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Duty First

by Ed Ruggero

Duty First is a penetrating account of a year inside one of America's premier schools for leadership -- the United States Military Academy -- as it celebrates the bicentennial of its founding. Ed Ruggero, a former West Point cadet and professor, takes an incisive look at how this elite school builds the "leaders of character" who will command the nation's military. Writing with deep insight and superb narrative skill, Ruggero follows the cadet's tumultuous lives: the initial grueling training; the strict student hierarchy and intense classroom work; and the interaction between the lowly first-year plebes and the upper-class cadets who train them. Duty First also shows the role played by the majors, captains, and sergeants, who oversee everything that happens at this unique institution.

Duty Free

by Moni Mohsin

Jane Austen's Emma, transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore.Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.Full of wit and wickedness and as clever as its heroine is clueless, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society -- though, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart, day by day, around her Louboutin-clad feet. Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War

by Robert M Gates

From the former secretary of defense, a strikingly candid, vivid account of serving Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. When Robert M. Gates received a call from the White House, he thought he'd long left Washington politics behind: After working for six presidents in both the CIA and the National Security Council, he was happily serving as president of Texas A&M University. But when he was asked to help a nation mired in two wars and to aid the troops doing the fighting, he answered what he felt was the call of duty.

The Duty of Delight

by Dorothy Day

For almost fifty years, through her tireless service to the poor and her courageous witness for peace, Dorothy Day offered an example of the gospel in action. Now the publication of her diaries, previously sealed for twenty-five years after her death, offers a uniquely intimate portrait of her struggles and concerns. Beginning in 1934 and ending in 1980, these diaries reflect her response to the vast changes in America, the Church, and the wider world. Day experienced most of the great social movements of her time but, as these diaries reveal, even while she labored for a transformed world, she simultaneously remained grounded in everyday human life: the demands of her extended Catholic worker family; her struggles to be more patient and charitable; the discipline of prayer and worship that structured her days; her efforts to find God in all the tasks and encounters of daily life. A story of faithful striving for holiness and the radical transformation of the world, Day's life challenges readers to imagine what it would be like to live as if the gospels were true.

The Duty of Delight

by Dorothy Day

For almost fifty years, through her tireless service to the poor and her courageous witness for peace, Dorothy Day offered an example of the gospel in action. Now the publication of her diaries, previously sealed for twenty-five years after her death, offers a uniquely intimate portrait of her struggles and concerns. Beginning in 1934 and ending in 1980, these diaries reflect her response to the vast changes in America, the Church, and the wider world. Day experienced most of the great social movements of her time but, as these diaries reveal, even while she labored for a transformed world, she simultaneously remained grounded in everyday human life: the demands of her extended Catholic worker family; her struggles to be more patient and charitable; the discipline of prayer and worship that structured her days; her efforts to find God in all the tasks and encounters of daily life. A story of faithful striving for holiness and the radical transformation of the world, Day's life challenges readers to imagine what it would be like to live as if the gospels were true.

Duty to Protect

by Roxanne Rustand

After nearly a lifetime in witness protection, Emma Graves depends on the anonymity of her false identity. But when her parents die under suspicious circumstances, and Emma is framed for murder, all security is gone. There's nothing to do but run. Cop-turned-rancher Jake Kincaid is an unlikely defender. Why would an ex-cop believe an accused killer? Still, Jake makes Emma feel safe. With his drive to protect, she knows staying on his ranch endangers them both-yet now that her heart's engaged, she's not sure she can walk away.

Dwarf: A Memoir

by Rennie Dyball Tiffanie Didonato

Tiffanie DiDonato was born with dwarfism. Her limbs were extremely short preventing her from even reaching her own ears. To achieve independence, she underwent a series of painful bone-lengthening surgeries that gave her an unprecedented 14 inches of height--and the independence she never thought she'd have. After her surgeries, Tiffanie was able to learn to drive, to live in the dorms during college, and to lead a normal life. As a volunteer during the War in Iraq, she wrote to the men stationed abroad. Specifically, she became a pen pal to one of the Marines, and because of this relationship, he ultimately became her husband. In this book, she wrote: "It's okay with me if you picked up this book because you're curious about what it's like to live with dwarfism. But I hope that you'll take away much more--about freedom, finding independence, and adapting to the world when it won't adapt to you."

Dwarf Rabbits: How to Take Care of Them and Understand Them

by Monika A. Wegler

This book deals with the keeping and care of dwarf rabbits as household pets.

The Dwarves

by Markus Heitz

For countless millennia, the dwarves of the Fifthling Kingdom have defended the stone gateway into Girdlegard. Many and varied foes have hurled themselves against the portal and died attempting to breach it. No man or beast has ever succeeded. Until now. . . Abandoned as a child, Tungdil the blacksmith labors contentedly in the land of Ionandar , the only dwarf in a kingdom of men. Although he does not want for friends, Tungdil is very much aware that he is alone - indeed, he has not so much as set eyes on another dwarf. But all that is about to change. Sent out into the world to deliver a message and reacquaint himself with his people, the young foundling finds himself thrust into a battle for which he has not been trained. Not only his own safety, but the life of every man, woman and child in Girdlegard depends upon his ability to embrace his heritage. Although he has many unanswered questions, Tungdil is certain of one thing: no matter where he was raised, he is a true dwarf. And no one has ever questioned the courage of the Dwarves.

