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Black United Methodists Preach!

by Gennifer Benjamin Brooks

What accounts for the spiritual power and vitality of black preaching? What are the distinctive contributions of black preaching to the life of The United Methodist Church? How must black preaching evolve if it is to rise to the new challenges facing the UMC? Fifteen distinguished preachers from across the connection answer these and other questions in this important and illuminating volume. Gennifer Benjamin Brooks not only edits this collect, she also shares one of her own sermons along with the sermons of the following fourteen other preachers: Rose Booker-Jones, Leo W. Curry, Safiyah Fosua, Telley Lynette Gadson, Linda Lee , Pamela R. Lightsey, Okitakoyi Lundula, Tracy S. Malone, Gregory Palmer, Vance P. Ross, Robert O. Simpson, Rodney P. Smothers. James E. Swanson, Sr., and Dorothy Watson-Tatem.

The Black Urban Atlantic in the Age of the Slave Trade

by Matt Childs Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra James Sidbury

During the era of the Atlantic slave trade, vibrant port cities became home to thousands of Africans in transit. Free and enslaved blacks alike crafted the necessary materials to support transoceanic commerce and labored as stevedores, carters, sex workers, and boarding-house keepers. Even though Africans continued to be exchanged as chattel, urban frontiers allowed a number of enslaved blacks to negotiate the right to hire out their own time, often greatly enhancing their autonomy within the Atlantic commercial system.In The Black Urban Atlantic in the Age of the Slave Trade, eleven original essays by leading scholars from the United States, Europe, and Latin America chronicle the black experience in Atlantic ports, providing a rich and diverse portrait of the ways in which Africans experienced urban life during the era of plantation slavery. Describing life in Portugal, Brazil, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Africa, this volume illuminates the historical identity, agency, and autonomy of the African experience as well as the crucial role Atlantic cities played in the formation of diasporic cultures. By shifting focus away from plantations, this volume poses new questions about the nature of slavery in the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries, illustrating early modern urban spaces as multiethnic sites of social connectivity, cultural incubation, and political negotiation.Contributors: Trevor Burnard, Mariza de Carvalho Soares, Matt D. Childs, Kevin Dawson, Roquinaldo Ferreira, David Geggus, Jane Landers, Robin Law, David Northrup, João José Reis, James H. Sweet, Nicole von Germeten.

Black Valley Riders

by Ralph Cotton

USA Today bestselling author. Seems like every time Arizona Ranger Sam Burrack turns over a rock, a Black Valley Rider jumps out. So when two bounty hunters arrive in Minton Hill trailing the same outlaws, Sam agrees to ride with them. Trouble is, only a drunken gambler called Tinnis Lucas knows where the gang is holed up-a dead man's land called Black Valley. .

The Black Veil

by Rick Moody

A raw, unflinching, convention-defying memoir of substance abuse, depression, and guilt In his genre-bending memoir, Rick Moody, author of The Ice Storm, delves into not only his own tormenting struggle with depression and alcoholism but also the pathos inherent in American society. Beginning with his childhood and widening his gaze to his ancestral past, Moody elegantly details the events that led him to admit himself to a psychiatric hospital. Seeking explanations for his inner demons, Moody traces his lineage back to Joseph "Handkerchief" Moody. In early-eighteenth-century Maine, Joseph accidentally killed his childhood friend and wore a handkerchief over his face for the rest of his life as a self-imposed punishment. His story stirs within Moody a drive to understand his own failings through a study of American violence from colonial times to the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School. Remarkably broad in scope and full of Moody's witticisms and brilliantly crafted prose, The Black Veil is an extraordinary exploration of both personal and cultural shame that transcends the expectations of a memoir.

The Black Velvet Mystery

by Carolyn Keene

There's trouble backstage!Peppermint Penny's clothing shop is having a back-to-school fashion show, and Nancy is one of the models. Everything is perfect -- until somebody cuts a hole in the show's star attraction, a black velvet coat from Paris.Meanwhile, Brenda Carlton is passing out copies of the Carlton News. Her new gossip column says that Nancy did the damage. Now Nancy and her friends have to turn a fashion disaster inside out and catch the real cut-up at the show!

