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Ontario 1610-1985

by Randall White

If Ontario is the land that is ours to discover then surely Randall White has written a book of discovery. Ontario 1610-1985 fulfills the need for a comprehensive text that chronicles the history of one of the founding provinces of Confederation, a province that has provided a vital legacy for Canada. Ontario 1610-1985 is for the general reader and an invaluable text for teachers and students of Canadian and Ontario history. Randall white concentrates his account of Ontario’s past and present on the political and economic events that have shaped the province. The book is supplemented with annotated photographs and illustrations that highlight the social and cultural context.

Newmarket: The Heart of York Region

by Robert Terence Carter

In the early 1800s, Timothy Robers, a Quaker millwright from Vermont, drew a flourishing community of fellow Quakers to the area which became the new-market for settles and traders. It soon became the commercial hub of a rich farming area. By the mid-1800s it was a central point on the Ontario, Simcoe, and Huron Railway. Over the following decades, gas deposits were confirmed there and a barge canal was built along with a street railway. In the early 20th century Newmarket languished through a long period of slow growth — wars and the Depression took a terrible toll on the small town. Yet in the 1940s it was another war that brought thousands of soldiers to Newmarket’s training camp on their way to battlefields in Europe. It took the 1960s to bring real prosperity — builders began developing the inexpensive land, industries came, and the town flourished. The pace of construction continued through the 1980s as Newmarket prepared for its busy life of today.

More Battlefields of Canada

by Mary Beacock Fryer

More Battlefields of Canada is a sequel to Mary Beacock Fryers bestselling Battlefields of Canada. Like it’s predecessor, this volume covers nearly three hundred years of history and covers the most significant - as well as some of the most comic and bizarre - Canadian battles. Illustrated with sketches, photographs and detailed maps, the individual chapters begin by setting the context of the battle in terms of the larger struggle. The reader is then taken on to the battlefield with an hour by hour account. A brief conclusion to each chapter assesses the consequences for the victor and the loser, assigning each battle it’s place in Canadian history. Not all the battles re-created in this volume were fought in Canada. Some took place in the United states, and there is also an account of the Canadian experience in Hong Kong in 1941.A detailed chronology provides a comprehensive list of every Canadian battle since the 1600’s.

Escaping Hell: The story of a Polish underground officer in Auschwitz and Buchenwald

by Kon Pierkarski

Escaping Hell is the compelling and true story of a heroic young Polish officer who survived the terror of five years in the prisons of Auschwitz and Buchenwald – where violence was meaningless because human life had lost all value. During World War II, Kon Piekarski was a member of the Polish Underground Army, a clandestine resistance movement which operated even inside Auschwitz – organizing spectacular escapes, operating a secret radio network and matching wits with the Gestapo. After Auschwitz, Piekarski became a prisoner of war at Buchenwald and spent time working in a factory where Russian prisoners of war were used for labour. In the face of constant danger, he and his comrades took every possible opportunity to sabotage the German war industry. He was finally transferred to a small camp near the French border, and escaped three months before the end of the war.

Careless at Work: Selected Canadian historical studies

by J.M.S. Careless

This sampling of the work of J.M.S. Careless in the area of Canadian historical studies was selected by the eminent scholar himself, and represents much of his finest work. The collection spans the years from 1940 to 1990 in the long and distinguished career of one of Canada’s best-known historians. In Careless’s own words, History is dated. Its very claim is that the past does not fade into nothing but continues to matter, whether or not the purely present-minded are able to recognize that basic fact. These essays cover the main lines of Careless’s career in Canadian scholarship. The collection is divided into four general subject areas each covering a main preoccupation in a distinguished career of over forty years. The first section concentrates on the earliest theme in his writing, George Brown and his times. The second centres on exploring various aspects of frontierism and metropolitanism in Canadian history. The third part deals with cities and regions focusing particularly on the West and nineteenth century Ontario. The final section picks up the threads of other themes including limited identities Canada and multiculturalism.

