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Hosni Mubarak and the Future of Democracy in Egypt

by Alaa Al-Din Arafat

The Egyptian revolution of 2011 captivated the world and served as the focal point of the regional uprisings that have collectively come to be known as the Arab Spring. Even now the world waits to see whether the country's elections will aid the progress of liberal democracy or resurgent Islamism. In this essential study, Egyptian scholar Alaa Al-Din Arafat provides a comprehensive look at the political, diplomatic, religious, and socioeconomic factors that were at play in the time leading up to the protests that led to the ouster of Hosni Mubarak. This edition includes a new foreword that reflects on the developments of the last year, providing valuable new context and exploring possible future outcomes.

The Disney Middle Ages

by Susan Aronstein Tison Pugh

For many, the middle ages depicted in Walt Disney movies have come to figure as the middle ages, forming the earliest visions of the medieval past for much of the contemporary Western (and increasingly Eastern) imagination. The essayists of The Disney Middle Ages explore Disney's mediation and re-creation of a fairy-tale and fantasy past, not to lament its exploitation of the middle ages for corporate ends, but to examine how and why these medieval visions prove so readily adaptable to themed entertainments many centuries after their creation. What results is a scrupulous and comprehensive examination of the intersection between the products of the Disney Corporation and popular culture's fascination with the middle ages.

The Bride's Secret: The Pregnancy Shock\A Stormy Greek Marriage

by Lynne Graham

Let USA TODAY bestselling author Lynne Graham whisk you away with this sparkling romance about scandal, secrets and falling in love… When innocent Billie Foster spends a wild night with her gorgeous Greek billionaire boss, Alexei Drakos, she can't quite believe what just happened! But before they can talk about it, an accident wipes Alexei's memory. He has no idea that they slept together. But Billie can't forget that night—because she's pregnant…with Alexei's baby! She takes eight months off to hide away, but when she returns she finds that while her irresistible boss still doesn't remember anything of their time together, he wants to make her his bride… It's supposed to be a simple, convenient match. So how can she tell him her biggest secret—that he's the father of her baby boy? But with the vows spoken and their honeymoon heating up, Billie knows she must reveal the truth and hope their wedding night will jog Alexei's memory! Previously published in two parts as The Pregnancy Shock and A Stormy Greek Marriage in 2010.

Confessions: An Innocent Life in Communist China

by Kang Zhengguo Susan Wilf

"A mesmerizing read.... A literary work of high distinction." --William Grimes, New York Times This "gripping and poignant memoir" (New York Times Book Review) draws us into the intersections of everyday life and Communist power from the first days of "Liberation" in 1949 through the post-Mao era. The son of a professional family, Kang Zhengguo is a free spirit, drawn to literature. In Mao's China, these innocuous circumstances expose him at age twenty to a fierce struggle session, expulsion from university, and a four-year term of hard labor. So begins his long stay in the prison-camp system. He finally escapes the Chinese gulag by forfeiting his identity: at age twenty-eight he is adopted by an aging bachelor in a peasant village, which enables him to start a new life.

Inventing Human Rights: A History

by Lynn Hunt

"A tour de force."--Gordon S. Wood, New York Times Book Review How were human rights invented, and how does their tumultuous history influence their perception and our ability to protect them today? From Professor Lynn Hunt comes this extraordinary cultural and intellectual history, which traces the roots of human rights to the rejection of torture as a means for finding the truth. She demonstrates how ideas of human relationships portrayed in novels and art helped spread these new ideals and how human rights continue to be contested today.

