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Medieval English Gardens

by Teresa Mclean

From castle to cottage, nearly every medieval dwelling possessed an enclosed plot for growing herbs, food, and flowers. This illustrated survey of gardening lore from the era between the Norman Conquest and the Renaissance reveals a wealth of ancient secrets. Drawn from obscure sources -- scraps of parchment from account rolls, charters, surveys, and registers -- the book provides hitherto inaccessible knowledge about the plans, organization, and common uses of gardens in the pre-industrial world. Both an excellent work of scholarship and a fascinating read, the book examines the location, ownership, purpose, layout, overall appearance, fashions, and workmanship of English gardens. It further explores the gardens' colorful and fragrant contents, describing castle gardens, pleasure gardens, lovers' gardens, and secret gardens. Other subjects include infirmary gardens, herbariums, kitchen gardens, and flowery meads in addition to the cultivation of orchards, vineyards, and beehives.

Victorian Murderesses: A True History of Thirteen Respectable French and English Women Accused of Unspeakable Crimes

by Mary S. Hartman

This riveting combination of true crime and social history examines a dozen cases from the 1800s involving thirteen French and English women charged with murder. Each incident was a cause célèbre, and this mixture of scandal and scholarship offers illuminating details of backgrounds, deeds, and trials. "The real delight is that historian Mary S. Hartman does more than reconstruct twelve famous trials. She has written a piece on the social history of nineteenth-century women from an illuminating perspective: their favorite murders." -- Time Magazine"Noteworthy .... It has several distinctions: its expert prose style, its scholarly authority, and its perceptive analysis of the prevailing attitudes toward women's roles and domestic relations."--Criticism"The author would have made a fine detective .... When she observes the women and men in extreme circumstances, she writes with the gift of a novelist and the depth of a scholar." -- Los Angeles Times"Vividly written, meticulously researched." -- Choice"Loved this book and so glad to see it's been returned to print! You can't beat the highly readable scholarly treatment of these 13 Victorian murderesses. Harman does a spectacular job of bringing these women and the carnage they created into the 20th and 21st centuries as well as giving the reader an excellent feminist critique of their reception in scholarly and popular culture. Pour yourself a cup of tea and enjoy the variety of their crimes and their drive to define themselves outside the constrictions of Victorian life." -- Under the Covers and Reading

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and His Essay: The Gospel of Wealth

by Andrew Carnegie

A native of Scotland, Andrew Carnegie emigrated to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in his youth and through voracious reading and personal initiative became one of the richest men in American history. His autobiography recounts the real-life, rags-to-riches tale of an immigrant's rise from telegrapher's clerk to captain of industry and steel magnate. One of the earliest memoirs of an American capitalist, The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie appeared shortly after the 84-year-old author's death in 1919.Industrialist, innovator, scholar, and philanthropist, Carnegie gave away more than 90 percent of his wealth for the establishment of libraries, schools, and hospitals. In addition to describing how he amassed his enormous fortune, his memoirs chronicle the deliberate and systematic distribution of his fortune for the enlightenment and betterment of humanity. This volume includes Carnegie's essay "The Gospel of Wealth," in which he outlines his philanthropic views, stating that "the millionaire will be but a trustee for the poor," bestowing charity on those willing to help themselves.

The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County

by Bob Blaisdell

The great American humorist first came to national attention with the 1865 publication of this short story. Mark Twain relates the tall tale of a gambler and his high-jumping frog, Dan'l Webster. This edition features the original story, a French translation, and Twain's own re-translation of the second version, retaining the French syntax and sentence structure with amusing results.

Rip Van Winkle: A Posthumous Tale of Diedrich Knickerbocker

by Washington Irving

To escape his nagging wife, a henpecked villager goes rambling through the Catskills and encounters mysterious strangers with a powerful liquor. Twenty years later, Rip Van Winkle awakens to find his world forever changed. Washington Irving's evocative 1819 classic of colonial life first appeared in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Other Stories.

