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Origins: The Lives and Worlds of Modern Cosmologists

by Alan Lightman Roberta Brawer

Biographies and contributions based on interviews.

Origins (Missing Link Trilogy #3)

by Kate Thompson

All Nessa knew was that Cats and Dogs were different. Always had been. Always would be. Generations in the future, our world has been changed irrevocably by an unspeakable disaster. In this bleak landscape a cat named Nessa has been exiled from her community during a violent outbreak with a group of Dogs. But when Nessa meets a fellow exile, a Dog named Farral, these unlikely companions set off to uncover the truth about their ancestry. Could Cats and Dogs have more in common than they have been taught to believe? Award-winning author Kate Thompson has crafted a brilliant page-turner in which readers will ultimately discover the secrets of a society's origins and the truth about what really happened in a genetic lab called Fourth World.

The Origins of American Social Science: Ideas in Context

by Dorothy Ross

Ross takes the reader on a journey through social science as practiced in America.

Origins of Existence

by Ian Schoenherr Fred C. Adams

In Origins of Existence astrophysicist Fred Adams takes a radically different approach from the long tradition of biologists and spiritual leaders who have tried to explain how the universe supports the development of life. He argues that life followed naturally from the laws of physics -- which were established as the universe burst into existence at the big bang. Those elegant laws drove the formation of galaxies, stars, and planets -- including some like our Earth. That chain of creation produced all the tiny chemical structures and vast celestial landscapes required for life. Ultimately, physical laws and the complexity they generate define the kind of biospheres that are possible -- from an Amazon rain forest to a frigid ocean beneath an ice sheet on a Jovian moon. Adams suggests that life was not merely some lucky break, but rather a natural outcome of the ascending ladder of complexity supported by our universe. Since our galaxy seems to harbor millions of planets with the same basic elements of habitability as Earth, the emergence of life is probably not a rare event. If life emerges deep inside planets and moons, as new research suggests happened on our planet, the number of viable habitats is truly enormous. Seven chronological chapters take the reader from the laws of physics and birth of the universe to the origins of life on Earth -- showing how energy flowed, exploded, and was repeatedly harnessed in replicating structures and organisms. In his groundbreaking first book, Fred Adams established the five eras of the universe with a focus on its long-term future. It is perhaps not surprising that he now turns his attention to the mystery of our astronomical origins. Here is a stunning new perspective, a book of genesis for our time, revealing how the laws of physics created galaxies, stars, planets, and even life in the universe.

The Origins of Fascist Ideology 1918-1925

by Emilio Gentile

The masterwork by Gentile fills a broad gap in the understanding of the origins of a major political movement of the 20th Century: fascism. This is the first detailed and definitive study of the development and initial success of fascism as it originated in Italy right after the First World War. the author traces each major influence and gives us a complete understanding of the birth of the doctrine that changed the face of Europe and found imitators of Mussolini around the world for decades.

The Origins of Israeli Mythology

by David Maisel David Ohana

It is claimed that Zionism as a meta-narrative has been formed through contradiction to two alternative models, the Canaanite and crusader narratives. These narratives are the most daring and heretical assaults on Israeli-Jewish identity. The Israelis, according to the Canaanite narrative, are from this place and belong only here; according to the crusader narrative, they are from another place and belong there. The mythological construction of Zionism as a modern crusade describes Israel as a Western colonial enterprise planted in the heart of the East and alien to the area, its logic and its peoples. The nativist construction of Israel as neo-Canaanism demands breaking away from the chain of historical continuity. These are the greatest anxieties that Zionism and Israel needed to encounter and answer forcefully. The Origins of Israeli Mythology seeks to examine the intellectual archaeology of Israeli mythology, as it reveals itself through the Canaanite and crusader narratives.

The Origins of Materialism: The Evolution of a Scientific View of the World

by George Novack

American communist politician and Marxist theoretician Novack (1905-1992) examines the first steps in the development of the materialist conception of the world, from its emergence among the Ionian Greeks through its elaboration in Greco-Roman society. The text is a sequel and supplement to Novack's earlier work, An Introduction to the Logic of Marxism, which outlined the main ideas of the dialectical method of thought but included minimal reference to the materialistic foundations of Marxism; this volume focuses on the materialistic roots of the Marxist outlook.

