country's tequila trail as well as bringing in expert opinions and cocktail suggestions from some of New York's top mixologists.

Earthrise: My Adventures as an Apollo 14 Astronaut

by Ellen Mahoney Dr Brian Cox Edgar Mitchell

The inspiring and fascinating biography of the sixth man to ever walk on the Moon Of the nearly seven billion people who live on Earth, only 12 have walked on the Moon and Dr. Edgar Mitchell was one of them. Earthrise is a vibrant memoir for young adults featuring the life story of this internationally known Apollo 14 astronaut. The book focuses on Edgar's amazing journey to the Moon in 1971 and highlights the many steps he took to get there, including growing up as a farm boy on a ranch; living in Roswell, New Mexico, during the alleged UFO crash; graduating from Carnegie Mellon and MIT; being a navy combat pilot; and becoming a NASA astronaut. In engaging and suspenseful prose he details his historic flight to the Moon, describing everything from the very practical--eating, sleeping, and going to the bathroom in space--to the metaphysical, such as the life-changing sensation of connectedness to the universe that he felt and that has been described, in varying degrees, by many astronauts. Extensive resources include annotated lists of websites about space, museums and organizations, films and videos, and books for further reading.

An Eye for Art: Focusing on Great Artists and Their Work

by National Gallery of Art

Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of full-color images, this family-oriented art resource introduces children to more than 50 great artists and their work, with corresponding activities and explorations that inspire artistic development, focused looking, and creative writing. This treasure trove of artwork from the National Gallery of Art includes, among others, works by Raphael, Rembrandt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Henri Matisse, Chuck Close, Jacob Lawrence, Pablo Picasso, and Alexander Calder, representing a wide range of artistic styles and techniques. Written by museum educators with decades of hands-on experience in both art-making activities and making art relatable to children, the activities include sculpting a clay figure inspired by Edgar Degas; drawing an object from touch alone, inspired by Joan Miro's experience as an art student; painting a double-sided portrait with one side reflecting physical traits and the other side personality traits, inspired by Leonardo da Vinci's Ginevra de' Benci; and creating a story based on a Mary Cassatt painting. Educators, homeschoolers, and families alike will find their creativity sparked by this art extravaganza.

Oddball Michigan: A Guide to 450 Really Strange Places

by Jerome Pohlen

There's more to Michigan than beautiful forests, shuttered factories, and miles and miles of stunning shoreline. Armed with this offbeat travel guide, you'll soon discover the strange underbelly of the Great Lakes State. Michigan has monuments to fluoridation, snurfing, the designer of the Jefferson nickel, and the once-famous Mr. Chicken, as well as festivals honoring tulips, Christmas pickles, and a 38-acre fungus. It's where you'll find the World's Largest Lugnut, the Nun Doll Museum, Joe's Gizzard City, the Teenie-Weenie Pickle Barrel Cottage, Howdy Doody, and Thomas Edison's last breath. The state also has its share of weird history--it's where Harry Houdini perished on Halloween night in 1926, where skater Tanya Harding's posse whacked Nancy Kerrigan, and where the Kellogg brothers invented popular breakfast cereals and less-popular yogurt enemas. Along with humorous histories and witty observations, Oddball Michigan provides addresses, websites, hours, fees, and driving directions for each of its 450 entries.

Blasphemy: A Memoir: Sentenced to Death Over a Cup of Water

by Asia Bibi Anne-Isabelle Tollet

In June 2009 a Pakistani mother of five, Asia Bibi, was out picking fruit in the fields. At midday she went to the nearest well, picked up a cup, and took a drink of cool water, and then offered it to another woman. Suddenly, one of her fellow workers cried out that the water belonged to Muslim women and that Bibi--who is Christian--had contaminated it. "Blasphemy!" someone shouted, a crime punishable by death in Pakistan. In that instant, with one word, Bibi's fate was sealed. First attacked by a mob, Bibi was then thrown into prison and sentenced to be hanged. Since that day, Asia Bibi has been held in appalling conditions, her family members have had to flee their village under threat from vengeful extremists, and the two brave public figures who came to Bibi's defense--the Muslim governor of the Punjab and Pakistan's Christian Minister for Minorities--have been brutally murdered. In Blasphemy, Asia Bibi, who has become a symbol for everyone concerned with ending an unjust law that allows people to settle personal scores and that kills Christians and Muslims alike indiscriminately, bravely tells her shocking and inspiring story and makes a last cry for help from her prison cell. Proceeds from the sale of this book support Asia Bibi's family, which has been forced into hiding.

