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Planters, Merchants, and Slaves: Plantation Societies in British America, 1650-1820

by Trevor Burnard

As with any enterprise involving violence and lots of money, running a plantation in early British America was a serious and brutal enterprise. Beyond resources and weapons, a plantation required a significant force of cruel and rapacious men--men who, as Trevor Burnard sees it, lacked any better options for making money. In the contentious Planters, Merchants, and Slaves, Burnard argues that white men did not choose to develop and maintain the plantation system out of virulent racism or sadism, but rather out of economic logic because--to speak bluntly--it worked. These economically successful and ethically monstrous plantations required racial divisions to exist, but their successes were always measured in gold, rather than skin or blood. Burnard argues that the best example of plantations functioning as intended is not those found in the fractious and poor North American colonies, but those in their booming and integrated commercial hub, Jamaica. Sure to be controversial, this book is a major intervention in the scholarship on slavery, economic development, and political power in early British America, mounting a powerful and original argument that boldly challenges historical orthodoxy.

Peak Oil: Apocalyptic Environmentalism and Libertarian Political Culture

by Matthew Schneider-Mayerson

In recent years, the concept of "peak oil"--the moment when global oil production peaks and a train of economic, social, and political catastrophes accompany its subsequent decline--has captured the imagination of a surprisingly large number of Americans, ordinary citizens as well as scholars, and created a quiet, yet intense underground movement. In Peak Oil, Matthew Schneider-Mayerson takes readers deep inside the world of "peakists," showing how their hopes and fears about the postcarbon future led them to prepare for the social breakdown they foresee--all of which are fervently discussed and debated via websites, online forums, videos, and novels. By exploring the worldview of peakists, and the unexpected way that the fear of peak oil and climate change transformed many members of this left-leaning group into survivalists, Schneider-Mayerson builds a larger analysis of the rise of libertarianism, the role of oil in modern life, the political impact of digital technologies, the racial and gender dynamics of post-apocalyptic fantasies, and the social organization of environmental denial.

Political Peoplehood: The Roles of Values, Interests, and Identities

by Rogers M. Smith

For more than three decades, Rogers M. Smith has been one of the leading scholars of the role of ideas in American politics, policies, and history. Over time, he has developed the concept of "political peoples," a category that is much broader and more fluid than legal citizenship, enabling Smith to offer rich new analyses of political communities, governing institutions, public policies, and moral debates. This book gathers Smith's most important writings on peoplehood to build a coherent theoretical and historical account of what peoplehood has meant in American political life, informed by frequent comparisons to other political societies. From the revolutionary-era adoption of individual rights rhetoric to today's battles over the place of immigrants in a rapidly diversifying American society, Smith shows how modern America's growing embrace of overlapping identities is in tension with the providentialism and exceptionalism that continue to make up so much of what many believe it means to be an American. A major work that brings a lifetime of thought to bear on questions that are as urgent now as they have ever been, Political Peoplehood will be essential reading for social scientists, political philosophers, policy analysts, and historians alike.

Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth-Century America

by April R. Haynes

Nineteenth-century America saw numerous campaigns against masturbation, which was said to cause illness, insanity, and even death. Riotous Flesh explores women's leadership of those movements, with a specific focus on their rhetorical, social, and political effects, showing how a desire to transform the politics of sex created unexpected alliances between groups that otherwise had very different goals. As April R. Haynes shows, the crusade against female masturbation was rooted in a generally shared agreement on some major points: that girls and women were as susceptible to masturbation as boys and men; that "self-abuse" was rooted in a lack of sexual information; and that sex education could empower women and girls to master their own bodies. Yet the groups who made this education their goal ranged widely, from "ultra" utopians and nascent feminists to black abolitionists. Riotous Flesh explains how and why diverse women came together to popularize, then institutionalize, the condemnation of masturbation, well before the advent of sexology or the professionalization of medicine.

