Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 4,851 through 4,875 of 26,493 results

With An Ambulance During The Franco-German War [Illustrated Edition]: Personal Experiences And Adventures With Both Armies, 1870-1871

by Dr Charles Edward Ryan

[Illustrated with portrait of the Author and additional maps]"A classic of 19th century war reportage by an Irish surgeon who led an ambulance unit on both sides of the Franco-Prussian War. Includes eye witness descriptions of the debacle at Sedan and the gruelling siege of Paris.Charles Ryan was an Irish surgeon from Tipperary who served with a horse-drawn Anglo-American ambulance unit in the latter stages of the 1870-71 Franco-Prussian War. This vivid account of his experiences is a fascinating glimpse of the war and the siege of Paris which concluded it from a civilian whose work involved him at the sharp end. The book opens by describing the disastrous French debacle at Sedan where an army, commanded by the Emperor Napoleon III in person, was trapped and crushed by the artillery of surrounding Prussian forces, despite heroic charges by the French cavalry. Later in the war, Ryan's unit saw the war at close quarters on both sides of the lines - inside besieged Paris; and at the Prussian HQ at Versailles. Because this account, compiled from Ryan's own recollections and his letters home, was not originally written for publication, it has a freshness and an immediacy that make it a classic of 19th century humane war reportage."-N&M Print Version.

The Memoirs Of Dr. Thomas W. Evans : Recollections Of The Second French Empire

by Dr Thomas Wiltberger Evans Dr Edward A. Crane

Despite not speaking a word of French, the intrepid Dr. Evans left his native Philadelphia for Paris. His professional qualifications as a dentist did not seem to indicate that his life be filled with the adventures that he gleefully threw himself into. Within a short period in Paris, he became renowned for his medical skill and enjoyed the confidences of Kings, Princes and no less a person than the Emperor Napoleon III. He acted as a go-between among the crowned heads of Europe with his engaging manner. As the American consul-general William Seward wrote: "IT SOMETIMES HAPPENS when the crowned heads of Europe wish to communicate with one another without any responsibility they send for Evans to fix their teeth. As you are not likely to send so far for a dentist, I need only add that the messages of this sort, which he bears, are always communicated to him by word of mouth and in the presence of no witnesses."His memoirs of the second Empire read both an engaging personal narrative and a secret view of the life of the court through tumultuous times including the diplomatic problems surrounding the Civil War, attempts at Coups d'état, numerous political plots, and disastrous Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71.

Recollections Of An Officer Of Napoleon’s Army

by Captain Elzéar Blaze E Jules Méras

Many memoirs of the Napoleonic period are recounting, more or less interesting dependant on the author, of the events of their service interspersed by anecdotes of interesting events, Elzéar Blaze eschewed that style of reminiscence and left a singular view of his time in the Grande Armée. His memoirs are highly stylised, divided into the 'themes' of military life, and eruditely written by an educated man of the era, who combined wit with an eye for an anecdote. He covers the different aspects of his military career with amusing stories and vivid recollections of the men with which he served, a number of the generals who commanded them, and the enemies that they were fought and were billeted on if they were in occupation; he covers the school of the Vélites, his military training, the marches, camp-life, bivouacs, active campaigning, and the battles fought under Napoleon. Blaze, like his brother, sought out a military life under the eagles of Napoleon, he enlisting in the Vélites of the Imperial Guard, his brother into the medical services of the army. The Vélites were founded as part of Napoleon's further, ultimately unsuccessful, attempts to sway the aristocracy to fall in line and support his rule. The military tutelage in the Vélites was to be supported by private means, which translated into their ranks being filled with the scions of the nobility and wealthy bourgeoisie. Blaze fought as part of Napoleon's invincibles from 1807 until the end of the empire, but continued his service under the returned Bourbons and retired as captain in 1828.An interesting and different view of the Grande Armée.

