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Inventing the Abbotts and Other Stories

by Sue Miller

In these short stories, written early in her career, Miller portrays characters as the cope with a variety of complex situations involving human relationships. In the title story the narrator observes his brother's longing and disdain for the ostentatiously wealthy Abbott girls. In "Appropriate Affect" a woman's true feelings emerge as she recovers from a stroke. In "The Birds and the Bees" an adolescent girl encounters a child molester. The protagonist of "Calling" feels compelled to make anonymous phone calls to his girlfriend.

Inventing the Enemy

by Umberto Eco

Inventing the Enemy covers a wide range of topics on which Umberto Eco has written and lectured for the past ten years, from a disquisition on the theme that runs through his most recent novel, The Prague Cemetery--every country needs an enemy, and if it doesn't have one, must invent it--to a discussion of ideas that have inspired his earlier novels. Along the way, he takes us on an exploration of lost islands, mythical realms, and the medieval world. Eco also sheds light on the indignant reviews of James Joyce's Ulysses by fascist journalists of the 1920s and 1930s, and provides a lively examination of Saint Thomas Aquinas's notions about the soul of an unborn child, censorship, violence, and WikiLeaks. These are essays full of passion, curiosity, and obsessions by one of the world's most esteemed scholars and critically acclaimed, best-selling novelists.

Inventing the People: The Rise of Popular Sovereignty in England and America

by Edmund Sears Morgan

This book makes the provocative case here that America has remained politically stable because the Founding Fathers invented the idea of the American people and used it to impose a government on the new nation. His landmark analysis shows how the notion of popular sovereignty the unexpected offspring of an older, equally fictional notion, the "divine right of kings" has worked in our history and remains a political force today.

Inventing Wine: A New History of One of the World's Most Ancient Pleasures

by Paul Lukacs

The story of how wine, as enjoyed by millions of people today, came to be. Drinking wine can be traced back 8,000 years, yet the wines we drink today are radically different from those made in earlier eras. While its basic chemistry remains largely the same, wine's social roles have changed fundamentally, being invented and reinvented many times over many centuries. In Inventing Wine, Paul Lukacs tells the enticing story of wine's transformation from a source of spiritual and bodily nourishment to a foodstuff valued for the wide array of pleasures it can provide. He chronicles how the prototypes of contemporary wines first emerged when people began to have options of what to drink, and he demonstrates that people selected wine for dramatically different reasons than those expressed when doing so was a necessity rather than a choice. During wine's long history, men and women imbued wine with different cultural meanings and invented different cultural roles for it to play. The power of such invention belonged both to those drinking wine and to those producing it. These included tastemakers like the medieval Cistercian monks of Burgundy who first thought of place as an important aspect of wine's identity; nineteenth-century writers such as Grimod de la Reyniere and Cyrus Redding who strived to give wine a rarefied aesthetic status; scientists like Louis Pasteur and Émile Peynaud who worked to help winemakers take more control over their craft; and a host of visionary vintners who aimed to produce better, more distinctive-tasting wines, eventually bringing high-quality wine to consumers around the globe. By charting the changes in both wine's appreciation and its production, Lukacs offers a fascinating new way to look at the present as well as the past.

The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus

by Pamela Gordon

The school of Greek philosopher Epicurus, which became known as the Garden, famously put great stock in happiness and pleasure. As a philosophical community, and a way of seeing the world, Epicureanism had a centuries-long life in Athens and Rome, as well as across the Mediterranean. The Invention and Gendering of Epicurusstudies how the Garden's outlook on pleasure captured Greek and Roman imaginations---particularly among non-Epicureans---for generations after its legendary founding. Unsympathetic sources from disparate eras generally focus not on historic personages but on the symbolic Epicurean. And yet the traditions of this imagined Garden, with its disreputable women and unmanly men, give us intermittent glimpses of historical Epicureans and their conceptions of the Epicurean life. Pamela Gordon suggests how a close hearing and contextualization of anti-Epicurean discourse leads us to a better understanding of the cultural history of Epicureanism. Her primary focus is on sources hostile to the Garden, but her Epicurean-friendly perspective is apparent throughout. Her engagement with ancient anti-Epicurean texts makes more palpable their impact on modern responses to the Garden. Intended both for students and for scholars of Epicureanism and its response, the volume is organized primarily according to the themes common among Epicurus' detractors. It considers the place of women in Epicurean circles, as well as the role of Epicurean philosophy in Homer and other writers.

Invention and Reinvention: The Evolution of San Diego's Innovation Economy

by Mary Lindenstein Walshok Abraham J. Shragge

Formerly prosperous cities across the United States, struggling to keep up with an increasingly global economy and the continued decline of post-war industries like manufacturing, face the issue of how to adapt to today's knowledge economy. In Invention and Reinvention, authors Mary Walshok and Abraham Shragge chronicle San Diego's transformation from a small West Coast settlement to a booming military metropolis and then to a successful innovation hub. This instructive story of a second-tier city that transformed its core economic identity can serve as a rich case and a model for similar regions. Stressing the role that cultural values and social dynamics played in its transition, the authors discern five distinct, recurring factors upon which San Diego capitalized at key junctures in its economic growth. San Diego--though not always a star city--has been able to repurpose its assets and realign its economic development strategies continuously in order to sustain prosperity. Chronicling over a century of adaptation, this book offers a lively and penetrating tale of how one city reinvented itself to meet the demands of today's economy, lighting the way for others.

