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May There Be a Road

by Louis L'Amour

Spirited American stories Gathered together for the first timeFrom the coasts of Brazil to the borders of Tibet to the very heartland of America, May There Be a Road gathers ten previously uncollected stories that capture the magnificent scope and sense of epic adventure that epitomize Louis L'Amour classic fiction.In these vivid settings L'Amour takes us into the pivotal moments when lives are altered forever, when men and women face a deadly enemy, find a kindred spirit, or confront their own mortality. Among the unforgettable characters we meet here are a hard-living, hard-drinking freighter captain whose penchant for flying may change the course of World War II . . . A lonely frontiersman who unexpectedly finds himself the protector of two orphans . . . A boxer who accepts a gambler's payoff and then must fight to redeem himself . . . A detective willing to believe an unproven story in order to discover a painful truth hidden in a small town. And in the title story L'Amour weaves the powerful tale of a young Tibetan khan who leads a band of horsemen on a daring escape across treacherous mountain terrain. At stake is the survival of a people and an ancient way of life. Evoking the American spirit of bravery, pride, adventure, and self-reliance as few writers have, this extraordinary volume proves once again that L'Amour has set a standard yet to be matched.From the Paperback edition.

May We Shed These Human Bodies

by Amber Sparks

May We Shed These Human Bodies peers through vast spaces and skies with the world's most powerful telescope to find humanity: wild and bright and hard as diamonds. Here is humanity building: families reconstruct themselves, mothers fashion babies from two-by-fours and nails, boys make a mother out of leaves and twigs and wishes. Here is humanity tearing down: a wife sets her house on fire in revenge, a young girl plots to kill the ghosts that stalk her, a dying man takes the whole human race with him. Here is humanity transforming: feral children, cannibalistic seniors, animal wives-a whole sideshow's worth of oddballs and freaks.

May You Be the Mother of a Hundred Sons

by Elisabeth Bumiller

"The most stimulating and thought-provoking book on India in a long time..Bumiller has made India new and immediate again."THE WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLDIn a chronicle rich in diversity, detail, and empathy, Elisabeth Bumiller illuminates the many women's lives she shared--from wealthy sophisticates in New Delhi, to villagers in the dusty northern plains, to movie stars in Bombay, intellectuals in Calcutta, and health workers in the south--and the contradictions she encountered, during her three and a half years in India as a reporter for THE WASHINGTON POST. In their fascinating, and often tragic stories, Bumiller found a strength even in powerlessness, and a universality that raises questions for women around the world.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Maya Angelou

by Marcia Ann Gillespie Rosa Johnson Butler Richard A. Long

Maya Angelou's memoirs, essay and poetry collections, and cookbooks have sold millions of copies. Now, Maya Angelou: A Glorious Celebration offers an unusual and irresistible look at her life and her myriad interests and accomplishments. Created by the people who know her best - her longtime friends Marcia Ann Gillespie and Richard A. Long, and her niece Rosa Johnson Butler - it is part tribute, part scrapbook, capturing Angelou at home, at work, and in the public eye. Listeners who have come to know and love Maya Angelou will be surprised and delighted by this personal, illustrated portrait of the renowned poet, author, playwright, and humanitarian.

Maya Angelou: Greeting the Morning

by Sarah E. King

Examines the life of the African-American poet, from her childhood in the segregated South to her rise to prominence as a writer.

Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings: A Casebook

by Joanne M. Braxton

This casebook presents documents relating to Maya Angelou's Autobiographical work I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. The casebook discusses the historical context and reception providing representative critical essays dealing with its psychological, sociological, and literary context. There is also an interview with the author, and a selected bibliography. Through reading this book, people can come to a fuller understanding of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and the unique aspects of the American ethnic, racial, and cultural experiences that this contemporary masterpiece portrays.

Maya for Travelers and Students: A Guide to Language and Culture in Yucatan

by Gary Bevington

The Yucatan Peninsula draws many North American and European travelers each year to view the ruins of the pre-Columbian Classical Maya civilization and the abundant native flora and fauna. For these travelers, as well as armchair travelers and students, Gary Bevington has prepared the first general English-language introduction to Yucatec Maya, the native language of the people indigenous to the region. Written in nontechnical terms for learners who have a basic knowledge of simple Mexican Spanish, the book presents easily understood, practical information for anyone who would like to communicate with the Maya in their native language. In addition to covering the pronunciation and grammar of Maya, Bevington includes invaluable tips on learning indigenous languages "in the field. " Most helpful are his discussions of the cultural and material worlds of the Maya, accompanied by essential words and expressions for common objects and experiences. A Maya-English-Spanish glossary with extensive usage examples and an English-Maya glossary conclude the book. Note: The supplemental audiocasette, Spoken Maya for Travelers and Students, is now available as a free download.

