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Showing 73,401 through 73,425 of 240,490 results

The Boy Who Could Find Anything

by Joan Lowery Nixon

David finds all sorts of missing items other people but cannot locate his own possessions.

The Boy Who Could Fly

by Robert Newman

Joey has always been a special kid, but his brother, Mark, is worried that the people in their new town won't understand his odd behavior Mark has always known that his brother, Joey, was special. The problem is, Joey has always been a little too special for most people to understand. When the brothers move to rural upstate New York to live with their aunt and uncle, Mark is worried that Joey will have a hard time fitting into their new town--especially since Joey has a habit of speaking his thoughts inside people's minds instead of out loud. Mark believes that Joey can do anything he sets his mind to--if he wanted to, he could probably even fly. But when a local politician dares Joey to prove his talents, Mark worries that by accepting the challenge, Joey is keeping himself from ever being able to live a regular life again. And in a town like Westfield, not being normal can be dangerous.

The Boy Who Could Fly Without a Motor

by Theodore Taylor

Jon Jeffers is the loneliest nine-year-old on earth. It's 1935, and he's stuck on a tiny rocky island off the coast of San Francisco with his mother and his lighthouse-keeper father. Jon longs for something more. If only he had a way to escape this forsaken pile of rocks, he could have some real adventures.Then one morning the irritable ghost of an ancient magician appears on the beach and offers--amazingly--to teach Jon to fly. Jon agrees, and at first flying seems to be the answer to his wildest dreams. But then he flies into some serious trouble. . . .From the acclaimed author of The Cay, here is a sweet, funny, and outrageous tale of a boy who gets his dearest wish--and then wishes he hadn't.

The Boy Who Couldn’t Die

by William Sleator

When his best friend dies in a plane crash, sixteen-year-old Ken has a ritual performed that will make him invulnerable, but soon learns that he had good reason to be suspicious of the woman he paid to lock his soul away.

The Boy Who Died and Came Back

by Robert Moss

Travels in Many Worlds with a Master Storyteller Join Robert Moss for an unforgettable journey that will expand your sense of reality and confirm that there is life beyond death and in other dimensions of the multiverse. Moss describes how he lived a whole life in another world when he died at age nine in a Melbourne hospital and how he died and came back again, in another sense, in a crisis of spiritual emergence during midlife. As he shares his adventures in walking between the worlds, we begin to understand that all times -- past, future, and parallel -- may be accessible now. Moss presents nine keys for living consciously at the center of the multidimensional universe, embracing synchronicity, entertaining our creative spirits, and communicating with a higher Self.

The Boy Who Drank Too Much

by Shep Greene

A teenage hockey star tries to cope with his problems through drinking, but finally seeks help through his friends.

The Boy Who Drew Birds

by Jacqueline Davies

John James Audubon was a boy who loved the out-of-doors more than the in. He was a boy who believed in studying birds in nature, not just from books. And, in the fall of 1804, he was a boy determined to learn if the small birds nesting near his Pennsylvania home really would return the following spring. This book reveals how the youthful Audubon pioneered a technique essential to our understanding of birds. Capturing the early passion of America's greatest painter of birds, this story will leave young readers listening intently for the call of birds large and small near their own homes.

The Boy Who Drew Cats

by Margaret Hodges

A boy's obsession with drawing cats everywhere gets him trouble, until the felines reward their creator.

The Boy Who Fell Out of the Sky: A True Story

by Ken Dornstein

Ken Dornstein always looked up to his older brother David. David was handsome, popular and successful with women. He was talented, and had dreams of writing the Great American Novel - dreams his little brother never doubted would come true. David died in the Lockerbie bombing of 1988, aged 25. This memoir begins as the story of Ken's investigation into David's death. But as his obsessive enquiries go on, it becomes the story of David's life, what he meant to Ken - and who he really was. As it moves towards its devastating finale, Ken's account becomes as page-turning as a thriller, and raises the question: how well do we know the people we love?

The Boy Who Followed Ripley

by Patricia Highsmith

"Ripley is an unmistakable descendant of Gatsby, that 'penniless young man without a past' who will stop at nothing."--Frank Rich Now part of American film and literary lore, Tom Ripley, "a bisexual psychopath and art forger who murders without remorse when his comforts are threatened" (New York Times Book Review), was Patricia Highsmith's favorite creation. In The Boy Who Followed Ripley (1980), Highsmith explores Ripley's bizarrely paternal relationship with a troubled young runaway, whose abduction draws them into Berlin's seamy underworld. More than any other American literary character, Ripley provides "a lens to peer into the sinister machinations of human behavior" (John Freeman, Pittsburgh Gazette).