Robert Schumann: The Life and Work of a Romantic Composer

by Martin Geck

Robert Schumann (1810-56) is one of the most important and representative composers of the Romantic era. Born in Zwickau, Germany, Schumann began piano instruction at age seven and immediately developed a passion for music. When a permanent injury to his hand prevented him from pursuing a career as a touring concert pianist, he turned his energies and talents to composing, writing hundreds of works for piano and voice, as well as four symphonies and an opera. Here acclaimed biographer Martin Geck tells the fascinating story of this multifaceted genius, set in the context of the political and social revolutions of his time. The image of Schumann the man and the artist that emerges in Geck's book is complex. Geck shows Schumann to be not only a major composer and music critic-he cofounded and wrote articles for the controversial Neue Zeitschrift für Musik­­-but also a political activist, the father of eight children, and an addict of mind-altering drugs. Through hard work and determination bordering on the obsessive, Schumann was able to control his demons and channel the tensions that seethed within him into music that mixes the popular and esoteric, resulting in compositions that require the creative engagement of reader and listener. The more we know about a composer, the more we hear his personality in his music, even if it is above all on the strength of his work that we love and admire him. Martin Geck's book on Schumann is not just another rehashing of Schumann's life and works, but an intelligent, personal interpretation of the composer as a musical, literary, and cultural personality.

Concrete Revolution: Large Dams, Cold War Geopolitics, and the US Bureau of Reclamation

by Christopher Sneddon

Water may seem innocuous, but as a universal necessity, it inevitably intersects with politics when it comes to acquisition, control, and associated technologies. While we know a great deal about the socioecological costs and benefits of modern dams, we know far less about their political origins and ramifications. In Concrete Revolution, Christopher Sneddon offers a corrective: a compelling historical account of the US Bureau of Reclamation's contributions to dam technology, Cold War politics, and the social and environmental adversity perpetuated by the US government in its pursuit of economic growth and geopolitical power. Founded in 1902, the Bureau became enmeshed in the US State Department's push for geopolitical power following World War II, a response to the Soviet Union's increasing global sway. By offering technical and water resource management advice to the world's underdeveloped regions, the Bureau found that it could not only provide them with economic assistance and the United States with investment opportunities, but also forge alliances and shore up a country's global standing in the face of burgeoning communist influence. Drawing on a number of international case studies--from the Bureau's early forays into overseas development and the launch of its Foreign Activities Office in 1950 to the Blue Nile investigation in Ethiopia--Concrete Revolution offers insights into this historic damming boom, with vital implications for the present. If, Sneddon argues, we can understand dams as both technical and political objects rather than instruments of impartial science, we can better participate in current debates about large dams and river basin planning.

Aristotle's Politics: Living Well and Living Together

by Eugene Garver

"Man is a political animal," Aristotle asserts near the beginning of the Politics. In this novel reading of one of the foundational texts of political philosophy, Eugene Garver traces the surprising implications of Aristotle's claim and explores the treatise's relevance to ongoing political concerns. Often dismissed as overly grounded in Aristotle's specific moment in time, in fact the Politics challenges contemporary understandings of human action and allows us to better see ourselves today. Close examination of Aristotle's treatise, Garver finds, reveals a significant, practical role for philosophy to play in politics. Philosophers present arguments about issues--such as the right and the good, justice and modes of governance, the relation between the good person and the good citizen, and the character of a good life--that politicians must then make appealing to their fellow citizens. Completing Garver's trilogy on Aristotle's unique vision, Aristotle's Politics yields new ways of thinking about ethics and politics, ancient and modern.

Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment

by Yarimar Bonilla

As an overseas department of France, Guadeloupe is one of a handful of non-independent societies in the Caribbean that seem like political exceptions--or even paradoxes--in our current postcolonial era. In Non-Sovereign Futures, Yarimar Bonilla wrestles with the conceptual arsenal of political modernity--challenging contemporary notions of freedom, sovereignty, nationalism, and revolution--in order to recast Guadeloupe not as a problematically non-sovereign site but as a place that can unsettle how we think of sovereignty itself. Through a deep ethnography of Guadeloupean labor activism, Bonilla examines how Caribbean political actors navigate the conflicting norms and desires produced by the modernist project of postcolonial sovereignty. Exploring the political and historical imaginaries of activist communities, she examines their attempts to forge new visions for the future by reconfiguring narratives of the past, especially the histories of colonialism and slavery. Drawing from nearly a decade of ethnographic research, she shows that political participation--even in failed movements--has social impacts beyond simple material or economic gains. Ultimately, she uses the cases of Guadeloupe and the Caribbean at large to offer a more sophisticated conception of the possibilities of sovereignty in the postcolonial era.

