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War and Peace

by Constance Garnett Leo Tolstoy A. N. Wilson

Often called the greatest novel ever written, War and Peace is at once an epic of the Napoleonic Wars, a philosophical study, and a celebration of the Russian spirit. Tolstoy's genius is seen clearly in the multitude of characters in this massive chronicle--all of them fully realized and equally memorable. Out of this complex narrative emerges a profound examination of the individual's place in the historical process, one that makes it clear why Thomas Mann praised Tolstoy for his Homeric powers and placed War and Peace in the same category as the Iliad: "To read him . . . is to find one's way home . . . to everything within us that is fundamental and sane."

War and Peace

by Leo Tolstoy

Often called the greatest novel ever written, War and Peace is at once an epic of the Napoleonic Wars, a philosophical study, and a celebration of the Russian spirit. Tolstoy's genius is seen clearly in the multitude of characters in this massive chronicle--all of them fully realized and equally memorable. Out of this complex narrative emerges a profound examination of the individual's place in the historical process, one that makes it clear why Thomas Mann praised Tolstoy for his Homeric powers and placed War and Peace in the same category as the Iliad" " "To read him . . . is to find one's way home . . . to everything within us that is fundamental and sane. "

War and Peace

by Leo Tolstoy

Undeniably epic in scale, Tolstoy's masterpiece has intimidated readers since it was published in 1869-until now. This deluxe mini edition makes this massive yet masterful work accessible to readers, who can get to know the greatest novel ever written in just one sitting. It includes comprehensive summaries of each book of War and Peace along with descriptive character profiles, an introduction, and biography of Leo Tolstoy, complemented with two-color illustrations throughout.

War and Peace and War

by Peter Turchin

Why do some nations, initially small and insignificant, go on to build mighty empires, while most nations fail to do so? And why do those successful empire-builders always eventually lose their empires? Peter Turchin, a leading thinker in the highly technical field of population dynamics, lucidly presents for the first time an approach to understanding the world's great powers throughout history--with powerful implications for nations today. Turchin shows how the edges of empires are the crucibles of new long-lived empires and how processes of decline inevitably follow on a 1000 year cycle. This sweeping work of social science culminates with a crisp declaration of the general principles of the science of history. A short final section considers Tolstoy and free will in a world of historical cycles, and includes an incisive look at the U. S. now.

War and Peas (A Jane Jeffry Mystery, Book 8)

by Jill Churchill

Wealthy old Auguste Caspar Snellen, the legendary Pea King, is long gone, but his greatest legacy lives on: the Snellen Museum, an institution dedicated to the glorification of local lore and legumes. But at this years annual Pea Festival, the museum sustains a terrible loss when its able, innovative director, Regina Price Palmer, is shot to death during a noisy reenactment of a Civil War battle. Suburban single mom Jane Jeffrey was a costumed participant in the deadly pageant. Now her part-time work at the museum has put Jane and best friend Shelley Nowack in the midst of a veritable potful of murder suspects. And its up to Jane and Shelley to determine who fatally beaned poor Regina--before another victim is planted six feet under.

War and the American Presidency

by Arthur Meier Schlesinger

"Historical reflections that deftly challenge the political and ideological foundations of President Bush's foreign policy."--Charles A. Kupchan, New York Times In a book that brings a magisterial command of history to the most urgent of contemporary questions, two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., explores the war in Iraq, the presidency, and the future of democracy. Describing unilateralism as "the oldest doctrine in American history," Schlesinger nevertheless warns of the dangers posed by the fatal turn in U.S. policy from deterrence and containment to preventive war. He writes powerfully about George W. Bush's expansion of presidential power, reminding us nevertheless of our country's distinguished legacy of patriotism through dissent in wartime. And in a new chapter written especially for the paperback edition, he examines the historical role of religion in American politics as a background for an assessment of Bush's faith-based presidency.