I Remember Sunnyside

by Mike Filey

First published in 1982, I Remember Sunnyside is a mine of golden memories, bringing back to life an earlier Toronto, only hints of which remain today.Like the city itself, Sunnyside was an everchanging landscape from its heady opening days in the early 1920s to its final sad demolition in the 1950s. The book captures the spirit of the best of times a magical era which can only be recaptured in memory and photographs. It also presents the reality of a newer Toronto where change, although necessary, is sometimes regrettable.

Opportunity Road: Yonge Street 1860-1939

by F. R. Hamish Berchem

This important original work with stylish illustrations by the author/artist F.R. (Hamish) Berchem, promises to be a worthy sequel to his earlier book on Yonge Street, The Yonge Street Story 1793-1860 (now out of print).The fascinating story of Yonge Street has involved an endless array of memorable personalities including the young reporter Charles Dickens; publisher J. Ross Robertson; successful Scots merchants John MacDonald, John Catto, Robert Simpson and Irishman Timothy Eaton; coal and wood merchant Elias Rogers; Hessian officer Frederic, Baron de Hoen; theatre magnate Ambrose Small; and soldier, financier, philanthropist Major General Sir Henry Pellatt.This is also the story of some of the communities that dot the northward route of Yonge Street from Toronto - Richmond Hill, Thornhill, Aurora, Newmarket, Holland Landing, Bradford and Penetanguishene, the latter for many years the northern terminus of Yonge Street. Today, as Highway 11, the world’s longest street winds its way through Ontario’s "Near North" to Rainy River, a remarkable tribute to the vision of Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe.

Canada's Parliament Buildings

by Mark Bourrie

Three beautiful gothic buildings loom over the Ottawa River just below the historic Chaudiere Falls. They are the seat of Canada’s federal government, visited by thousands of people each year. Canada’s Parliament Buildings, filled with heraldry and history, instill pride in our country and give visitors a deep sense of being Canadian. Constructed in controversy, and steeped in decades of political lore, the Parliament Buildings have been the stage for the evolution of Canada from a small colony to one of the great nations of the world. This fascinating book takes you behind the scenes of Parliament Hill, examines the architecture, heraldry, and history of the buildings, and gives readers an understanding of the important role of Parliament in our society. Profusely illustrated with contemporary and historic photographs, this beautiful book belongs on the shelf of everyone who has toured the Parliament Buildings. It will also appeal to those interested in Canadian history and politics.

Constabulary: The Rise of Police Institutions in Britain, the Commonwealth and the United States

by Hereward Senior

The insular character of Britain delayed the creation of professional police until the 19th century. This volume traces the course of British amateur policing until that time, at which point it deals with the foundation of the London Metropolitan Police and efforts to create similar professional urban institutions in New York and Montreal.Due attention is also given to the fact that very different conditions in rural Ireland necessitated the creation of a para-military type of force, which in turn served as the model for police in the countryside throughout the Empire.The nature of these derivative organizations and the way they were able to serve the needs of such varied societies as India, Australia, South Africa and Canada are examined. The several alternatives to Irish-style police which were attempted in the United States - Texas Rangers, private detective agencies, sheriffs, marshalls, and vigilante committees - are also considered. The point of this work is to present a comparative study of law enforcement agencies with a Common Law tradition working in otherwise considerably different countries.