In Reckless Hands: Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near-Triumph of American Eugenics

by Victoria F. Nourse

The disturbing, forgotten history of America's experiment with eugenics. In the 1920s and 1930s, thousands of men and women were sterilized at asylums and prisons across America. Believing that criminality and mental illness were inherited, state legislatures passed laws calling for the sterilization of "habitual criminals" and the "feebleminded." But in 1936, inmates at Oklahoma's McAlester prison refused to cooperate; a man named Jack Skinner was the first to come to trial. A colorful and heroic cast of characters--from the inmates themselves to their devoted, self-taught lawyer--would fight the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Only after Americans learned the extent of another large-scale eugenics project--in Nazi Germany--would the inmates triumph. Combining engrossing narrative with sharp legal analysis, Victoria F. Nourse explains the consequences of this landmark decision, still vital today--and reveals the stories of these forgotten men and women who fought for human dignity and the basic right to have a family.

Bill Mauldin: A Life Up Front

by Todd Depastino

"A deeply felt, vivacious and wonderfully illustrated biography." --Clancy Sigal, Los Angeles Times Book Review A self-described "desert rat" who rocketed to fame at the age of twenty-two, Bill Mauldin used flashing black brush lines and sardonic captions to capture the world of the American combat soldier in World War II. His cartoon dogfaces, Willie and Joe, appeared in Stars and Stripes and hundreds of newspapers back home, bearing grim witness to life in the foxhole. We've never viewed war in the same way since. This lushly illustrated biography draws on private papers, correspondence, and thousands of original drawings to render a full portrait of a complex and quintessentially American genius.

Servants of the Map: Stories

by Andrea Barrett

"Luminous....Each [story] is rich and independent and beautiful and should draw Barrett many new admirers."--Publishers Weekly, starred review Ranging across two centuries, and from the western Himalaya to an Adirondack village, these wonderfully imagined stories and novellas travel the territories of yearning and awakening, of loss and unexpected discovery. A mapper of the highest mountain peaks realizes his true obsession. A young woman afire with scientific curiosity must come to terms with a romantic fantasy. Brothers and sisters, torn apart at an early age, are beset by dreams of reunion. Throughout, Barrett's most characteristic theme--the happenings in that borderland between science and desire--unfolds in the diverse lives of unforgettable human beings. Although each richly layered tale stands independently, readers of Ship Fever (National Book Award winner) and Barrett's extraordinary novel The Voyage of the Narwhal, will discover subtle links both among these new stories and to characters in the earlier works.

Requiem, Mass.: A Novel

by John Dufresne

In the tragicomic mode of his best-selling Louisiana Power & Light, a hilarious and tenderhearted novel about a son's attempts to save his family. John Dufresne takes us to Requiem, Mass., heart of the Commonwealth, where Johnny's mom, Frances, is driving in the breakdown lane once again. She thinks Johnny and his little sister Audrey have been replaced by aliens; she's sure of it, and she's pretty certain that she herself is already dead, or she wouldn't need to cover the stink of her rotting flesh with Jean Naté Apres Bain. Dad, truck driver and pathological liar, is down South somewhere living his secret life. And Audrey, when she's not walking her cat Deluxe in a baby stroller, spends her time locked in a closet telling herself stories. Johnny, meanwhile, is hell-bent on saving the family from itself. In his "truly original voice" (Miami Herald) and with the "miraculous beauty of his tale-telling" (New York Times Book Review), Dufresne brings his unparalleled eye for the tragic and the absurd to the dysfunctions and joys of family in this powerful new novel.

The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad (Revised Edition)

by Fareed Zakaria

"A work of tremendous originality and insight. ... Makes you see the world differently."--Washington Post Translated into twenty languages ?The Future of Freedom ?is a modern classic that uses historical analysis to shed light on the present, examining how democracy has changed our politics, economies, and social relations. Prescient in laying out the distinction between democracy and liberty, the book contains a new afterword on the United States's occupation of Iraq and a wide-ranging update of the book's themes.

