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Showing 114,526 through 114,550 of 146,345 results

Potbellied Pigs (Peculiar Pets)

by Natalie Lunis

Why would anyone welcome a potbellied pig into their home? Aren't pigs dirty, smelly animals? No way! In fact, potbellied pigs are clean, intelligent, and fun-loving pets. They can even be trained to do some tricks and walk on a leash. These playful porkers are no ordinary pets! A potbellied pig might be an unusual choice for an animal companion, but love comes in all kinds of packages. How can kids find out whether a pig is the right pet for them? Potbellied Pigs explores the responsibilities and rewards of caring for this pet through real-life anecdotes and practical advice. Engaging narrative text and vivid, eye-popping photos of these unique creatures will keep young readers turning the pages to find out more.

Potent Pleasures

by Eloisa James

Nothing is more seductive than temptation. Reckless desire sends Charlotte Daicheston into the garden with a dashing masked stranger. He's powerful, unforgettable, a devastatingly handsome footman who lures her--not against her will--into a grand indiscretion at a masquerade ball. Then he vanishes. Several years later, after Charlotte has made her dazzling debut in London society, they meet again. But the rogue is no footman. He's rich, titled, and he doesn't remember Charlotte. Worse, he's the subject of some scandalous gossip: rumor has it, the earl's virility is in question. Charlotte, who knows all too intimately the power of his passion, is stunned by the gossip that has set society ablaze. At last, there can be a storybook ending. . . unless, of course, Charlotte's one mad indiscretion had not been with him at all. . . .

The Potential Principle

by Edwin Louis Cole

TO DREAM THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM. I remember when God first spoke to me about changing the direction of my life. Throughout the entire year, He continually spoke to me, reinforcing His will for me.

A Potion for a Widow (Chronicles of Isaac of Girona #5)

by Caroline Roe

This is an excellent series set in 14th-century Spain. The sleuth is Isaac, a blind Jewish physician. He is often accompanied by his two assistance, his daughter Raquel, and a young moorish boy Yusuf who is apprenticed to him. Isaac and his family find themselves caught up in political and religious intrigue.

Potluck at Midnight Farm

by Tamara Weiss

Potlucks are the friendliest of gatherings. As guests take part in the festivities, sharing their contributions--a dish of pasta, a bottle of wine, a bunch of wildflowers--they share a bit of themselves. Author Tamara Weiss knows this well. A self-described "organizer, assembler, and table setter," she has all the qualities of the consummate host, as well as years of experience attending and planning potlucks.

Potluck: Parables of Giving, Taking, and Belonging

by Kim Thomas

It all begins at the table. A long table dressed in an oversized tablecloth and covered with various pyrex dishes, fiesta bowls, covered casseroles, dutch ovens, and cake plates. The tradition is familiar, the recipes are old and new, the people are known and unknown. But by the end of the evening, everyone is full, all having given something, taken something, and found something. This compelling and transparent collection of meditations is based on the Potluck dinner heritage. Kim Thomas explores the beauty and diversity of food at the community table as a metaphor for the community of faith. The table offers a place of discovery and delivery, becoming and belonging. Potluck: Parables of Giving, Taking, and Belonging is an insightful assembly of thoughts, a narrative moving readers to find that they have a place at the table-a place to give, to take, and to belong.

Potpies

by Elinor Klivans Scott Peterson

With succulent fillings under their golden toppings, it's no wonder that potpies have such a universal appeal. Author Elinor Klivans offers a huge range of filling options from vegetables and eggs to meats, chicken, or fish. And the variety of toppings is a real eye-opener: homemade crusts; story-bought phyllo or puff pastry; tortillas; quick-mixing corn bread or biscuits; even nuts, potatoes, or bread. These 50 recipes go from classics like beef and vegetable potpie or everyone's favorite chicken pot pie, to new takes like the Breakfast Special Potpie: Eggs, bacon, and potatoes with an Irish soda bread crust is a great new option for brunch. Also included are plenty of meatless versions, such as the sublime Spinach, Ricotta, and Parmesan Potpie topped with a delicious cream cheese crust. Advice about assembling and baking potpies assures that all parts of the fillings will be cooked just right and toppings will stand at crispy and proud attention. With useful ideas for do-ahead preparation, storing, freezing, and re-heating, there's nothing like Potpies!

