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Showing 132,426 through 132,450 of 229,662 results

Indians Are Us?: Culture and Genocide in Native North America

by Ward Churchill

Churchill sets out to expose those who would appropriate native culture and turn it into a commodity to be bought and sold. He reviews books and movies which have historical inaccuracies and which perpetuate stereotypes. Other essays deal with the issue of products and sports teams and the impact of government definitions of who is and is not Indian.

Indians in the Fur Trade

by Arthur Ray

First published in 1974, this best-selling book was lauded by Choice as 'an important, ground-breaking study of the Assiniboine and western Cree Indians who inhabited southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan' and 'essential reading for anyone interested in the history of the Canadian west before 1870.' Indians in the Fur Trade makes extensive use of previously unpublished Hudson's Bay Company archival materials and other available data to reconstruct the cultural geography of the West at the time of early contact, illustrating many of the rapid cultural transformations with maps and diagrams. Now with a new introduction and an update on sources, it will continue to be of great use to students and scholars of Native and Canadian history.

The Indians’ New World

by James H. Merrell

This eloquent, pathbreaking account follows the Catawbas from their first contact with Europeans in the sixteenth century until they carved out a place in the American republic three centuries later. It is a story of Native agency, creativity, resilience, and endurance. Upon its original publication in 1989, James Merrell's definitive history of Catawbas and their neighbors in the southern piedmont helped signal a new direction in the study of Native Americans, serving as a model for their reintegration into American history. In an introduction written for this twentieth anniversary edition, Merrell recalls the book's origins and considers its place in the field of early American history in general and Native American history in particular, both at the time it was first published and two decades later.

The Indians of Canada

by Diamond Jenness

First published in 1932, The Indians of Canada remains the most comprehensive works available on Canada's Indians. Part one includes chapters on languages, economic conditions, food resources, hunting and fishing, dress and adornment, dwellings, travel and transportation, trade and commerce, social and political organization, social life, religion, folklore and traditions, and drama, music, and art. The second part of the book describes the tribes in different groupings: the migratory tribbes of the eastern woodlands, the plains tribes, tribes of the Pacific coast, of the Cordillera, and the Mackenzie and Yukon River basins, and finally the Eskimo.

The Indians of New Jersey: Dickon among the Lenapes

by M. R. Harrington

In 1612 Dickon, an English teen, is shipwrecked off the coast of present-day New Jersey. He is rescued by a band of Lenape Indians and lives with them for two years. At first he is treated as a slave and is forced to do women's work. Eventually he is adopted by a loving family and becomes a full-fledged member of the tribe. This novel was originally published in 1938. The author draws upon years of research, including interviews with Lenape survivors in Oklahoma who shared knowledge of crafts, music, and ceremonies. The book provides detailed instructions on such crafts as flute-making and mat-weaving. Many Lenape words are used throughout, and there is a glossary at the back.

Indians of the Pacific Northwest

by Vine Deloria Jr. Steve Pavlik Billy Frank Jr

The Pacific Northwest was one of the most populated and prosperous regions for Native Americans before the coming of the white man. By the mid-1800s, measles and smallpox decimated the Indian population, and the remaining tribes were forced to give up their ancestral lands. Vine Deloria Jr., named one of the most influential religious thinkers in the world, tells the story of these tribes' fight for survival, one that continues today. Billy Frank Jr. was the first recipient of Indian Country Today's American Indian Visionary Award. Steve Pavlik is a professor of Native American studies at Northwest Indian College.

Indiapedia

by Hachette India

ALL YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT INDIA IS NOW AT YOUR FINGERTIPS! Tired of sifting through thousands of websites for school projects? Bored of flipping through thick history books for an overview of a dynasty? Sick of staring at maps to understand the land forms of the country? Going crazy searching the newspaper archives to understand the Reservation Bill? Don?t worry, help is at hand! Hachette India brings you a super compendium of information: Indiapedia: The All-India Factfinder. This useful reference book will introduce you to the different aspects of India, from history to economy, from geography to flora and fauna, from sports to cinema?an absolute must-have for every student to know more about their country and find detailed information for homework, essays, quizzes and general knowledge enhancement. Plus: 100 Special A-Z of facts about Incredible India!