The Origins of Modern Humans

by Fred H. Smith James C. Ahern

This update to the award-winning The Origins of Modern Humans: A World Survey of the Fossil Evidence covers the most accepted common theories concerning the emergence of modern Homo sapiens-adding fresh insight from top young scholars on the key new discoveries of the past 25 years.The Origins of Modern Humans: Biology Reconsidered allows field leaders to discuss and assess the assemblage of hominid fossil material in each region of the world during the Pleistocene epoch. It features new fossil and molecular evidence, such as the evolutionary inferences drawn from assessments of modern humans and large segments of the Neandertal genome. It also addresses the impact of digital imagery and the more sophisticated morphometrics that have entered the analytical fray since 1984.Beginning with a thoughtful introduction by the authors on modern human origins, the book offers such insightful chapter contributions as:Africa: The Cradle of Modern PeopleCrossroads of the Old World: Late Hominin Evolution in Western AsiaA River Runs through It: Modern Human Origins in East AsiaPerspectives on the Origins of Modern AustraliansModern Human Origins in Central EuropeThe Makers of the Early Upper Paleolithic in Western EurasiaNeandertal Craniofacial Growth and Development and Its Relevance for Modern Human OriginsEnergetics and the Origin of Modern HumansUnderstanding Human Cranial Variation in Light of Modern Human OriginsThe Relevance of Archaic Genomes to Modern Human OriginsThe Process of Modern Human Origins: The Evolutionary and Demographic Changes Giving Rise to Modern HumansThe Paleobiology of Modern Human EmergenceElegant and thought provoking, The Origins of Modern Humans: Biology Reconsidered is an ideal read for students, grad students, and professionals in human evolution and paleoanthropology.

Origins of Political Extremism: Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century and Beyond

by Manus I. Midlarsky

Political extremism is one of the most pernicious, destructive, and nihilistic forms of human expression. During the twentieth century, in excess of 100 million people had their lives taken from them as the result of extremist violence. In this wide-ranging book Manus I. Midlarsky suggests that ephemeral gains, together with mortality salience, form basic explanations for the origins of political extremism and constitute a theoretical framework that also explains later mass violence. Midlarsky applies his framework to multiple forms of political extremism, including the rise of Italian, Hungarian and Romanian fascism, Nazism, radical Islamism, and Soviet, Chinese and Cambodian communism. Other applications include a rampaging military (Japan, Pakistan, Indonesia) and extreme nationalism in Serbia, Croatia, the Ottoman Empire and Rwanda. Polish anti-Semitism after World War II and the rise of separatist violence in Sri Lanka are also examined.

Origins of Possession

by Philippe Rochat

Human possession psychology originates from deeply rooted experiential capacities shared with other animals. However, unlike other animals, we are a uniquely self-conscious species concerned with reputation, and possessions affect our perception of how we exist in the eyes of others. This book discusses the psychology surrounding the ways in which humans experience possession, claim ownership, and share from both a developmental and cross-cultural perspective. Philippe Rochat explores the origins of human possession and its symbolic development across cultures. He proposes that human possession psychology is particularly revealing of human nature, and also the source of our elusive moral sense.

The Origins of Psychoanalysis (Letters, Drafts and Notes to Wilhelm Fliess, 1887-1902)

by Sigmund Freud

This book consists of a selection of letters from Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess, a Berlin physician and biologist, written between the years 1887 and 1902. The letters, with other documents left by Fliess, came into the hands of a second-hand dealer during the Nazi period in Germany and thus into the editors' possession. Fliess's letters to Freud have not been found.

The Origins of Schizophrenia

by Paul H. Patterson Alan S. Brown

The Origins of Schizophrenia synthesizes key findings on a disorder that has been increasingly studied over the past decade. Advances in epidemiology, neuroscience technology, and molecular and statistical genetics have identified new putative environmental risk factors and candidate susceptibility genes, recasting schizophrenia's neurobiological nature. Providing the latest clinical and neuroscience research developments in a comprehensive volume, this collection by world-renowned investigators answers a pressing need for balanced, thorough information, while pointing to future directions in research and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Origins of the Cold War 1941-1949

by Martin Mccauley

Martin McCauley's best-selling Seminar Study unravels the complex issues which gave rise to the Cold War. Updated and expanded, this new edition provides students with an invaluable introduction to the subject. The Cold War is an increasingly popular option on second/third year options Also useful to students of politics and international relations This is one of the top-selling Seminar Studies Easy to read, accessible writing style for students Lots of new material and recently released information to be included Martin McCauley is an extremely well-known and respected author.