Maya History

by Tatiana Proskouriakoff Rosemary Joyce

Tatiana Proskouriakoff, a preeminent student of the Maya, made many breakthroughs in deciphering Maya writing, particularly in demonstrating that the glyphs record the deeds of actual human beings, not gods or priests. This discovery opened the way for a history of the Maya, a monumental task that Proskouriakoff was engaged in before her death in 1985. Her work, Maya History, has been made ready for press by the able editorship of Rosemary Joyce.Maya History reconstructs the Classic Maya period (roughly A.D. 250-900) from the glyphic record on stelae at numerous sites, including Altar de Sacrificios, Copan, Dos Pilas, Naranjo, Piedras Negras, Quirigua, Tikal, and Yaxchilan. Proskouriakoff traces the spread of governmental institutions from the central Peten, especially from Tikal, to other city-states by conquest and intermarriage. Thirteen line drawings of monuments and over three hundred original drawings of glyphs amplify the text.

Maya Pill

by German Sadulaev Carol Apollonio

In the traditions of Victor Pelevin and Vladimir Sorokin, German Sadulaev's follow-up to his acclaimed I am a Chechen! is set in a twenty-first century Russia, phantasmagorical and violent. A bitingly funny twenty-first century satire, The Maya Pill tells the story of a mid-level manager at a frozen-food import company who comes upon a box of psychotropic pills that's accidentally been slipped into a shipment. He takes one, and disappears down the rabbit hole: entering the mind of a Chinese colleague; dreaming that he is one of the rulers of an ancient kingdom; even beleiving he is in negotiations with the devil. A mind-expanding companion to the great Russian classics, The Maya Pill is strange, savage, bizarre, and uproarious.

Maya: The Riddle and Rediscovery of a Lost Civilization

by Charles Gallenkamp

This third version of the book that originally appeared in 1959 incorporates recent archaeological findings concerning the Maya.

Mayada, Daughter of Iraq: One Woman's Survival Under Saddam Hussein

by Jean Sasson

Sasson paints an intimate portrait of one woman's incredible life under the regime of Saddam Hussein. Once a privileged member of Iraqi society, Mayada's life shifted drastically when she was thrown into the notorious Baladiayat Prison.

A Mayan Life

by Gaspar P. González Elaine Elliott

A book about the Mayan people, particularly the Q'anjob'al from the Cuchumatn Region.

Maya's World: Angelina of Italy

by Maya Angelou Lizzy Rockwell

ANGELINA LOVES PIZZA. So much so that when she hears that there is a Leaning Tower of Pisa, and mistakenly thinks it's made of pizzas, she is so distressed that she must go see it for herself!

Maya's World: Izak of Lapland

by Maya Angelou Lizzy Rockwell

IZAK LOVES REINDEER. Which is good, since he comes from a family of reindeer herders and even has a pet reindeer, named Totti! It is up to Izak to teach his little brother all about responsibility.

Maya's World: Mikale of Hawaii

by Maya Angelou Lizzy Rockwell

MIKALE LIVES IN OAHU--one of the beautiful Hawaiian islands, surrounded by water. He also happens to be afraid of the ocean! Luckily, his uncle and a little pet fish teach Mikale something about having confidence in your abilities.

Maya's World: Renee Marie of France

by Maya Angelou Lizzy Rockwell

A TALL GIRL who is afraid of heights? When Renée Marie's class takes a trip to the Eiffel Tower, she would much rather stay with her feet on the ground than go up to the top!

Maybe Baby

by Elaine Fox

Not Looking For Mr. Right? Dr. Delaney Poole thinks Harp Cove, Maine, will be the perfect place to settle down and raise her infant daughter -- though she can't say why. Something wonderful happened in this charming, two-spotlight coastal town on a previous summer night, when a sexy stranger stole his way briefly into her heart and then moved on. But now single-mom Delaney has to invent a husband in order to deflect small town gossip -- buying masculine clothing that no one will ever wear, framing pictures she's cut from magazine. Her foolproof plan has one small glitch, however: her one-time mystery man is Delaney's new landlord! Jack Shepard never dreamed he'd see Delaney again -- and he doesn't believe for one minute her cockamamie story about a husband! While he's exploring the leaks in Delaney's bathroom -- and in her alleged "marriage" -- he's trying desperately to get her to admit that they share something special. But when the truth does come out, can Jack and Delaney deal with the passionate consequence?