The War at the Shore: Donald Trump, Steve Wynn, and the Epic Battle to Save Atlantic City

by Richard D. Bronson

The high-stakes battle between two casino titans over the Vegas of the East Coast. It's all quiet now on the eastern front of the American gaming industry--Atlantic City, New Jersey--but for five chaotic years, real estate developer Richard "Skip" Bronson was at the white-hot center of a titanic clash of money and power that transformed Atlantic City from a struggling day-tripper place with buses in and out to a born again destination drawing tourists from New York, Philadelphia, and other major cities along the eastern seaboard. From 1995 to 2000, two of the world's best-known companies-- Mirage Resorts and Trump Resorts--run by two of the most flamboyant businessmen of our time, fought a bare-knuckled, high-stakes battle over a prime piece of real estate in one of America's most famous resort towns. No money was spared, no punch was pulled, no invective went unhurled in "The War at the Shore." Now Bronson, who was a member of the board of directors of Mirage and president of New City Development Company, the Mirage subsidiary whose primary purpose was to build a top-level new casino and hotel complex in Atlantic City, tells the inside story of this epic struggle. Along the way, Bronson weaves in fascinating and inspiring anecdotes from his complicated past: A product of a fractured family and city-owned housing project in Hartford, Connecticut; former paperboy, spelling bee champion yet college dropout; and prolific developer of shopping centers and office buildings--including CityPlace, Connecticut's tallest skyscraper, Bronson embodies the self-made business success story. Gripping from beginning to end, The War at the Shore is a rare up-close look at the world of casino development and the essential modern chapter in the history of America's "Boardwalk Empire."

War Before Civilization

by Lawrence H. Keeley

The myth of the peace-loving "noble savage" is persistent and pernicious. Indeed, for the last fifty years, most popular and scholarly works have agreed that prehistoric warfare was rare, harmless, unimportant, and, like smallpox, a disease of civilized societies alone. Prehistoric warfare, according to this view, was little more than a ritualized game, where casualties were limited and the effects of aggression relatively mild. Lawrence Keeley's groundbreaking War Before Civilization offers a devastating rebuttal to such comfortable myths and debunks the notion that warfare was introduced to primitive societies through contact with civilization (an idea he denounces as "the pacification of the past"). Building on much fascinating archeological and historical research and offering an astute comparison of warfare in civilized and prehistoric societies, from modern European states to the Plains Indians of North America, War Before Civilization convincingly demonstrates that prehistoric warfare was in fact more deadly, more frequent, and more ruthless than modern war. To support this point, Keeley provides a wide-ranging look at warfare and brutality in the prehistoric world. He reveals, for instance, that prehistorical tactics favoring raids and ambushes, as opposed to formal battles, often yielded a high death-rate; that adult males falling into the hands of their enemies were almost universally killed; and that surprise raids seldom spared even women and children. Keeley cites evidence of ancient massacres in many areas of the world, including the discovery in South Dakota of a prehistoric mass grave containing the remains of over 500 scalped and mutilated men, women, and children (a slaughter that took place a century and a half before the arrival of Columbus). In addition, Keeley surveys the prevalence of looting, destruction, and trophy-taking in all kinds of warfare and again finds little moral distinction between ancient warriors and civilized armies. Finally, and perhaps most controversially, he examines the evidence of cannibalism among some preliterate peoples. Keeley is a seasoned writer and his book is packed with vivid, eye-opening details (for instance, that the homicide rate of prehistoric Illinois villagers may have exceeded that of the modern United States by some 70 times). But he also goes beyond grisly facts to address the larger moral and philosophical issues raised by his work. What are the causes of war? Are human beings inherently violent? How can we ensure peace in our own time? Challenging some of our most dearly held beliefs, Keeley's conclusions are bound to stir controversy.

The War Below

by James Scott

The riveting story of the submarine force that helped win World War II by ravaging Japan's merchant fleet and destroying its economy.The War Below is a dramatic account of extraordinary heroism, ingenuity, and perseverance--and the vital role American submarines played in winning the Pacific war. Focusing on the unique stories of the submarines Silversides, Drum, and Tang--and the men who skippered and crewed them--James Scott takes readers beneath the waves to experience the thrill of a direct hit on a merchant ship and the terror of depth charge attacks. It's a story filled with incredible feats of courage, including an emergency appendectomy performed with spoons by an inexperienced medic and the desperate struggle of sailors to escape from a flooded submarine stuck on the bottom, as well as tragic moments such as American submarines sinking an unmarked enemy ship carrying some 1,800 American POWs. The casualty rate among submariners topped that of all military branches, a staggering six times higher than the surface Navy. The war claimed almost one out of every five boats. But Japan was so ravaged by the loss of precious fuel and supplies that by war's end, Japanese warships lay at anchor while hungry civilians ate sawdust. Scott paints an unforgettable picture of the dangerous life submariners endured, including the atrocious prison camps where the Japanese beat, tortured, and starved captured Allied troops. Based on more than 100 interviews with submarine veterans and a review of more than 3,000 pages of previously unpublished letters, diaries, and personal writings, readers of The War Below will experience the Pacific War as never before.