Black Velvet Valentines

by Carrie Alexander

BLAZE Red-hot reads from Temptation! BLACK VELVET VALENTINES Three blazingly sexy stories to set the mood for the most romantic day of the year Secrets of the Heart Sensuous, arousing black velvet valentines sent by a stranger. At first Charlotte Colfax was shocked, then intrigued...then determined to find her secret admirer. Two Hearts Valentine's Day. A full moon. A hot tub. And a love potion. Pansy Kingsmith had it all figured out...except the part where the wrong twin succumbs to her seduction. Heart's Desire Angie Dubonnet had no idea that her Valentine cruise would give her the chance to live out all her fantasies. Or that Nikolas Dorian would make it a voyage of sensual discovery.

Black Venus 2010: They Called Her "Hottentot"

by Deborah Willis

As a young South African woman of about twenty, Saartjie Baartman, the so-called "Hottentot Venus," was brought to London and placed on exhibit in 1810. Clad in the Victorian equivalent of a body stocking, and paraded through the streets and on stage in a cage she became a human spectacle in London and Paris. Baartman's distinctive physique became the object of ridicule, curiosity, scientific inquiry, and desire until and after her premature death. The figure of Sarah Baartman was reduced to her sexual parts. Black Venus 2010 traces Baartman's memory in our collective histories, as well as her symbolic history in the construction and identity of black women as artists, performers, and icons. The wide-ranging essays, poems, and images in Black Venus 2010 represent some of the most compelling responses to Baartman. Each one grapples with the enduring legacy of this young African woman who forever remains a touchstone for black women. Contributors include: Elizabeth Alexander, Holly Bass, Petrushka A Bazin, William Jelani Cobb, Lisa Gail Collins, Renée Cox, J. Yolande Daniels, Carole Boyce Davies, Leon de Wailly, Manthia Diawara, Diana Ferrus, Cheryl Finley, Nikky Finney, Kianga K. Ford, Terri Francis, Sander Gilman, Renée Green, Joy Gregory, Lyle Ashton Harris, Michael D. Harris, Linda Susan Jackson, Kellie Jones, Roshini Kempadoo, Simone Leigh, Zine Magubane, E. Ethelbert Miller, Robin Mitchell, Charmaine Nelson, Tracey Rose, Radcliffe Roye, Bernadette Searle, Lorna Simpson, Debra S. Singer, Penny Siopis, Hank Willis Thomas, Kara Walker, Michele Wallace, Carla Williams, Carrie Mae Weems, J. T. Zealy, and the editor.

The Black Violin

by Maxence Fermine Chris Mulhern

There were many musical souls adrift on that raft of silence that is Venice. There was the music of Johannes Karelsky.There was the music of Erasmus, the violin maker. And there was the music of war. But of that, the two men never spoke. From the internationally acclaimed author of Snow comes a timeless tale of love and music set against the romantic backdrop of eighteenth-century Venice. In 1797, the violin prodigy Johannes Karelsky arrives in Venice after fighting with Napoleon's army in the Italian campaign. After the war, he boards with an aged violin maker named Erasmus who created the legendary "Black Violin," which he forbids Johannes to touch because, as he says, "Once you have tasted it, you will never be the same again." Johannes becomes obsessed with the idea of playing this violin as well as finding the woman who saved his life when he was injured in battle. Beautifully written and highly evocative, The Black Violin interweaves Johannes's quest for love and the history of this mysterious instrument in a narrative that is sure to resonate long after the last page is turned.

Black Visions: The Roots of Contemporary African-American Political Ideologies

by Michael C. Dawson

This stunning book represents the most comprehensive analysis to date of the complex relationships between black political thought and black political identity and behavior. Ranging from Frederick Douglass to rap artist Ice Cube, Michael C. Dawson brilliantly illuminates the history and current role of black political thought in shaping political debate in America.

Black Voices: An Anthology Of African-American Literature

by Editor Abraham Chapman

Featuring fiction, poetry, autobiography, and literary criticism, Black Voices captures the diverse and powerful words of a literary explosion, the ramifications of which can be seen and heard in the works of today's African-American artists. A comprehensive and impressive primer, this anthology presents some of the greatest and most enduring work born out of the African-American experience in the United States. Contributors Include: Sterling A. Brown Charles W. Chesnutt John Henrik Clarke Countee Cullen Frederick Douglass Paul Laurence Dunbar James Weldon Johnson Naomi Long Madgett Paule Marshall Clarence Major Claude McKay Ann Petry Dudley Randall J. Saunders Redding Jean Toomer Darwin T. Turner As well as: Lerone Bennett, Jr. Frank London Brown Arthur P. Davis Frank Marshall Davis Owen Dodson Mari Evans Rudolph Fisher Dan Georgakas Robert Hayden Frank Horne Blyden Jackson Lance Jeffers Fenton Johnson George E. Kent Alain Locke Diane Oliver Stanley Sanders Richard G. Stern Sterling Stuckey Melvin B. Tolson