The Culture of Control: Crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society

by David Garland

The past 30 years have seen vast changes in our attitudes toward crime. More and more of us live in gated communities; prison populations have skyrocketed; and issues such as racial profiling, community policing, and "zero-tolerance" policies dominate the headlines. How is it that our response to crime and our sense of criminal justice has come to be so dramatically reconfigured? David Garland charts the changes in crime and criminal justice in America and Britain over the past twenty-five years, showing how they have been shaped by two underlying social forces: the distinctive social organization of late modernity and the neoconservative politics that came to dominate the United States and the United Kingdom in the 1980s. Garland explains how the new policies of crime and punishment, welfare and security--and the changing class, race, and gender relations that underpin them--are linked to the fundamental problems of governing contemporary societies, as states, corporations, and private citizens grapple with a volatile economy and a culture that combines expanded personal freedom with relaxed social controls. It is the risky, unfixed character of modern life that underlies our accelerating concern with control and crime control in particular. It is not just crime that has changed; society has changed as well, and this transformation has reshaped criminological thought, public policy, and the cultural meaning of crime and criminals. David Garland'sThe Culture of Controloffers a brilliant guide to this process and its still-reverberating consequences.

Punishment and Modern Society

by David Garland

In this path-breaking book, David Garland argues that punishment is a complex social institution that affects both social relations and cultural meanings. Drawing on theorists from Durkheim to Foucault, he insightfully critiques the entire spectrum of social thought concerning punishment, and reworks it into a new interpretive synthesis. "Punishment and Modern Society is an outstanding delineation of the sociology of punishment. At last the process that is surely the heart and soul of criminology, and perhaps of sociology as well--punishment--has been rescued from the fringes of these 'disciplines'. . . . This book is a first-class piece of scholarship. "--Graeme Newman, Contemporary Sociology "Garland's treatment of the theorists he draws upon is erudite, faithful and constructive. . . . Punishment and Modern Society is a magnificent example of working social theory. "--John R. Sutton, American Journal of Sociology "Punishment and Modern Society lifts contemporary penal issues from the mundane and narrow contours within which they are so often discussed and relocates them at the forefront of public policy. . . . This book will become a landmark study. "--Andrew Rutherford, Legal Studies "This is a superbly intelligent study. Its comprehensive coverage makes it a genuine review of the field. Its scholarship and incisiveness of judgment will make it a constant reference work for the initiated, and its concluding theoretical synthesis will make it a challenge and inspiration for those undertaking research and writing on the subject. As a state-of-the-art account it is unlikely to be bettered for many a year. "--Rod Morgan, British Journal of Criminology Winner of both the Outstanding Scholarship Award of the Crime and Delinquency Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association's Crime, Law, and Deviance Section

Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics

by Michael J. Lansing

In 1915, western farmers mounted one of the most significant challenges to party politics America has seen: the Nonpartisan League, which sought to empower citizens and restrain corporate influence. Before its collapse in the 1920s, the League counted over 250,000 paying members, spread to thirteen states and two Canadian provinces, controlled North Dakota's state government, and birthed new farmer-labor alliances. Yet today it is all but forgotten, neglected even by scholars. Michael J. Lansing aims to change that. Insurgent Democracy offers a new look at the Nonpartisan League and a new way to understand its rise and fall in the United States and Canada. Lansing argues that, rather than a spasm of populist rage that inevitably burned itself out, the story of the League is in fact an instructive example of how popular movements can create lasting change. Depicting the League as a transnational response to economic inequity, Lansing not only resurrects its story of citizen activism, but also allows us to see its potential to inform contemporary movements.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: In a Modern English Version

by John Gardner

The adventures and challenges of Sir Gawain, King Arthur's nephew and a knight at the Round Table, including his duel with the mysterious Green Knight, are among the oldest and best known of Arthurian stories. Here the distinguished author and poet John Gardner has captured the humor, elegance, and richness of the original Middle English in flowing modern verse translations of this literary masterpiece. Besides the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, this edition includes two allegorical poems, "Purity" and "Patience"; the beautiful dream allegory "Pearl"; and the miracle story "Saint Erkenwald," all attributed to the same anonymous poet, a contemporary of Chaucer and an artist of the first rank. "Mr. Gardner has translated into modern English and edited a text of these five poems that could hardly be improved. . . . The entire work is preceded by a very fine and complete general introduction and a critical commentary on each poem. "--Library Journal