Decline And Fall Of Napoleon

by Field Marshal Viscount Garnet Wolseley

The Napoleon in power in later years may have lacked the absolute genius and resolution that his earlier campaigns displayed; however, he was more than a match for his enemies on more than one occasion. Field-Marshal Wolseley's short biography of Wellington begins in 1812, following the travails of Napoleon as he and the few survivors of the La Grande Armée trudged back from the Russian snows. As Napoleon feverishly combs depots for recruits, and conscripts more men for his army, he takes the fight to the Allies in Germany. But outnumbered, and demanding the impossible from his generals and troops, he is heavily defeated by the Allied forces. Pushed back to the borders of France, Napoleon contrives his finest campaign since the early Italian campaigns that gained him his fame. However, the number of allied forces eventually pushed him back, forcing his abdication and banishment to Elba. In the final throw of the dice, Napoleon returns to France and, despite some of his finest manoeuvring, is finally defeated at the battle of Waterloo."An admirable monograph, by the new Commander-in-Chief of the Forces,...giving in a crisp resume the last half of the career of Napoleon, ... Limited by space, there is yet a well-digested mass within these covers, clearly collated and tersely expressed..."-Theodore Aryault Dodge

Napoleon As A General. Vol. II

by Field Marshal Count Maximilian Yorck von Wartenburg Major Walter H. James

A complete analysis of Napoleon Bonaparte as a general. Possibly the best analysis ever written, and the source book for many later works.There are many books about Napoleon, and some of them attempt to analyse his particular brand of military genius. Almost all these books owe a tremendous debt to Colonel Count Yorck von Wartenburg. His book was published at the end of the nineteenth Century and is still as important today; indeed, Dr David Chandler acknowledges that he used the book as one of the primary works when researching his momentous history of Napoleon. After a brief look at Napoleon's youth and early career Wartenburg sets out Napoleon's military exploits chronologically, beginning with the campaign in Italy, and the battles for Mantua. The first volume then describes the campaigns in Egypt and Syria before giving an account of the first of Napoleon's great battles: Marengo. Ulm, Austerlitz, Jena, Eylau and Friedland complete Volume I. Volume II covers Spain, Ratisbon, Wagram and the ill-fated invasion of Russia. After Moscow and the Beresina crossing came the armistice, and then Dresden and Leipzig. The book ends with the exile of Napoleon for the last time after his defeat at Waterloo. The writing is always clear and uncomplicated, suiting a description of twenty years in Europe which threw the political map into confusion, and had as legacy the mistrust between France and the remainder of the continent, and the growth of Prussian military might and British complacency in military matters.

Napoleon As A General. Vol. I

by Field Marshal Count Maximilian Yorck von Wartenburg Major Walter H. James

A complete analysis of Napoleon Bonaparte as a general. Possibly the best analysis ever written, and the source book for many later works.There are many books about Napoleon, and some of them attempt to analyse his particular brand of military genius. Almost all these books owe a tremendous debt to Colonel Count Yorck von Wartenburg. His book was published at the end of the nineteenth Century and is still as important today; indeed, Dr David Chandler acknowledges that he used the book as one of the primary works when researching his momentous history of Napoleon. After a brief look at Napoleon's youth and early career Wartenburg sets out Napoleon's military exploits chronologically, beginning with the campaign in Italy, and the battles for Mantua. The first volume then describes the campaigns in Egypt and Syria before giving an account of the first of Napoleon's great battles: Marengo. Ulm, Austerlitz, Jena, Eylau and Friedland complete Volume I. Volume II covers Spain, Ratisbon, Wagram and the ill-fated invasion of Russia. After Moscow and the Beresina crossing came the armistice, and then Dresden and Leipzig. The book ends with the exile of Napoleon for the last time after his defeat at Waterloo. The writing is always clear and uncomplicated, suiting a description of twenty years in Europe which threw the political map into confusion, and had as legacy the mistrust between France and the remainder of the continent, and the growth of Prussian military might and British complacency in military matters.