War Comes to the Big Bend

by Zane Grey

A wheat farmer is torn between allegiances while fighting to keep the woman he loves in this epic of the First World War!It's 1917, and the United States is about to enter the First World War. The wheat farms of rural Washington State have become an important resource in winning the war. Kurt Dorn is a wheat farmer born of a German father and an American mother, and his family's farm contains some of the finest wheat grown anywhere. But a Bolshevik band, calling itself the Industrial Workers of the World, led by a spy financed by imperial Germany, and, secretly, by a German wheat magnate, seeks to stop Dorn's wheat from getting in Allied hands.Meanwhile, Dorn has fallen in love with Lenore Anderson, the daughter of a wealthy farmer who wants Dorn to supervise his empire and prevent the destructive IWW from ruining everything. But Dorn loses the battle to keep his farm, and instead of fighting from the home front, decides to take up arms and enlist in the US Army. Dorn will now be forced to choose between his patriotism, his love for Lenore, and his desire for revenge in a tale that spans continents and delivers a sobering message of the horrors of war.Heavily edited upon its original publication in 1918, this edition of War Comes to the Big Bend has been restored from Grey's original handwritten manuscript, and showcases the full vision of a master storyteller.

war cry (Seal Team Seven #9)

by Keith Douglass

Since 1953, the no-man's-land between North and South Korea has remained in a permanent stalemate...until now. As the vice president of the United States and several congressmen make an official inspection of the American border troops, the North Koreans launch a lightning-fast offensive with the goal of uniting Korea under their power. The officials are all captured, and held as prisoners of war. It's up to Lieutenant Blake Murdock and his SEALs to pull off a daring rescue behind enemy lines. But there is more bloody work to be done. In a day-to-day dance with death, the SEAL team proves again and again why they're the best. Then they get the orders they've been waiting for, orders that can stop the bloodshed: Hunt down the North Korean generals who instigated the war... and take them out!

War Everlasting

by Don Pendleton

KILLER COUNTDOWN A flight carrying military service personnel goes down in the Bering Sea, and the rescue team vanishes without a trace. Called in to investigate, Mack Bolan goes undercover in an Alaskan fishing city and hones in on a criminal empire fronted by a ruthless union boss. Bolan targets their prime operations one by one, and goes up against their army of criminals. On a desolate ring of islands, Bolan discovers that an active volcano isn't the only force about to blow. A Russian mercenary and his group of fanatics are working to destroy America's network of military bases and kill unsuspecting soldiers. But the Executioner is going to turn up the heat on this frozen hell and obliterate this lethal plot with pure molten payback.

War Games

by Audrey Couloumbis Akila Couloumbis

Based on a true story of World War II.For 12-year-old Petros, World War II feels unreal and far away. What's real is working in his papa's garden. Playing marbles with his friends. Fighting with his older brother, Zola. Zola, who must always be first. Who must always be best. But when the Germans invade Greece, the war suddenly comes impossibly close. Overnight, neighbors become enemies. People begin to keep secrets (Petros's family most of all). And for the first time, Petros has the chance to show Zola that he's not just a little brother but that he can truly be counted on. Soon what were once just boys' games become matters of life and death as Petros and Zola each wonder if, like their resistance fighter cousin, they too can make a difference.From the Hardcover edition.

War Games (SideStreets)

by Jacqueline Guest

Ryan Taber's father is about to deploy for his first tour of duty with the Canadian army in Afghanistan. Ryan lives his days on an army base in Alberta, and spends his evenings at the CyberKnights cafe, playing his favourite video game, Desert Death. At CyberKnights, Ryan meets the Desert Death ultimate champion and becomes entangled in a world of danger and deceit that begins to resemble the very real circumstances his father is facing overseas.

