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The Lonesome Trials Of Johnny Riles

by Gregory Hill

The Lonesome Trials of Johnny Riles revisits Strattford County, the setting of Hill's award-winning novel, East of Denver. Set in 1975, we follow the feverish tale of Johnny Riles, a reclusive rancher who spends his days and nights searching for the murderer of his horse, for the soul of his mad brother, and for a sober reason to live. Over the course of this unpredictable, witty novel, Johnny delves beneath landscapes both great and plain to unearth the truths behind his nightmares.

The Long Arm of Gil Hamilton

by Larry Niven

3 novellas from the science fiction writer: Death by Ecstasy, The Defenseless Dead, and Arm.

Long Arm Quarterback

by Matt Christopher

Cap Wadell loves football; unfortunately, living in a rural town of 1,223 people makes putting together a team a little difficult. His grandfather suggests that Cap organize a local six-man team and play with other surrounding small towns. Recruiting players, finding uniforms, locating a field to play on, and securing a rule book are all easily done, but one major problem remains -- who is going to coach this team? Cap thinks his grandfather is perfect for the job, but trouble strikes when another grandfather thinks Cap's grandfather is playing favorites by putting Cap at quarterback. An old-time rivalry is about to heat up again as the grandfathers battle it out off the field and Cap and the other grandson battle it out on field. As the generations clash, nobody is exactly sure who will succeed and play the coveted quarterback position. Who in the end will prevail?

Long Ball to Left Field

by Duane Decker

Blue Sox 9. The Blue Sox had a problem. After nearly ten years in left field, the famous Kennie Willard had retired, and someone was needed to take his place and bat in the clean-up slot. They had Mike Jaffe, a bonus boy, who had proved during his two years with the Sox that he could do just what was wanted: hit that long ball to left. But Mike didn't want to be an outfielder; he was convinced that he should be a pitcher, as his father had been. Feeling like this, Mike just naturally was sympathetic toward pitchers, even when they weren't on his own team. Since this proved to be an unsatisfactory state of mind for a potential slugger, Mike began to spend more and more time on a Sox farm club instead of with the Sox themselves. Because Mr. Decker is a strictly major-league baseball writer, he resolves this situation in a true-to-life way. Boys will enjoy this sports novel both for its excitement and its authenticity.

The Long, Bitter Trail (Andrew Jackson and the Indians)

by Anthony F. C. Wallace

This account of Congress's Indian Removal Act of 1830 focuses on the plight of the Indians of the Southeast--Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, and Seminoles--who were forced to leave their ancestral lands and relocate to what is now the state of Oklahoma. Revealing Andrew Jackson's central role in the government's policies, Wallace examines the racist attitudes toward Native Americans that led to their removal and, ultimately, their tragic fate.

Long Blows the North Wind

by Paul Lederer

To avenge his murdered friend, a young fur trapper will risk everythingAfter the Sioux attacked, Sad Sam found young Brian McCulloch in the ruins of the wagon train, surrounded by the bodies of his slaughtered family. He took the frightened child under his wing, and for years they were inseparable--hunting, wandering, and trapping beavers for fur in the frigid Montana wilderness. While Sad Sam and Brian are returning south, their cart piled high with valuable pelts, a gang of bandits stops them, stealing the furs and leaving a bullet in Sad Sam's gut before Brian has a chance to draw the Colt in his holster.Brian vows to avenge the man who was as close to a father as he will ever have. Tracking the outlaws means a long and dangerous journey, but with nothing left to lose, Brian wagers revenge will be worth the wait.