In The King’s German Legion: Memoirs Of Baron Ompteda, Colonel In The King’s German Legion During The Napoleonic Wars

by Freiherr von Ludwig Ompteda Freiherr von Christian Ompteda

Colonel Baron Christian Ompteda, 1765-1815, was one of the most distinguished Hanoverian officers of the Napoleonic period. He served in the Netherlands in 1793-5 and was orderly to the Duke of York, but he was wounded and suffered the first of his mental breakdowns. One of the early members of the King's German Legion, he commanded the 1st Line Battalion and was exchanged after being shipwrecked on the Dutch coast in 1807. He sailed for the Peninsula in 1808 but a further bout of mental instability led to his retirement. His friend Scharnhorst helped his recovery, Ompteda rejoined the Legion as commander of the 1st Light Battalion in 1812, serving through the remainder of the Peninsular War which included the Battle of Vittoria, the storm of Tolosa, the siege of San Sebastian, fighting on the Nive, and the siege of Bayonne, 1814.In the Hundred Days campaign, he commanded the 2nd K. G. L. Brigade, which included his own 5th Line Battalion. At Waterloo, ordered by the Prince of Orange and Alten to make a suicidal attack, he calmly drew his sword, asked a friend to try to save his nephews, and rode off at the head of his men. As he had realised, the order resulted in the near destruction of his battalion but he carried it out without hesitation and was last seen surrounded by French troops. Shot through the neck, his body was recovered and buried near the gate of La Haye Sainte.

The Year Of Trafalgar

by Sir John Henry Newbolt

A happy idea carried to excellent completion by very competent hands is the best description of The Year of Trafalgar, by Henry Newbolt. It is not likely that this year of splendid memory will find a worthier literary tribute than this delightful volume. Mr. Newbolt's is much more than a familiar story, gracefully retold. He has made an exhaustive study of all the details of the Naval Campaign of 1805, and his narrative is of distinct historical value. As might have been expected, Mr. Newbolt writes with deliberate sobriety and restraint. Great deeds are best told simply, and the last glorious chapter in the life of Nelson needs no literary embellishment. Every danger besetting a task full of difficulty is evaded. He is not laboured, nor pedantic, nor sentimental, but rather tells the great story in a direct and manly way, eminently befitting the subject. His is a book which every boy should read in "Nelson's year," and no Briton of any age will read it unmoved. It was a happy thought to add to the narrative an anthology of Trafalgar poetry. It is a little curious, as Mr. Newbolt points out, how our greatest warlike achievements have received scant treatment from our poets. The "Victory " has been less fortunate than "The Revenge" or "The Temeraire." Strange that it did not rouse the war-bugle of Campbell to an immortal strain. Of all the verses, Mr. Newbolt's own are perhaps the best. Some day, we trust, he will give us a song of Nelson to rank in all future patriotic anthologies with his incomparable "Drake's Drum," "The Fighting Temeraire," and "The Ballad of the Bold Menelaus."--The Bookman 1905.

Recollections Of The Storming Of The Castle Of Badajos

by Captain James Maccarthy

The situation for the Duke of Wellington and his British and Portuguese troops in 1812 was somewhat perilous. Although they had chased Masséna and his French Legions from Spain, overwhelming numbers of enemy troops were still in Spain despite being scattered through the provinces. For Wellington to move forward and take the fight to the enemy, he would have to take the two border fortresses of Ciudad Rodrigo and Badajos, and do so quickly before the bickering French marshals united against him. After capturing Ciudad Rodrigo in a bloody but short siege, the Iron Duke turned his attention on the much more formidable fortress of Badajos, a fortress that they had failed to take before.The few trained Allied engineers were bolstered by volunteer officers like the author Captain MacCarthy, who undertook the dangerous work of the engineers. However, a lack of artillery and shot meant that the task would be exceptionally difficult, and pressed by time Wellington orders an early assault by the best of his infantry over barely practicable breeches. As a diversion, he also orders an attempt to capture the castle of Badajos by escalade - the author himself being part of this diversionary effort. In the event, the breeches prove to be impregnable and after repeated murderous attempts, the defences of Badajos are only breached by the ladder borne assault on the castle.Captain MacCarthy's short narrative is vividly written filled with the blood and shot of the siege and the castle's final capture.