Barbarians to Angels: The Dark Ages Reconsidered

by Peter S. Wells

A rich and surprising look at the robust European culture that thrived after the collapse of Rome. The barbarians who destroyed the glory that was Rome demolished civilization along with it, and for the next four centuries the peasants and artisans of Europe barely held on. Random violence, mass migration, disease, and starvation were the only ways of life. This is the picture of the Dark Ages that most historians promote. But archaeology tells a different story. Peter Wells, one of the world's leading archaeologists, surveys the archaeological record to demonstrate that the Dark Ages were not dark at all. The kingdoms of Christendom that emerged starting in the ninth century sprang from a robust, previously little-known European culture, albeit one that left behind few written texts.

The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story

by Diane Ackerman

The New York Times bestseller: a true story in which the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands. After their zoo was bombed, Polish zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski managed to save over three hundred people from the Nazis by hiding refugees in the empty animal cages. With animal names for these "guests," and human names for the animals, it's no wonder that the zoo's code name became "The House Under a Crazy Star." Best-selling naturalist and acclaimed storyteller Diane Ackerman combines extensive research and an exuberant writing style to re-create this fascinating, true-life story--sharing Antonina's life as "the zookeeper's wife," while examining the disturbing obsessions at the core of Nazism. Winner of the 2008 Orion Award.

Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex

by Mary Roach

"Rich in dexterous innuendo, laugh-out-loud humor and illuminating fact. It's compulsively readable." --Los Angeles Times Book Review In ?Bonk, ?the best-selling author of Stiff turns her outrageous curiosity and insight on the most alluring scientific subject of all: sex. Can a person think herself to orgasm? Why doesn't Viagra help women-or, for that matter, pandas? Can a dead man get an erection? Is vaginal orgasm a myth? Mary Roach shows us how and why sexual arousal and orgasm-two of the most complex, delightful, and amazing scientific phenomena on earth-can be so hard to achieve and what science is doing to make the bedroom a more satisfying place.

The Grenada Revolution in the Caribbean Present

by Shalini Puri

The Grenada Revolution in the Caribbean Present: Operation Urgent Memory is the first scholarly book from the humanities on the subject of the Grenada Revolution and the US intervention. It is simultaneously a critique, tribute, and memorial. It argues that in both its making and its fall, the 1979-1983 Revolution was a transnational event that deeply impacted politics and culture across the Caribbean and its diaspora during its life and in the decades since its fall. Drawing together studies of landscape, memorials, literature, music, painting, photographs, film and TV, cartoons, memorabilia traded on e-bay, interviews, everyday life, and government, journalistic, and scholarly accounts, the book assembles and analyzes an archive of divergent memories. In an analysis that is relevant to all micro-states, the book reflects on how Grenada's small size shapes memory, political and poetic practice, and efforts at reconciliation.

Loss and Cultural Remains in Performance

by Heather Davis-Fisch

In 1845, John Franklin's Northwest Passage expedition disappeared. The expedition left an archive of performative remains that entice one to consider the tension between material remains and memory and reflect on how substitution and surrogation work alongside mourning and melancholia as responses to loss.

Culture, Faith, and Philanthropy

by Joseph P. Ward

Empowered by new wealth and by their faith, early modern Londoners began to use philanthropy to assert their cultural authority in distant parts of the nation. Culture, Faith, and Philanthropy analyzes how disputes between London and provincial authorities over such benefactions demonstrated the often tense relations between center and periphery.

Secondary Education And The Raising Of The School-leaving Age

by Steven Cowan Gary Mcculloch Tom Woodin

The progressive raising of the school-leaving age has had momentous repercussions for our understanding of childhood and youth, for secondary education, and for social and educational inequality. This book assesses secondary education and the raising of the school-leaving age in the UK and places issues and debates in an international context.

Reading Memory And Identity In The Texts Of Medieval European Holy Women

by Brad Herzog Margaret Cotter-Lynch

Drawing upon much of the recent scholarly interest in the nature and uses of memory, this collection of essays examines a range of texts commemorating European holy women from the ninth through fifteenth centuries. The contributors explore the relationship between memorial practices and identity formation in two ways: first, by showing how women drew upon traditions and memories in fashioning their own lived lives; and secondly, by showing how both male and female authors used medieval memory arts to portray those lives for contemporary and future audiences. This book will interest scholars of medieval literature, medieval religious history, feminist scholars, and historians of rhetoric.