The Nature of Statistics

by Prof. Harry V. Roberts W. Allen Wallis George P Shultz

Focusing on everyday applications as well as those of scientific research, this classic of modern statistical methods requires little to no mathematical background. Readers develop basic skills for evaluating and using statistical data. Lively, relevant examples include applications to business, government, social and physical sciences, genetics, medicine, and public health. "W. Allen Wallis and Harry V. Roberts have made statistics fascinating." -- The New York Times "The authors have set out with considerable success, to write a text which would be of interest and value to the student who, not concerned primarily with statistical technics, must understand the nature and methodology of the subject in order to make proper use of its results." -- American Journal of Public Health and the Nation's Health "This book is a distinct and important contribution to the text literature in statistics for social scientists and should be given careful consideration by sociologists." -- American Sociological Review.

Yo-Yo World Trick Book: Featuring 50 of the Most Popular Yo-Yo Tricks

by Harry Baier

Walk the Dog, Rock the Baby, and perform the Robin Hood, Sky Rocket, and Eiffel Tower! This entertaining book features 50 of the most popular Yo-Yo tricks, along with an illustrated history of the toy and its variations. Helpful diagrams accompany the easy instructions, and you'll also find tips for keeping your Yo-Yo in top condition.Author Harry Baier is the creator of the internationally acclaimed Moonstar and Mondial, the Rolls-Royces of Yo-Yos. His complete guide to Yo-Yo tricks can be enjoyed by readers of all ages.

Twelve Years a Slave

by Solomon Northup

The basis for the Academy Award®-winning movie! "A moving, vital testament to one of slavery's 'many thousand gone' who retained his humanity in the bowels of degradation." -- Saturday Review Born a free man in New York State in 1808, Solomon Northup was kidnapped in Washington, DC, in 1841. He spent the next 12 harrowing years of his life as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation. During this time he was frequently abused and often afraid for his life. After regaining his freedom in 1853, Northup decided to publish this gripping autobiographical account of his captivity. As an educated man, Northup was able to present an exceptionally detailed and accurate description of slave life and plantation society. Indeed, this book is probably the fullest, most realistic picture of the "peculiar institution" during the three decades before the Civil War. Moreover, Northup tells his story both from the viewpoint of an outsider, who had experienced 30 years of freedom and dignity in the United States before his capture, and as a slave, reduced to total bondage and submission. Very few personal accounts of American slavery were written by slaves with a similar history. Published in 1853, Northup's book found a ready audience and almost immediately became a bestseller. Aside from its vivid depiction of the detention, transportation, and sale of slaves, Twelve Years a Slave is admired for its classic accounts of cotton and sugar production, its uncannily precise recall of people, times, and places, and the compelling details that re-create the daily routine of slaves in the Gulf South. 7 illustrations. Index. ®

Demonolatry: An Account of the Historical Practice of Witchcraft

by Nicolas Remy Montague Summers E. A. Ashwin

In an era when the church and its people actually believed in a universal infection of heresy and sorcery, they turned to this book for guidance. Daemonolatreiae, first published in France in 1595, was the leading witchcraft handbook of its day. In addition to defining the black arts and their practitioners--making it possible to "recognize" witches--it offered civil and religious authorities directives for persecution of the accused and punishment of the condemned.This book amplified and updated Malleus Maleficarum, the 1486 opus that established trial procedures for charges of heresy and witchcraft. Its author, Nicolas Remy, was a notorious magistrate who boasted of having personally condemned and burned hundreds of witches. Remy's collection of notes, opinions, and court records features lurid details of satanic pacts and sexual perversity as well as the particulars of numerous trials. A work of tremendous historical significance, this volume is complemented by an introduction and notes by Montague Summers, a celebrated occult historian and expert on witchcraft and supernatural lore.