The Invention of Autonomy

by J. B. Schneewind

J.B. Schneewind's remarkable book is the most comprehensive study ever written of the history of moral philosophy. Its aim is to set Kant's still influential ethics in its historical context by showing in detail what the central questions in moral philosophy were for him and how he arrived at his own distinctive ethical views. In its range, analyses, and discussion of the subtle interweaving of religious and political thought with moral philosophy, this is an unprecedented account of the evolution of Kant's ethics.

The Invention of Coinage and the Monetization of Ancient Greece

by David M. Schaps

Coinage appeared at a moment when it fulfilled an essential need in Greek society and brought with it rationalization and social leveling in some respects, while simultaneously producing new illusions, paradoxes, and new elites. In a book that will encourage scholarly discussion for some time, David M. Schaps addresses a range of important coinage topics, among them money, exchange, and economic organization in the Near East and in Greece before the introduction of coinage; the invention of coinage and the reasons for its adoption; and the developing use of money to make more money. David M. Schaps is Professor of Classics at Bar-Ilan University in Israel.

The Invention of Enterprise

by David S. Landes Joel Mokyr William J. Baumol

Whether hailed as heroes or cast as threats to social order, entrepreneurs--and their innovations--have had an enormous influence on the growth and prosperity of nations. The Invention of Enterprise gathers together, for the first time, leading economic historians to explore the entrepreneur's role in society from antiquity to the present. Addressing social and institutional influences from a historical context, each chapter examines entrepreneurship during a particular period and in an important geographic location. The book chronicles the sweeping history of enterprise in Mesopotamia and Neo-Babylon; carries the reader through the Islamic Middle East; offers insights into the entrepreneurial history of China, Japan, and Colonial India; and describes the crucial role of the entrepreneur in innovative activity in Europe and the United States, from the medieval period to today. In considering the critical contributions of entrepreneurship, the authors discuss why entrepreneurial activities are not always productive and may even sabotage prosperity. They examine the institutions and restrictions that have enabled or impeded innovation, and the incentives for the adoption and dissemination of inventions. They also describe the wide variations in global entrepreneurial activity during different historical periods and the similarities in development, as well as entrepreneurship's role in economic growth. The book is filled with past examples and events that provide lessons for promoting and successfully pursuing contemporary entrepreneurship as a means of contributing to the welfare of society. The Invention of Enterprise lays out a definitive picture for all who seek an understanding of innovation's central place in our world.

The Invention of Heterosexuality

by Jonathan Ned Katz

Heterosexuality, assumed to denote a universal sexual and cultural norm, has been largely exempt from critical scrutiny. In this boldly original work, Jonathan Ned Katz challenges the common notion that the distinction between heterosexuality and homosexuality has been a timeless one. Building on the history of medical terminology, he reveals that as late as 1923, the term "heterosexuality" referred to a "morbid sexual passion," and that its current usage emerged to legitimate men and women having sex for pleasure. Drawing on the works of Sigmund Freud, James Baldwin, Betty Friedan, and Michel Foucault, The Invention of Heterosexuality considers the effects of heterosexuality's recently forged primacy on both scientific literature and popular culture. "Lively and provocative."--Carol Tavris, New York Times Book Review. "A valuable primer ... misses no significant twists in sexual politics."--Gary Indiana, Village Voice Literary Supplement. "One of the most important--if not outright subversive--works to emerge from gay and lesbian studies in years."--Mark Thompson, The Advocate.

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

by Brian Selznick

Orphan, clock keeper, thief: Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. Combining elements of picture book, graphic novel, and film, Caldecott Honor artist Selznick breaks open the novel form to create an entirely new reading experience in this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

The Invention of Solitude

by Paul Auster

In this debut work by New York Times-bestselling author Paul Auster (The New York Trilogy), The Invention of Solitude, a memoir, established Auster's reputation as a major new voice in American writing. His moving and personal meditation on fatherhood is split into two stylistically separate sections. In the first, Auster reflects on the memories of his father who was a distant, undemonstrative, and cold man who died an untimely death. As he sifts through his Father's things, Auster uncovers a sixty-year-old murder mystery that sheds light on his father's elusive character. In the second section, the perspective shifts and Auster begins to reflect on his own identity as a father by adopting the voice of a narrator, #147;A. " Through a mosaic of images, coincidences, and associations #147;A," contemplates his separation from his son, his dying grandfather, turning the story into a self-conscious reflection on the process of writing.

The Invention of Tradition

by Eric Hobsbawm Terence Ranger

Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparatively recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh and Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial rituals in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. It addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historians and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which poses new questions for the understanding of our history.