The Dwarves of Whiskey Island

by Swann S. Andrew

In this sequel to "The Dragons of Cuyahoga," political reporter Kline Maxwell receives information about the unexplained suicide of the former City Council President, drawing Kline into a case that has dark spells, destruction, and death written all over it.

Dweeb: Burgers, Beasts, And Brainwashed Bullies

by Aaron Starmer

A smart and funny tale of perseverance, teamwork, and the true meaning of success. Strange things are happening at Ho-Ho-Kus Junior High. The cafeteria is covered in a sea of burger wrappers. Bullies aren't bullying anymore. And there's an eerie growling coming from the walls. If anyone can get to the bottom of these mysteries, it's Denton, Wendell, Eddie, Elijah, and Bijay. They may be misfits, but they're also the smartest kids in the eighth grade. There's just one problem. Vice Principal Snodgrass has framed them for a crime they didn't commit and imprisoned them in a secret room in the bowels of the school. His terms: Ace the dreaded Idaho Tests and all will be forgiven. Their plan: figure out who--or what--is to blame for the changes at school. It will take the nerdiest of skills. It will be scarier than talking to girls. It will be a true test, one that can be passed only by a select few. And those five boys are known as DWEEB. From the Hardcover edition.

Dwellers in the Crucible

by Margaret Wander Bonanno

DWELLERS IN THE CRUCIBLE Warrantors of Peace: the Federation's daring experiment to prevent war among its members. each Warrantor, man or woman is hostage for the government of his native world -- and is instantly killed if that world breaks the peace. Now Romulans have kidnapped six Warrantors, to foment political chaos -- and then civil war -- within the Federation. Captain Kirk must send Sulu to infiltrate Romulan territory, find the hostages, and bring them back alive -- before the Federation self-destructs!

Dwelling in Conflict

by Emily Mckee

Land disputes in Israel are most commonly described as stand-offs between distinct groups of Arabs and Jews. In Israel's southern region, the Negev, Jewish and Bedouin Arab citizens and governmental bodies contest access to land for farming, homes, and industry and struggle over the status of unrecognized Bedouin villages. "Natural," immutable divisions, both in space and between people, are too frequently assumed within these struggles. Dwelling in Conflict offers the first study of land conflict and environment based on extensive fieldwork within both Arab and Jewish settings. It explores planned towns for Jews and for Bedouin Arabs, unrecognized villages, and single-family farmsteads, as well as Knesset hearings, media coverage, and activist projects. Emily McKee sensitively portrays the impact that dividing lines--both physical and social--have on residents. She investigates the political charge of people's everyday interactions with their environments and the ways in which basic understandings of people and "their" landscapes drive political developments. While recognizing deep divisions, McKee also takes seriously the social projects that residents engage in to soften and challenge socio-environmental boundaries. Ultimately, Dwelling in Conflict highlights opportunities for boundary crossings, revealing both contemporary segregation and the possible mutability of these dividing lines in the future.

Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic

by Erskine Clarke

Published some thirty years ago, Robert Manson Myers's Children of Pride: The True Story of Georgia and the Civil War won the National Book Award in history and went on to become a classic reference on America's slaveholding South. That book presented the letters of the prominent Presbyterian minister and plantation patriarch Charles Colcock Jones (1804-1863), whose family owned more than one hundred slaves. While extensive, these letters can provide only one part of the story of the Jones family plantations in coastal Georgia. In this remarkable new book, the religious historian Erskine Clarke completes the story, offering a narrative history of four generations of the plantations' inhabitants, whiteandblack. Encompassing the years 1805 to 1869,Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epicdescribes the simultaneous but vastly different experiences of slave and slave owner. This "upstairsdownstairs" history reveals in detail how the benevolent impulses of Jones and his family became ideological supports for deep oppression, and how the slave Lizzy Jones and members of her family struggled against that oppression. Through letters, plantation and church records, court documents, slave narratives, archaeological findings, and the memory of the African-American community, Clarke brings to light the long-suppressed history of the slaves of the Jones plantations--a history inseparably bound to that of their white owners.

The Dwellings Debacle

by David Lee Stone

In the fourth book of the Illmoor Chronicles, a peculiar assortment of investigators must solve a mystery: Who kidnapped the viscount of Dullitch?Viscount Curfew, the ruler of Dullitch, has gone missing. In the middle of the night, with his entire palace guard inexplicably asleep, the viscount disappeared from his bedroom--a skillful kidnapping that will require help from the sharpest minds in Dullitch if the city is ever to see its leader again.Enoch Dwellings is as wily as he is arrogant. One of the capital city's best detectives, he is called upon to root out the perpetrators. But Jareth Obegarde, a half-vampire and rival sleuth, refuses to let the case go without a fight. Grappling for an advantage, Dwellings turns to Jimmy Quickstint, a gravedigger and former thief; Parsnip Daily, a professional tracker with a short-term memory problem; and even Lusa Mardris, Jareth's newly discovered daughter. Pursuit of the kidnappers leads Enoch and his crew on a wild journey into battle with everyone from a deadly shape-shifter to a master swordsman, all of whom demand one price in exchange for Viscount Curfew: blood.

