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The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century

by John Hope Franklin

Originating as three lectures delivered at the U. of Missouri in April 1992 (just one day after the "not guilty" verdict was returned in the trial of Los Angeles police officers in the beating of Rodney King), distinguished historian Franklin reflects on the most tragic and persistent social problem in American history-- racism.

The Color Master

by Aimee Bender

The bestselling author of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake returns with a wondrous collection of dreamy, strange, and magical stories.Truly beloved by readers and critics alike, Aimee Bender has become known as something of an enchantress whose lush prose is "moving, fanciful, and gorgeously strange" (People), "richly imagined and bittersweet" (Vanity Fair), and "full of provocative ideas" (The Boston Globe). In her deft hands, "relationships and mundane activities take on mythic qualities" (The Wall Street Journal).In this collection, Bender's unique talents sparkle brilliantly in stories about people searching for connection through love, sex, and family--while navigating the often painful realities of their lives. A traumatic event unfolds when a girl with flowing hair of golden wheat appears in an apple orchard, where a group of people await her. A woman plays out a prostitution fantasy with her husband and finds she cannot go back to her old sex life. An ugly woman marries an ogre and struggles to decide if she should stay with him after he mistakenly eats their children. Two sisters travel deep into Malaysia, where one learns the art of mending tigers who have been ripped to shreds.In these deeply resonant stories--evocative, funny, beautiful, and sad--we see ourselves reflected as if in a funhouse mirror. Aimee Bender has once again proven herself to be among the most imaginative, exciting, and intelligent writers of our time.

Color Me Bad

by Sharon Sala

An original short story by New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Sharon Sala links to her full-length contemporary women's fiction novel, The Curl Up and Dye. The novella centers around the four women who run the Curl Up and Dye hair salon and their relationships with the quirky customers of small-town Blessings, Georgia. Their meddlesome efforts at match-making run awry, but there's always another makeover just around the corner.

Color Me Beautiful: Discover Your Natural Beauty Through The Colors That Make You Look Great and Feel Fabulous!

by Carole Jackson

Finding your colors will be the nicest thing you can do for yourself. Without dieting, expense or effort, color can make you beautiful TODAY! In Color Me Beautiful, Carole Jackson, a leading professional color consultant, tells you how. The secret is simple: she uses the four seasons to describe people and their best colors. For just as nature is divided into four distinct seasons, each with its own harmonious colors - you have a unique skin tone, hair and eye coloring in tune with one of them: WINTER SUMMER AUTUMN SPRING. Carole Jackson tells you how to discover your "season" and how to use the 30 sensational colors in your "seasonal palette" to make your wardrobe, hair color, makeup and accessories just right for you. Your 30 "right" colors will smooth and clarify your complexion and bring healthy color to your face. You'll feel better all over. And, you'll learn how to unclutter your closet, dress for your figure, discover your clothing "personality," design your personal wardrobe and make it workable for all occasions, learn to use accessories successfully from scarves to stockings, And shop sanely. Color Me Beautiful is more than a beauty book: color can put you in tune with yourself and bring out your real beauty --- the beauty that comes from total harmony with yourself.

The Color Me Beautiful Make-up Book

by Carole Jackson

It's fun. It's easy. It's foolproof. The celebrated Queen of Color, Carole Jackson shows how her clear, detailed application techniques will bring out the beauty in you. Fully illustrated with vivid color-true palettes and full-color photos showing right and wrong looks for each season, this is the best make-up investment you'll ever make.

Color Me Dark: The Diary of Nellie Lee Love, The Great Migration North (Dear America)

by Patricia C. Mckissack

Like many other African-Americans, Nellie and her family move North for a better life and hopefully, to escape racism. Instead, they are faced with a more sinister form of prejudice--hatred within their own race.

Color of Darkness

by James Purdy

"Eleven stories and a novella" which are psychological fictions concerning society in the 20th century.