Not All of Us Were Brave

by Stanley Scislowski

This is the story of a young man’s journey through World War II. It covers a wide cross section of the strengths and weaknesses of young men not attuned to killing, and not mentally prepared to face the horror of seeing their close friends die violent deaths in battle. The story is about the hopes, the prayers, the fears, the daily miseries and even the lighter moments that the aspiring heroes of the Perth Regiment experienced on the Italian front as part of 11th Infantry Brigade, 5th Canadian Armoured Division.As the title suggests, from his first battle inoculation Private Stan Scislowski realizes he is not destined for the heroic role to which he once aspired. His fears affect him deeply: his burning dream of returning home a national hero becomes more and more improbable, and his attempts to come to terms with his un-heroic nature make the war as much a mental battle as a physical one. His story is much like that of the overwhelming number of Canadians who found themselves in the cauldron of war, serving their country with all the strength they could find, even when that strength was fading fast.Not All of Us Were Brave focuses not on the heroes, but on the ordinary soldiers who endured the mud, the misery, the ever-present fear, the inspiration, and the degradation. The narrative holds nothing back: the dirty linen is aired along with the clean; the light is shown alongside the dark. It shows what war is all about.

"C" Force to Hong Kong: A Canadian Catastrophe

by Brereton Greenhous

This is the story of a “no military risk” campaign that slowly turned into a nightmare. The book provides new answers to a number of difficult questions beginning with a discussion of why Canadian troops were sent to Hong Kong at the request of the British War Office. Were the British duplicitous in making this request? Was Canadian Chief of the General Staff, Lieutenant-General Harry Crerar, guilty of putting his own interests above those of his men in telling the minister of National Defence that there was “no military risk” in sending the “C” Force? The book recounts the formation of the “C” Force and its departure to Hong Kong where it arrived just three weeks before the Japanese attack. It outlines the course of the battle from December 8, 1941, until the inevitable surrender of the garrison on Christmas Day. It places appropriate emphasis on the Canadian contribution, refuting 1947 allegations by the British General-Officer-Commanding — allegations which were only made public in 1993 — that the Canadians did not fight well. Greenhous attacks these charges with solid evidence from participants and eye-witnesses. Finally, the book tells the story of life and death in the prison camps of Hong Kong and Japan.

Bowmanville: A Small Town at the Edge

by William Humber

William Humber’s Bowmanville: A Small Town at the Edge is an extraordinarily detailed, often affectionate and occasionally critical account of a modern small town on the edge of a rapidly expanding metropolitan region. The book recounts stories from the time of Charles Bowman, the potential ambition of railroads from Lake Ontario to Georgian Bay, the legacy of grand pianos found in every corner of the world and the fateful decision of a rural businessman which gave General Motors to another community. A treat for small-town enthusiasts, urban designers and community activists, Humber’s book provides a fresh look at the present life of small towns and how their character can be recreated in future decision making. "When I first started broadcasting baseball, I read everything and anything related to the game. I kept encountering the name William Humber. When I finally met him in person I understood his passion and love for and knowledge of the game is indeed genuine. That passion obviously extends beyond baseball and is evident in his writing on his adopted hometown of Bowmanville, Ontario." - Brian Williams, CBC television sports announcer

Toronto Sketches 5: The Way We Were

by Mike Filey

Mike Filey’s "The Way We Were" column in the Toronto Sun continues to be one of the paper’s most popular features. In Toronto Sketches 5, the fifth volume in Dundurn Press’s Toronto Sketches series, Filey brings together some of the best of his columns from 1996 and 1997.Each column looks at Toronto as it was, and contributes to our understanding of how Toronto became what it is. Illustrated with photographs of the city’s people and places of the past, Toronto Sketches 5 is a nostalgic journey for the long-time Torontonian, and a voyage of discovery for the newcomer.

Brockville: The River City

by Russ Disotell

Brockville’s origins reach back to the resettlement of Loyalists following the American Revolution and the threat of American encroachment. Following the War of 1812, Brockville, along the St. Lawrence River, benefitted greatly from the rapidly expanding colonization. A centre for the political activity of the day and a focal point for the Orange movement, Brockville was often immersed in controversy.The end of the 19th century was the golden age of patent medicine business and Brockville was home to two of the most successful, the W. H. Comstock Company and the G. T. Fulford Company. "Pink Pills for Pale People" were sold worldwide. Today, Brockville retains the charm of its heritage mansions and is home to a number of prominent industries.