The Long Christmas

by Ruth Sawyer

The Christmas is long because the author believes it takes a full season of feasting, singing, storytelling, and observing many holiday traditions to attain then maintain a Christmas state of mind in keeping with the importance of Christ's birth. Ruth Sawyer retells tales she's gathered with care and respect for the traditions and peoples who have passed them on for centuries as Christmas entertainment and inspiration. Her 9 page Introduction in which she sketches the practices of many nations since the first Christmas is as captivating as the 13 stories that follow. Who would not sympathize with the old men who, on the day before Twelfth Night, stood so long admiring the pastries through the display windows that mischievous boys nailed their coat tails to the shop walls? Before each tale is a carol from that story's country of origin. Such as the carol from the north of Spain in which Miguel brings a mouse, gray and small, for Christ's house. And a cobbler sings, "Carol clear, casting all fear out, May his sandals wear the year out." The stories are peopled with a gallery of characters spurning, embracing, and being moved by the birth of Jesus. Satan in a sombrero terrorizes shepherds who don't yet know that Jesus as been born. A Roman soldier, who laughed three times at Christians, wanders for centuries until he understands the goodness Christ brought to the world. A kind, generous girl who never had a family or home of her own because she was scorned as a tinker's daughter, is given a home for all time where she can shelter the poor. Three frightened, motherless, boys are rudely pushed out of bed by a cranky dwarf who makes them do cartwheels and stand on their heads to keep warm, but leaves them with the merriest Christmas of their lives. A hunch backed young ship builder, a starving Irish Immigrant with two cold babies, and a wise, devoted King's fool, make us believe in miracles and challenge us to help others and put love in our Christmas celebrations.

A Long Day for Dying

by Patrick A. Davis

New York Times bestselling author Patrick A. Davis spins a gripping tale of deadly intrigue in a time of national crisis that races to the explosive final act. A LONG DAY FOR DYING When General Michael Garber, the newly appointed Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is discovered dead in the private compartment of his airplane, Air Force investigator Martin Collins finds himself thrust into the most dangerous case of his career. What initially appears to be an accidental death turns out to be a near-perfect murder -- and three members of the Joint Chiefs are the prime suspects. As Martin weaves his way through a puzzling maze of blood and deceit, he finds himself in the firing line of Garber's enemies, including a half-mad rival general who collects the ears of the men he's killed, and the ruthless female secretary of defense, whose hatred for Garber knows no bounds. With his life and the honor of the military at stake, Martin has only twenty-four hours to uncover a legacy of secrets that no one wants brought to light -- secrets that the most powerful forces in Washington will kill to keep buried....

Long Day's Journey into Night

by Eugene O'Neill

Eugene O'Neill's autobiographical play Long Day's Journey into Night is regarded as his finest work. First published by Yale University Press in 1956, it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1957 and has since sold more than one million copies. This edition, which includes a new foreword by Harold Bloom, coincides with a new production of the play starring Brian Dennehy, which opens in Chicago in January 2002 and in New York in April.

The Long-Distance Relationship Survival Guide

by Kate Brauer-Bell Chris Bell

Skyrocketing phone bills. Layovers and missed flights. Countless hours spent pining, worrying, and wondering, Why do we do this to ourselves? Long-distance love can be one challenge afteranother, but as most committed couples will tell you, the rewards well outweigh the stresses. In this sensitive yet sensible guide, long-distance veterans Chris and Kate provide strategies for making the distance seem shorter and outline eight essential skills for relationship success:Communicating effectivelyEstablishing mutual goals and expectationsDealing with issues of trust, fidelity, and independenceHaving fun in spite of the distanceManaging time, schedules, and stressKeeping the relationship realBalancing sex and emotional intimacyMaking the transition to same-city livingBased on interviews with more than 100 couples and packed with knowledgeable tips and honest advice, THE LONG-DISTANCE RELATIONSHIP SURVIVAL GUIDE proves that, with patience and dedication, a loving relationship can not only survive but also thrive across the miles.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Long Distance: A Year of Living Strenuously

by Bill Mckibben

In his late thirties, celebrated essayist, journalist, and author Bill McKibben -- never much of an athlete -- decided the time had come for him to really test his body. Cross-country skiing his challenge of choice, he lived the fantasy of many amateur athletes and trained -- with the help of a coach/guru -- nearly full-time, putting in hours and miles typical of an Olympic hopeful. For one vigorous year, which would culminate in a series of grueling, long-distance races, McKibben experienced his body's rhythms and possibilities as never before. But the year also brought tragedy to McKibben and his family as his father developed a life-threatening illness. Forcing a deeper exploration of both body and spirit, the arrival of this illness transforms McKibben's action-packed memoir into a moving account of two men coming to terms with the limits of the flesh.