The Color of Death

by Elizabeth Lowell

The name Elizabeth Lowell has become synonymous with electrifying fiction that seamlessly combines suspense, intrigue, and passion. And now the phenomenal New York Times bestselling author brilliantly displays her incomparable talents in a story of treachery, greed, conspiracy, and murder that will hold the reader spellbound until the final word. It is the opportunity of a lifetime for Kate Chandler, the chance to cut seven rare, priceless sapphires and solidify her reputation as a world-class jewel cutter. But something goes horribly, tragically wrong during what should have been a simple transfer of goods. The sapphires vanish without a trace. Missing also is the man Kate trusted to transport the gems: her half brother, Lee, who now, quite possibly, is dead. And suddenly she is on the run, pursued by federal agents who suspect her of being the criminal mastermind of a cunning bait-and-switch scheme. Special agent Sam Groves is one of the best of the best, an essential member of the FBI's elite crime strike force and the perfect man to lead the hunt, since he could never be scammed by a beautiful confidence woman. But something is troubling about this assignment, because someone else is chasing Kate Chandler as well. Only Kate suspects the awful truth: She's unwittingly stumbled into a conspiracy of deceit, betrayal, and cold-blooded murder that goes far beyond a simple jewel heist. And a chilling, threatening voice on the telephone only confirms her worst suspicions. Getting Sam Groves, the FBI agent who's her constant shadow, to believe her is a step in the right direction -- but it may be one that's too little too late in a bloody game where terror dictates her every move and the rules are constantly changing. Because the order has already been passed down to a ruthlessly efficient assassin: Kate Chandler must not be allowed to live ...

The Color of Death (Sir John Fielding Mystery #7)

by Bruce Alexander

"Suspicion and fear are running high in London, as a gang of expert criminals terrorizes the town in a spree of robbery and murder - noblewomen are held at gunpoint in their parlors, and an innocent manservant is executed in cold blood. There is but one peculiar clue to the identity of this group: The robbers are all black men." "When Sir John takes a bullet to the shoulder early on, it is young Jeremy Proctor - who has been the blind magistrate's eyes for so many years - who must lead this most delicate investigation, albeit under Sir John's bedridden counsel. And when Jeremy begins to turn over stones, he and Sir John come to find that black and white is never as simple as it seems - and the deeds being committed are even darker than they imagined."--BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Color of Grace

by Katie J. Davis Beth Clark Bethany Haley Williams

A middle-class woman in rural America and war-affected children in Africa find common ground in their journeys from brokenness to redemption.Author and psychologist Bethany Haley Williams shares how her own emotional healing led her into treacherous war zones, where she provides care to former child soldiers and young girls used as sex slaves. Faced with her own battle with shame and a rocky journey toward healing, Bethany founded Exile International, a non-profit that implements art/expressive therapy and long-term, rehabilitative care to restore and empower war-affected children--including children rescued from Joseph Kony's LRA (Lord's Resistance Army). One of those rescued young men, Solomon, was abducted at the age of ten after being forced to watch LRA soldiers maim and murder his father and grandfather. His younger siblings were left behind, and his mother was instructed to "raise them well...for one day we'll return to take them too." Solomon is one of hundreds of thousands of boys and girls who have had their innocence stolen and are forced to do the unthinkable on a daily basis. But their horrific experiences are just the beginning. The real story is what happens after. Once these children learn to face their pasts, they are given hope for a future and a vision for changing the fabric of their countries by becoming leaders for peace and advocates of the power of forgiveness. of forgiveness. "If the world could learn forgiveness, resilience, and joy to this level, it would be radically changed. And these young survivors would be our greatest teachers." --Bethany Haley

The Color of Justice

by Ace Collins

1964 Justice, Mississippi, is a town divided. White and black. Rich and poor. Rule makers and rule breakers. Right or wrong, everyone assumes their place behind a fragile façade that is about to crumble. When attorney Coop Lindsay agrees to defend a black man accused of murdering a white teenager, the bribes and death threats don't intimidate him. As he prepares for the case of a lifetime, the young lawyer knows it's the verdict that poses the real threat--innocent or guilty, because of his stand Coop is no longer welcome in Justice. As he follows his conscience, he wonders just how far some people will go to make sure he doesn't finish his job? 2014 To some, the result of the trial still feels like a fresh wound even fifty years later, when Coop's grandson arrives in Justice seeking answers to the questions unresolved by the trial that changed his family's legacy. When a new case is presented, again pitting white against black, this third generation Lindsay may have the opportunity he needs to right the wrongs of the past. But hate destroys everything it touches, and the Lindsay family will not escape unscathed.