Black Votes Count

by Frank R. Parker

Most Americans see the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 as the culmination of the civil rights movement. When the law was enacted, black voter registration in Mississippi soared. Few black candidates won office, however. In this book, Frank Parker describes black Mississippians' battle for meaningful voting rights, bringing the story up to 1986, when Mike Espy was elected as Mississippi's first black member of Congress in this century.To nullify the impact of the black vote, white Mississippi devised a political "massive resistance" strategy, adopting such disenfranchising devices as at-large elections, racial gerrymandering, making elective offices appointive, and revising the qualifications for candidates for public office. As legal challenges to these mechanisms mounted, Mississippi once again became the testing ground for deciding whether the promises of the Fifteenth Amendment would be fulfilled, and Parker describes the court battles that ensued until black voters obtained relief.

Black Walden

by Elise Lemire

Concord, Massachusetts, has long been heralded as the birthplace of American liberty and American letters. It was here that the first military engagement of the Revolutionary War was fought and here that Thoreau came to "live deliberately" on the shores of Walden Pond. Between the Revolution and the settlement of the little cabin with the bean rows, however, Walden Woods was home to several generations of freed slaves and their children. Living on the fringes of society, they attempted to pursue lives of freedom, promised by the rhetoric of the Revolution, and yet withheld by the practice of racism. Thoreau was all but alone in his attempt "to conjure up the former occupants of these woods." Other than the chapter he devoted to them in Walden, the history of slavery in Concord has been all but forgotten.In Black Walden: Slavery and Its Aftermath in Concord, Massachusetts, Elise Lemire brings to life the former slaves of Walden Woods and the men and women who held them in bondage during the eighteenth century. After charting the rise of Concord slaveholder John Cuming, Black Walden follows the struggles of Cuming's slave, Brister, as he attempts to build a life for himself after thirty-five years of enslavement. Brister Freeman, as he came to call himself, and other of the town's slaves were able to leverage the political tensions that fueled the American Revolution and force their owners into relinquishing them. Once emancipated, however, the former slaves were permitted to squat on only the most remote and infertile places. Walden Woods was one of them. Here, Freeman and his neighbors farmed, spun linen, made baskets, told fortunes, and otherwise tried to survive in spite of poverty and harassment.Today Walden Woods is preserved as a place for visitors to commune with nature. Lemire, who grew up two miles from Walden Pond, reminds us that this was a black space before it was an internationally known green space. Black Walden preserves the legacy of the people who strove against all odds to overcome slavery and segregation.

Black Water

by T. Jefferson Parker

A beautiful young woman is found dead and her cop husband is shot in the head, but still alive. Murder suicide? Maybe.

Black Water

by Faith Hunter

Three stories from New York Times bestselling author Faith Hunter, starring shapeshifting skinwalker Jane Yellowrock. In Snafu, a young Jane shows up for her internship with a securities firm. But before she even gets her foot in the door, she's accosted by two street toughs and is forced to draw on her new-found Beast-magic to defend herself... In Black Water, Jane encounters a dire situation involving an escaped prisoner and endangered hostages. With a helpful--and oddly sane--werewolf, Jane goes after the criminals, but can she stop them in time to bring the kidnapped women home alive? In Off the Grid, Jane goes on what looks like a simple mission for the Knoxville blood-master--finding a missing Mithran. Her search leads Jane to a young woman named Nell, a woman with a scarred past and a strange power, a woman who may hold the key to saving the missing vampire, if Jane can convince her to assist. Includes an exclusive preview of the Jane Yellowrock novel, Broken Soul, coming October 2014 from Roc! Snafu and Off the Grid are never before published. The story Black Water was previously published as an Audible Audio Edition. Praise for Faith Hunter's Jane Yellowrock Novels "Jane Yellowrock is smart, sexy, and ruthless."--New York Times Bestselling Author Kim Harrison "There is nothing as satisfying as the first time reading a Jane Yellowrock novel."--Fresh Fiction Faith Hunter is the New York Times bestselling author of the Jane Yellowrock series, as well as the Rogue Mage novels. She lives in Rock Hill, South Carolina.