Le Service naval du Canada, 1910-2010: Cent ans d'histoire

by The Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean Richard H. Gimblett

La Marine canadienne a eu 100 ans en 2010, et le Canada a fièrement célébré cet anniversaire. Connue officiellement jusqu’en 1968 comme la Marine royale du Canada, et après comme le Commandement maritime des Forces canadiennes, le service naval du Canada a joué un rôle important dans le développement et la securité de notre pays. Son Excellence la gourverneure générale Michaelle Jean, commandante en chef des Forces canadiennes, a écrit l’avant-propos de cet ouvrage commémoratif richement illustré. Dans cette collection d’articles, tous écrits par d’éminents historiens specialistes de leur période, chaque chapitre est consacré à une période de l’histoire de la Marine: ses origines remontant à 1867, les deux guerres mondiales, la guerre de Corée, la Guerre froide, et sur l’avenir de la Marine ; il y a également un chapitre sur les oeuvres des peintres de guerre. Les auteurs des chapitres font référence à une multitude d’archives et d’ouvrages d’autres auteurs dans leurs écrits. Ce livre se veut un tour d’horizon général qui saura plaire à de nombreux lecteurs, notamment les passionnés de marine, les anciens de la marine et leur famille, les historiens et les bibliothécaires.

No Lack of Courage: Operation Medusa, Afghanistan

by R. J. Hillier Colonel Bernd Horn

No Lack of Courage is the story of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s Operation Medusa, the largely Canadian action in Afghanistan from 1 to 17 September 2006, to dislodge a heavily entrenched Taliban force in the Pashmul district of Afghanistans Kandahar Province. At stake, according to senior Afghan politicians and NATO military commanders, was nothing less than the very existence of the reconstituted state of Afghanistan, as well as the NATO alliance itself. In a bitterly fought conflict that lasted more than two weeks, Canadian, Afghan, and Coalition troops defeated the dug-in enemy forces and chased them from the Pashmul area. In the end, the brunt of the fighting fell on the Canadians, and the operation that saved Afghanistan exacted a great cost. However, the battle also demonstrated that Canada had shed its peacekeeping mythology and was once more ready to commit troops deliberately to combat. Moreover, it revealed yet again that Canadian soldiers have no lack of courage.

Sailing Seven Seas: A History of the Canadian Pacific Line

by Peter Pigott

Under Canadian Pacific’s red-and-white-checkered flag, the company’s founders, George Stephen and William C. Van Horne, created a rail-sea service from Liverpool to Hong Kong. Boasting sternwheelers, Great Lakes bulk carriers, ferries, and luxurious ocean-going liner leviathans, the Canadian Pacific shipping line sailed around the globe. In both world wars the entire fleet served gallantly as Allied troop carriers. After the Second World War, the company staved off the realities of the jet age for as long as it could, replacing liners with container ships, until what was left of the legendary maritime operation was sold off in 2005. With a witty and informative style, author Peter Pigott evokes not only the nostalgic heyday of ocean travel but reveals a slice of almost-forgotten Canadiana. From the stifling steerage quarters of immigrant ships to the elegant drawing rooms of nautical titans such as the ill-fated Empress of Ireland and the Empress of Asia, from U-boat-haunted convoys to container ships, shore dwellers and old salts alike will be delighted with Sailing Seven Seas.

Props on Her Sleeve: The Wartime Letters of a Canadian Airwoman

by Mary Hawkins Buch Carolyn Gossage

A first-hand account of the experiences of a young Canadian airwoman who served both in Canada and on overseas duty, this series of 150 letters brings home the day-to-day immediacy of life in uniform during the Second World War. Moments of hilarity interspersed with impatience and frustration are recorded verbatim, along with an underlying sense of urgency about winning a war that hung in the balance for too long. Written to the Dead of Women at Macdonald College in Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Mary Buch’s letters lay untouched for over fifty years after her return to Canada from England in 1945. Today they serve as a looking-glass into the War Years that is tinged with the freshness of youthful spontaneity and the promise of a brighter tomorrow. Carolyn Gossage has interwoven colourful contextual sidebars that provide today’s reader with an overview of times and circumstances that have become increasingly elusive in the intervening years.