Generations and Collective Memory

by Amy Corning Howard Schuman

When discussing large social trends or experiences, we tend to group people into generations. But what does it mean to be part of a generation, and what gives that group meaning and coherence? It's collective memory, say Amy Corning and Howard Schuman, and in Generations and Collective Memory, they draw on an impressive range of research to show how generations share memories of formative experiences, and how understanding the way those memories form and change can help us understand society and history. Their key finding--built on historical research and interviews in the United States and seven other countries (including China, Japan, Germany, Lithuania, Russia, Israel, and Ukraine)--is that our most powerful generational memories are of shared experiences in adolescence and early adulthood, like the 1963 Kennedy assassination for those born in the 1950s or the fall of the Berlin Wall for young people in 1989. But there are exceptions to that rule, and they're significant: Corning and Schuman find that epochal events in a country, like revolutions, override the expected effects of age, affecting citizens of all ages with a similar power and lasting intensity. The picture Corning and Schuman paint of collective memory and its formation is fascinating on its face, but it also offers intriguing new ways to think about the rise and fall of historical reputations and attitudes toward political issues.

A World of Homeowners: American Power and the Politics of Housing Aid

by Nancy H. Kwak

Is there anything more American than the ideal of homeownership? In this groundbreaking work of transnational history, Nancy H. Kwak reveals how the concept of homeownership became one of America's major exports and defining characteristics around the world. In the aftermath of World War II, American advisers urged countries to pursue greater access to homeownership, arguing it would give families a literal stake in their nations, jumpstart a productive home-building industry, fuel economic growth, and raise the standard of living in their countries, helping to ward off the specter of communism. A World of Homeowners charts the emergence of democratic homeownership in the postwar landscape and booming economy; its evolution as a tool of foreign policy and a vehicle for international investment in the 1950s, '60s, and '70s; and the growth of lower-income homeownership programs in the United States from the 1960s to today. Kwak unravels all these threads, detailing the complex stories and policy struggles that emerged from a particularly American vision for global democracy and capitalism. Ultimately, she argues, the question of who should own homes where--and how--is intertwined with the most difficult questions about economy, government, and society.

Second-Best Justice: The Virtues of Japanese Private Law

by J. Mark Ramseyer

It's long been known that Japanese file fewer lawsuits per capita than Americans do. Yet explanations for the difference have tended to be partial and unconvincing, ranging from circular arguments about Japanese culture to suggestions that the slow-moving Japanese court system acts as a deterrent. With Second-Best Justice, J. Mark Ramseyer offers a more compelling, better-grounded explanation: the low rate of lawsuits in Japan results not from distrust of a dysfunctional system but from trust in a system that works--that sorts and resolves disputes in such an overwhelmingly predictable pattern that opposing parties rarely find it worthwhile to push their dispute to trial. Using evidence from tort claims across many domains, Ramseyer reveals a court system designed not to find perfect justice, but to "make do"--to adopt strategies that are mostly right and that thereby resolve disputes quickly and economically. An eye-opening study of comparative law, Second-Best Justice will force a wholesale rethinking of the differences among alternative legal systems and their broader consequences for social welfare.

Legislating in the Dark: Information and Power in the House of Representatives

by James M. Curry

The 2009 financial stimulus bill ran to more than 1,100 pages, yet it wasn't even given to Congress in its final form until thirteen hours before debate was set to begin, and it was passed twenty-eight hours later. How are representatives expected to digest so much information in such a short time. The answer? They aren't. With Legislating in the Dark, James M. Curry reveals that the availability of information about legislation is a key tool through which Congressional leadership exercises power. Through a deft mix of legislative analysis, interviews, and participant observation, Curry shows how congresspersons--lacking the time and resources to study bills deeply themselves--are forced to rely on information and cues from their leadership. By controlling their rank-and-file's access to information, Congressional leaders are able to emphasize or bury particular items, exploiting their information advantage to push the legislative agenda in directions that they and their party prefer. Offering an unexpected new way of thinking about party power and influence, Legislating in the Dark will spark substantial debate in political science.