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

by William Kamkwamba Bryan Mealer Anna Hymas

When a terrible drought struck William Kamkwamba's tiny village in Malawi, his family lost all of the season's crops, leaving them with nothing to eat and nothing to sell. William began to explore science books in his village library, looking for a solution. There, he came up with the idea that would change his family's life forever: he could build a windmill. Made out of scrap metal and old bicycle parts, William's windmill brought electricity to his home and helped his family pump the water they needed to farm the land.Retold for a younger audience, this exciting memoir shows how, even in a desperate situation, one boy's brilliant idea can light up the world. Complete with photographs, illustrations, and an epilogue that will bring readers up to date on William's story, this is the perfect edition to read and share with the whole family.

The Boy Who Invented TV: The Story of Philo Farnsworth

by Kathleen Krull

An inspiring true story of a boy genius. Plowing a potato field in 1920, a 14-year-old farm boy from Idaho saw in the parallel rows of overturned earth a way to "make pictures fly through the air." This boy was not a magician; he was a scientific genius and just eight years later he made his brainstorm in the potato field a reality by transmitting the world's first television image. This fascinating picture-book biography of Philo Farnsworth covers his early interest in machines and electricity, leading up to how he put it all together in one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century. The author's afterword discusses the lawsuit Farnsworth waged and won against RCA when his high school science teacher testified that Philo's invention of television was years before RCA's.

The Boy Who Killed Caterpillars

by Joshua Kornreich

In a language all his own, a language driven by stutterance and repetition, Joshua Kornreich evokes and seduces the reader into a boyhood mythography where things are not always what they seem to be.

The Boy Who Killed Demons

by Dave Zeltserman

"My name's Henry Dudlow. I'm fifteen and a half. And I'm cursed. Or damned. Take your pick. The reason? I see demons." So begins the latest novel by horror master Dave Zeltserman. The setting is quiet Newton, Massachussetts, where nothing ever happens. Nothing, that is, until two months after Henry Dudlow's 13th birthday, when his neighbor, Mr. Hanley, suddenly starts to look . . . different. While everyone else sees a balding man with a beer belly, Henry suddenly sees a nasty, bilious, rage-filled demon. Once Henry catches onto the real Mr. Hanley, he starts to see demons all around him, and his boring, adolescent life is transformed. There's no more time for friends or sports or the lovely Sally Freeman--instead Henry must work his way through ancient texts and hunt down the demons before they steal any more innocent children. And if hunting demons is hard at any age, it's borderline impossible when your parents are on your case, and your grades are getting worse, and you can't tell anyone about your chosen mission. A very scary novel written with verve and flashes of great humor, The Boy Who Killed Demons is Dave Zeltserman's most accomplished and entertaining horror novel yet.

The Boy Who Lived With The Seals (with Image Descriptions)

by Rafe Martin

When their son disappeared, his parents thought they would never see him again. But years later, the boy was spotted swimming with the seals. Shannon's haunting pictures dramatize the bittersweet beauty of this traditional story from the Chinook people of the Northwest. Full-color illustrations.

The Boy Who Loved Anne Frank: A Novel

by Ellen Feldman

"An appealing and inventive novel...original and cathartic."--Dana Kennedy, New York Times On February 16, 1944, Anne Frank recorded in her diary that Peter, whom she at first disliked but eventually came to love, had confided in her that if he got out alive, he would reinvent himself entirely. This is the story of what might have happened if the boy in hiding survived to become a man. Peter arrives in America, the land of self-creation; he flourishes in business, marries, and raises a family. He thrives in the present, plans for the future, and has no past. But when The Diary of a Young Girl is published to worldwide acclaim and gives rise to bitter infighting, he realizes the cost of forgetting. Based on extensive research of Peter van Pels and the strange and disturbing life Anne Frank's diary took on after her death, this is a novel about the memory of death, the death of memory, and the inescapability of the past. Reading group guide included.

The Boy Who Loved Batman

by Michael E. Uslan

Is any superhero cooler than Batman? He s a crime-fighting vigilante with a tragic past, a lawless attitude, and a seemingly endless supply of high-tech gadgetry. In this fully illustrated memoir, author Michael Uslan recalls his journey from early childhood fandom through to the decades he spent on a caped crusade of his own: to bring Batman to the silver screen as the dark, serious character he was at heart. Uslan's story traces his path from the wilds of New Jersey to the limelight of Hollywood, following his work as Executive Producer on every Batman film from Tim Burton s 1989 re-envisioning to 2012's The Dark Knight Rises. Through it all, he helped to create one of the most successful pop culture franchises of all time.