Spectral Shakespeares

by Maurizio Calbi

Spectral Shakespeares is an illuminating exploration of recent, experimental adaptations of Shakespeare on film, TV, and the web. Drawing on adaptation studies and media theory as well as Jacques Derrida's work, this book argues that these adaptations foreground a cluster of self-reflexive "themes" - from incorporation to reiteration, from migration to addiction, from silence to survival - that contribute to the redefinition of adaptation, and Shakespearean adaptation in particular, as an unfinished and interminable process. The "Shakespeare" that emerges from these adaptations is a fragmentary, mediatized, and heterogeneous presence, a spectral Shakespeare that leaves a mark on our contemporary mediascape.

British Literary Salons Of The Late Eighteenth And Early Nineteenth Centuries

by Susanne Schmid

During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, British salons were veritable hothouses of political and cultural agitation, with renowned guests such as Byron, Moore, Thackeray, and Baillie. In this comprehensive study of the British salon, Susanne Schmid traces the activities of threesalonni#65533;res: Mary Berry, Lady Holland, and the Countess of Blessington. Mapping out the central place these circles held in London, this study explains to what extent they shaped intellectual debate and publishing ventures. Using a large number of sources — diaries, letters, silver-fork novels, satires, travel writing,Keepsakes, and imaginary conversations — the book establishes sociable networks of days gone by.

Approximating Prudence

by Andrew M. Yuengert

In a unique undertaking, Andrew Yuengert explores and describes the limits to the economic model of the human being, providing an alternative account of human choice, to which economic models can be compared.

Derivatives and Development

by Sasha Breger Bush

Breger Bush argues that derivatives markets work in the development context as engines of inequality and instability, aggravating poverty among those they are purported to help and highlighting some of the dangers of neoliberal globalization for the poor.

What Water Is Worth: Overlooked Non-Economic Value in Water Resources

by Zachary A. Smith Kira Artemis Russo

This book addresses both conventional and non-conventional values of water, discussing the value of water as it relates to conventional microeconomics, water's true utility and government regulation, and new and current practices in water management

The Perfect Liar

by Brenda Novak

Obsession leads to lies…When air force captain Luke Trussell opens his door one Sunday morning, he's shocked to find the police—and even more shocked when they charge him with rape. He knows he made a mistake in judgment the night before, but he certainly didn't force his attentions on the woman who's been stalking him for months.Problem is…Karina Harter has the bruises—and the DNA evidence—to make her claim convincing.And lies can lead to murder.Determined to isolate Luke, Karina goes to victims' rights advocate Ava Bixby of The Last Stand, hoping Ava will help put Luke behind bars. But Ava soon realizes she's defending the wrong victim.Problem is…switching her support to Luke could be dangerous—especially when she falls for him. Because Karina won't tolerate losing the man she wants to anyone. Least of all Ava…

The Perfect Couple

by Brenda Novak

One afternoon in May, Zoe Duncan's thirteen-year-old daughter goes missing from her own backyard. The police think Samantha ran away because she's unhappy about her mother's upcoming marriage—but Zoe doesn't believe it. In fact, she's willing to do anything to bring Sam home, even if it means losing her job, her beautiful home, her fiancé. Even if it means divulging all her secrets to a private investigator.Jonathan Stivers is a P.I. who donates his time to The Last Stand, a victims' charity in Sacramento. He's good at what he does, the best. But never has he had fewer leads to work with—or been more attracted to a client. Jonathan's sure of only one thing: Sam was taken by someone close to the family. He doesn't know how close until he realizes that the "perfect" couple next door is anything but….

Showing 4,876 through 4,900 of 17,301 results

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