57 Ways to Screw Up in Grad School: Perverse Professional Lessons for Graduate Students

by Kevin D. Haggerty Aaron Doyle

Don't think about why you're applying. Select a topic for entirely strategic reasons. Choose the coolest supervisor. Write only to deadlines. Expect people to hold your hand. Become "that" student. When it comes to a masters or PhD program, most graduate students don't deliberately set out to fail. Yet, of the nearly 500,000 people who start a graduate program each year, up to half will never complete their degree. Books abound on acing the admissions process, but there is little on what to do once the acceptance letter arrives. Veteran graduate directors Kevin D. Haggerty and Aaron Doyle have set out to demystify the world of advanced education. Taking a wry, frank approach, they explain the common mistakes that can trip up a new graduate student and lay out practical advice about how to avoid the pitfalls. Along the way they relate stories from their decades of mentorship and even share some slip-ups from their own grad experiences. The litany of foul-ups is organized by theme and covers the grad school experience from beginning to end: selecting the university and program, interacting with advisors and fellow students, balancing personal and scholarly lives, navigating a thesis, and creating a life after academia. Although the tone is engagingly tongue-in-cheek, the lessons are crucial to anyone attending or contemplating grad school. 57 Ways to Screw Up in Grad School allows you to learn from others' mistakes rather than making them yourself.

A Curse Unbroken

by Cecy Robson

Fans of Keri Arthur will love the Weird Girls, four sisters cursed with supernatural powers. In Cecy Robson's latest urban fantasy romance, the search is on for an unholy grail, while evil is licking its wounds--and looking for revenge. The preternatural world is changing. After a massive magical throwdown tore apart the established order, the dark elements are rebuilding their ranks unopposed. Celia Wird's world is changing, too. She's the mate of the pureblood were Aric, and his Warriors are honor-bound to protect her family as she and her sisters recover from unimaginable horrors. Celia hesitates to reveal the true extent of the Wird sisters' trauma, but they aren't the only ones keeping secrets: Aric and the werewolf Elders are tracking a stone that grants limitless power. So is a tough coven of witches. Then Misha, a master vampire with his own plans for the stone, sends Celia after it. Can she and the vamps beat both the weres and the witches to the treasure before it falls into the wrong hands? Fearing for Celia's safety, Aric begs her to stay out of the hunt. What they don't realize is that they're the ones being hunted. But Celia's ready to prove that she's not easy prey.Praise for A Curse Unbroken "Thrilling . . . I loved the danger, the action, the romance and the reveals. . . . This is one of the best new series I have read, and I highly recommend it."--Rainy Day Ramblings "The Weird Girls series is dark, romantic, and intense, and one I completely adore. The wait for A Curse Unbroken was worth it."--Caffeinated Book Reviewer "Whew! What a whirlwind. Each one of these books are incredibly intense."--A Book Obsession "Is it more than just bad luck that follows Celia around, or is it a malicious plot derived from the mind of author Cecy Robson?"--Heroes and Heartbreakers "I know that Ms. Robson has more stories to tell for these amazing characters and I can't wait to see what she comes up with next. I'll have my tissues and bottle of wine waiting for the next book."--Books-n-Kisses "Cecy Robson did another magnificent job with this novel. It was an equally hilarious, heartbreaking and action-filled romance story."--Under the Covers"This book gains a spot on my 'favorites' shelf and five stars from me."--The Hopeless Reader Praise for the Weird Girls series "One of my favorite books series . . . so much action, so much violence and, oh, the lust radiating off of our heroes . . . I definitely recommend this series for lovers of all things paranormal and awesome."--USA Today "[With Robson's] edgy, witty and modern style of storytelling, the reader will be drawn deep into this quirky paranormal world. . . . Strong pacing, constant action and distinctive, appealing characters--including a gutsy heroine--will no doubt keep you invested."--RT Book Reviews "A healthy dose of humor, a heaping dash of the supernatural, and a pinch of mystery all laced with a heavy dollop of action . . . Robson knows how to combine all the best ingredients to keep her readers hooked and begging for another hit."--Fresh Fiction Includes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.