The Boy Who Loved to Draw

by Barbara Brenner

When Benjamin West was seven years old, the only thing in the world he wanted to do was draw pictures. For a time, that got him into a peck of trouble. Papa wasn't pleased when Benjamin "borrowed" his best quill pen. Mama wasn't happy that Benjamin would rather sketch the cows than milk them. And Grimalkin, the family cat, was not keen on being the source for paintbrush hairs! Truth was, there was nothing Benjamin cared more about than art, and that led him to some surprising adventures. Here, in lively easy-to-read words and vivid pictures, is the engaging true story of Benjamin West, the farmboy from colonial Pennsylvania who grew up to become the first world-famous American artist and a friend to Benjamin Franklin and the king of England.

The Boy Who Loved Windows

by Patricia Stacey

This enthralling memoir is the day-by-day story of how one little boy was saved from a path leading to autistic isolation. It is also a first-hand account of the new model of research and treatment pioneered by Stanley Greenspan, M. D. that makes this recovery possible for others. Walker, whom pediatricians worried would never walk, talk, or perhaps even hear or see, was lucky enough to be born to a family who would not accept defeat. Pat Stacey reveals the darkest fears, struggles, exhaustion, tiny victories, and eventual joys her family faced as they gradually brought Walker into full contact with the world.

The Boy Who Loved Words

by Roni Schotter Giselle Potter

In this Parents' Choice Gold Award-winning book, Selig collects words, ones that stir his heart (Mama!) and ones that make him laugh (giggle). But what to do with so many luscious words? After helping a poet find the perfect words for his poem (lozenge, lemon, and licorice), he figures it out: His purpose is to spread the word to others. And so he begins to sprinkle, disburse, and broadcast them to people in need.

The Boy Who Made Dragonfly: A Zuni Myth

by Tony Hillerman Janet Grado

A Zuni myth first recorded a century ago.

The Boy Who Made Them Love Again

by Scarlet Wilson

From Dr Storm to devoted dadWhen Luke Storm ended his relationship with Abby Tyler, he thought that he was doing the right thing. Abby so wanted children and Luke knew he could never give them to her. Now, five years later, when he meets Abby again, and with a little boy of her own, Luke is rocked. She's as gorgeous and adorable as ever, but he realises that if he wants Abby back in his life, he has to let her special little son into his heart and become the father he never expected to be...

The Boy Who Met Jesus: Segatashya of Kibeho

by Steve Erwin Immaculée Ilibagiza

It's the greatest story never told: that of a boy who met Jesus and dared to ask him all the questions that have consumed mankind since the dawn of time. No matter what one's faith or religious beliefs are, Segatashya's words will bring comfort and joy.

The Boy Who Never Grew Up

by David Handler

A famous director, mired in a nasty divorce, hires Hoagy to salvage his nameIn Matthew Wax's films, politicians are honest, parents are respected, and nice guys finish first. Wax has been Hollywood's most beloved director for decades, and his personal life seemed as squeaky-clean as the world of his films. But when he and his wife, leading lady Pennyroyal Brim, file for divorce, the mud starts to fly. She accuses him of bedroom tyranny, sexual perversion, and every stripe of abuse. When she announces a tell-all memoir, Wax fires back the only way he can. He calls Stewart Hoag, ghostwriter to the stars. To tell Wax's side of the story, Hoagy and his basset hound Lulu have to get closer to the boy wonder than anyone ever has. The true story of the man behind America's most family-friendly films is even darker than the press suspects, and people will die to keep it hidden from view.

The Boy Who Played with Fusion

by Tom Clynes

How an American teenager became the youngest person ever to build a working nuclear fusion reactor By the age of nine, Taylor Wilson had mastered the science of rocket propulsion. At eleven, his grandmother's cancer diagnosis drove him to investigate new ways to produce medical isotopes. And by fourteen, Wilson had built a 500-million-degree reactor and become the youngest person in history to achieve nuclear fusion. How could someone so young achieve so much, and what can Wilson's story teach parents and teachers about how to support high-achieving kids? In The Boy Who Played with Fusion, science journalist Tom Clynes narrates Taylor Wilson's extraordinary journey--from his Arkansas home where his parents fully supported his intellectual passions, to a unique Reno, Nevada, public high school just for academic superstars, to the present, when now nineteen-year-old Wilson is winning international science competitions with devices designed to prevent terrorists from shipping radioactive material into the country. Along the way, Clynes reveals how our education system shortchanges gifted students, and what we can do to fix it.

Showing 73,401 through 73,425 of 240,490 results

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