War Hospital

by Sheri Lee Fink

In April 1992, a handful of young physicians, not one of them a surgeon, was trapped along with 50,000 men, women, and children in the embattled enclave of Srebrenica, Bosnia-Herzegovina. There the doctors faced the most intense professional, ethical, and personal predicaments of their lives.Drawing on extensive interviews, documents, and recorded materials she collected over four and a half years, doctor and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Sheri Fink tells the harrowing--and ultimately enlightening--story of these physicians and the three who try to help them: an idealistic internist from Doctors without Borders, who hopes that interposition of international aid workers will help prevent a massacre; an aspiring Bosnian surgeon willing to walk through minefields to reach the civilian wounded; and a Serb doctor on the opposite side of the front line with the army that is intent on destroying his former colleagues.With limited resources and a makeshift hospital overflowing with patients, how can these doctors decide who to save and who to let die? Will their duty to treat patients come into conflict with their own struggle to survive? And are there times when medical and humanitarian aid ironically prolong war and human suffering rather than helping to relieve it?

War in the Deep: Pacific Submarine Action in World War II

by Edwin P. Hoyt

No one ever lived more dangerously than those who took to the depths of the Pacific Ocean in submarines during World War II. In this book the well-known author Edwin P. Hoyt tells the exciting story of those perilous days when submariners of the U. S. navy, at first outnumbered by their Japanese enemies, put to sea in outmoded boats armed with faulty torpedoes. War in the Deep recounts hazardous adventure after adventure experienced by both Americans and Japanese. It follows the comeback of American submarines and their daring forays that led to their vital role in the economic strangulation of Japan.

War in the Middle East: A Reporter's Story: Black September and the Yom Kippur War

by Wilborn Hampton

An award-winning journalist offers a reporter's-eye view of the Middle East conflict, from Black September to the Yom Kippur War to events of the present day. In 1970, when the Jordanian civil war known as Black September began, U. P. I. correspondent Wilborn Hampton was sent to report on unfolding events. Holed up in the InterContinental Hotel and caught in the crossfire, he managed to get the story out. Three years later, dispatched to Israel to cover the Yom Kippur War, the reporter took it on himself to drive to the front lines. Now the acclaimed author of KENNEDY ASSASSINATED!, MELTDOWN, and SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, relays his on-the-spot experiences covering two pivotal wars, while offering readers a clear, balanced overview of the issues that have plagued the Middle East for decades and continue to this day.

War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning

by Chris Hedges

A veteran "New York Times" war correspondent's complex, moving, and thought-provoking reflection on how life is lived most intensely in times of war

The War Lovers: Roosevelt, Lodge, Hearst, and the Rush to Empire 1898

by Evan Thomas

On February 15th, 1898, the American ship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in the Havana Harbor. News of the blast quickly reached U.S. shores, where it was met by some not with alarm but great enthusiasm. A powerful group of war lovers agitated that the United States exert its muscle across the seas. Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge were influential politicians dismayed by the "closing" of the Western frontier. William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal falsely heralded that Spain's "secret infernal machine" had destroyed the battleship as Hearst himself saw great potential in whipping Americans into a frenzy. The Maine would provide the excuse they'd been waiting for. On the other side were Roosevelt's former teacher, philosopher William James, and his friend and political ally, Thomas Reed, the powerful Speaker of the House. Both foresaw a disaster. At stake was not only sending troops to Cuba and the Philippines, Spain's sprawling colony on the other side of the world-but the friendships between these men.Now, bestselling historian Evan Thomas brings us the full story of this monumental turning point in American history. Epic in scope and revelatory in detail, The War Lovers takes us from Boston mansions to the halls of Congress to the beaches of Cuba and the jungles of the Philippines. It is landmark work with an unforgettable cast of characters--and provocative relevance to today.

The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts

by Louis De Bernieres

This rambunctious first novel by the author of the bestselling Corelli's Mandolin is set in an impoverished, violent, yet ravishingly beautiful country somewhere in South America. When the haughty Dona Constanza decides to divert a river to fill her swimming pool, the consequences are at once tragic, heroic, and outrageously funny. "Walks a precarious edge between slapstick and pathos, never once losing its balance."--Washington Post Book World.