When Joss Met Matt

by Ellie Cahill

In the tradition of New Adult superstar Jessica Sorensen, Ellie Cahill's debut novel is a charming friends-with-benefits story . . . with a twist! What if after every bad breakup, there was someone to help "cleanse your palate"--someone who wouldn't judge you, who was great in bed, someone you were sure not to fall in love with? "Sorbet sex" could solve everything--as long as it never got too sweet. Joss and Matt have been friends since freshman year of college, meeting one night after Joss is dumped by her boyfriend. After a few drinks, Matt humors her with a proposition: that he'll become her go-to guy whenever she needs to heal a broken heart. In return, she'll do the same for him. The #1 Rule: They'll never fall in love with each other. People scoff at the arrangement. But six years later, Joss and Matt are still the best of friends . . . with benefits. Through a string of boyfriends and girlfriends--some almost perfect, some downright wrong--Joss and Matt are always there for each other when the going gets tough. No strings. No attachments. Piece of cake. No problem. After all, since they wrote the rules, surely they can play by them. Or can they?Advance praise for When Joss Met Matt "Hands down, one of my favorite New Adult reads . . . Ellie Cahill is definitely one to watch!"--New York Times bestselling author Cora Carmack "This is one of those books that make you forget everything around you. Prepare to be consumed by this story."--Sophie Jordan, New York Times bestselling author of Wild "Fun, sexy, and full of amazing chemistry, When Joss Met Matt is an entertaining escape that will leave you smiling with every turn of the page."--Cassie Mae, author of The Real ThingFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

The Day We Met

by Rowan Coleman

For fans of Jojo Moyes's Me Before You comes a beautifully written, heartwarming novel about mothers and daughters, husbands and wives. The Day We Met asks: Can you love someone you don't remember falling in love with? A gorgeous husband, two beautiful children, a job she loves--Claire's got it all. And then some. But lately, her mother hovers more than a helicopter, her husband, Greg, seems like a stranger, and her kids are like characters in a movie. Three-year-old Esther's growing up in the blink of an eye, and twenty-year-old Caitlin, with her jet-black hair and clothes to match, looks like she's about to join a punk band--and seems to be hiding something. Most concerning, however, is the fact that Claire is losing her memory, including that of the day she met Greg. A chance meeting with a handsome stranger one rainy day sets Claire wondering whether she and Greg still belong together: She knows she should love him, but she can't always remember why. In search of an answer, Claire fills the pages of a blank book Greg gives her with private memories and keepsakes, jotting down beginnings and endings and everything in between. The book becomes the story of Claire--her passions, her sorrows, her joys, her adventures in a life that refuses to surrender to a fate worse than dying: disappearing.Praise for The Day We Met "[Rowan] Coleman executes another incredibly powerful novel that is beautifully written. The story is so well-crafted, it's impossible to put the book down. The tale is so poignant and heartbreaking that readers will be completely engrossed with the characters while experiencing a wide array of emotions."--RT Book Reviews "[The Day We Met] is, at heart, a book about mothers, daughters and the strong bonds that exist between women even during heartbreak. Coleman will make you cry with this emotional, beautifully written novel."--Kirkus Reviews"As with Me Before You, by Jojo Moyes, I couldn't put this book down."--Katie Fforde "Rowan Coleman's heartbreaking, humorous novel about a family in crisis vividly reminded me about the fierce, resilient core in all kinds of love. Readers of Lisa Genova's Still Alice and Elin Hilderbrand's Beautiful Day will especially savor this book."--Nancy Thayer Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader's Circle for author chats and more.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Once Pure