India's and Pakistan's Strategies in Afghanistan: Implications for the United States and the Region

by Peter Chalk Larry Hanauer

India and Pakistan have very different visions for Afghanistan, and they seek to advance highly disparate interests through their respective engagements in the country. This paper reviews the countries' interests in Afghanistan, how they have tried to further their interests, how Afghanistan navigates their rivalry, and the rivalry's implications for U. S. and Indian policy.

India's Israel Policy

by P. R. Kumaraswamy

India's foreign policy toward Israel is a subject of deep dispute. Throughout the twentieth century arguments have raged over the Palestinian problem and the future of bilateral relations. Yet no text comprehensively looks at the attitudes and policies of India toward Israel, especially their development in conjunction with history. P. R. Kumaraswamy is the first to account for India's Israel policy, revealing surprising inconsistencies in positions taken by the country's leaders, such as Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru, and tracing the crackling tensions between its professed values and realpolitik. Kumaraswamy's findings debunk the belief that India possesses a homogenous policy toward the Middle East. In fact, since the early days of independence, many within India have supported and pursued relations with Israel. Using material derived from archives in both India and Israel, Kumaraswamy investigates the factors that have hindered relations between these two countries despite their numerous commonalities. He also considers how India destabilized relations, the actions that were necessary for normalization to occur, and the directions bilateral relations may take in the future. In his most provocative argument, Kumaraswamy underscores the disproportionate affect of anticolonial sentiments and the Muslim minority on shaping Indian policy.

India's Late, Late Industrial Revolution

by Sumit K. Majumdar

There is a paradox at the heart of the Indian economy. Indian businessmen and traders are highly industrious and ingenious people, yet for many years Indian industry was sluggish and slow to develop. One of the major factors in this sluggish development was the command and control regime known as the License Raj. This regime has gradually been removed and, after two decades of reform, India is now awakening from its slumber and is experiencing a late, late industrial revolution. This important new book catalogues and explains this revolution through a combination of rigorous analysis and entertaining anecdotes about India's entrepreneurs, Indian firms' strategies and the changing role of government in Indian industry. This analysis shows that there is a strong case for a manufacturing focus so that India can replicate the success stories of Asian countries such as Japan, South Korea and China.

India's Living Constitution

by Zoya Hasan . E. Sridharan . R. Sudarshan

This volume originated in the felt need for an exploration of the terms of discourse in Indian constitutionalism and politics at the turn of the century and millennium, the completion of fifty years of the existence of the Indian constitution, and a little over half a century of Indian independence.

Indie Girl

by Kavita Daswani

FIFTEEN-YEAR-OLD INDIE KONKIPUDDI HAS ALWAYS DREAMED OF BECOMING A FASHION REPORTER. She'd do anything to land an internship with glamorous Celebrity Style magazine -- even babysit publisher Aaralyn Taylor's two-year-old son. Indie's neurosurgeon dad can't understand why Indie would want to spend her weekends picking Play-Doh off of someone else's Persian carpets, and pretty soon she starts asking herself the same thing. Then Indie finds out that (1) Celebrity Style is in trouble, and (2) Hollywood's hottest star is having her wedding dress made in a village in India. Indie's sure she's scored the juiciest gossip in town -- the kind of story that will put the magazine back on the map and finally land her the internship! But when things don't pan out exactly as planned, Indie wonders -- will Aaralyn ever see her as anything more than just the hired help?

Indie Girl

by Arne Johnson Karen Macklin

Fun and inspirational, this do-it-yourself guide for party young women enables them to unleash their creative talents through independent and imaginative ventures, including designing clothing, organizing a poetry slam, starting a band, and publishing a 'zine. Start-to-finish explanations on how to organize, implement, and complete each activity are accompanied by creative and technical advice to ensure success. Filled with inspirational quotes by artists from a variety of backgrounds and professions, this book helps teen girls develop organizational and leadership skills and build self confidence while challenging them to do something interesting and original.