Canadian Nuclear Weapons: The Untold Story of Canada's Cold War Arsenal

by John Clearwater

"We are thus not only the first country in the world with the capability to produce nuclear weapons that chose not to do so, we are also the first nuclear armed country to have chosen to divest itself of nuclear weapons."Pierre Trudeau United Nations, 26 May 1978From 1963 to 1984, US nuclear warheads armed Canadian weapons systems in both Canada and West Germany. It is likely that during the early part of this period, the Canadian military was putting more effort, money, and manpower into the nuclear commitment than any other single activity. This important book is an operational-technical history and exposÈ of this period.Its purpose is to bring together until-recently secret information about the nature of the nuclear arsenal in Canada, and combine it with known information about the systems in the US nuclear arsenal. The work begins with an account of the efforts of the Pearson government to sign the agreement with the US necessary to bring nuclear weapons to Canada. Subsequent chapters provide a detailed discussion of the four nuclear weapons systems deployed by Canada: the BOMARC surface-to-air guided interceptor missile; the Honest John short range battlefield rocket; the Starfighter tactical thermonuclear bomber; the VooDoo-Genie air defence system. Each chapter also includes a section on the accidents and incidents which occurred while the weapons were at Canadian sites. The final chapter covers the ultimately futile efforts of the Maritime Air Command and the Royal Canadian Navy to acquire nuclear weapons. An appendix includes the text of the until-now secret agreements Canada signed with the USA for the provision of nuclear weapons.Illustrated throughout with photographs and diagrams, and supported by extensive transcriptions of original documents, Canadian Nuclear Weapons will be of great value both to scholars and interested laypersons in its presentation of what has been a deeply hidden secret of Canadian political and military history.

Almaguin: A Highland History

by Astrid Taim

The Almaguin Highlands, an extensive territory covering a 90 km corridor from Huntsville, north to Callander, west to Dunchurch and east to the Algonquin Park border, is a land rich with lakes, rivers and a lively history. Once considered as a possibility for a government Indian Reserve in the early 1800s, Almaguin became a centre for lumbering and ultimately a year-round mecca for outdoor enthusiasts.Almaguin: A Highland History offers a wide range of stories from the opening of the area by colonization roads to the first vessels on the Magnetawan River and the courage of the early pioneers. Included are community histories of the many towns, villages and ghost towns of today, profiles of colourful personalities, as well as interesting and amusing tales of these rugged early times.

Call in Pinkerton's: American Detectives at Work for Canada

by David Ricardo Williams

Soon after Allan Pinkerton established his legendary detective agency in the United States, Canadians began seeking their services. Call in Pinkerton’s is the history of the agency’s work on behalf of Canadian governments and police forces. During the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, Pinkerton’s operatives hunted legendary train robber Bill Miner in the woods of British Columbia, infiltrated German spy rings during World War I, and helped future prime minister John A. Macdonald to fend off the Fenian raids. They tracked down the Reno Brothers in Windsor, Ontario, and investigated labour unrest in Hamilton. The agency’s detectives countered crimes all over Canada, particularly in the West and British Columbia. Pinkerton’s activities went as far north as the Yukon, where fears were growing of an imminent invasion by a force of Americans from Alaska. Call in Pinkerton’s is the first book to chronicle the agency’s work on behalf of Canadian governments and police forces. This entertaining book provides accounts of actual Pinkerton’s investigations while detailing the day-to-day activities of a private detective at work. Call in Pinkerton’s is a fascinating read for anyone with an interest in crime and espionage.