Common LISP: A Gentle Introduction to Symbolic Computation

by David S. Touretzky

This highly accessible introduction to Lisp is suitable both for novices approaching their first programming language and experienced programmers interested in exploring a key tool for artificial intelligence research. The text offers clear, reader-friendly explanations of such essential concepts as cons cell structures, evaluation rules, programs as data, and recursive and applicative programming styles. The treatment incorporates several innovative instructional devices, such as the use of function boxes in the first two chapters to visually distinguish functions from data, use of evaltrace notation in later chapters to illustrate the operation of evaluation rules, and "Dragon stories" to explain recursion. The book contains nearly 400 diagrams and illustrations, and 77 pages of answers to exercises. Advanced topics and "toolkit" sections, and a variety of complete programs, extend readers' programming power.

Henry VIII

by William Shakespeare

The portrait of a monarchy in crisis, this historical drama concerns the famous king's efforts to secure a divorce from his dignified and popular queen in order to marry an enchanting courtesan and produce a male heir. The play ranks among Shakespeare's most sumptuous and spectacular works, offering a splendid pageant of masques and royal ceremony. Occasional lapses in historical accuracy are compensated for by keen psychological and political insights, vivid characterizations, and evocative language.Possibly the last of Shakespeare's dramas, Henry VIII was almost certainly co-written with John Fletcher. It is a play of farewells - to the world, to life, to power - in which major historical characters make memorable exits, including Cardinal Wolsey's rueful observation: "Had I but served my God with half the zeal/I served my king, he would not in mine age/Have left me naked to mine enemies." Nevertheless, the play ends in triumph and hopeful expectations with the prophecy of the coming Elizabethan age.

Troilus and Cressida

by William Shakespeare

A tragedy of jealousy and betrayal as well as a satire of the consequences of greed and lust, this drama unfolds amid the violent desperation of the Trojan War. After seven years of bloodshed, few illusions remain about the glory of war. The fate of two young lovers - Troilus, a Trojan prince, and Cressida, the fickle daughter of a traitorous priest - is intertwined with the exploits of Ulysses, Achilles, and other immortal figures of classical mythology.Based in part on Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, Shakespeare's work offers a darker and more cynical vision than its predecessor. Comic, tragic, and ironic by turns, the drama shifts between the intimacy of the central romance to the broader perspective of the armies' pointless skirmishes. Frequently regarded as the most modern of Shakespeare's dramas, the play debunks heroic ideals and delivers a powerful statement about the futility of war.

Henry IV, Part II

by William Shakespeare

"Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown," laments the sleepless king of Henry IV, Part II. Despite having quelled a rebel army along the Welsh border in Part I, Henry IV faces further insurrections elsewhere in England. His woes are compounded by disturbing reminders of his own mortality as well as the wayward behavior of Prince Hal. The heir to the throne acquitted himself admirably in the battles against the Welsh rebels, but has returned to his old haunts in Eastcheap, where he carouses nightly at the Boar's Head Tavern with the notorious reprobate, Sir John Falstaff.Renowned Shakespeare critic G. B. Harrison pronounced Falstaff "the supreme comic character in all drama . . . who redeems his vices by his incomparable wit and his skill at escaping from every tight corner." The fat knight's humorous quips and antics are balanced by the play's thought-provoking reflections on ambition, guilt, leadership, and responsibility. Rich in sparkling wordplay and historical drama, this tale sets the stage for Henry V.

King John

by William Shakespeare

Amid a backdrop of war, conspiracy, and murder, this historical play depicts the troubled reign of King John, who ruled England from 1199 to 1216. Shakespeare's most enigmatic king struggles with the shifting loyalties of his nobles as well as threats from his covetous heirs and the burdens of his own conscience. The play, which abounds in battles and betrayals, explores issues of politics, inheritance, and legitimacy. John's problems are threefold: he has usurped the throne from the rightful heir, his nephew Arthur; his relationship with the Vatican is troubled; and he is highly unpopular with his own subjects. Shakespeare's portrayal of the despised monarch finds a more heroic figure in Sir Richard Plantagenet, an illegitimate son of Richard I. The Bastard, as John's loyal nephew is known, forms the moral center of the play as well as a source of irreverent humor and honesty. A cynical play about power struggles, King John offers a remarkably contemporary mix of history and ironic commentary, balanced in equal measures by elements of tragedy and satire.