Potsdam Station (John Russell #4)

by David Downing

In April 1945, Hitler's Reich is on the verge of extinction. Assaulted by Allied bombs and Soviet shells, ruled by Nazis with nothing to lose, Berlin has become the most dangerous place on earth. John Russell's son Paul is stationed on the Eastern Front with the German Army, awaiting the Soviets' final onslaught. In Berlin, Russell's girlfriend Effi has been living in disguise, helping fugitives to escape from Germany. With a Jewish orphan to care for, she's trying to outlast the Nazis. Russell hasn't heard from either of them since fleeing Germany in 1941. He is desperate to find out if they're alive and to protect them from the advancing Red Army. He flies to Moscow, seeking permission to enter Berlin with the Red Army as a journalist, but when the Soviet's arrest him as a spy, things look bleak-until they find a use for him that has him parachuting into Berlin behind German lines. From the Hardcover edition.

The Potter's Field: The Seventeenth Chronicle of Brother Cadfael

by Ellis Peters

The year is 1143 and this is the seventeenth chronicle of Brother Cadfael, of the Benedictine Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, at Shrewsbury. Once again, the gentle monk is forced to leave the tranquility of his herb garden and use his knowledge of human nature to solve a murder-this one frighteningly close to home. When a newly plowed field recently given to the Benedictine Abbey of Saint Peter and Saint Paul yields the body of a young woman, Brother Cadfael is quickly thrown into a delicate situation. The field was once owned by a local potter named Ruald who had abandoned his beautiful wife Generys to take monastic vows. Generys was said to have gone away with a lover, but now it seems as if she had been murdered. With the arrival at the Abbey of young Sulien Blount, a novice fleeing homeward from the civil war raging in East Anglia, the mysteries surrounding the corpse start to multiply.

The Potty Mouth at the Table

by Laurie Notaro

Pinterest. Foodies. Anne Frank's underwear. New York Times bestselling author Laurie Notaro--rightfully hailed as "the funniest writer in the solar system" (The Miami Herald)--spares nothing and no one, least of all herself, in this uproarious new collection of essays on rudeness. With the sardonic, self-deprecating wit that makes us all feel a little better about ourselves for identifying with her, Laurie explores her recent misadventures and explains why it's not her who is nuts, it's them (and okay, sometimes it's her too). Whether confessing that her obsession with buying fabric has reached junior hoarder status or mistaking a friend's heinous tattoo as temporary, Laurie puts her unique spin--sometimes bizarre, always entertaining--on the many perils of modern living in a mannerless society. From shuddering at the graphic Harry Potter erotica conjured up at a writer's group to lamenting the sudden ubiquity of quinoa ("It looks like larvae no matter how you cook it"), The Potty Mouth at the Table is whip-smart, unpredictable, and hilarious. In other words, irresistibly Laurie.

Potty Training: Top Tips From the Baby Whisperer

by Tracy Hogg Melinda Blau

From the bestselling Baby Whisperer franchise, a concise, detailed guide to potty training your toddler - available exclusively as a $1.99 eBook.

Pourquoi Tales (Leveled Readers 4.5.4)

by Ingeborg Peterson

An introduction to what a "pourquoi tale" is. Includes a tale of how fire was brought to the world.

Poverty Amid Plenty in the New India

by Atul Kohli

India has one of the fastest growing economies on earth. Over the past three decades, socialism has been replaced by pro-business policies as the way forward. And yet, in this 'new' India, grinding poverty is still a feature of everyday life. Some 450 million people subsist on less than $1.25 per day and nearly half of India's children are malnourished. In his latest book, Atul Kohli, a seasoned scholar of Indian politics and economics, blames this discrepancy on the narrow nature of the ruling alliance in India that, in its new-found relationship with business, has prioritized economic growth above all other social and political considerations. This thoughtful and challenging book affords an alternative vision of India's rise in the world that its democratic rulers will be forced to come to grips with in the years ahead.