Last Team Standing: How the Steelers and the Eagles—"The Steagles"—Saved Pro Football During World War II

by Matthew Algeo

Tracing the history of the National Football League during World War II, this book delves into the severe player shortage during the war which led to the merging of the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Philadelphia Eagles, creating the "Steagles." The team's center was deaf in one ear, its wide receiver was blind in one eye (and partially blind in the other), and its halfback had bleeding ulcers. One player was so old he'd never before played football with a helmet. Yet somehow, this group of players--deemed unfit for military service due to age or physical ailment--posted a winning record in the league, to the surprise of players and fans alike. Digging into the history of the war paralleled by the unlikely story of the Steagles franchise, both sports fans and history buffs will learn about the cultural significance of this motley crew of ball players during a trying time in United States history.

The Criminal Conversation of Mrs. Norton: Victorian England's "Scandal of the Century" and the Fallen Socialite Who Changed Women's Lives Fore

by Diane Atkinson

A forgotten heroine of the women's rights movement is rescued from obscurity in this biography of Caroline Norton, a respected poet, songwriter, and socialite whose 1836 adultery trial rocked Victorian England. When George Norton accused his wife of having an affair with the British Prime Minister he sparked what was considered "the scandal of the century." Though she was declared innocent, the humiliated George locked Caroline out of their home, seized her manuscripts, letters, clothes, jewels, and every penny of her earnings, and refused to let her see their three sons. This detailed account of the Norton "criminal conversation" trial sheds vivid light on the desperate position of women in male-dominated Victorian society and chronicles Caroline's lifelong campaign to establish legal rights for married and divorced women, allowing them to inherit property, take court action on their own behalf, and in effect establishing them for the first time as full-fledged human beings before the law. Figuring into this fascinating story are Norton's friend and confidante Mary Shelley, longtime admirer Charles Dickens, Lord Byron, Queen Victoria, and other literary and royal heavyweights of the day.

This Wheel's on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of the Band

by Stephen Davis Levon Helm

The singer and drummer of the Band details, in this book, the history of one of the most influential groups of the 1960s. While their music evoked a Southern mythology with their beautifully crafted, image-rich songs, only their Arkansan drummer, Levon Helm, was the genuine article. This updated edition of his life story includes a new epilogue that covers the last dozen years of his life. From the cotton fields to Woodstock and from seeing Sonny Boy Williamson and Elvis Presley to playing for President Clinton, This Wheel's on Fire replays the tumultuous life of Levon Helm in his own unforgettable folksy drawl.

Not So Fast: Parenting Your Teen Through the Dangers of Driving

by Tim Hollister Sandy Spavone

Providing advice to parents, guardians, and other adults who supervise teen drivers about the critical decisions that must be made before getting behind the wheel of a car, this book will help empower and guide parents of the more than three million teens obtaining new driver's licenses annually in the United States. Author and parent Tim Hollister proves that supervision before driving is every bit as important to lowering crash rates as teaching teens how to turn at a busy intersection. Parents will learn priceless information in teaching teenagers how to evaluate the circumstances of every driving trip, how to be able to say "no" when necessary, how to prepare a "flight plan" for each drive, and how to put safety before convenience. Parents will also benefit by understanding the real dangers and risks in teen driving by recognizing the limits of driver training programs and will thus become more informed and proactive in their supervisory role. Proceeds from sales will support a memorial fund--set up in honor of Hollister's son, Reid, who was killed in an automobile accident in 2006--which subsidizes infant and toddler education in greater Hartford, Connecticut, and other worthy traffic safety causes.