Black Water

by Joyce Carol Oates

Joyce Carol Oates has taken a shocking story that has become an American myth and, from it, has created a novel of electrifying power and illumination. Kelly Kelleher is an idealistic, twenty-six-year-old "good girl" when she meets the Senator at a Fourth of July party. In a brilliantly woven narrative, we enter her past and her present, her mind and her body as she is fatally attracted to this older man, this hero, this soon-to-be-lover. Kelly becomes the very embodiment of the vulnerable, romantic dreams of bright and brave women, drawn to the power that certain men command--at a party that takes on the quality of a surreal nightmare; in a tragic car ride that we hope against hope will not end as we know it must end. One of the acknowledged masters of American fiction, Joyce Carol Oates has written a bold tour de force that parts the black water to reveal the profoundest depths of human truth.

Black Water

by D. J. MacHale

Just when Bobby Pendragon thinks he finally understands his purpose as a Traveller he is faced with an impossible choice. Arriving on the beautiful yet primitive territory of Eelong, Bobby finds himself at the bottom of the food chain when he is confronted by the ferocious half-human / half-cat species called Klee. But something is terribly wrong and Bobby soon discovers that the inhabitants of Eelong are in danger of being wiped out by a mysterious plague. In order to save Eelong Bobby realises he must break all Traveller rules. . . endangering himself, his friends and the future of all other territories â ¼ but can he do it?

Black Water Rising

by Attica Locke

Writing in the tradition of Dennis Lehane and Greg Iles, Attica Locke, a powerful new voice in American fiction, delivers a brilliant debut thriller that readers will not soon forget. Jay Porter is hardly the lawyer he set out to be. His most promising client is a low-rent call girl and he runs his fledgling law practice out of a dingy strip mall. But he's long since made peace with not living the American Dream and carefully tucked away his darkest sins: the guns, the FBI file, the trial that nearly destroyed him. Houston, Texas, 1981. It is here that Jay believes he can make a fresh start. That is, until the night in a boat out on the bayou when he impulsively saves a woman from drowning--and opens a Pandora's box. Her secrets put Jay in danger, ensnaring him in a murder investigation that could cost him his practice, his family, and even his life. But before he can get to the bottom of a tangled mystery that reaches into the upper echelons of Houston's corporate power brokers, Jay must confront the demons of his past. With pacing that captures the reader from the first scene through an exhilarating climax, Black Water Rising marks the arrival of an electrifying new talent.

A Black Way of Seeing

by Paul Robeson

In the tradition of James Baldwin's Notes of a Native Son, Robeson's A Black Way of Seeing melds history and analysis in a sweeping panorama of the present moment as we know it to be--scathing in its understanding of why Black empowerment has failed and prescient in its articulation of what it will take for Black Americans to be agents of change for the country as a whole.

Black & White

by Dani Shapiro

From the author of "Family History" (" Poised, absorbing . . . a bona fide page turner" -- "The New York Times Book Review") and the best-selling memoir "Slow Motion," a spellbinding novel about art, fame, ambition, and family that explores a provocative question: Is it possible for a mother to be true to herself and true to her children at the same time? Clara Brodeur has spent her entire adult life pulling herself away from her famous mother, the renowned and controversial photographer Ruth Dunne, whose towering reputation rests on the unsettling nude portraits she took of her young daughter from the ages of three to fourteen. The Clara Series, which graced the walls of museums around the world as well as the pages of New York City tabloids that labeled the work pornographic, cast a long and inescapable shadow over its subject. At eighteen, when Clara might have entered university and begun to shape an identity beyond her sensationalized, unsought role in the New York art world, she fled to the quiet obscurity of small-town Maine, where she married and had a child, a daughter whom she has tried to shield from the central facts of her early life and her damaging role as her mother' s muse. Fourteen years later, Ruth Dunne is dying, and Clara is summoned to her bedside. Despite her anguish and ambivalence about confronting a family life she has repressed and denied for more than a decade, Clara returns. She finds Ruth surrounded, even in her illness, by worshipful interns, protective assistants, and her conniving art dealer. Once again, she is Clara Dunne, the object of curiosity, the girl in the photos. Except this time she has her own daughter tothink about-- a girl who at nine looks strikingly like the girl in Ruth' s photos-- and she yearns to protect her, to insulate her from the exposure that will inevitably result when her two worlds, New York and Maine, collide. As Clara charts a path connecting her childhood with her adult life, Shapiro' s novel weaves together past and present in images as stark and intense as the photographs that tore the Dunnes apart. A brilliant examination of motherhood-- a novel that pits artistic inspiration against maternal obligation and asks whether the two can ever be fully reconciled-- "Black & White" explores the limits and duties of family loyalties, and even of love. Gripping, haunting, psychologically complex, this is Shapiro at her captivating best.