Poverty and Children's Adjustment

by Suniya S. Luthar

An interdisciplinary perspective on the effects of poverty, lack of education, and other negative socioeconomic forces on children's development

Poverty and Discrimination

by Kevin Lang

Many ideas about poverty and discrimination are nothing more than politically driven assertions unsupported by evidence. And even politically neutral studies that do try to assess evidence are often simply unreliable. In Poverty and Discrimination, economist Kevin Lang cuts through the vast literature on poverty and discrimination to determine what we actually know and how we know it. Using rigorous statistical analysis and economic thinking to judge what the best research is and which theories match the evidence, this book clears the ground for students, social scientists, and policymakers who want to understand--and help reduce--poverty and discrimination. It evaluates how well antipoverty and antidiscrimination policies and programs have worked--and whether they have sometimes actually made the problems worse. And it provides new insights about the causes of, and possible solutions to, poverty and discrimination.The book begins by asking, "Who is poor?" and by giving a brief history of poverty and poverty policy in the United States in the twentieth century, including the Welfare Reform Act of 1996. Among the topics covered are the changing definition of poverty, the relation between economic growth and poverty, and the effects of labor markets, education, family composition, and concentrated poverty. The book then evaluates the evidence on racial discrimination in areas such as education, employment, and criminal justice, as well as sex discrimination in the labor market, and assesses the effectiveness of antidiscrimination policies.Throughout, the book is grounded in the conviction that we must have much better empirical knowledge of poverty and discrimination if we hope to reduce them.

Poverty in America

by John Iceland

The United States is among the most affluent nations in the world and has its largest economy; nevertheless, it has more poverty than most countries with similar standards of living. Growing income inequality and the Great Recession have made the problem worse. In this thoroughly revised edition of Poverty in America, Iceland takes a new look at this issue by examining why poverty remains pervasive, what it means to be poor in America today, which groups are most likely to be poor, the root causes of poverty, and the effects of policy on poverty. This new edition also includes completely updated data and extended discussions of poverty in the context of the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements as well as new chapters on the Great Recession and global poverty. In doing so this book provides the most recent information available on patterns and trends in poverty and engages in an open and accessible manner in current critical debates.

Poverty in America: A Handbook, with a 2012 Preface

by John Iceland

Poverty may have always been with us, but it hasn't always been the same. In an in-depth look at trends, patterns, and causes of poverty in the United States, John Iceland combines the latest statistical information, historical data, and social scientific theory to provide a comprehensive picture of poverty in America--a picture that shows how poverty is measured and understood and how this has changed over time, as well as how public policies have grappled with poverty as a political issue and an economic reality. Why does poverty remain so pervasive? Is it unavoidable? Are people from particular racial or ethnic backgrounds or family types inevitably more likely to be poor? What can we expect over the next few years? What are the limits of policy? These are just a few of the questions this book addresses. In a remarkably concise, readable, and accessible format, Iceland explores what the statistics and the historical record, along with most of the major works on poverty, tell us. At the same time, he advances arguments about the relative nature and structural causes of poverty--arguments that eloquently contest conventional wisdom about the links between individual failure, family breakdown, and poverty in America. At a time when the personal, political, social, and broader economic consequences of poverty are ever clearer and more pressing, the depth and breadth of understanding offered by this handbook should make it an essential resource and reference for all scholars, politicians, policymakers, and people of conscience in America.

Poverty Knowledge

by Alice O'Connor

Progressive-era "poverty warriors" cast poverty in America as a problem of unemployment, low wages, labor exploitation, and political disfranchisement. In the 1990s, policy specialists made "dependency" the issue and crafted incentives to get people off welfare. Poverty Knowledge gives the first comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem," in a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy. Alice O'Connor chronicles a transformation in the study of poverty, from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to a detached, highly technical analysis of the demographic and behavioral characteristics of the poor. Along the way, she uncovers the origins of several controversial concepts, including the "culture of poverty" and the "underclass." She shows how such notions emerged not only from trends within the social sciences, but from the central preoccupations of twentieth-century American liberalism: economic growth, the Cold War against communism, the changing fortunes of the welfare state, and the enduring racial divide. The book details important changes in the politics and organization as well as the substance of poverty knowledge. Tracing the genesis of a still-thriving poverty research industry from its roots in the War on Poverty, it demonstrates how research agendas were subsequently influenced by an emerging obsession with welfare reform. Over the course of the twentieth century, O'Connor shows, the study of poverty became more about altering individual behavior and less about addressing structural inequality. The consequences of this steady narrowing of focus came to the fore in the 1990s, when the nation's leading poverty experts helped to end "welfare as we know it." O'Connor shows just how far they had traveled from their field's original aims.