History Of The King’s German Legion Vol. II

by N. Ludlow Beamish

"Ludlow Beamish's famous history of the K.G.L. is undoubtedly one of the rarest and most sought-after contemporary studies of the Napoleonic Wars. Much praised by Sir Charles Oman as 'a valuable and conscientious' history, it was largely compiled from eye-witness accounts of serving soldiers. The Legion played a major part in the British Army in the Peninsula and this special edition is a vital addition to the library of all serious students of the Napoleonic Wars.One of the most unusual, as well as the most heroic and distinguished Allied units in the Napoleonic Wars was the King's German Legion (KGL). Originally composed of German volunteers from King George III's Hanoverian domain, and founded out of Royal outrage at France's occupation of Hanover in 1803, the KGL, according to David Chandler, doyen of Napoleonic military historians 'was without a doubt amongst the very best troops commanded by Wellington in the Peninsula and at Waterloo'. The KGL was a mini-army in its own right, comprising infantry, cavalry and artillery... Volume 2 opens with the sieges of Badajoz and Cieudad Roderigo and the great battle of Salamanca which broke the back of the French in Spain. As Wellington rolled the enemy up to the Pyrenees, the KGL wewre also present at the battle of Vittoria. Meanwhile the KGL were also operating against Marshal Davout in the noirth of their native Germany. The Allied pressure caused Napoelon to abdicate and retire to Elba in 1814. The book's final chapter deals with the Waterloo campaign in which the KGL played a heroic part in holding the strategically vital La Haye Sainte Farm in front of the British line, against furious French assaults.."-N&M Print version

History Of The King’s German Legion Vol. I

by N. Ludlow Beamish

"Ludlow Beamish's famous history of the K.G.L. is undoubtedly one of the rarest and most sought-after contemporary studies of the Napoleonic Wars. Much praised by Sir Charles Oman as 'a valuable and conscientious' history, it was largely compiled from eye-witness accounts of serving soldiers. The Legion played a major part in the British Army in the Peninsula and this special edition is a vital addition to the library of all serious students of the Napoleonic Wars.One of the most unusual, as well as the most heroic and distinguished Allied units in the Napoleonic Wars was the King's German Legion (KGL). Originally composed of German volunteers from King George III's Hanoverian domain, and founded out of Royal outrage at France's occupation of Hanover in 1803, the KGL, according to David Chandler, doyen of Napoleonic military historians 'was without a doubt amongst the very best troops commanded by Wellington in the Peninsula and at Waterloo'. The KGL was a mini-army in its own right, comprising infantry, cavalry and artillery... Volume 1 begins with the bungled loss of Hanover and the raising of the KGL, and its first foreign expedition - to Denmark under Lord Rosslyn. The KGL was next deployed in the Mediterranean theatre, and had its first taste of Spain under Sir John Moore and Sir Arthur Wellesley (Wellington) where the German hussars covered the disastrous retreat to Corunna. The Legion returned to Portugal and Spain with Wellington and lost heavily at the Battle of Talavera. Other KGL units took part in Sir Eyre Coote's expedition to Flushing and Walcheren. In the Peninsula War, the Legion fought under General Craufurd, helping to defeat the French at Busaco and before the lines of Torres Vedras, and later participating in Wellington's victory over Marshal Massena at Fuentes d'Oñoro. The volume ends with Soult's defeat at Albuera and the siege of Badajoz."-N&M Print version