Black & White

by T. Thomas Fortune Seth Moglen

This new edition of T. Thomas Fortune's masterpiece -- originally published in 1884 -- presents a classic work of African-American political thought to a new generation of readers. Like the intellectual giants who emerged before and after him -- Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois -- T. Thomas Fortune was a writer, activist, and public intellectual. Born into slavery, Fortune became the leading black journalist of his generation, and he was the most eloquent and influential African-American radical of the late nineteenth century. Black and White offers Fortune's brilliant analysis of racism as a systemic, institutionalized practice that had undermined America's Enlightenment ideals from the time of the nation's founding. Asserting that the abolition of slavery had in no way diminished the virulence of white racism, he insisted that share-cropping, chain gangs, lynching, and the denial of civil rights had forced black Americans into a terrible new form of enslavement. With a prophetic voice, Fortune argued that if the United States was ever to realize its long-betrayed promise of equality, it would need not only to end racial prejudice but also to create a more just economic order.

Black, White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self

by Rebecca Walker

Black, White, and Jewish is the story of a child's unique struggle for identity and home when nothing in her world told her who she was or where she belonged. Poetic reflections on memory, time, and identity punctuate this gritty exploration of race and sexuality.

Black White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self

by Rebecca Walker

The Civil Rights movement brought author Alice Walker and lawyer Mel Leventhal together, and in 1969 their daughter, Rebecca, was born. Some saw this unusual copper-colored girl as an outrage or an oddity; others viewed her as a symbol of harmony, a triumph of love over hate. But after her parents divorced, leaving her a lonely only child ferrying between two worlds that only seemed to grow further apart, Rebecca was no longer sure what she represented. In this book, Rebecca Leventhal Walker attempts to define herself as a soul instead of a symbol&#151and offers a new look at the challenge of personal identity, in a story at once strikingly unique and truly universal. .

Black & White & Noir

by Paula Rabinowitz

Black & White & Noir explores America's pulp modernism through penetrating readings of the noir sensibility lurking in an eclectic array of media: Office of War Information photography, women's experimental films, and African-American novels, among others. It traces the dark edges of cultural detritus blowing across the postwar landscape, finding in pulp a political theory that helps explain America's fascination with lurid spectacles of crime.We are accustomed to thinking of noir as a film form popularized in movies like The Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, and, more recently, Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction. But it is also, Paula Rabinowitz argues, an avenue of social and political expression. This book offers an unparalleled historical and theoretical overview of the noir shadows cast when the media's glare is focused on the unseen and the unseemly in our culture. Through far-ranging discussions of the Starr Report, movies such as Double Indemnity and The Big Heat, and figures as various as Barbara Stanwyck, Kenneth Fearing, and Richard Wright, Rabinowitz finds in film noir the representation of modern America's attempt to submerge and mask its violent history of racial and class anatagonisms. Black & White & Noir also explores the theory and practice of stilettos, the ways in which girls in the 1950s viewed film noir as a secret language about their mothers' pasts, the extraordinary tone-setting photographs of Esther Bubley, and the smutty aspect of social workers' case studies, among other unexpected twists and provocative turns.

Black & White & Noir: America's Pulp Modernism

by Paula Rabinowitz

The first book to treat issues of race and ethnicity as related to noir, offering a cultural history of twentieth-century America through episodic readings of films, photographs, and literature.

Black Widow

by Randy Wayne White

A cult of death. A weapon of apocalyptic horror. Juan Cabrillo must stop them both. THE ?FASCINATING?( BOOKLIST) NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Some women you love. Some women you hate. Some women you survive.Doc Ford is drawn into a deadly battle when his goddaughter Shay is blackmailed. Someone filmed her at an out-of-control bachelorette party?and they want big money to keep it quiet. When Ford investigates, he finds that the woman responsible is an agent of corruption unlike any Ford has ever encountered before. And she may be the last encounter he ever has.

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