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The Phantom Rickshaw and Other Ghost

by Rudyard Kipling

Contains the following stories: THE PHANTOM 'RICKSHAW MY OWN TRUE GHOST STORY THE STRANGE RIDE OF MORROWBIE JUKES THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING "THE FINEST STORY IN THE WORLD"

The Magic Fishbone

by Charles Dickens

There was once a King, and he had a Queen; and he was the manliest of his sex, and she was the loveliest of hers. The King was, in his private profession, Under Government. The Queen's father had been a medical man out of town.

The Lost Prince

by Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Lost Prince is a novel by British-American author Frances Hodgson Burnett, first published in 1915 following Marco Loristan, his father, and his friend, a street urchin called "The Rat" working to overthrow the cruel dictatorship in the kingdom of Samavia.

The Little Colonel

by Annie Fellows Johnston

The scene of this story is laid in Kentucky. Its heroine is a small girl, who is known as the Little Colonel, on account of her fancied resemblance to an old-school Southern gentleman, whose fine estate and old family are famous in the region.

The Life and Adventures of Santa Clau

by L. Frank Baum

This story of Santa Claus veers away slightly from the traditional stories of his beginnings. L. Frank Baum creates a world of fantasy that surrounds Santa Claus's life. Orphaned at an infant he is found by the nymph Necile, who convinces the great Ak to allow her to raise Claus for her own. As he grows older he meets his fellow humans, and sees the neglect of children. This sets him on the path to making toys and becoming the beloved Saint Nicholas we are familiar with today.

The Irish Twins

by Lucy Fitch Perkins

Lucy Fitch Perkins (1865-1937) was an American children's book author and illustrator, famous for writing the "Twins" series of books. She wrote books giving pictures of child life in other countries, and then, for the benefit of American and foreign born children alike, she also wrote books which gave some idea of what had been done for this country by those who had founded and developed it.

The House of Arden

by E. Nesbit

With the Arden family castle in ruins and the family treasure lost for generations, Edred Arden is graced with the chance of a lifetime just prior to his tenth birthday. When he inherits the title of Lord he discovers that if he can find the lost family treasure before he turns ten, it will be his. With his sister Elfrida at his side, Edred sets out on a magical time-travelling quest to restore the House of Arden to its former glory. Fans of Edith Nesbit will delight in this wonderful children's story of fantastical adventure.

The Giant's Robe

by F. Anstey

Thomas Anstey Guthrie was an English novelist and journalist, who wrote his comic novels under the pseudonym F. Anstey.

The Gate of the Giant Scissors

by Annie Fellows Johnston

Annie Fellows Johnston (1863-1931) was an American author of juvenile fiction, most well-known for the Little Colonel series, the first book of which was made into a 1935 movie starring Shirley Temple, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson and Lionel Barrymore. Johnston based her characters on friends and family, many of whom appear in several different series. Her semi-biographical characters include The Old Colonel, Mom Beck, Papa Jack, Mrs Sherman, Aunt Allison, and the Waltons. Her first novel, Big Brother was published in 1894 followed by The Little Colonel (1895), and 13 novels in the Little Colonel series. Other works include; Ole Mammy's Torment (1897), Two Little Knights of Kentucky (1899), The Story of Dago (1900), The Quilt that Jack Built (1905), The Legend of the Bleeding-Heart (1907), The Rescue of the Princess Winsome (1908) and Georgina of the Rainbows (1916).

The Flight of the Shadow

by George Macdonald

The young orphan, Belorba Whichcote, struggles to uncover the mysterious secret, which her uncle attempts to keep hidden from her

The Enchanted Island of Yew

by L. Frank Baum

E. Nesbit's classic story of how Gerald, Cathy and Jimmy find an enchanted garden and awake a princess from a hundred-year sleep, only to have her immediately made invisible by a magic ring. Her rescue is difficult, funny and sometimes frightening.

The Enchanted Castle

by E. Nesbit

The Enchanted Castle is a children's fantasy novel by Edith Nesbit first published in 1907.

The Camp Fire Girls Solve a Mystery

by Hildegard G. Frey

Published in 1919, The Camp Fire Girls Solve a Mystery, or, the Christmas Adventure at Carver House is the 58th book written in The Camp Fire Girls series.

The Camp Fire Girls on the March

by Jane L. Stewart

Published in 1914, The Camp Fire Girls on the March, or Bessie King's Test of Friendship is the 21st book written in The Camp Fire Girls series.

The Camp Fire Girls on the Farm

by Jane L. Stewart

Published in 1914, The Camp Fire Girls on the Farm, or Bessie King's New Chum is the 20th book written in The Camp Fire Girls series.

The Camp Fire Girls' Larks and Pranks

by Hildegard G. Frey

Published in 1917, The Camp Fire Girls' Larks and Pranks, or The House of the Open Door is the 34th book written in The Camp Fire Girls series.

The Camp Fire Girls in the Woods

by Jane L. Stewart

""Now then, you, Bessie, quit your loafin' and get them dishes washed! An' then you can go out and chop me some wood for the kitchen fire!" The voice was that of a slatternly woman of middle age, thin and complaining. She had come suddenly into the kitchen of the Hoover farmhouse and surprised Bessie King as the girl sat resting for a moment and reading."