The Origins of the First World War

by William Mulligan

Providing a new interpretation of the origins of the First World War, this textbook synthesises recent scholarship and introduces the major historiographical and political debates surrounding the outbreak of the war. William Mulligan argues that the war was a far from inevitable outcome of international politics in the early twentieth century and suggests instead that there were powerful forces operating in favour of the maintenance of peace. His fresh perspective on the pre-war international system takes account of new approaches to the study of international politics since the end of the Cold War and the acceleration of globalisation. Thematic chapters examine key issues, including the military, public opinion, economics, diplomacy and geopolitics, and analyse relations between the great powers, the role of smaller states, the disintegrating empires and the July crisis. This compelling account will significantly revise our understanding of diplomacy, political culture, and economic history from 1870 to 1914. Advanced praise for the Origins of the First World War Book jacket.

Origins of the Kabbalah

by Allan Arkush Gershom Gerhard Scholem

One of the most important scholars of our century, Gershom Scholem (1897-1982) opened up a once esoteric world of Jewish mysticism, the Kabbalah, to concerned students of religion. The Kabbalah is a rich tradition of repeated attempts to achieve and portray direct experiences of God: its twelfth-and thirteenth-century beginnings in southern France and Spain are probed in Origins of the Kabbalah, a work crucial in Scholem's oeuvre. The book is a contribution not only to the history of Jewish medieval mysticism but also to the study of medieval mysticism in general and will be of interest to historians and psychologists, as well as to students of the history of religion.

The Origins of the Lebanese National Idea

by Carol Hakim

In this fascinating study, Carol Hakim presents a new and original narrative on the origins of the Lebanese national idea. Hakim's study reconsiders conventional accounts that locate the origins of Lebanese nationalism in a distant legendary past and then trace its evolution in a linear and gradual manner. She argues that while some of the ideas and historical myths at the core of Lebanese nationalism appeared by the mid-nineteenth century, a coherent popular nationalist ideology and movement emerged only with the establishment of the Lebanese state in 1920. Hakim reconstructs the complex process that led to the appearance of fluid national ideals among members of the clerical and secular Lebanese elite, and follows the fluctuations and variations of these ideals up until the establishment of a Lebanese state. The book is an essential read for anyone interested in the evolution of nationalism in the Middle East and beyond.

The Origins of the Second World War in Europe

by P. M. H. Bell

These are the tasks which a consideration of the origins of the war (or rather, wars) must face. But what is meant by 'origins' in this context? It is possible to seek the origins of the war in the events of diplomatic relations - the alliances and alignments of states, the activities of ambassadors and foreign ministers, conferences between statesmen. It may be, however, that such matters were merely superficial, eddies on the surface of a deep-running stream whose course was determined by more profound forces. If so, what were these forces? Obvious possibilities may be found in the movement of ideas and the clash of ideologies; in economic pressures and opportunities; and in changes in military technology and strategic thought. If we accept the importance of such developments, what were the links between them and the decisions of individual statesmen and the sentiments of peoples?

Origins of the Specious

by Patricia T. O'Conner Stewart Kellerman

Do you cringe when a talking head pronounces "niche" as NITCH? Do you get bent out of shape when your teenager begins a sentence with "and"? Do you think British spellings are more "civilised" than the American versions? If you answered yes to any of those questions, you're myth-informed. In Origins of the Specious, word mavens Patricia T. O'Conner and Stewart Kellerman reveal why some of grammar's best-known "rules" aren't--and never were--rules at all. This playfully witty, rigorously researched book sets the record straight about bogus word origins, politically correct fictions, phony français, fake acronyms, and more. Here are some shockers: "They" was once commonly used for both singular and plural, much the way "you" is today. And an eighteenth-century female grammarian, of all people, is largely responsible for the all-purpose "he." From the Queen's English to street slang, this eye-opening romp will be the toast of grammarphiles and the salvation of grammarphobes. Take our word for it.

