Browse Results

Showing 51 through 75 of 11,638 results

Responsibilities in the Supply Chain

by Nien-He Hsieh

Industry and Background Note

Wolfgang Puck: Setting the Table for the Future

by Boris Groysberg Matthew Preble

Case

Cisco Systems: Managing the Go-to-Market Evolution

by V. Kasturi Rangan

With the collapse of the dot-com market and related shrinkage in the high-tech industry, Cisco took a dip in its sales and profits in 2001. Coming back from the recession, Cisco had to manage and evolve its go-to-market strategy and design in keeping with its new business strategy. Describes those changes and poses new channel management challenges in light of Cisco's entry into new markets and technologies.

Major League Baseball Advanced Media: America's Pastime Goes Digital

by Anita Elberse Brett Laffel

In January 2010, Bob Bowman, chief executive officer of Major League Baseball Advanced Media -- MLB's digital arm -- is facing a number of decisions related to its app for Apple's new iPad. For example, what are the best name, price, and set of features for MLBAM's iPad app? The case describes what is often seen as one of the most successful paid-content businesses in sports and media. Provides in-depth information on MLBAM's four main sources of revenues and relates those to the league's overall revenues. It also describes the company's online and mobile offerings in considerable detail and outlines the choices facing MLB's offering for Apple's iPad device, enabling a rich discussion of viable marketing strategies.

Note on Neuromarketing

by Uma Karmarkar

Industry and Background Note

Marquee: Reinventing the Business of Nightlife

by Anita Elberse Ryan Barlow Sheldon Wong

In January 2013, nightlife impresarios Jason Strauss and Noah Tepperberg are celebrating the re-opening of their famed New York City-based nightclub Marquee. While most clubs are over within their first one and a half years, Strauss and Tepperberg managed to keep Marquee one of NYC's hottest clubs for almost nine years. Meanwhile, they significantly expanded their portfolio of clubs in New York City, Las Vegas, and abroad. Now, after a costly renovation of Marquee New York City, would their investment pay off? Was it a wise idea to model the revamped club after its namesake in Las Vegas that had become North America's highest-grossing club by focusing on electronic dance music and featuring a high-profile DJ every night? Could Strauss and Tepperberg make the seemingly risky economics-which involved placing large bets on superstar DJs-work in a very different market?

Measuring True Value at Ambuja Cement

by V. Kasturi Rangan Suraj Srinivasan Namrata Arora

Professors V. Kasturi Rangan and Suraj Srinivasan and Associate Director Namrata Arora (India Research Center) prepared this case. It was reviewed and approved before publication by a company designate. Funding for the development of this case was provided by Harvard Business School and not by the company. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis for class discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective management.

The Brand Management of Places

by Elie Ofek Nathaniel Schwalb

Industry and Background Note

Sales Force Management at Nobel Ilac

by Gamze Yucaoglu Doug J. Chung

The case opens in 2017 as Hakan Sahin, CEO of Nobel, the Turkish pharmaceuticals company, reviews Nobel's year-to-date performance. The case describes the pharmaceutical market and sales channels in Turkey and provides a background on Nobel. The case also provides details about a transformation strategy; particularly, a customer segmentation plan, whereby the salesforce began to use a scientific matrix when determining their call plans. As a result, between 2014- 2017, Nobel increased its sales significantly and its previously negative EBITDA reached double digit positive numbers. In 2017, two key issues still remained: growth was not as high as desired, and the voluntary turnover rate for the sales force was very high. Given that the sales force was the only go-to-market channel for Nobel, Sahin needed to do something to reduce the sales force turnover without affecting the positive trend in sales and profits. He contemplated the options with his executive team where many proposed a change in sales force compensation. Should he increase the fixed base salary, increase the performance-based variable pay, or change the fundamental structure of compensation? Or should Sahin keep compensation the same and adjust other factors such as the recruitment criteria, mentoring, and (or) training?