The Poverty of Philosophy

by Karl Marx

This is an answer to "The Philosophy of Poverty" by M. Proudhon.

Powder and Patch

by Georgette Heyer

"Georgette Heyer is unbeatable!"--SUNDAY TELEGRAPHFor her, he would do anything...Plainspoken country gentleman Philip Jettan won't bother with a powdered wig, high heels, and fashionable lace cuffs, until he discovers that his lovely neighbor is enamored with a sophisticated man-about-town...But what is it that she really wants?Cleone Charteris sends her suitor Philip away to get some town polish, and he comes back with powder, patches, and all the manners of a seasoned rake. Does Cleone now have exactly the kind of man she's always wanted, or was her insistence on Philip's remarkable transformation a terrible mistake?What readers say:"Charming, charming, charming. And highly readable!""Witty dialogue and well-developed storylines--even Jane Austen could do no better. ""Scintillating and very human love story by an author of exceptional talents. ""Ms Heyer's effervescent wit and obvious ability to tell a good and humorous story is already evident, making Powder and Patch an enjoyable and worthwhile read. ""This story sparkles with witty dialogue and wonderful descriptions of costumes and festivities of the 1700s. I re-read it at least once a year and I enjoy it as much as the first time, again and again!"

Power Ambition Glory: The Stunning Parallels Between Great Leaders of the Ancient World and Today... and the Lessons You Can Learn

by John Prevas Steve Forbes

Based on an extraordinary collaboration between Steve Forbes, chairman, CEO, and editor in chief of Forbes Media, and classics professor John Prevas, Power Ambition Glory provides intriguing comparisons between six great leaders of the ancient world and contemporary business leaders. * Great leaders not only have vision but know how to build structures to effect it. Cyrus the Great did so in creating an empire based on tolerance and inclusion, an approach highly unusual for his or any age. Jack Welch and John Chambers built their business empires using a similar approach, and like Cyrus, they remain the exceptions rather than the rule. * Great leaders know how to build consensus and motivate by doing what is right rather than what is in their self-interest. Xenophon put personal gain aside to lead his fellow Greeks out of a perilous situation in Persia-something very similar to what Lou Gerstner and Anne Mulcahy did in rescuing IBM and Xerox.* Character matters in leadership. Alexander the Great had exceptional leadership skills that enabled him to conquer the eastern half of the ancient world, but he was ultimately destroyed by his inability to manage his phenomenal success. The corporate world is full of similar examples, such as the now incarcerated Dennis Kozlowski, who, flush with success at the head of his empire, was driven down the highway of self-destruction by an out-of-control ego.* A great leader is one who challenges the conventional wisdom of the day and is able to think out of the box to pull off amazing feats. Hannibal did something no one in the ancient world thought possible; he crossed the Alps in winter to challenge Rome for control of the ancient world. That same innovative way of thinking enabled Serge Brin and Larry Page of Google to challenge and best two formidable competitors, Microsoft and Yahoo!* A leader must have ambition to succeed, and Julius Caesar had plenty of it. He set Rome on the path to empire, but his success made him believe he was a living god and blinded him to the dangers that eventually did him in. The parallels with corporate leaders and Wall Street master-of-the-universe types are numerous, but none more salient than Hank Greenberg, who built the AIG insurance empire only to be struck down at the height of his success by the corporate daggers of his directors. * And finally, leadership is about keeping a sane and modest perspective in the face of success and remaining focused on the fundamentals-the nuts and bolts of making an organization work day in and day out. Augustus saved Rome from dissolution after the assassination of Julius Caesar and ruled it for more than forty years, bringing the empire to the height of its power. What made him successful were personal humility, attention to the mundane details of building and maintaining an infrastructure, and the understanding of limits. Augustus set Rome on a course of prosperity and stability that lasted for centuries, just as Alfred Sloan, using many of the same approaches, built GM into the leviathan that until recently dominated the automotive business.From the Hardcover edition.