Last Chance for Justice: How Relentless Investigators Uncovered New Evidence Convicting the Birmingham Church Bombers

by T. K. Thorne

Revealing the story of the reopening of the case of the Birmingham, Alabama, church bombing of 1963, this insider's account divulges the ins and outs of the investigation led by detective Ben Herren of the Birmingham Police Department and special agent Bill Fleming of the FBI. For more than a year, they analyzed the original FBI files on the bombing and activities of the Ku Klux Klan, then began a search for new evidence. Their first interview--with Klansman Bobby Frank Cherry--broke open the case, but not in the way they expected. Herren and Fleming unearthed lost evidence and convinced long-silent witnesses to tell their stories. With tenacity, humor, dedication, and some luck, the pair encountered the worst and best in human nature on their journey to find justice, and perhaps closure, for the citizens of Birmingham.

Pandora's DNA: Tracing the Breast Cancer Genes Through History, Science, and One Family Tree

by Lizzie Stark

Would you cut out your healthy breasts and ovaries if you thought it might save your life? That's not a theoretical question for journalist Lizzie Stark's relatives, who grapple with the horrific legacy of cancer built into the family DNA. It is a BRCA mutation that has robbed most of her female relatives of breasts, ovaries, peace of mind, or life itself. In Pandora's DNA, Stark uses her family's experience to frame a larger story about the so-called breast cancer genes, exploring the morass of legal quandaries, scientific developments, medical breakthroughs, and ethical concerns that surround the BRCA mutations. She tells of the troubling history of prophylactic surgery and the storied origins of the boob job and relates the landmark lawsuit against Myriad Genetics, which held patents on the BRCA genes every human carries in their body until the Supreme Court overturned them in 2013. Although a genetic test for cancer risk may sound like the height of scientific development, the treatment remains crude and barbaric. Through her own experience, Stark shows what it's like to live in a brave new world where gazing into a crystal ball of genetics has many unintended consequences.

Her Next Chapter: How Mother-Daughter Book Clubs Can Help Girls Navigate Malicious Media, Risky Relationships, Girl Gossip, and So Much More

by Charlotte Kugler Lori Day

A guide to using book clubs to open up dialogue about and explore issues facing young girls today Mother-daughter book clubs are a great way to encourage your child's reading and for girls and moms to bond with each other while also socializing with friends, but they can do much more than that, suggests educational psychologist and parenting coach Lori Day. They can create a safe and empowering haven where girls can openly discuss, question, and navigate some of the challenges of girlhood today. In Her Next Chapter, Day draws from experiences in her own club and her more than 25 years in education to offer a unique, timely, and inspiring take on mother-daughter book clubs. She provides clear, succinct overviews of eight of the biggest challenges facing girls and young women today, giving mothers the information they need to moderate thoughtful conversations, while weaving in all the carefully chosen book, movie, and media recommendations; plentiful discussion questions and prompts; and suggested related activities that guide and extend discussions and make clubs fun. It outlines precisely how mothers can work together, using the magic of books, to build girls' confidence and lessen the negative impact of media on self-image. Also included are relevant quotes and experiences from a wide range of mothers, a list of further resources, and chapter-closing reflections from Day's now-adult daughter, Charlotte, who shares memories about what the club did for her as a child and observations on today's girl culture.

Lifting My Voice: A Memoir

by Kofi Annan Barbara Hendricks

Growing up African American in segregated Arkansas in the 1950s, Barbara Hendricks witnessed firsthand the painful struggle for civil rights. After graduation from the Juilliard School of Music, Hendricks immediately won a number of important international prizes, and began performing in recitals and operas throughout the world. A Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, she is as devoted to humanitarian work as she is to her music. Always the anti-diva, Hendricks is a down-to-earth and straightforward woman, whether singing Mozart or black spirituals. She challenges stereotypes and puts the music first and presents a warm, engaging, and honest self-portrait of one of the great women of music.

Gentlemen Bootleggers: The True Story of Templeton Rye, Prohibition, and a Small Town in Cahoots

by Bryce Bauer

During Prohibition, while Al Capone was rising to worldwide prominence as Public Enemy Number One, the townspeople of rural Templeton, Iowa--population just 418--were busy with a bootlegging empire of their own. Led by Joe Irlbeck, the whip-smart and gregarious son of a Bavarian immigrant, the outfit of farmers, small merchants, and even the church Monsignor worked together to create a whiskey so excellent it was ordered by name: Templeton Rye. Gentlemen Bootleggers tells a never-before-told tale of ingenuity, bootstrapping, and perseverance in one small town, showcasing a group of immigrants who embraced the American ideals of self-reliance, dynamism, and democratic justice. It relies on previously classified Prohibition Bureau investigation files, federal court case files, extensive newspaper archive research, and a recently disclosed interview with kingpin Joe Irlbeck. Unlike other Prohibition-era tales of big-city gangsters, it provides an important reminder that bootlegging wasn't only about glory and riches, but could be in the service of a higher goal: producing the best whiskey money could buy.

Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures

by Karen Gibson

Twenty-three women from 10 different countries whose careers span a half century of human spaceflight are profiled in this educational book for young readers. Women in Space features such figures as Sally Ride, the first American woman to orbit the earth; Peggy Whitson, who logged more than a year in orbit while aboard the International Space Station; Mae Jemison, the first African American woman in space; and astronauts from Japan, Canada, Italy, South Korea, and France. Additional attention is paid to the women of Mercury 13, a program that trained women in the same screening tests administered to the men who became the first astronauts at NASA. Space pioneer Valentina Tereshkova, who in 1963 became the first woman to rocket into space, is also profiled. These stories of the pilots, physicists, and doctors who broke the stratospheric ceiling demonstrate the vital role women have played in the history of space exploration.

A Mysterious Something in the Light: The Life of Raymond Chandler

by Tom Williams

Drawing on new interviews, previously unpublished letters, and archives, this biography casts a new light on Raymond Chandler, one of the most mysterious of writers. The man revealed was troubled by loneliness and desertion from an early age--experiences that informed his writing as much as they scarred his life. The bleak picture details the collapse of his parents' marriage, and the relocation of Chandler and his mother to Ireland, and later London, due to his father's alcohol-fueled violence. In his 20s, he returned to the United States and he met his one great love, Cissy Pascal, a married woman 18 years his senior. Only during middle age, after his own alcoholism dissolved a lucrative career as an oilman, did Chandler turn to crime fiction, although his success proved bittersweet. His literary obsession, ambition, and suicidal turn after Cissy's death combined to prevent him from living up to the promise of his first novels. This long-awaited biography shadows one of the true literary giants of the 20th century and considers how crime writing was raised to the level of art.

The Dangerous Divide: Peril and Promise on the US-Mexico Border

by Peter Eichstaedt

How do we balance border security and America's need for a vital workforce while continuing to provide access to the American dream? Since the attacks of 9/11, the United States has steadily ramped up security along the U.S.-Mexico border, transforming America's legendary Southwest into a frontier of fear. Veteran journalist Peter Eichstaedt roams this fabled region from Tucson, Arizona, to El Paso, Texas, meeting with migrants, border security advocates, and communities ravaged by cross-border crime. He rides with the border patrol and reveals the tragic situation that has evolved along the border. Eichstaedt finds that despite tens of thousands of border agents and the expenditure of billions of dollars, an estimated one million Mexicans and Central Americans continue to cross the border each year. These migrants fill jobs that have become the underpinnings of the U.S. economy. Rather than building more and better barricades, Eichstaedt argues that the United States must reform its immigration and drug laws and acknowledge that costly, counterproductive, and antiquated policies have created deadly circumstances on both sides of the border. Recognizing the truth of America's long and tortured relations with Mexico must be followed by legitimizing the contributions made by migrants to the American way of life.

The Making of Wizard of Oz

by Aljean Harmetz Margaret Hamilton

Released in conjunction with the 75th-anniversary DVD release of The Wizard of Oz, this book is the definitive story of how one of America's most beloved movies was made and a marvelous, unprecedented examination of how Hollywood used to make movies. This updated edition includes numerous photos and shares hundreds of interviews with cameramen, screenwriters, costume designers, directors, producers, light technicians, actors, and more to reveal how the factory-like Hollywood system of moviemaking miraculously produced one of the most enduring films ever made. From the scandalous headlines of Munchkin orgies at the Culver City Hotel and the Witch's (accidental) burning to the building of the Emerald City and the sewing of nearly 1,000 costumes, The Making of The Wizard of Oz provides a richly detailed re-creation of MGM's production No. 1060 and a detail-by-detail, department-by-department look at the most powerful and flamboyant studio Hollywood has ever known.

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