The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East

by Timur Kuran

In the year 1000, the economy of the Middle East was at least as advanced as that of Europe. But by 1800, the region had fallen dramatically behind--in living standards, technology, and economic institutions. In short, the Middle East had failed to modernize economically as the West surged ahead. What caused this long divergence? And why does the Middle East remain drastically underdeveloped compared to the West? InThe Long Divergence, one of the world's leading experts on Islamic economic institutions and the economy of the Middle East provides a new answer to these long-debated questions. Timur Kuran argues that what slowed the economic development of the Middle East was not colonialism or geography, still less Muslim attitudes or some incompatibility between Islam and capitalism. Rather, starting around the tenth century, Islamic legal institutions, which had benefitted the Middle Eastern economy in the early centuries of Islam, began to act as a drag on development by slowing or blocking the emergence of central features of modern economic life--including private capital accumulation, corporations, large-scale production, and impersonal exchange. By the nineteenth century, modern economic institutions began to be transplanted to the Middle East, but its economy has not caught up. And there is no quick fix today. Low trust, rampant corruption, and weak civil societies--all characteristic of the region's economies today and all legacies of its economic history--will take generations to overcome. The Long Divergenceopens up a frank and honest debate on a crucial issue that even some of the most ardent secularists in the Muslim world have hesitated to discuss.

Long Division

by Kiese Laymon

Long Division includes two distinct but tightly interwoven stories--one called "All Things Considered," the other "Long Division." In the first, it's March 2012: 14-year-old Citoyen "City" Coldson and his nemesis, LaVander Peeler, become the first black male duo to win the state of Mississippi's "Can You Use This Word in a Sentence" contest finals. Both boys are asked to represent Mississippi at the televised national competition. (Hours before the contest begins, City is given a book without an author called "Long Division.") Turmoil and misunderstanding ensue, as City and LaVander learn they have reason to doubt the merit of their presence at the contest. "They want us to win," City says to LaVander moments before the contest starts. After being assigned, and then misusing, the word "niggardly" in the first round of the contest, City has a remarkable on-stage meltdown in front of a national television audience. LaVander, on the other hand, though incredibly shaken, advances to the finals and has the chance to win the contest.The day after the contest, City is sent to spend the weekend with his grandmother in the small coastal community of Melahatchie, which is also the site of the mysterious disappearance of girl named Baize Shephard. Baize Shephard also happens to be one of the main characters in the book "Long Division," which City has been dipping into throughout the story. While in Melahatchie, City's troubled Uncle Relle reveals that City has become an overnight YouTube celebrity thanks to his on-stage meltdown, and that he is being sought to appear on a new television show called "Youtube'sBlack Reality All Stars." City is alternately celebrated and ridiculed by the white and black residents of Melahatchie as a result of his performance at the contest, even as he delves deeper into "Long Division" and its story of the missing Baize Shephard.When the neighborhood is convinced that a white man nicknamed Pot-Belly has assaulted Baize and done away with her body, they beat the man to death...or so City thinks, until he finds the man alive, chained up in a workshed in the back yard of his grandmother's house. City visits the imprisoned white man four times during the course of his weekend--reading to him from "Long Division," asking him questions he's always wanted to ask white people, and promising to save him if he survives his own baptism, which his grandmother has engineered during City's visit. When LaVander appears, he and City must reluctantly work together again, this time to save the life of the white man chained in the workshed--and quite possibly the life of City's grandmother, too.There's something else that City finds especially interesting about "Long Division," besides the story of Baize: another main character in the book is also named City Coldson--except this City Coldson, who lives in Melahatchie, is 14 in 1985. This City will do anything to make Shalaya Crump love him--including traveling 26 years into the future (via a time portal they find in the woods) to steal a laptop and cellphone from a girl--a mysterious teenaged rapper named Baize Shephard, who lost her parents in Hurricane Katrina.The following day, Shalaya and City meet another worn down time-traveler, this one from 1964, a boy named "Jewish" Evan Altshuler. Evan is desperate to protect his family against the Klu Klux Klan during Freedom Summer. He convinces Shalaya that he can help her find her parents and her future self if she brings the laptop computer back to 1964 and does him a favor.Unexpectedly, City and Shalaya become separated, with Shalaya stuck in 1964 and City stuck in 2012. In their wanderings back and forward through time, much is revealed about City's relationship with Baize, and about segregation, Freedom Summer, the destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf Oil spill, and the limits of technology and love. Long Division is a Twain-esque exploration of celebrity, authorship, racialized terror, neo-liberalism, religion, and coming of age in Post-Katrina Mississippi.