Memoirs Of The Emperor Napoleon – From Ajaccio To Waterloo, As Soldier, Emperor And Husband – Vol. III

by Anon Laure Junot duchesse d’Abrantès S. M. Hamilton

Laure Junot, Duchesse d'Abrantes stands as one of the most influential figures in shaping the Napoleonic era: she was no statesman, military or civil leader, but she was a hugely well connected member of the court of Napoleon, and an inveterate gossip. An old family friend of the Bonaparte's from Corsica, she was married to one of Napoleon's oldest friends Andoche Junot, thus moving in the highest circles in Paris, known by and knowing everyone of note. Originally written at huge length (some editions run to more than 12 volumes), this English edition provides the highlights of her witty, irreverent, yet highly informative memoirs of the reign of Napoleon.

Memoirs Of The Emperor Napoleon – From Ajaccio To Waterloo, As Soldier, Emperor And Husband – Vol. II

by Anon Laure Junot duchesse d’Abrantès S. M. Hamilton

Laure Junot, Duchesse d'Abrantes stands as one of the most influential figures in shaping the Napoleonic era: she was no statesman, military or civil leader, but she was a hugely well connected member of the court of Napoleon, and an inveterate gossip. An old family friend of the Bonaparte's from Corsica, she was married to one of Napoleon's oldest friends Andoche Junot, thus moving in the highest circles in Paris, known by and knowing everyone of note. Originally written at huge length (some editions run to more than 12 volumes), this English edition provides the highlights of her witty, irreverent, yet highly informative memoirs of the reign of Napoleon.

Memoirs Of The Emperor Napoleon – From Ajaccio To Waterloo, As Soldier, Emperor And Husband – Vol. I

by Anon Laure Junot duchesse d’Abrantès S. M. Hamilton

Laure Junot, Duchesse d'Abrantes stands as one of the most influential figures in shaping the Napoleonic era: she was no statesman, military or civil leader, but she was a hugely well connected member of the court of Napoleon, and an inveterate gossip. An old family friend of the Bonaparte's from Corsica, she was married to one of Napoleon's oldest friends Andoche Junot, thus moving in the highest circles in Paris, known by and knowing everyone of note. Originally written at huge length (some editions run to more than 12 volumes), this English edition provides the highlights of her witty, irreverent, yet highly informative memoirs of the reign of Napoleon.

Le Général Curély. Itinéraire D’un Cavalier Léger De La Grande Armée (1793-1815)

by Général Baron Jean-Nicolas Curély

Le général Curély. Itinéraire d'un cavalier léger de la Grande Armée (1793-1815), publié d'après un manuscrit authentique par le général Thoumas. Paris, Berger-Levrault, 1887, in-16, X-436 p., portr.« Malgré son titre, il s'agit bien de mémoires sur les campagnes de 1805, 1806, 1807 et 1809. La Russie, l'Allemagne, Waterloo sont également évoqués dans un panorama complet qui ne s'élève jamais au-dessus d'une stricte narration des aventures person­nelles du brillant cavalier que fut Curély. » p 45 - Professeur Jean Tulard, Bibliographie Critique Des Mémoires Sur Le Consulat Et L'Empire, Droz, Genève, 1971.

Mémoires Du Général Bigarré, Aide De Camp Du Roi Joseph

by Général Baron Auguste Bigarré

Mémoires du général Bigarré, aide de camp du roi Joseph. Paris, Kolb, 1893, in-80, XV-320 p.« Ces souvenirs ont été écrits en 1830. Entré à la garde consulaire, Bigarré assiste au sacre puis à la bataille d'Austerlitz. Son régiment ayant perdu un drapeau à Austerlitz, il se cabre sous les reproches de Napoléon (pp. 180-183) et passe aide de camp de Joseph qu'il suit à Madrid (chapitres IX-XI), le récit s'arrête en 1812. Racontées naïvement les conquêtes galantes et les infortunes conjugales de Bigarré donnent à ses souvenirs un ton plaisant. Malheureusement, l'appareil critique fait défaut. » p 18 - Professeur Jean Tulard, Bibliographie Critique Des Mémoires Sur Le Consulat Et L'Empire, Droz, Genève, 1971.