Power and Imagination: City-States in Renaissance Italy

by Lauro Martines

'A brilliant study . . . Martines takes a new and refreshing look at the political, social and economic sources of the extraordinary explosion of expression in art and scholarship which made Italy the model tor Europe. ' Los Angeles Times The Italian Renaissance, writes Lauro Martines, came forth in two stages. The first extended from the eleventh century to about 1300, the second from the late thirteenth to the late sixteenth centuries. In the first period, social energies - economics, politics, a vibrant demography - were primary and foremost; in the second, cultural energies seemed to dominate. In Power and Imagination, Lauro Martines rethinks the evolution of the city - state in Renaissance Italy and recasts the conventional distinction between 'society' and 'culture'. He traces the growth of commerce and the evolution of governments; he describes the attitudes, pleasures and rituals of the ruling elite; he seeks to understand the period's towering works of the imagination in literature, painting, city planning and philosophy - not simply as the creations of individual artists, but as the formal expression of the ambitions and egos of those in power.

Power and Influence

by John P. Kotter

In today's complex work world, things no longer get done simply because someone issues an order and someone else follows it. Most of us work in socially intricate organizations where we need the help not only of subordinates but of colleagues, superiors, and outsiders to accomplish our goals. This often leaves us in a "power gap" because we must depend on people over whom we have little or no explicit control. This is a book about how to bridge that gap: how to exercise the power and influence you need to get things done through others when your responsibilities exceed your formal authority. Full of original ideas and expert insights about how organizations-and the people in them-function, Power and Influence goes further, demonstrating that lower-level personnel also need strong leadership skills and interpersonal know-how to perform well. Kotter shows how you can develop sufficient resources of "unofficial" power and influence to achieve goals, steer clear of conflicts, foster creative team behavior, and gain the cooperation and support you need from subordinates, coworkers, superiors-even people outside your department or organization. He also shows how you can avoid the twin traps of naivete and cynicism when dealing with power relationships, and how to use your power without abusing it. Power and Influence is essential for top managers who need to overcome the infighting, foot-dragging, and politicking that can destroy both morale and profits; for middle managers who don't want their careers sidetracked by unproductive power struggles; for professionals hindered by bureaucratic obstacles and deadline delays; and for staff workers who have to "manage the boss." This is not a book for those who want to "grab" power for their own ends. But if you'd like to create smooth, responsive working relationships and increase your personal effectiveness on the job, Kotter can show you how-and make the dynamics of power work for you instead of against you.

Power and Landscape in Atlantic West Africa

by J. Cameron Monroe Akinwumi Ogundiran

This volume examines the archaeology of precolonial West African societies in the era of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Using historical and archaeological perspectives on landscape, this collection of essays sheds light on how involvement in the commercial revolutions of the early modern period dramatically reshaped the regional contours of political organization across West Africa. The essays examine how social and political transformations occurred at the regional level by exploring regional economic networks, population shifts, cultural values and ideologies. The book demonstrates the importance of anthropological insights not only to the broad political history of West Africa, but also to an understanding of political culture as a form of meaningful social practice.

Power and Plenty: Trade, War, and the World Economy in the Second Millennium

by Ronald Findlay Kevin H. O'Rourke

"Trade has been the economic foundation of international integration and globalization. But, as Findlay and O'Rourke show in this masterful, state-of-the-art historical survey, it has also been a very frequent cause of rivalry between nations and maritime conflict. No better book exists on the role that commerce has played in generating both the wealth of nations and the wars between them. The authors command the literature the way Victorian admirals ruled the waves. "--Niall Ferguson, Harvard University "A work of extraordinary scope and ambition and a major achievement. Findlay and O'Rourke show how international trade opens an illuminating window onto fully a millennium of world economic history. "--Barry Eichengreen, University of California, Berkeley The vision that emerges in this book is more powerful and encompassing than any previous study of world trade. It passes all the tests that an economic historian might require in terms of empirical evidence while also embodying a very clear view of the economics of globalization. The authors have new and important things to say about trade and the Industrial Revolution, the Great Divergence, the extent and driving forces of the globalization of trade in different periods, and the possibility of another globalization backlash. A marvelous achievement. "--Nicholas Crafts, University of Warwick "The significance of this work lies in its comprehensiveness and the unflagging thoughtfulness of its analysis. It is very rare to find such detailed historical coverage resting on such a solid theoretical foundation. "--Eric L. Jones, author ofThe European MiracleandCultures Merging "This book, magisterial in scope and execution, marries a reading of voluminous historical research with an economist's sharp eye to what is important in shaping economies and events. The authors have drawn exhaustively on the secondary historical, political, and economic literature of the relevant periods and have integrated it faithfully with their own conceptual framework. "--Douglas A. Irwin, Dartmouth College

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