The Long Earth

by Terry Pratchett Stephen Baxter

An unmissable milestone for fans of Sir Terry Pratchett: the first SF novel in over three decades in which the visionary inventor of Discworld has created a new universe of tantalizing possibilities-a series of parallel "Earths" with doorways leading to adventure, intrigue, excitement, and an escape into the furthest reaches of the imagination. The Long Earth, written with award-winning novelist Stephen Baxter, author of Stone Spring, Ark, and Floodwill, captivate science fiction fans of all stripes, readers of Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, and Carl Hiaasen, and anyone who enjoyed the Terry Pratchett/Neil Gaiman collaboration Good Omens. The Long Earth is an adventure of the highest order-and an unforgettable read.

The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved

by Judith Freeman

Raymond Chandler was among the most original and enduring crime novelists of the twentieth century. Yet much of his pre-writing life, including his unconventional marriage, has remained shrouded in mystery. In this compelling, wholly original book, Judith Freeman sets out to solve the puzzle of who Chandler was and how he became the writer who would create in Philip Marlowe an icon of American culture. Visiting Chandler's many homes and apartments, Freeman uncovers vestiges of the Los Angeles that was Chandler's terrain and inspiration for his imagination. She also uncovers the life of Cissy Pascal, the older, twice-divorced woman Chandler married in 1924. A revelation of a marriage that was a wellspring of need, illusion, and creativity, The Long Embrace provides us with a more complete picture of Raymond Chandler's life and art than any we have had before.

The Long Emergency

by James Howard Kunstler

Kunstler discusses the implications of peak oil, where oil production will eventually start to decrease as most of the easily-accessible oil has been used already. He gives some historical background and then discusses various proposed alternatives to oil and natural gas for providing transportation and electricity. He is skeptical that anything will be able to replace the abundant supply of energy that has been supplied by oil, with the possible exception of nuclear energy for electricity, and believes that the age of globalization will come to an end with declining standards of living. He discusses what he sees as the implications for different parts of the country and the world, each having their unique situations.

The Long Fall (Leonid McGill #1)

by Walter Mosley

A brand-new mystery series from one of the country's best-known, best-loved writers: a new character, a new city, a new era. A new Walter Mosley. His name is etched on the door of his Manhattan office: LEONID McGILL, PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR. It's a name that takes a little explaining, but he's used to it. "Daddy was a communist and great-great- Granddaddy was a slave master from Scotland. You know, the black man's family tree is mostly root. Whatever you see aboveground is only a hint at the real story." Ex-boxer, hard drinker, in a business that trades mostly in cash and favors: McGill's an old-school P.I. working a city that's gotten fancy all around him. Fancy or not, he has always managed to get by-keep a roof over the head of his wife and kids, and still manage a little fun on the side-mostly because he's never been above taking a shady job for a quick buck. But like the city itself, McGill is turning over a new leaf, "decided to go from crooked to slightly bent." New York City in the twenty-first century is a city full of secrets-and still a place that reacts when you know where to poke and which string to pull. That's exactly the kind of thing Leonid McGill knows how to do. As soon as The Long Fall begins, with McGill calling in old markers and greasing NYPD palms to unearth some seemingly harmless information for a high-paying client, he learns that even in this cleaned-up city, his commitment to the straight and narrow is going to be constantly tested. And we learn that with this protagonist, this city, this time, Mosley has tapped a rich new vein that's inspiring his best work since the classic Devil in a Blue Dress.