The Color of Law

by Mark Gimenez

A. Scott Fenney is a hotshot corporate lawyer at a big Dallas firm. At 33, in the prime of his life, he rakes in $750,000 a year, drives a Ferrari and comes home every night to a mansion in Dallas's most exclusive neighbourhood. He also comes home to one of Dallas's most beautiful women, with whom he has a much-loved daughter, Boo. For Fenney, life could not be better. But when a senator's son is killed in a hit-and-run, Fenney is asked by the state judge to put his air-conditioned lifestyle on hold to defend the accused: a black, heroin-addicted prostitute - a very different client to the people Fenney usually represents. And, more importantly, she is not going be paying Ford Stevens $350 an hour for the privilege of his services. Under fire from all sides, Fenney drafts in a public defender to take the case on. Yet as Scott prepares to hand over to Bobby, he feels increasingly guilty about the path he is taking, because Scott still believes in the principle of justice.

The Color of Liberty: Histories of Race in France

by Tyler Stovall Sue Peabody

France has long defined itself as a color-blind nation where racial bias has no place. Even today, the French universal curriculum for secondary students makes no mention of race or slavery, and many French scholars still resist addressing racial questions. Yet, as this groundbreaking volume shows, color and other racial markers have been major factors in French national life for more than three hundred years. The sixteen essays in The Color of Liberty offer a wealth of innovative research on the neglected history of race in France, ranging from the early modern period to the present. The Color of Liberty addresses four major themes: the evolution of race as an idea in France; representations of "the other" in French literature, art, government, and trade; the international dimensions of French racial thinking, particularly in relation to colonialism; and the impact of racial differences on the shaping of the modern French city. The many permutations of race in French history--as assigned identity, consumer product icon, scientific discourse, philosophical problem, by-product of migration, or tool in empire building--here receive nuanced treatments confronting the malleability of ideas about race and the uses to which they have been put. Contributors. Leora Auslander, Claude Blanckaert, Alice Conklin, Fred Constant, Laurent Dubois, Yal Simpson Fletcher, Richard Fogarty, John Garrigus, Dana Hale, Thomas C. Holt, Patricia M. E. Lorcin, Dennis McEnnerney, Michael A. Osborne, Lynn Palermo, Sue Peabody, Pierre H. Boulle, Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall, Tyler Stovall, Michael G. Vann, Gary Wilder

The Color of Light

by Karen White

At thirty-two, pregnant and recently divorced, Jillian Parrish and her seven-year-old daughter find refuge and solace on Pawleys Island, South Carolina. Jillian had experienced her best childhood memories here-until her best friend Lauren Mills disappeared, never to be found. At the time, Linc Rising, Lauren's boyfriend and Jillian's confidant, had been a suspect in Lauren's disappearance. Now he's back on Pawleys Island-renovating the old Mills house. And as ghosts of the past are resurrected, and Jillian's daughter begins having eerie conversations with an imaginary friend named Lauren, Jillian and Linc will uncover the truth about Lauren's disappearance and about the feelings they have buried for sixteen years. .

The Color of My Words

by Lynn Joseph

When life gets difficult for Ana Rosa, a twelve-year-old would-be writer living in a small village in the Dominican Republic, she can depend on her older brother to make her feel better--until the life-changing events on her thirteenth birthday.