Kjell and Company: Motivating Salespeople with Incentive Compensation (C)

by Doug J. Chung

Kjell & Company was a Swedish retail electronics chain founded in 1988 by brothers Marcus, Mikael and Fredrik Dahnelius. The company operated 84 stores, all company-owned, located mainly in the metropolitan areas of Sweden's most popular cities: Stockholm, Gothemburg and Malm . The company's products consisted of home electronics, accessories for home electronics and cellular phones (e.g., networking accessories, headsets and phone cases), and parts for consumer electronics and appliances (e.g., semiconductors and switches). The company was noted for its excellent customer service and a fair "one-for-all" HR policy. The company had a direct sales force of about 350 in-store salespeople. The salespeople historically had been compensated by a fixed salary and a variable commission conditional on meeting a monthly sales quota. Anecdotal evidence suggested that the monthly-quota compensation scheme might have demotivated some salespeople toward the end of the month, as those who fell short early in a month simply gave up because they had no chance of meeting quota. Thus, to mitigate this problem, management proposed a shorter temporal horizon daily-quota scheme. The (A) case focuses on the decision faced by the CEO, Thomas Keifer, on whether to change the sales force compensation plan to a temporally shorter daily-quota scheme and, if so, how to implement the change-that is, whether to run a pilot study with the new plan (implementing it at a few selected stores) or to launch the plan at all stores simultaneously. The (B), (C), and (D) cases show the results of various metrics across different types of salespeople after the change in the compensation plan was implemented. The case series explores different ways to analyze data for inference about salespeople's behavior caused by a change in the compensation plan. Also, the case series shows ways to experiment with the compensation plan for causal inference.

Kjell and Company: Motivating Salespeople with Incentive Compensation (D)

by Doug J. Chung

Kjell & Company was a Swedish retail electronics chain founded in 1988 by brothers Marcus, Mikael and Fredrik Dahnelius. The company operated 84 stores, all company-owned, located mainly in the metropolitan areas of Sweden's most popular cities: Stockholm, Gothemburg and Malm . The company's products consisted of home electronics, accessories for home electronics and cellular phones (e.g., networking accessories, headsets and phone cases), and parts for consumer electronics and appliances (e.g., semiconductors and switches). The company was noted for its excellent customer service and a fair "one-for-all" HR policy. The company had a direct sales force of about 350 in-store salespeople. The salespeople historically had been compensated by a fixed salary and a variable commission conditional on meeting a monthly sales quota. Anecdotal evidence suggested that the monthly-quota compensation scheme might have demotivated some salespeople toward the end of the month, as those who fell short early in a month simply gave up because they had no chance of meeting quota. Thus, to mitigate this problem, management proposed a shorter temporal horizon daily-quota scheme. The (A) case focuses on the decision faced by the CEO, Thomas Keifer, on whether to change the sales force compensation plan to a temporally shorter daily-quota scheme and, if so, how to implement the change-that is, whether to run a pilot study with the new plan (implementing it at a few selected stores) or to launch the plan at all stores simultaneously. The (B), (C), and (D) cases show the results of various metrics across different types of salespeople after the change in the compensation plan was implemented. The case series explores different ways to analyze data for inference about salespeople's behavior caused by a change in the compensation plan. Also, the case series shows ways to experiment with the compensation plan for causal inference.

ZBJ: Building a Global Outsourcing Platform for Knowledge Workers (A)

by Feng Zhu Weiru Chen Shirley Sun

ZBJ.com (ZBJ), an online platform that connects knowledge workers to small and medium-sized enterprises, is China's largest outsourcing platform. Founded by Mingyue Zhu in 2006, ZBJ had grown into a unicorn with 4,000 employees and a daily transaction volume of RMB15 million by 2017. During the company's 11-year history, ZBJ had launched ten transformation campaigns to overcome various challenges by changing its products, operations, and business model. For example, it encountered winner-takes-all competition, disintermediation (when service providers and clients took transactions off the platform to avoid the platform's 20% commission fees), the rise of fake transactions, member management issues, and difficulties in delivering satisfactory services to large enterprises. Zhu must decide how to use the next campaign to address challenges that had emerged since the last campaign and how ZBJ should expand globally.

ZBJ: Building a Global Outsourcing Platform for Knowledge Workers (B)

by Feng Zhu Weiru Chen Shirley Sun

ZBJ.com (ZBJ), an online platform that connects knowledge workers to small and medium-sized enterprises, is China's largest outsourcing platform. Founded by Mingyue Zhu in 2006, ZBJ had grown into a unicorn with 4,000 employees and a daily transaction volume of RMB15 million by 2017. During the company's 11-year history, ZBJ had launched ten transformation campaigns to overcome various challenges by changing its products, operations, and business model. For example, it encountered winner-takes-all competition, disintermediation (when service providers and clients took transactions off the platform to avoid the platform's 20% commission fees), the rise of fake transactions, member management issues, and difficulties in delivering satisfactory services to large enterprises. Zhu must decide how to use the next campaign to address challenges that had emerged since the last campaign and how ZBJ should expand globally.