Indie, Inc.: Miramax and the Transformation of Hollywood in the 1990s

by Alisa Perren

During the 1990s, films such as sex, lies, and videotape, The Crying Game, Pulp Fiction, Good Will Hunting, and Shakespeare in Love earned substantial sums at the box office along with extensive critical acclaim. A disproportionate number of these hits came from one company: Miramax. Indie, Inc. surveys Miramax's evolution from independent producer-distributor to studio subsidiary, chronicling how one company transformed not just the independent film world but the film and media industries more broadly. As Alisa Perren illustrates, Miramax's activities had an impact on everything from film festival practices to marketing strategies, talent development to awards campaigning. Case studies of key films, including The Piano, Kids, Scream, The English Patient, and Life Is Beautiful, reveal how Miramax went beyond influencing Hollywood business practices and motion picture aesthetics to shaping popular and critical discourses about cinema during the 1990s. Indie, Inc. does what other books about contemporary low-budget cinema have not--it transcends discussions of "American indies" to look at the range of Miramax-released genre films, foreign-language films, and English-language imports released over the course of the decade. The book illustrates that what both the press and scholars have typically represented as the "rise of the American independent" was in fact part of a larger reconfiguration of the media industries toward niche-oriented products.

Indie Producers Handbook: Creative Producing from A to Z

by Myrl A. Schreibman

Schreibman, a film professor and administrator at the University of California Los Angeles School of Theater, Film and Television, gives practical, step-by-step directions for organizing and running a film from budgeting and pre-production through post-production and delivery, and offers engaging anecdotes from his 15 years of film, television, and theater projects to illustrate points. He describes the varied elements that go into making a film, and details the producer's role of bringing these elements together. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Indie Spiritualist

by Chris Grosso

Brutally honest and radically unconventional, Chris Grosso's collection of stories and musings about his meandering journey of self-inquiry, recovery, and acceptance shows what it means to live a truly authentic spiritual life. Set amongst the backdrop of Grosso's original music (includ­ed for download via QR codes in the text), Indie Spiritualist encourages you to accept yourself just as you are, in all your humanity and imperfect perfection.tion of vignettes shows what it means to live an authentic, open, and mindful life. Indie Spiritualist empowers you to accept yourself as you are, in all your humanity and imperfect perfection.

Indigara

by Tanith Lee

Jet and her robot dog, Otis, have been taken to their planet's film capital, Ollywood, and are soon catapulted into the unplumbed underworld that lurks below the studios and lots. Here lies the beautiful and sinister otherwhere of Indigara, which has spontaneously generated from the sets, costumes, models, and actual celluloid of rejected pilot fantasy and SF movies that never got made into series. Even while girl and dog try to survive the dangers and terrors below, their Indigaran mirror images have replaced them, and are running amok in the real world above . . .

Indigeneity (Volume 1)

by G. N. Devy Geoffrey V. Davis Kalyan Kumar Chakravarty

Proceedings of 2008 Chotro conference on indigenous languages, culture and society.

Indigenous and Popular Thinking in América

by Rodolfo Kusch

Originally published in Mexico in 1970, Indigenous and Popular Thinking in Amrica is the first book by the Argentine philosopher Rodolfo Kusch (1922-79) to be translated into English. At its core is a binary created by colonization and the devaluation of indigenous practices and cosmologies: an opposition between the technologies and rationalities of European modernity and the popular mode of thinking, which is deeply tied to Indian ways of knowing and being. Arguing that this binary cuts through Amrica, Kusch seeks to identify and recover the indigenous and popular way of thinking, which he contends is dismissed or misunderstood by many urban Argentines, including leftist intellectuals. Indigenous and Popular Thinking in Amrica is a record of Kusch's attempt to immerse himself in the indigenous ways of knowing and being. At first glance, his methodology resembles ethnography. He speaks with and observes indigenous people and mestizos in Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina. He questions them about their agricultural practices and economic decisions; he observes rituals; he asks women in the market the meaning of indigenous talismans; he interviews shamans; he describes the spatial arrangement and the contents of shrines, altars, and temples; and he reproduces diagrams of archaeological sites, which he then interprets at length. Yet he does not present a "them" to a putative "us. " Instead, he offers an inroad to a way of thinking and being that does not follow the logic or fit into the categories of Western social science and philosophy. In his introduction, Walter D. Mignolo discusses Kusch's work and its relation to that of other twentieth-century intellectuals, Argentine history, and contemporary scholarship on the subaltern and decoloniality.