Inventors (A Library of Congress Book)

by Martin W. Sandler

The Library of Congress, located in Washington, DC, is often called "the storehouse of our national memory," and is home to the largest collection of knowledge on earth. Illustrated with over 100 vintage photographs, posters, and paintings from its archives, the Library of Congress Books offer readers a fascinating look at some of the most important events in our country's history. Americans have been characterized by their inventive spirit since the days of Benjamin Franklin, but the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries proved especially fruitful in groundbreaking discoveries that revolutionized life as we know it. This book presents the evolution of these inventions as it has never been seen before--and celebrates the spirit of the great American inventors who let loose their imaginations and changed the world forever. Notable Children's Trade Books in Social Studies, 1997 (NCSS/CBC)

Inversions

by Iain M. Banks

Iain Banks writes some of the very best space opera ever penned and this novel is no exception.

Investigating Astronomy

by Jodi E. Asbell-Clarke Erin M. Bardar Teon E. Edwards Jefffrey F. Lockwood

Investigating Astronomy is the first comprehensive astronomy textbook written specifically for high school students. In writing this book, we have tried to include all the major topics in an astronomy course while also engaging you in hands-on investigations and using tools that will help you learn in an interactive and meaningful way. The book also focuses on scientific inquiry, the process of making scientific claims and supporting them with evidence, and using scientific reasoning to justify and revise those claims.

Investigating God's World (4th Edition)

by Matilda Nordtvedt Gregory Rickard Julie Rickard Stephen Mcalister

The book investigates the things that you see every day and to know the laws that these objects of nature obey and how they all fit together in God's creation.

Investigating Plants

by Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Investigating Pragmatics in Foreign Language Learning, Teaching and Testing

by Eva Alcon Soler Alicia Martinez-Flor

The book focuses on investigating pragmatic learning, teaching and testing in foreign language contexts. The volume brings together research that investigates these three areas in different formal language learning settings. The number and variety of languages involved both as the first language (e.g. English, Finnish, Iranian, Spanish, Japanese) as well as the target foreign language (e.g. English, French, German, Indonesian, Korean, Spanish) makes the volume specially attractive for language educators in different sociocultural foreign language contexts. Additionally, the different approaches adopted by the researchers participating in this volume, such as information processing, sociocultural, language socialization, computer-mediated or conversation analysis should be of interest to graduate students and researchers working in the area of second language acquisition.

Investigating Sociological Theory

by Charles Turner

'This book is not an encyclopaedic survey of the most influential or important sociological theories of the 20th century; nor is it an institutional history of sociological theory; it is not a textbook, a distillation of the accumulated knowledge of a particular discipline; nor is it a crib, a set of ready-made and easily-remembered answers to imagined examination questions. It is more of a reader's guide, a series of hints and suggestions for those who, whether students or teachers, believe that sociology is a profession and a discipline but also something more...' - Charles Turner in the introduction to 'Investigating Sociological Theory' This is an accessible, enlivening introductory book that provides a shot in the arm for all those who maintain the relevance of sociology for understanding the modern world. It will inspire discussion in classes, and provide teachers with an opportunity to discuss the big questions in theory, history, social order and social change. Turner provides a wealth of concrete examples which demonstrate what a sociological perspective can do to unpack and illuminate everyday life. The book allows students to understand sociological theory from the inside. It moves effortlessly beyond the mere parade of great names and core ideas to introduce concepts that can be used to understand the social world in which we live, where this world has come from and where it might be heading. Original, informed, and deftly written with the needs of students in mind this book is an antidote to arid theorising and the dull recitation of the grand sociological tradition.

Investigating Your Career (Third Edition)

by Lynne Whaley Ann Jordan Tena B. Crews

Would you like a text that gives you the opportunity to direct your attention toward an area of interest that might develop into a career path and helps you identify educational course offerings related to your career choices? INVESTIGATING YOUR CAREER, 3rd Edition has been revised to include social networking, personal finance, blog activities, math and financial information, and additional coverage on the 16 Career Clusters, making it the perfect solution. This career exploration text uniquely focuses on your individual PATH to success: your Passions, Attitude, Talents, and Heart, as career possibilities are explored. You will learn critical success skills such as how to budget your money, the value and misuse of credit, and how to manage your time. Focusing education on the future, the U.S. Office of Education has grouped careers into 16 clusters based on similar job characteristics. Every chapter in INVESTIGATING YOUR CAREER, 3E includes detailed information on a career cluster allowing you to learn about the various career options available. The career cluster approach makes it easier to understand the relevance of your required courses.

Investigations in Number Data and Space (2nd edition)

by Pearson Scott Foresman

A student activity book for factors, multiples, arrays, shape of the data, Multiple Towers and Division Stories, Size, Shape, and Symmetry, Landmarks and Large Numbers, Fraction Cards and Decimal Squares, Moving Between Solids and Silhouettes, Penny Jars and Plant Growth.

Showing 74,201 through 74,225 of 121,006 results

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