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

by William Shakespeare

Valentine and Proteus are devoted comrades - until they travel to Milan and meet Silvia, the Duke's ravishing daughter. Torn between the bonds of friendship and the lure of romance, the two gentlemen are further bedeviled by Proteus's prior commitment to Julia, his hometown sweetheart, and the Duke's disdain for Valentine. Thus the stage is set for a comic spree involving a daring escape into a forest, capture by outlaws, and the antics of a clown and his dog.Written early in Shakespeare's career, this madcap romp embodies many themes and motifs the playwright would explore at greater depth in his later works. The first of his plays in which the heroine dresses as a boy to seek out her beloved, it's also the first in which the characters retreat to the natural world to brave danger and disorder before achieving harmony, and the first in which passionate youth triumphs over dictatorial elders. And amid its merriment and jests, the play also raises thought-provoking questions about conflicts between friendship and love and the value of forgiveness.

Titus Andronicus

by William Shakespeare

A triumphant general returns to Rome from a war against the Goths and descends into a vicious circle of revenge by refusing to show mercy to his conquered enemy. Blood begets more blood in Titus Andronicus, a fictional drama drawn from a tale by Ovid. Shakespeare styled this early play in the manner of a "revenge tragedy," a genre rooted in classical theater and enormously successful with Elizabethan audiences. Enacting grotesque incidents of rape, murder, and mutilation, this daringly experimental play explores the nature of justice and vengeance.Critical judgment of the drama ranges from dismissal as a panderer's concession to a bloodthirsty mob to praise as a skillful treatment of theatrical violence that examines suffering through the experience of art. Shakespeare's memorable tragedy questions whether revenge is ever justifiable, and its analysis of moral and political issues - betrayal, familial loyalties, sexual violence, nationalism, racism-remains ever relevant.

Henry VI, Part II

by William Shakespeare

Preferring a life of spiritual contemplation, Henry VI leaves politics to his nobles. The resulting power struggle pits the Houses of York and Lancaster against one another for control of the crown. Against a backdrop of violent rebellion, the play explores the relationship between law and justice and the extent of a ruler's authority.The second of three plays based on the life of England's fifteenth-century monarch, this historical drama chronicles the conflicts behind the War of the Roses. Each part of the trilogy is self-contained and can be appreciated without knowledge of the others. Vivid characterization, dark comedy, and powerful language combine for a memorable portrait of a country devastated by civil war.

The Charles

by Arthur Bernon Tourtellot Ernest J. Donnelly

"Thou hast been a generous giver," wrote Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in "To the River Charles," a poetic celebration of the eastern Massachusetts watercourse. Rich in intriguing and amusing anecdotes, this illustrated history traces the Charles's path to the sea through rocky gorges and vast meadows, along with the river's contributions to America's cultural development. Profiles of those who dwelt along the banks range from colonial settlers in the Boston, Charlestown, and Cambridge areas to more recent residents -- Captain John Smith, Governor Winthrop, and John Harvard as well as Longfellow, Robert Lowell, and many others.Arthur Bernon Tourtellot recounts the Charles's role in national affairs, including the protective advantages the river offered to colonists during the Revolutionary War. He chronicles the riverside industrial boom of the 1800s, the twentieth-century decline, and the valley's reversion to provincialism. His highly readable narrative also explores the river's influence on the painters, poets, and philosophers of New England's golden age.

The Slang of Poker

by Peter Donahue Tom Dalzell

An equal-opportunity pastime, poker is played everywhere from country clubs to penitentiaries and has even developed into a spectator sport. In this entertaining gift book for poker fanatics and students of American vernacular, a cultural historian and slang authority offers a compendium of traditional poker slang, as well as the new vocabulary of online poker and jargon from high-stakes tournaments.