Flim Flam: Canada's Greatest Frauds, Scams, and Con Artists

by Mark Bourrie

Flim Flam explores the world of Canadian white-collar crime, a place inhabited by hustlers, wild gamblers, and crazy dreamers. It takes the reader to the Vancouver Stock Exchange, where dream salesmen have peddled wild stories of easy money, through the "moose pasture" scams of northern Canada, to the con artists who have been drawn to Toronto’s financial district. Along the way, you’ll meet crooked politicians, a young con man who confessed to a church congregation after he was "born again," disbarred lawyers, and the creator of a huge paper fortune who was left with nothing but a wolfskin coat when his real estate empire fell apart. Greed is a powerful motivator that has taken some Canadians down strange roads. Some have ended up pocketing millions, but many more of Canada’s con artists have self-destructed, taking with them the fortunes of the people they bilked. In the end, they’ve usually fooled themselves, too. Flim Flam shows that Canadians aren’t nearly as dull as we’d like to believe. When it comes to conning each other, we have some of the most colourful and interesting hucksters in the world. This book contains stories from all regions of the country. It will appeal to business and true-crime readers, as well as people who are students of human nature.

Destined to Survive: A Dieppe Veteran's Story

by Jayne Turvey Poolton Jack A. Poolton

Private Jack Poolton was among the Canadians landing at the disastrous raid on Dieppe. Fortunate to have survived, Jack was taken to a prisoner of war camp in Germany. In Destined to Survive: A Dieppe Veteran’s Story, Jack Poolton relates the story of his training, capture, and experiences in the POW camp. We follow Jack’s three escape attempts, and his subsequent punishment. And we share his elation when Jack and his fellow prisoners are liberated by American soldiers.Poolton and the other POWs never lost their desire to escape. Throughout the ordeal, Jack dreamed of one day celebrating the end of the war, and an allied victory. He eventually celebrated V-E Day in England.Written as a tribute to the fifty-fifth anniversary of the Dieppe Raid, Destined to Survive is an extraordinary contribution to Canadian military history. Poolton’s honest prose reveals the emotions of a man devoted to King and country, and determined to survive at all costs. The gripping account brings the reader to a new understanding about soldiers, prisoners, and war.

Hard Oiler!: The Story of Canadians' Quest for Oil at Home and Abroad

by Gary May

A hard-luck Yankee fortune seeker. A Hamilton wagon maker hoping to sell cars to the new railways. A howling swamp so isolated and foul that pioneer farmers had steered it a wide miss. An unlikely trio indeed. And yet these three seemingly unconnected elements came together at just the right moment in time, to create one of the great but little known stories of Canada’s early years.Hard Oiler! is the story of how oil was discovered near Sarnia, Ontario, one hundred and forty years ago, and how the subsequent exploitation of that oil gave birth to what is arguably the world’s most important industry today.This great Canadian milestone can be traced back to the summer of 1858 when James Miller Williams struck oil in Lambton County, in Southwestern Ontario. Soon thereafter Williams dug the first commercial oil well in North America - if not the world - and began refining and marketing his product as machine lubricant and lighting oil. This set off a chain of events that resulted in the establishment of an industry on which our very life today is so heavily dependent.Hard Oiler! traces these events including the gold rush-like frenzy that saw the overnight rise and decline of the frontier town of Oil Springs, and the creation of the much more permanent community of Petrolia, which still flashes its Victorian charm to this day. It also recalls the exotic adventures of Lambton oil drillers as they travelled the globe opening up oil fields from Java to the Ukraine, and from America to Venezuela and the Middle East.

200 Years Yonge: A History

by Ralph Magel

The Yonge Street as conceived by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe is celebrated, from its beginning as a First Nation’s Trail, to the Yonge Street we know today, extending from Toronto to Innisfil. Augustus Jones, the surveyor assigned by Simcoe, the French, the German pioneers, the Loyalists – all were to influence the building of Yonge Street. With the building of a route came tolls, inns, villages, more immigrants and ultimately an avenue of economy serving as the key transportation route for the people, goods and services that represent our province.

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