Souvenirs Militaires De La République Et De l’Empire Tome II

by Général Baron Pierre Berthezène

« Souvenirs militaires de la République et de l'Empire. Paris, Dumaine, 1855, 2 vol. in-8°. Portr.Bon récit de la seconde campagne d'Italie (pp. 85-108) et surtout des opérations en Prusse et de l'occupation du pays : recensement des ressources (donations, problème de la monnaie... (pp. 111-168). Nombreux détails, mais des inexactitudes, sur la campagne d'Autriche (pp. 169-270), l'expédition d'Anvers (pp. 273-283). La guerre en Russie occupe les dernières pages du tome I et le début du tome II. La campagne de 1813 est également racontée de façon détaillée. A peu près rien en revanche sur la campagne de France. Les souvenirs s'achèvent sur les opérations de 1815. C'est par cette partie que Berthezène avait commencé la rédaction de ses mémoires en 1816. Malgré quelques erreurs, il a l'avantage sur d'autres généraux, de s'attacher à décrire les pays occupés ou envahis. » p 16 - Professeur Jean Tulard, Bibliographie Critique Des Mémoires Sur Le Consulat Et L'Empire, Droz, Genève, 1971

Souvenirs Militaires De La République Et De l’Empire Tome I

by Général Baron Pierre Berthezène

« Souvenirs militaires de la République et de l'Empire. Paris, Dumaine, 1855, 2 vol. in-8°. Portr.Bon récit de la seconde campagne d'Italie (pp. 85-108) et surtout des opérations en Prusse et de l'occupation du pays : recensement des ressources (donations, problème de la monnaie... (pp. 111-168). Nombreux détails, mais des inexactitudes, sur la campagne d'Autriche (pp. 169-270), l'expédition d'Anvers (pp. 273-283). La guerre en Russie occupe les dernières pages du tome I et le début du tome II. La campagne de 1813 est également racontée de façon détaillée. A peu près rien en revanche sur la campagne de France. Les souvenirs s'achèvent sur les opérations de 1815. C'est par cette partie que Berthezène avait commencé la rédaction de ses mémoires en 1816. Malgré quelques erreurs, il a l'avantage sur d'autres généraux, de s'attacher à décrire les pays occupés ou envahis. » p 16 - Professeur Jean Tulard, Bibliographie Critique Des Mémoires Sur Le Consulat Et L'Empire, Droz, Genève, 1971

Souvenirs De Campagnes Du Lieutenant-Colonel Louis Bégos

by Lieutenant-Colonel Louis Bégos

« Souvenirs de campagnes du lieutenant-colonel Louis Bégos, ancien capitaine adjudant-major au 20 régiment suisse au service de la France. Lausanne, Delafontaine, 1859, in-8°, 188 p.Bégos a voulu par réaction contre Thiers qu'il accuse d'avoir oublié le rôle des soldats suisses, dans les armées napoléoniennes, raconter sa participation aux opérations militaires en Italie, en Espagne et en Russie. » p 14 - Professeur Jean Tulard, Bibliographie Critique Des Mémoires Sur Le Consulat Et L'Empire, Droz, Genève, 1971

Prince Aage Of Denmark - A Royal Adventurer In The Foreign Legion

by Prince Aage of Denmark

Prince Aage could have lived a remarkably quiet, rich and privileged life as a hereditary prince to the throne of Denmark; however, none of these responsibilities seemed to sit well with the Prince. His thirst for action and danger were only sated by military and amorous adventures; his memoirs are concerned only with his service in the French Foreign Legion in the deserts of Morocco, where there were pitifully few opportunities for female companions.Prince Aage joined the elite Foreign legion in 1922 having already fought in the First World War as an artillery observer. His taste for adventure seems to be his prime motivator. At this time in the history of Morocco was a French protectorate, and was undergoing a rebellion of the Berbers and tribes of the Rif mountains. As always, the Legion was at the forefront of the fighting, including the author who amongst his numerous engagements would receive a Croix de Guerre for a leg wound sustained in the fighting.An interesting autobiography from the French Foreign Legion.