by Cecy Robson

She bears the scars of the past. He blames himself for things he can't control. Their defenses are up, but in Cecy Robson's latest Shattered Past novel--perfect for fans of Monica Murphy and J. Lynn--true love lands a knockout punch. Sofia Tres Santos remembers a time before her life went sour, before her innocence was ripped away, before she began punishing herself with risky behaviors and unworthy men. Now, at twenty, she just hopes she's ready to rebuild some of what she lost. One way or another, it always comes back to her childhood friend and longtime crush, Killian O'Brien. As strong as Killian is, Sofia has always been his one weakness. He knows Sofia has suffered and wants to ensure she's never hurt again--not like before, and definitely not under his watch. When Sofia agrees to work at his mixed martial arts gym, Killian seizes the opportunity to help and protect the sweet girl he's always cared for. And yet, as he trains Sofia to defend herself using his hard-hitting MMA techniques, he's drawn to the vulnerable beauty in ways he never expected. As Sofia grows stronger, she also grows brave enough to open herself up to love. And along the way, she challenges everything Killian believes to be true, showing him that no matter how much he dominates in the ring, the real battle is fought in the heart.Advance praise for Once Pure "The sexual tension between Sofia and Killian is super steamy; the passion builds with every page."--RT Book Reviews"Sexy and heartbreaking, Once Pure is an excellent, emotional read."--New York Times bestselling author Monica Murphy"Intense and powerfully emotional, Cecy Robson's Once Pure grabs hold of your heart from the first page and doesn't let go until the last."--USA Today bestselling author Mira Lyn KellyPraise for the Shattered Past series "Brody made it his mission to be Lety's rock. . . . Cecy Robson created a perfect book boyfriend in Brody Quaid, and many will enjoy his patience, sexiness, and unconditional love for Lety."--Heroes and Heartbreakers, on Once Loved "With its skillfully developed characters and scorching sexual tension, Once Loved is a gorgeous second-chance love story you won't want to put down."--USA Today bestselling author Lauren Layne "Once Perfect is exactly that: perfect for fans of sweetly sexy New Adult with a to-die-for protective hero."--New York Times bestselling author Marquita Valentine "Sweet and sexy, a perfect combination . . . Cecy Robson delivers pure reading bliss."--USA Today bestselling author Sawyer Bennett, on Once Perfect Includes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.

Once Loved

by Cecy Robson

He's the campus golden boy. She's picking up the pieces of her broken past. But in Cecy Robson's scorching novel of second chances--perfect for readers of Monica Murphy and J. Lynn--their differences only make their connection more explosive.Every memory Lety Tres Santos has from her childhood comes with a scar--some emotional, some physical. Her father is an abusive drug addict, and her mother enables his destructive behavior. College offers Lety a fresh start . . . until her father finds a way to ruin that, too. Now, after losing her scholarship to kick off junior year, Lety must somehow stay in school, pay tuition, and turn a deaf ear to the whispers that follow her. And she intends to do it all without Brody Quaid's help.Brody is a lacrosse star, a 4.0 student--and as a freshman, he fell hard for the beautiful and spirited Lety. But their relationship crashed and burned because he couldn't break through the walls she's put up around her heart. With Lety hurting more than ever, Brody strives to win her back and make her believe in real love and true partnership. That will mean opening up secrets locked away in his own past--and trusting someone more than he's ever dared.Lety knows how painful it can be to depend on the wrong man. She also knows how much Brody wants to do this the right way. But it takes more than sizzling desire to move on and build a future together.Praise for Once Loved "This family drama filled with past horrors and possible salvation tugs at the heartstrings. Full of romance and humor--and a bit of steamy sex--this story from [Cecy] Robson is sure to be a hit in any collection."--Library Journal (starred review)"Brody made it his mission to be Lety's rock. . . . Robson created a perfect book boyfriend in Brody Quaid, and many will enjoy his patience, sexiness, and unconditional love for Lety."--Heroes and Heartbreakers"With its skillfully developed characters and scorching sexual tension, Once Loved is a gorgeous second-chance love story you won't want to put down."--USA Today bestselling author Lauren Layne "This heartbreakingly beautiful story and series is one to keep and read again and again. Truly beautiful. Amazingly touching, and completely breathtakingly beautiful. To say I loved this book is so mild a word, but I truly do, and I can't wait for the next book."--April Hollingworth, author of Double Magick in the Falls"Once Loved was delightful, with characters you cannot help but root for. I cannot wait for Once Pure and Sophia's story."--Caffeinated Book Reviewer "I was emotionally invested and the ending slayed me!"--Book Crack "Intense and emotional."--Under the Covers "I really had a great time with this novel even though everything was really heartbreaking."--Between Dreams and Reality "This is a great book. I couldn't put it down once I started it, and I cannot wait for the next one."--Hines and Bigham's Literary TrystIncludes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title. it, and I cannot wait for the next one."--Hines and Bigham's Literary TrystIncludes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.