Origins of the Tarot

by Dai Leon

Conventional wisdom traces Tarot cards to medieval Italy, but their roots go back much further in time and draw on a surprisingly rich variety of cultures and spiritual traditions. Combining pioneering scholarship with practical spiritual instruction, Origins of the Tarot is the first book to unveil the full range of the ancient streams of wisdom from which the Tarot emerged.The timeless principles of conscious realization and cosmological unfoldment underlying the Tarot have never been explored in a comparably extensive and detailed way: herein the teachings of a tremendous range of traditions, including Kabbalah, Western esotericism and alchemy, Buddhism, Taoism, yogic disciplines, Sufism, mystical Christianity, Gnosticism, and Neoplatonism, are masterfully incorporated and synthesized.Author Dai Léon explores a confluence of philosophical schools from East and West as they relate to the Tarot, giving each its due in the exposition of a universal procession of evolution and the soul's quest for enlightenment. In the process, the Tarot is seen as a unique exemplification of perennial teachings on the soul and its liberation, as well as a still-unfolding window into concealed currents of human history. The book's profound learning and unprecedented range of references are sure to attract close study among students both of the world's most enduring esoteric tradition and of esotericism itself.

The Origins of the Universe for Dummies

by Stephen Pincock Mark Frary

Do you want to learn about the physical origin of the Universe, but don't have the rest of eternity to read up on it? Do you want to know what scientists know about where you and your planet came from, but without the science blinding you? 'Course you do - and who better than For Dummies to tackle the biggest, strangest and most wonderful question there is!The Origins of the Universe For Dummies covers:Early ideas about our universeModern cosmologyBig Bang theoryDark matter and gravityGalaxies and solar systemsLife on earthFinding life elsewhereThe Universe's forecast

The Origins of Totalitarianism

by Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt's definitive work on totalitarianism and an essential component of any study of twentieth-century political history The Origins of Totalitarianism begins with the rise of anti-Semitism in central and western Europe in the 1800s and continues with an examination of European colonial imperialism from 1884 to the outbreak of World War I. Arendt explores the institutions and operations of totalitarian movements, focusing on the two genuine forms of totalitarian government in our time--Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia--which she adroitly recognizes were two sides of the same coin, rather than opposing philosophies of Right and Left. From this vantage point, she discusses the evolution of classes into masses, the role of propaganda in dealing with the nontotalitarian world, the use of terror, and the nature of isolation and loneliness as preconditions for total domination.

The Origins of Totalitarianism

by Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt's definitive work on totalitarianism and an essential component of any study of twentieth-century political history The Origins of Totalitarianism begins with the rise of anti-Semitism in central and western Europe in the 1800s and continues with an examination of European colonial imperialism from 1884 to the outbreak of World War I. Arendt explores the institutions and operations of totalitarian movements, focusing on the two genuine forms of totalitarian government in our time--Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia--which she adroitly recognizes were two sides of the same coin, rather than opposing philosophies of Right and Left. From this vantage point, she discusses the evolution of classes into masses, the role of propaganda in dealing with the nontotalitarian world, the use of terror, and the nature of isolation and loneliness as preconditions for total domination.

The Origins of World War I

by Holger H. Herwig Richard F. Hamilton

This work poses a straightforward - yet at the same time perplexing - question about World War I: Why did it happen? Several of the oft-cited causes are reviewed and discussed. The argument of the alliance systems is inadequate, lacking relevance or compelling force. The arguments of mass demands, those focusing on nationalism, militarism and social Darwinism, it is argued, are insufficient, lacking indications of frequency, intensity, and process (how they influenced the various decisions). The work focuses on decision-making, on the choices made by small coteries, in Austria-Hungary, Germany, Russia, France, Britain and elsewhere. The decisions made later by leaders in Japan, the Ottoman Empire, Italy, the Balkans, and the United States are also explored. The final chapters review the 'basic causes' once again. An alternative position is advanced, one focused on elites and coteries, their backgrounds and training, and on their unique agendas.

Showing 135,576 through 135,600 of 180,625 results

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