Maybe Baby

by Tenaya Darlington

"Rusty and Judy did the best they could when raising their three children, yet nothing turned out the way they planned. The Glide parents have just about resigned themselves to the fact that their kids will never live up to their expectations - when a ray of hope comes in the form of a new baby." "Judy's heart soars as Gretchen announces that she and her disturbingly hirsute boyfriend, Ray, are expecting their first child. But it soon becomes clear that Gretchen proposes to raise her child in her own way - absent any indication of its sex: no pink or blue nursery, no baby dolls or trucks, no - to Judy's horror - traditional male or female names. In order to be a part of their grandchild's life, Rusty and Judy must first come to terms with their daughter - and to do that, they must look at themselves and their family with new eyes." "Tenaya Darlington's debut is a look at the real meaning of family."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Maybe (Maybe Not)

by Robert Fulghum

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERI once began a list of the contradictory notions I hold:Look before you leap.He who hesitates is lost.Two heads are better than one.If you want something done right, do it yourself.Nothing ventured, nothing gained.Better safe than sorry.Out of sight, out of mind.Absence makes the heart grow fonder.You can't tell a book by its cover.Clothes make the man.Many hands make light work.Too many cooks spoil the broth.You can't teach an old dog new tricks.It's never too late to learn.Never sweat the small stuff.God is in the details.And so on. The list goes on forever. Once I got so caught up in this kind of thinking that I wore two buttons on my smock when I was teaching art. One said, "Trust me, I'm a teacher." The other replied, "Question Authority."[signature]FulghumFrom the Paperback edition.

Maybe (Maybe Not): Second Thoughts from a Secret Life

by Robert Fulghum

Author of 'All I Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten', Robert Fulghum presents his fourth book musing on various aspects of life.

Maybe Next Time

by Karin Kallmaker

Sabrina Starling doesn't need love. She has fame as a concert violinist, houses on three continents, and available women for company. Nothing can shake her except the memory of her first love.

Maybe One: A Personal and Environmental Argument for Single-Child Families

by Bill Mckibben

From the ground breaking author of "The End of Nature" comes a provocative, compelling, and environmentally sound argument for saving the planet through voluntary population control.

Maybe the Moon

by Armistead Maupin

Maybe the Moon, Armistead Maupin's first novel since ending his bestselling Tales of the City series, is the audaciously original chronicle of Cadence Roth -- Hollywood actress, singer, iconoclast and former Guiness Book record holder as the world's shortest woman. All of 31 inches tall, Cady is a true survivor in a town where -- as she says -- "you can die of encouragement." Her early starring role as a lovable elf in an immensely popular American film proved a major disappointment, since moviegoers never saw the face behind the stifling rubber suit she was required to wear. Now, after a decade of hollow promises from the Industry, she is reduced to performing at birthday parties and bat mitzvahs as she waits for the miracle that will finally make her a star. In a series of mordantly funny journal entries, Maupin tracks his spunky heroine across the saffron-hazed wasteland of Los Angeles -- from her all-too-infrequent meetings with agents and studio moguls to her regular harrowing encounters with small children, large dogs and human ignorance. Then one day a lanky piano player saunters into Cady's life, unleashing heady new emotions, and she finds herself going for broke, shooting the moon with a scheme so harebrained and daring that it just might succeed. Her accomplice in the venture is her best friend, Jeff, a gay waiter who sees Cady's struggle for visibility as a natural extension of his own war against the Hollywood Closet. As clear-eyed as it is charming, Maybe the Moon is a modern parable about the mythology of the movies and the toll it exacts from it participants on both sides of the screen. It is a work that speaks to the resilience of the human spirit from a perspective rarely found in literature.

Maybe the Moon

by Armistead Maupin

Maybe the Moon, Armistead Maupin's first novel since ending his bestselling Tales of the City series, is the audaciously original chronicle of Cadence Roth -- Hollywood actress, singer, iconoclast and former Guiness Book record holder as the world's shortest woman. All of 31 inches tall, Cady is a true survivor in a town where -- as she says -- "you can die of encouragement." Her early starring role as a lovable elf in an immensely popular American film proved a major disappointment, since moviegoers never saw the face behind the stifling rubber suit she was required to wear. Now, after a decade of hollow promises from the Industry, she is reduced to performing at birthday parties and bat mitzvahs as she waits for the miracle that will finally make her a star. In a series of mordantly funny journal entries, Maupin tracks his spunky heroine across the saffron-hazed wasteland of Los Angeles -- from her all-too-infrequent meetings with agents and studio moguls to her regular harrowing encounters with small children, large dogs and human ignorance. Then one day a lanky piano player saunters into Cady's life, unleashing heady new emotions, and she finds herself going for broke, shooting the moon with a scheme so harebrained and daring that it just might succeed. Her accomplice in the venture is her best friend, Jeff, a gay waiter who sees Cady's struggle for visibility as a natural extension of his own war against the Hollywood Closet. As clear-eyed as it is charming, Maybe the Moon is a modern parable about the mythology of the movies and the toll it exacts from it participants on both sides of the screen. It is a work that speaks to the resilience of the human spirit from a perspective rarely found in literature.

Showing 124,376 through 124,400 of 180,876 results

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