The 21-Day Belly Fix

by Dr Tasneem Bhatia

A leading integrative physician shares a groundbreaking 21-day eating plan to shed pounds, accelerate metabolism, balance your digestive system, improve gut function, and feel better every day--without dieting! There are one hundred trillion reasons losing weight and staying healthy are so hard: That's the number of bacteria living in your digestive system--good bugs and bad that influence everything from how much fat you store to whether or not you'll get arthritis, diabetes, or Alzheimer's. As medical director of the Atlanta Center for Holistic and Integrative Medicine, Tasneem Bhatia, M.D., is an expert in unlocking the mystery of the gut and probiotic health. Combining the latest research and cutting-edge science with proven alternative nutritional remedies, Dr. Taz has developed a simple plan--one that has worked for thousands of her own patients--that aims to reprogram your digestive system, help fight disease, and strip away pounds in just 21 days! The Belly Fix accelerates metabolism, increases energy, and jump-starts weight loss immediately. Once "fixed," you'll continue to feel the benefits. Drop pounds on the 21-Day Belly Fix plan, with more to come, as you continue to follow the program designed to balance your digestive bacteria and put you on the path to long-term health and vitality. Speed up your metabolism with the help of research that proves a direct link between your gut bacteria and how quickly you burn fat. Reduce inflammation and rebalance your body to help fight diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimer's, skin disorders, and more. Find focus and clarity with the help of simple and delicious foods that feed the healthy microorganisms in your gut--and fight the bad ones! The 21-Day Belly Fix is the final word on what researchers call your "second brain" and the simple ways that fixing your diet--instead of committing to a long-term food-banishing plan--can get your gut out of the gutter and help you to start feeling great. With delicious recipes and easy swaps, The 21-Day Belly Fix is the ultimate weight-loss plan!From the Trade Paperback edition.

Mrs. Kaplan and the Matzoh Ball of Death

by Mark Reutlinger

Move over, Miss Marple--Mark Reutlinger's charming cozy debut, the short novel Mrs. Kaplan and the Matzoh Ball of Death, introduces readers to the unforgettable amateur sleuth Rose Kaplan and her loyal sidekick, Ida. Everyone knows that Rose Kaplan makes the best matzoh ball soup around--she's a regular matzoh ball maven--so it's no surprise at the Julius and Rebecca Cohen Home for Jewish Seniors when, once again, Mrs. K wins the honor of preparing the beloved dish for the Home's seder on the first night of Passover. But when Bertha Finkelstein is discovered facedown in her bowl of soup, her death puts a bit of a pall on the rest of the seder. And things go really meshugge when it comes out that Bertha choked on a diamond earring earlier stolen from resident Daisy Goldfarb. Suddenly Mrs. K is the prime suspect in the police investigation of both theft and murder. Oy vey--it's a recipe for disaster, unless Rose and her dear friend Ida can summon up the chutzpah to face down the police and solve the mystery themselves.Advance praise for Mrs. Kaplan and the Matzoh Ball of Death "Is there kosher food in jail? These two heroines have gotten themselves in quite a pickle! Well, it's a matzoh ball mess, really. Too deliciously funny!"--Rita Mae Brown, bestselling author of Nine Lives to Die

Taming Lily

by Monica Murphy

Perfect for fans of Christina Lauren, Emma Chase, and Maya Banks, the anticipated finale in New York Times bestselling author Monica Murphy's sexy contemporary romance series about three fiery and determined sisters with their own ideas about life and love. I'm in trouble. Again. And instead of facing my problems head-on, I've run away. Far away this time, and no one can catch me--not my two younger sisters, Violet and Rose, not my father, my grandmother, or that witch Pilar who wants to take control of my family's cosmetics company. Now I'm in Hawaii, enjoying the sun and sand and water, where nobody knows the hot mess known as Lily Fowler. And I'm loving every minute of it. But someone is watching me. Following me. He's gorgeous. Soon we're talking, and against all my instincts, I reveal bits and pieces of myself to Max. It feels good, though I know he can't be the man for me. These sudden feelings we share are way too complicated, too fraught, too intense. Then everything explodes and I'm forced to return home. My intentions have always been true, but now everyone's mad at me. I don't know who to turn to anymore . . . except to Max. He's the one I want to trust. But I'm not so sure I should. Maybe it's worth the risk--what-ifs be damned. . . .From the Trade Paperback edition.

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