Indigenous Fruit Trees in the Tropics: Domestication, Utilization and Commercialization

by Festus K. Akinnifesi Oluyede C. Ajayi Patrick Matakala Freddie R. Kwesiga Gudeta Sileshi Zac Tchoundjeu Roger R. B. Leakey

Focusing on livestock production systems, this comprehensive text addresses how the growing diversity of global food demands will be met in the future, providing insights into new and emerging scientific areas and the implications for addressing global drivers for change.

Indigenous (In)Justice: Human Rights Law and Bedouin Arabs in the Naqab/Negev

by Ahmad Amara Ismael Abu-Saad Oren Yiftachel

The indigenous Bedouin Arab population in the Naqab/Negev desert in Israel has experienced a history of displacement, intense political conflict, and cultural disruption, along with recent rapid modernization, forced urbanization, and migration. This volume of essays highlights international, national, and comparative law perspectives and explores the legal and human rights dimensions of land, planning, and housing issues, as well as the economic, social, and cultural rights of indigenous peoples. Within this context, the essays examine the various dimensions of the âeoenegotiationsâe#157; between the Bedouin Arab population and the State of Israel. Indigenous (In)Justice locates the discussion of the Naqab/Negev question within the broader Israeli-Palestinian conflict and within key international debates among legal scholars and human rights advocates, including the application of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the formalization of traditional property rights, and the utility of restorative and reparative justice approaches. Leading international scholars and professionals, including the current United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women and the former United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, are among the contributors to this volume.

Indigenous Medicine among the Bedouin in the Middle East

by Aref Abu-Rabia

Modern medicine has penetrated Bedouin tribes in the course of rapid urbanization and education, but when serious illnesses strike, particularly in the case of incurable diseases, even educated people turn to traditional medicine for a remedy. Over the course of 30 years, the author gathered data on traditional Bedouin medicine among pastoral-nomadic, semi-nomadic, and settled tribes. Based on interviews with healers, clients, and other active participants in treatments, this book will contribute to renewed thinking about a synthesis between traditional and modern medicine - to their reciprocal enrichment.

Indigenous Methodologies

by Margaret Elizabeth Kovach

What are Indigenous research methodologies, and how do they unfold? Indigenous methodologies flow from tribal knowledge, and while they are allied with several western qualitative approaches, they remain distinct. These are the focal considerations of Margaret Kovach's study,which offers guidance to those conducting research in the academy using Indigenous methodologies.Kovach includes topics such as Indigenous epistemologies, decolonizing theory, story as method, situating self and culture, Indigenous methods, protocol, meaning-making, and ethics. In exploring these elements, the book interweaves perspectives from six Indigenous researchers who share their stories, and also includes excerpts from the author's own journey into Indigenous methodologies. Indigenous Methodologies is an innovative and important contribution to the emergent discourse on Indigenous research approaches and will be of use to graduate students, professors, and community-based researchers of all backgrounds - both within the academy and beyond.

An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States

by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. In An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: "The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them." Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples' history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

Indigenous Peoples of the British Dominions and the First World War

by Timothy C. Winegard

This pioneering comparative history of the participation of indigenous peoples of the British Empire in the First World War is based upon archival research in four continents. It provides the first comprehensive examination and comparison of how indigenous peoples of Canada, Australia, Newfoundland, New Zealand and South Africa experienced the Great War. The participation of indigenes was an extension of their ongoing effort to shape and alter their social and political realities, their resistance to cultural assimilation or segregation and their desire to attain equality through service and sacrifice. While the dominions discouraged indigenous participation at the outbreak of war, by late 1915 the imperial government demanded their inclusion to meet the pragmatic need for military manpower. Indigenous peoples responded with patriotism and enthusiasm both on the battlefield and the home front and shared equally in the horrors and burdens of the First World War.

Showing 132,426 through 132,450 of 229,662 results

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