The Color of Night

by David L. Lindsey

Behind Harry Strand is a career in American intelligence he wishes he could forget and a wife for whom he can't stop mourning. Then Mara Song dives into the lap pool of his exclusive club and into his life with an allure he can't resist, an extraordinary business proposition he can't refuse--and a window into his greatest nightmare of all. For one day or Mara's VCR, Harry happens to watch a surveillance tape of his wife's final, terrifying moments. He sees her car forced off the road. He understands only too well who the killers are. And now, through a series of agonizing, chesslike gambits, he will find a way to make them pay.

The Color of the Soul (The Penbrook Diaries #1)

by Tracey Victoria Bateman

Andy Carmichael, a reporter given the chance to cover the story that will make his career, finds more than he bargained for within the pages of Miss Penbrook's diary. The Color of the Soul will keep readers captivated from beginning to end.

The Color of War

by James Campbell

From the acclaimed World War II writer and author of The Ghost Mountain Boys, an incisive retelling of the key month, July 1944, that won the war in the pacific and ignited a whole new struggle on the home front. In the pantheon of great World War II conflicts, the battle for Saipan is often forgotten. Yet historian Donald Miller calls it "as important to victory over Japan as the Normandy invasion was to victory over Germany." For the Americans, defeating the Japanese came at a high price. In the words of a Time magazine correspondent, Saipan was "war at its grimmest." On the night of July 17, 1944, as Admirals Ernest King and Chester Nimitz were celebrating the battle's end, the Port Chicago Naval Ammunition Depot, just thirty-five miles northeast of San Francisco, exploded with a force nearly that of an atomic bomb. The men who died in the blast were predominantly black sailors. They toiled in obscurity loading munitions ships with ordnance essential to the US victory in Saipan. Yet instead of honoring the sacrifice these men made for their country, the Navy blamed them for the accident, and when the men refused to handle ammunition again, launched the largest mutiny trial in US naval history.The Color of War is the story of two battles: the one overseas and the one on America's home turf. By weaving together these two narratives for the first time, Campbell paints a more accurate picture of the cataclysmic events that occurred in July 1944--the month that won the war and changed America.

The Color of Wealth

by Betsy Leondar-Wright Rebecca Adamson Meizhu Lui Barbara J. Robles Rose M. Brewer

For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans.This accessible book-published in conjunction with one of the country's leading economics education organizations-makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice.Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies-how, for example, many post-World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only-The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans' net worth.

The Color of Welfare: How Racism Undermined the War on Poverty

by Jill S. Quadagno

Thirty years after Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty, the United States still lags behind most Western democracies in national welfare systems, lacking such basic programs as national health insurance and child care support. Some critics have explained the failure of social programs by citing our tradition of individual freedom and libertarian values, while others point to weaknesses within the working class. In The Color of Welfare, Jill Quadagno takes exception to these claims, placing race at the center of the "American Dilemma," as Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal did half a century ago. The "American creed" of liberty, justice, and equality clashed with a history of active racial discrimination, says Quadagno. It is racism that has undermined the War on Poverty, and America must come to terms with this history if there is to be any hope of addressing welfare reform today. From Reconstruction to Lyndon Johnson and beyond, Quadagno reveals how American social policy has continually foundered on issues of race. Drawing on extensive primary research, Quadagno shows, for instance, how Roosevelt, in need of support from southern congressmen, excluded African Americans from the core programs of the Social Security Act. Turning to Lyndon Johnson's "unconditional war on poverty," she contends that though anti-poverty programs for job training, community action, health care, housing, and education have accomplished much, they have not been fully realized because they became inextricably intertwined with the civil rights movement of the 1960s, which triggered a white backlash. Job training programs, for instance, became affirmative action programs, programs to improve housing became programs to integrate housing, programs that began as community action to upgrade the quality of life in the cities were taken over by local civil rights groups. This shift of emphasis eventually alienated white, working-class Americans, who had some of the same needs--for health care, subsidized housing, and job training opportunities--but who got very little from these programs. At the same time, affirmative action clashed openly with organized labor, and equal housing raised protests from the white suburban middle-class, who didn't want their neighborhoods integrated. Quadagno shows that Nixon, who initially supported many of Johnson's programs, eventually caught on that the white middle class was disenchanted. He realized that his grand plan for welfare reform, the Family Assistance Plan, threatened to undermine wages in the South and alienate the Republican party's new constituency--white, southern Democrats--and therefore dropped it. In the 1960s, the United States embarked on a journey to resolve the "American dilemma." Yet instead of finally instituting full democratic rights for all its citizens, the policies enacted in that turbulent decade failed dismally. The Color of Welfare reveals the root cause of this failure--the inability to address racial inequality.