Snappy Critters: Easy-to-Make Plush Toys

by Ted Menten

Expert toymaker Ted Menten shows how to make 14 cute little critters, each held together by snaps. The snappy approach allows mixing and matching of heads, arms, and legs--and it assists with attaching a variety of charming accessories, including such seasonal items as valentines, Christmas stockings, and Easter eggs. Well-illustrated, simple instructions make assembling these lovable toys a snap!Beginners and veteran crafters alike will love creating these creatures, which include a puppy, lion, tiger, lamb, panda, squirrel, elephant, and other animals. Nothing expresses affection like a handcrafted present, and these adorable plush toys make wonderful, one-of-a-kind gifts.

Special Matrices and Their Applications in Numerical Mathematics: Second Edition

by Miroslav Fiedler

This revised and corrected second edition of a classic book on special matrices provides researchers in numerical linear algebra and students of general computational mathematics with an essential reference.Author Miroslav Fiedler, a Professor at the Institute of Computer Science of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, begins with definitions of basic concepts of the theory of matrices and fundamental theorems. In subsequent chapters, he explores symmetric and Hermitian matrices, the mutual connections between graphs and matrices, and the theory of entrywise nonnegative matrices. After introducing M-matrices, or matrices of class K, Professor Fiedler discusses important properties of tensor products of matrices and compound matrices and describes the matricial representation of polynomials. He further defines band matrices and norms of vectors and matrices. The final five chapters treat selected numerical methods for solving problems from the field of linear algebra, using the concepts and results explained in the preceding chapters.

Essays on Teaching

by Bob Blaisdell

Rich in insights and inspiration, this anthology surveys the challenges and rewards of teaching. Contributions range from essays by renowned educators such as Pestalozzi, Froebel, Montessori, and Neill to the philosophical observations of Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, and Russell. Writings by Tolstoy, Emerson, and D. H. Lawrence appear alongside those of contemporary teachers, including Taylor Mali, Elizabeth Gold, and Philip Schultz, who reflect on their experiences with honesty, humor, and wonder.In addition to essays, this compilation draws upon letters, diaries, commencement addresses, memoirs, and poetry, all of which portray the dynamics of teaching. Editor Bob Blaisdell provides brief introductions to the contributors and their works and contributes an essay as well. Teachers, professors, and students will welcome this thought-provoking anthology, as will others interested in the history and philosophy of education.

Essays on Immigration

by Bob Blaisdell

"In America, everything was possible," recalls Louis Adamic of Slovenia. "There even the common people were 'citizens,' not 'subjects' . . . a citizen, or even a non-citizen foreigner, could walk up to the President of the United States and pump his hand. Indeed, that seemed to be a custom in America."The history and experience of immigration remain central to American culture, past and present. This anthology surveys the recollections of emigrants from around the world who sought new lives in the United States. Their stories range in mood and setting from the misery of an Englishman in colonial Virginia, bound by indentured servitude, to the cultural commentary of an Iranian woman in California. Poignant, eye-opening reflections include those of a Polish sweatshop laborer, a Chinese businessman, an Italian bootblack, and a Ukrainian musician, in addition to observations and reminiscences by Jacob Riis, Edwidge Danticat, Junot Díaz, and other well-known authors.

Crochet Workshop

by James Walters

An outstanding guide for crocheters of all levels, this volume covers all aspects of crochet stitches and technique. The perfect introduction to the craft, the down-to-earth guide is also a terrific resource for more experienced practitioners seeking to develop new design ideas. Profusely illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and photographs.

A Beginner's Guide to Mathematical Logic

by Raymond M. Smullyan

Combining stories of great writers and philosophers with quotations and riddles, this completely original text for first courses in mathematical logic examines problems related to proofs, propositional logic and first-order logic, undecidability, and other topics. 2013 edition.

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