Kelly Of The Foreign Legion - Letters Of Légionnaire Russell A. Kelly

by Légionnaire Russell A. Kelly

The French Army have had numerous foreign regiments in its service for centuries; however, few have the mystique and elite status of the French Foreign Legion. It became a haven for the rough, tough, and adventure-seeking crowds of all of Europe. Bred with a fierce and disciplined esprit de corps, these soldiers could expect to fight France's enemies even in the most desperate of circumstances.Like his American compatriot Henry Weston Farnsworth, Russell Kelly enlisted in the French Foreign Legion as soon as possible after the declaration of war was made and the start of the awful slaughter of the First World War began. After a scant two months of training, Kelly recounts that he and his fellow soldiers were shipped off to the Front. Within a mere three months, his letters tell of the vicious and confused fighting that he was involved in around Bouzy and then in the Arras sector. He and his unit were heavily engaged during the battle of Artois and after a short spell of rest and recruitment were back in the frontlines near Souchez, where Legionnaire Kelly met his end.These letters were thought of such quality and interest that they were published in the New York Evening Sun.

A History Of The British Army – Vol. X – (1814-1815)

by Hon. Sir John William Fortescue

Sir John Fortescue holds a pre-eminent place amongst British military historians, his enduring fame and legacy resting mainly on his life's work "The History of the British Army", issued in 20 volumes, which took him some 30 years to complete. In scope and breadth it is such that no modern scholar has attempted to cover such a large and diverse subject in its entirety; but Sir John did so and with aplomb, leading to a readable and comprehensive study.This tenth volume covers the period from 1814-1815, as the British Army along with its Portuguese and Spanish Allies finally pushed into France in 1814 they still met with fierce and determined resistance from the French troops under the veteran Marshal Soult. After a number of skilful, and some less skilful actions along the river lines the victories of the British troops added further evidence to the hopeless situation for Napoleon who abdicated in 1814. The British government immediately sent a large part of the victorious Peninsular army on a foolish and unsuccessful attack of New Orleans, all the more futile as peace had already been signed between the United States and Great Britain. Napoleon did not rest long in his new home on the Isle of Elba, returning to France in 1815 reuniting his enemies against him and fighting the era defining battle of Waterloo, one of the finest hours of the British Army.TIMES.--"We have in these volumes the worthy continuation of a history which is worthy of its subject. Mr. Fortescue will not ask for higher praise." A MUST READ for any military enthusiast.

A History Of The British Army – Vol. IX – (1813-1814)

by Hon. Sir John William Fortescue

Sir John Fortescue holds a pre-eminent place amongst British military historians, his enduring fame and legacy resting mainly on his life's work "The History of the British Army", issued in 20 volumes, which took him some 30 years to complete. In scope and breadth it is such that no modern scholar has attempted to cover such a large and diverse subject in its entirety; but Sir John did so and with aplomb, leading to a readable and comprehensive study.This ninth volume covers the period from 1813-1814, after a bloody struggle the Duke of Wellington finally cleared the border fortress at Ciudad Rodrigo and Badajoz having laid siege to them more than once he set his victorious British and Portuguese troops on to the task of destroying the French armies before them in a piecemeal fashion. As can well be followed in Fortescue's masterly volume the advance of the British forces leavers the French forces out of numerous river protected positions before converging and destroying on the armies of the Centre and the North at the battle of Vitoria. Despite great ineptitude in the east of Spain, Wellington drove the French before him and into the Pyrenees, leading to a number of vicious engagements around the mountains through which the British Troops emerged victorious. However in North America the fighting was becoming desperate including bloody reverse at Sackett's Harbour, but ultimately the British and Canadian forces would fight to a honourable peace after the disastrous attack on New Orleans in 1815 [this battle is covered in the next volume].TIMES.--"We have in these volumes the worthy continuation of a history which is worthy of its subject. Mr. Fortescue will not ask for higher praise."