Dwight D. Eisenhower: Young Military Leader

by George E. Stanley

Profiles the famous general of World War II who later became president of the U.S.A. from 1953-1961.

Dwightmare

by Orlando Sentinel Staff Brian Schmitz

As the last seconds ticked down at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis, the most bizarre, tumultuous and cursed season in the 23-year history of the Orlando Magic mercifully came to an end. Coach Stan Van Gundy, known to keep coaching until the final buzzer, walked to the opposing bench with 10 seconds left in the lopsided playoff elimination game to congratulate young Frank Vogel, coach of the Indiana Pacers. Even more conspicuous than this rare mid-game conciliatory gesture from Van Gundy was the absence of the team's most recognizable, talented superstar: Dwight Howard.Howard had always talked about winning a championship and bringing joy to Orlando. Despite this, the face of the franchise did not show his face throughout the playoffs, opting to undergo three weeks' worth of rehabilitation in the Los Angeles area following his season-ending back injury. This sour finale was an ignominious ending matched only by this ill-fated season's tumultuous beginning. Entering training camp after a prolonged off-season, Howard stunned the team and town by delivering a defiant trade request to Magic management. Even more devastating for Magic fans was that this request to be dealt to another team was vividly reminiscent of a similar event from a decade ago, when the Magic's last franchise star center, Shaquille O'Neal, abandoned Florida for the Los Angeles Lakers.Howard and the Magic for so long seemed like the perfect match, and had even grown up together in many ways. The 2004 NBA draft brought together a skinny, devoutly religious teenage sensation and a squeaky-clean, family-run ownership down on its luck. Howard blossomed into a global superstar, turning the Magic into contenders. The city of Orlando embraced its new happy-go-lucky hero and fell in love with its basketball team again. They were once inseparable, as close as a player and a franchise could possibly be in today's NBA.What followed was one of the most bizarre reality shows to befall any professional sports team in memory, with Howard taking the Magic on a wild, emotional and confounding ride. There was presidential-like flip-flopping, a near trade, an 11th-hour reprieve, farcical front-office fumbling, YouTube moments, a drunk-dialing accusation, media shenanigans and one heart-attack scare, among other things. And the soap opera is far from over. Follow the Orlando Sentinel's unmatched coverage of this ongoing saga with Dwightmare: Dwight Howard, the Orlando Magic, and the Season of Dysfunction. From the very beginning of Howard's career through the ouster of coach Stan Van Gundy and general manager Otis Smith, this book is the only place where the entirety of this saga's sordid details have been collected, analyzed, and boiled down to their bare facts. Dwightmare is a must read for Orlando Magic and basketball fans everywhere.

Dwyane Wade

by Jeff Savage

A biography about Dwyane Wade, his life and basketball career.

Dwyane Wade: Basketball Star / Estrella del baloncesto

by Mary Ann Hoffman Eduardo Alaman

Readers will love this bilingual English/Spanish title about the career of basketball star Dwayne Wade.

A Dybbuk

by Joachim Neugrochel Tony Kushner

Kushner's imaginative retelling of the classic mystical legend, The Dybbuk, by S. Ansky, the noted Russian and Yiddish-language folklorist, novelist and dramatist. Ansky formed an expedition which roamed throughout the Ukraine to preserve and collect Hasidic folktales. The Dybbuk was a product of that journey. Written before the outbreak of World War I, it wasn't produced until 1920, shortly after Ansky's death. It has been much-produced worldwide ever since.

Dyeing Wishes: A Haunted Yarn Shop Mystery

by Molly Macrae

Kath puts her detective skills to use once more in the latest installment of the Haunted Yarn Shop Mysteries series.

Dyer Consequences (A Knitting Mystery #5)

by Maggie Sefton

Kelly's spring project: rehabbing an alpaca ranch. But someone has different ideas for keeping her busy, including slashing tires and cracking windshields. Then the House of Lambspun knitting shop is trashed, and a woman is found drowned in a tub of dye. Although it seems like a burglary gone wrong, Kelly suspects there's more to it. And as disturbing incidents pile up, she must pick up the stitches of these crimes before the killer strikes again.

The Dyer's Hand and Other Essays

by W. H. Auden

In this volume, W. H. Auden assembled, edited, and arranged the best of his prose writing, including the famous lectures he delivered as Oxford Professor of Poetry. The Dyer's Hand is a surprisingly personal, intimate view of the author's mind, whose central focus is poetry--Shakespearean poetry in particular--but whose province is the author's whole experience of the twentieth century.

Showing 107,601 through 107,625 of 268,020 results

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