Ariadne Labs: Building Impactful Partnerships

by Ariel D. Stern Sarah Mehta

In September 2018, the executive team at Ariadne Labs (Ariadne), a Boston-based organization dedicated to improving health systems through the discovery and implementation of simple tools, faced a number of strategic decisions. Chief among them, the seven-year-old organization needed to determine how it might establish and shepherd successful partnerships with a wide range of diverse entities-ranging from major international public health organizations like the World Bank to small non-profit implementing organizations.

Bill Cummings: The Cummings Way

by Michael Norris Robert F. White Christina R. Wing

In 2019, Bill Cummings, founder of Cummings Properties and Cummings Foundation and billionaire signer of the Giving Pledge, is winding down his roles at his company and foundation. How should the management move the company forward?

Process Fundamentals

by James Leonard Ann E. Gray

This note provides an introduction for a course or module covering the basic elements of production or service operations and how processes are managed. Begins by discussing the activities that take place in a "process." Analysis tools such as the process flow diagram are provided. The types of management choices involved in designing, operating, and improving processes are described. Measures of process performance and basic process analysis are introduced. The different cost structures, capabilities, and performance characteristics of alternative types of processes are touched upon. Finally, the note focuses briefly on the complexity stemming from uncertainty and variability in processes and their external environments. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

A Simple Graphical Framework for Use in The Role of Government in Market Economies (RoGME)

by Matthew C. Weinzierl

Industry and Background Note

Libert , galit , fragilit : The Rise of Populism in France

by Vincent Pons

Case

Alere

by Raffaella Sadun Catherine Slater Channing Spencer

The Board of Alere, Inc, a leading medical diagnostic firm, is evaluating the offer made by Ron Zwanziger, the firm's founder and former CEO, to acquire the company and take it private. The offer arrives at the end of a tumultuous year for the company, which saw Zwanziger fighting and ultimately losing a confrontation with activist investors Coppersmith Capital. How should the board evaluate this offer? Should they reject it, on the basis that Zwanziger's decision to expand into integrated healthcare solutions was the main reason behind the company's poor stock performance, as Coppersmith claimed? Or should they once more place their trust in Zwanziger's leadership, and in Alere's ability to effectively implement his vision?

Walmart: Navigating a Changing Retail Landscape

by Michael E. Porter Jorge Ramirez-Vallejo

As the largest company, by revenue, in the world, Walmart has been a lightning rod for criticism. However, in an attempt to stay ahead of traditional and digital retailers, and keep customers satisfied with evolving demands, the company is strengthening its competitive advantage by creating Shared Value. Current CEO, Doug McMillon outlines his strategy for fending off competition, navigating a challenging retail landscape, and positioning Walmart as a leading retailer for today and the future.

Populism

by Vincent Pons

Professor Vincent Pons prepared this note as the basis for class discussion.

Democracy: Exit, Voice and Representation

by Vincent Pons

Industry and Background Note

Chinese Infrastructure Investments in Sri Lanka: A Pearl or a Teardrop on the Belt and Road?

by Meg Rithmire Yihao Li

In 2015, a surprise presidential election result seemed to imperil Chinese investments in Sri Lanka, which were associated with China's Belt and Road Initiative to build global infrastructure. In the previous decade, China had undertaken two major projects in the country: the construction of a port in the poor district of Hambantota (also the previous president's hometown), for which Sri Lanka borrowed 1.2 bn USD from the China Ex-Im bank, and a major real estate project outside of Colombo. The new administration pursued renegotiation of both contracts. In 2016, a Chinese state-owned company purchased the asset of the Hambantota port, generating concerns about sovereignty in Sri Lanka and Chinese naval ambitions in Delhi and Washington, DC. This case explores the dynamics of Chinas ambitious Belt and Road Initiative, a large-scale infrastructure and connectivity project launched under its powerful leader, Xi Jinping, as well as the politics and economics of sovereign borrowing in the age of Chinese lending. Did Sri Lanka fall victim to a sort of "debt diplomacy," or did the Chinese side fail to understand Sri Lanka's domestic political landscape? Was the sale of the asset the right choice for Sri Lanka? The right investment for China Merchants Group, which bought the 99-year lease?

Refine Search

Showing 51 through 75 of 11,638 results