A History Of The British Army – Vol. VIII – (1811-1812)

by Hon. Sir John William Fortescue

Sir John Fortescue holds a pre-eminent place amongst British military historians, his enduring fame and legacy resting mainly on his life's work "The History of the British Army", issued in 20 volumes, which took him some 30 years to complete. In scope and breadth it is such that no modern scholar has attempted to cover such a large and diverse subject in its entirety; but Sir John did so and with aplomb, leading to a readable and comprehensive study.This eight volume covers the period from 1811-12, having drawn the invading French forces into a trap before the fortified lines of Torres Vedras the British Army under Wellington set about expelling his foe from the land of his Portuguese allies. Despite much skill and bravery on the part of their French foes, the Duke of Wellington and his British troops pushed them back in some disarray and with heavy loss. The French however regrouped quickly and almost inflicted a serious reverse on the British forces at the battle of Fuentes d'Oñoro, but the determined resistance of the British army ensured that the French would never return to Portugal as anything other than as prisoners of war. Sir John does not miss the actions and manoeuvres in the other provinces of Spain, French successes in the east were balanced by losses in the south at the battle of Barossa and the failed siege of Tarifa. Across the Atlantic British naval high-handedness allied with American opportunism began to simmer over into the War of 1812 as the British would be caught fighting on two fronts and their Canadian citizens would face annexation into the United States. Written as always with superb detail and authority, Fortescue blends the political machinations with the movements of the British Armies across the globe and the glory gained by the troops in Spain and Portugal.ARMY AND NAVY GAZETTE.--"The whole volume is admirable; it is equally the work of a great student and of an impartial historian."A MUST READ for any military enthusiast.

A History Of The British Army – Vol. VII – (1809-1810)

by Hon. Sir John William Fortescue

Sir John Fortescue holds a pre-eminent place amongst British military historians, his enduring fame and legacy resting mainly on his life's work "The History of the British Army", issued in 20 volumes, which took him some 30 years to complete. In scope and breadth it is such that no modern scholar has attempted to cover such a large and diverse subject in its entirety; but Sir John did so and with aplomb, leading to a readable and comprehensive study.According to Professor of Military History Brian Bond, the work was "the product of indefatigable research in original documents, a determination to present a clear, accurate, and readable narrative of military operations, and a close personal knowledge of the battlefields, which enabled him to elucidate his account with excellent maps. Most important, however, was his motivation: namely, a lifelong affection for the old, long-service, pre-Cardwell army, the spirit of the regiments of which it largely consisted, and the value of its traditions to the nation. An important part of his task was to distil and inculcate these soldierly virtues which, in his conservative view, contrasted sharply with the unedifying character of politicians who habitually meddled in military matters." ODNB.This seventh volume covers the period from 1809-1810, after a disastrous raid into French held Holland, the British government decided to use all their power to the strike at Napoleon at his weakest point, Portugal and Spain. After the British foray into Spain in 1809 culminating the bloody victory at Talavera, the British troops retreated into Portugal before the overwhelming French numbers. Inflicting a punishing check to the French invasion force under Masséna at Bussaco, the British army marched to the massive and impenetrable lines of Torres Vedras close to Lisbon.BROAD ARROW.--"This is a worthy successor to the volumes which have preceded it, and the whole forms a great work by a great, an impartial, and a bold writer,"

Showing 4,851 through 4,875 of 26,493 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.