The Color of Your Skin Ain't the Color of Your Heart (Shenandoah Sisters, Book 3)

by Michael Phillips

Historical fiction about two girls in the South in the year 1865.

The Color Revolutions

by Lincoln A. Mitchell

From late 2003 through mid-2005, a series of peaceful street protests toppled corrupt and undemocratic regimes in Georgia, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan and ushered in the election of new presidents in all three nations. These movements--collectively known as the Color Revolutions--were greeted in the West as democratic breakthroughs that might thoroughly reshape the political terrain of the former Soviet Union.But as Lincoln A. Mitchell explains in The Color Revolutions, it has since become clear that these protests were as much reflections of continuity as they were moments of radical change. Not only did these movements do little to spur democratic change in other post-Soviet states, but their impact on Georgia, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan themselves was quite different from what was initially expected. In fact, Mitchell suggests, the Color Revolutions are best understood as phases in each nation's long post-Communist transition: significant events, to be sure, but far short of true revolutions.The Color Revolutions explores the causes and consequences of all three Color Revolutions--the Rose Revolution in Georgia, the Orange Revolution in Ukraine, and the Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan--identifying both common themes and national variations. Mitchell's analysis also addresses the role of American democracy promotion programs, the responses of nondemocratic regimes to the Color Revolutions, the impact of these events on U.S.-Russian relations, and the failed "revolutions" in Azerbaijan and Belarus in 2005 and 2006.At a time when the Arab Spring has raised hopes for democratic development in the Middle East, Mitchell's account of the Color Revolutions serves as a valuable reminder of the dangers of confusing dramatic moments with lasting democratic breakthroughs.

Color the Sidewalk for Me (Bradleyville Series Book 2)

by Brandilyn Collins

As a chalk-fingered child, I had worn my craving for Mama's love on my sleeve. But as I grew, that craving became cloaked in excuses and denial until slowly it sank beneath my skin to lie unheeded but vital, like the sinews of my framework. By the time I was a teenager, I thought the gap between Mama and me could not be wider. And then Danny came along. . . . A splendidly colored sidewalk. Six-year-old Celia presented the gift to her mother with pride-and received only anger in return. Why couldn't Mama love her? Years later, when once-in-a-lifetime love found Celia, her mother opposed it. The crushing losses that followed drove Celia, guilt-ridden and grieving, from her Bradleyville home. Now thirty-five, she must return to nurse her father after a stroke. But the deepest need for healing lies in the rift between mother and daughter. God can perform such a miracle. But first Celia and Mama must let go of the past--before it destroys them both.

Color: Travels Through the Paintbox

by Victoria Finlay

Part travelogue, part narrative history, 'Colour' unlocks the history of the colours of the rainbow, and reveals how paints came to be invented, discovered, traded and used. This remarkable and beautifully written book remembers a time when red paint was really the colour of blood, when orange was the poison pigment, blue as expensive as gold, and yellow made from the urine of cows force-fed with mangoes. It looks at how green was carried by yaks along the silk road, and how an entire nation was founded on the colour purple. Exciting, richly informative, and always surprising, 'Colour' lifts the lid on the historical palette and unearths an astonishing wealth of stories about the quest for colours, and our efforts to understand them.

Color War! (Camp Sunnyside Friends #3)

by Marilyn Kaye

The girls in Cabin 6 end up on the same team in the annual color war. This year, some of them are assigned to a different team, splitting the cabin into. The girls become aggressive, and the strain to win threatens their friendship. The girls have to decide what's more important: the war or their friendship.

Showing 73,001 through 73,025 of 183,045 results

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