War of Love

by Carole Mortimer

A Battle Royal?Lyon Buchanan was the man who had just about everything-looks, power, sex appeal, money. Was there a woman in his life, though? And, if not, had he frightened them all away? Silke reckoned that Lyon wouldn't know love if it jumped up and bit him on the nose...but maybe it was just about to. Because Silke was made of strong stuff and would give as good as she got!

War of Necessity, War of Choice: A Memoir of Two Iraq Wars

by Richard N. Haass

When should the United States go to war? It is arguably the most important foreign policy question facing any president, and Richard Haass -- a member of the National Security Council staff for the first President Bush and the director of policy planning in the State Department for Bush II -- is in a unique position to address it. Haass is one of just a handful of individuals -- along with Colin Powell, Dick Cheney, Paul Wolfowitz, and Bob Gates -- involved at a senior level of U. S. government decision making during both Iraq conflicts. He is the first to take us behind closed doors and the first to provide a personal account. The result is a book that is authoritative, revealing, and surprising. Haass explains not only what happened but why. At first blush, the two Iraq wars appear similar. Both involved a President George Bush and the United States in conflicts with Saddam Hussein and Iraq. There, however, the resemblance ends. Haass contrasts the decisions that shaped the conduct of the two wars and makes a crucial distinction between the 1991 and 2003 conflicts. The first Iraq war, following Saddam Hussein's invasion of neighboring Kuwait, was a war of necessity. It was limited in ambition, well executed, and carried out with unprecedented international support. By contrast, the second Iraq war was one of choice, the most significant discretionary war undertaken by the United States since Vietnam. Haass argues that it was unwarranted, as the United States had other viable policy options. Making matters worse was the fact that this ambitious undertaking was poorly implemented and fought with considerably more international opposition than backing. These are the principal conclusions of this compelling, honest, and challenging book by one of this country's most respected voices on foreign policy. Haass's assessments are critical yet fair -- and carry tremendous weight. He offers a thoughtful examination of the means and ends of U. S. foreign policy: how it should be made, what it should seek to accomplish, and how it should be pursued. War of Necessity, War of Choice-- part history, part memoir -- provides invaluable insight into some of the most important recent events in the world. It also provides a much-needed compass for how the United States can apply the lessons learned from the two Iraq wars so that it is better positioned to put into practice what worked and to avoid repeating what so clearly did not.

War of the Black Curtain (Jimmy Fincher Saga #4)

by James Dashner

The world was falling asleep. The pace of it seemed to be quickening, people falling over left and right, sleeping in everything from gutters to pumpkin patches. Nothing would wake them up. Not shaking. Not water. Not even the classic of all wake-up classics-pinching--would make them stir. Things were getting bad.

The War of the Dwarves

by Markus Heitz

The dwarves have gone to battle and they have been victorious. But outside the realm, dark forces are at work. . . A secret army of Orcs, made immortal by the hidden powers of the Black Water, now marches towards Girdlegard, set to unleash its fury upon the kingdom. Sooner than they realize, Tungdil and his comrades will need to summon all their courage to do battle against this bloodthirsty horde. The Orcs are not the only threat. An unspeakable new power is growing and threatens the very existence of the dwarves. But both enemies have forgotten one very important truth: a dwarf is never more dangerous than when total obliteration seems inevitable . . .

The War Of The Prophets

by Judith Reeves-Stevens

The crew of the Starship Defiant is trapped in a future in which the Pah-wraiths have triumphed-as the greatest epic adventure in the saga of Deep Space 9 continues.... In the last days of the twenty-fourth century, caught in the crossfire of the apocalyptic confrontation between the Bajoran Prophets and the Pah-wraiths, Captain Benjamin Sisko, and his crew face what might be the final millennium. On one side, the Pah-wraiths' new Emissary -- Kai Weyoun -- promises his followers that when Bajor's two Celestial -Temples are restored as one, all beings in the universe will ascend to a new and glorious existence with the True Prophets. On the other side, the scientists of Starfleet predict that when the two Bajoran wormholes merge, they will create a Warp 10 shock wave of infinite destructive power. With the Federation on the brink of collapse, and Starfleet consumed by Admiral Jean-Luc Picard's obsessive quest to build the largest starship ever conceived, Sisko enters the ultimate race against time for the biggest stakes of all -- the survival of the universe itself.

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