The Camp Fire Girls in the Mountains

by Jane L. Stewart

On the shores of Long Lake the dozen girls who made up the Manasquan Camp Fire of the Camp Fire Girls of America were busily engaged in preparing for a friendly contest and matching of skill that had caused the greatest excitement among the girls ever since they had learned that it was to take place. For the first time since the organization of the Camp Fire under the guardianship of Miss Eleanor Mercer, the girls were living with no aid but their own. They did all the work of the camp; even the rough work, which, in any previous camping expedition of more than one or two days, men had done for them. For Miss Mercer, the Guardian, felt that one of the great purposes of the Camp Fire movement was to prove that girls and women could be independent of men when the need came. It was her idea that before the coming of the Camp Fire idea girls had been too willing to look to their brothers and their other men folks for services which they should be able, in case of need, to perform for themselves, and that, as a consequence, when suddenly deprived of the support of their natural helpers and protectors, many girls were in a particularly helpless and unfortunate position. So the Camp Fire movement, designed to give girls self-reliance and the ability to do without outside help, struck her as an ideal means of correcting what she regarded as faults in the modern methods of educating women.

The Camp Fire Girls in the Maine Wood

by Hildegard G. Frey

This lively Camp Fire group and their Guardian go back to Nature in a camp in the wilds of Maine and pile up more adventures in one summer than they have had in all their previous vacations put together. Before the summer is over they have transformed Gladys, the frivolous boarding school girl, into a genuine Winnebago.

The Camp Fire Girls Do Their Bit

by Hildegard G. Frey

The long train, which for nearly an hour had been gliding smoothly forward with a soothing, cradling motion of its heavy trucked Pullmans, and a crooning, lullaby sound of its droning wheels, came to a jarring stop at one of the mountain stations, and Lieutenant Allison wakened with a start. The echo of the laugh that he had heard in his dream still sounded in his ears, a tantalizing, compelling note, elusive as the Pipes of Pan, luring as a will-o'-the-wisp. Above the bustle of departing and incoming passengers, the confusion of the station and the grinding of the wheels as the train started again that haunting peal of laughter still rang in his ears, still held him in its thrall, calling him back into the dream from which he had just awakened. Still heavy with sleep and also somewhat light-headed--for he had been traveling for two days and the strain was beginning to tell on him, although the doctors had at last pronounced him able to make the journey home for a month's furlough--he leaned his head against the cool green plush back-rest and stared idly through half-closed eyelids down the long vista of the Pullman aisle. Then his pulses gave a leap and the blood began to pound in his ears and he thought he was back in the base hospital again and the fever was playing tricks on him. For down in the shadowy end of the aisle there moved a figure which his sleep-heavy eyes recognized as the Maiden, the one who had flitted through his weeks of delirium, luring him, beckoning him, calling him, eluding him, vanishing from his touch with a peal of silvery laughter that echoed in his ears with a haunting sweetness long after she and the fever had fled away together in the night, not to return. And now, weeks afterward, here she stood, in the shadowy end of a Pullman aisle, watching him from afar, just as she had stood watching in those other days when he and the fever were wrestling in mortal combat.

The Camp Fire Girls at School

by Hildegard G. Frey

"Speaking of diaries," said Gladys Evans, "what do you think of this for one?" She spread out a bead band, about an inch and a half wide and a yard or more long, in which she had worked out in colors the main events of her summer's camping trip with the Winnebago Camp Fire Girls. The girls dropped their hand work and crowded around Gladys to get a better look at the band, which told so cleverly the story of their wonderful summer. "Oh, look," cried "Sahwah" Brewster, excitedly pointing out the figures, "there's Shadow River and the canoe floating upside down, and Ed Roberts serenading Gladys--only it turned out to be Sherry serenading Nyoda--and the Hike, and the Fourth of July pageant, and everything!" The Winnebagos were loud in their expressions of admiration, and the "Don't you remembers" fell thick and fast as they recalled the events depicted in the bead band.

The Camp Fire Girls at Long Lake

by Jane L. Stewart

I told you we were going to be happy here, didn't I, Zara? The speaker was Dolly Ransom, a black-haired, mischievous Wood Gatherer of the Camp Fire Girls, a member of the Manasquan Camp Fire, the Guardian of which was Miss Eleanor Mercer, or Wanaka, as she was known in the ceremonial camp fires that were held each month. The girls were staying with her at her father's farm, and only a few days before Zara, who had enemies determined to keep her from her friends of the Camp Fire, had been restored to them, through the shrewd suspicions that a faithless friend had aroused in Bessie King, Zara's best chum. Zara and Dolly were on top of a big wagon, half filled with new-mown hay, the sweet smell of which delighted Dolly, although Zara, who had lived in the country, knew it too well to become wildly enthusiastic over anything that was so commonplace to her. Below them, on the ground, two other Camp Fire Girls in the regular working costume of the Camp Fire - middy blouses and wide blue bloomers - were tossing up the hay, under the amused direction of Walter Stubbs, one of the boys who worked on the farm.

The Brass Bottle

by F. Anstey

A djinn, sealed in a jar for three thousand years, has been found by Horace Ventimore, a young and not very flourishing architect. Upon his release the djinn expresses his gratitude by seeking to grant his benefactor's every wish--generally with results the very opposite to those desired!

The Book of Dragons

by E. Nesbit

Eight madcap tales of unpredictable dragons -- including one made of ice, another that takes refuge in the General Post Office, and a fire-breathing monster that flies out of an enchanted book and eats an entire soccer team! Marvelous adventure and excitement for make-believers of all ages.

The Adventures of Odysseus And The Ta

by Padraic Colum

Travel back to a mythical time when Achilles, aided by the gods, waged war against the Trojans. And join Odysseus on his journey through murky waters, facing obstacles like the terrifying Scylla and whirring Charybdis, the beautiful enchantress Circe, and the land of the raging Cyclôpes. Using narrative threads from The Iliad and The Odyssey, Padraic Colum weaves a stunning adventure with all the drama and power that Homer intended.

Showing 4,876 through 4,900 of 16,084 results

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