The Long Falling

by Keith Ridgway

Grace Quinn is an Englishwoman living in rural Ireland. Isolated by religion and circumstance, she endures both an abusive husband and a strained relationship with her son, Martin, whose open homosexuality her husband refuses to accept. After an act of desperation, reeling with doubt and denial, she seeks out her son in Dublin. Keith Ridgway "affectingly renders the separate sanctuaries of mother and son . . . and lights the distance between them" (The New Yorker). Keith Ridgway's first novel, nominated for 1999 Lambda Literary Award.

A Long Finish (Aurelio Zen #6)

by Michael Dibdin

After his adventures under sun-drenched Neapolitan skies in Cosi Fan Tutti, Aurelio Zen finds himself back in Rome, sneezing in a damp wine cellar and being given another unorthodox assignment: to release the jailed scion of an important wine-growing family who is accused of a brutal murder. Zen travels north to an Italy as outwardly serene as Naples was manic. Amid the quiet fields, autumnal skies and crumbling farmhouses of Piedmont, Zen must try to penetrate a traditional culture in which family and soil are inextricably linked. Here secrets can last for generations, and have a finish as long and lingering as that of a good Barbaresco. Zen must also face up to mysteries from his own past, as well as grapple with the greed, envy, hatred and love that are the human components of any landscape.

The Long Good Boy (Rachel Alexander and Dash Mystery #6)

by Carol Lea Benjamin

P. I. Rachel Alexander dives into the world of transvestite hookers in Manhattan's meat packing district to help solve the case of a killer with a deadly eye out for the wanna-be-ladies.

The Long Goodbye

by Patti Davis

Ronald Reagan's daughter writes with a moving openness about losing her father to Alzheimer's disease. The simplicity with which she reveals the intensity, the rush, the flow of her feelings encompasses all the surprises and complexities that ambush us when death gradually, unstoppably invades life.In The Long Goodbye, Patti Davis describes losing her father to Alzheimer's disease, saying goodbye in stages, helpless against the onslaught of a disease that steals what is most precious-a person's memory. "Alzheimer's," she writes, "snips away at the threads, a slow unraveling, a steady retreat; as a witness all you can do is watch, cry, and whisper a soft stream of goodbyes."She writes of needing to be reunited at forty-two with her mother ("she had wept as much as I over our long, embittered war"), of regaining what they had spent decades demolishing; a truce was necessary to bring together a splintered family, a few weeks before her father released his letter telling the country and the world of his illness . . .The author delves into her memories to touch her father again, to hear his voice, to keep alive the years she had with him.She writes as if past and present were coming together, of her memories as a child, holding her father's hand, and as a young woman whose hand is being given away in marriage by her father . . . of her father teaching her to ride a bicycle, of the moment when he let her go and she went off on her own . . . of his teaching her the difference between a hawk and a buzzard . . . of the family summer vacations at a rented beach house-each of them tan, her father looking like the athlete he was, with a swimmer's broad shoulders and lean torso. . . . She writes of how her father never resisted solitude, in fact was born for it, of that strange reserve that made people reach for him. . . . She recalls him sitting at his desk, writing, staring out the window . . . and she writes about the toll of the disease itself, the look in her father's eyes, and her efforts to reel him back to her. Moving . . . honest . . . an illuminating portrait of grief, of a man, a disease, and a woman and her father.From the Hardcover edition.

The Long Goodbye

by Raymond Chandler

Marlowe befriends a down on his luck war veteran with the scars to prove it. Then he finds out that Terry Lennox has a very wealthy nymphomaniac wife, who he's divorced and re-married and who ends up dead. and now Lennox is on the lam and the cops and a crazy gangster are after Marlowe.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Long Hot Summer

by Wendy Rosnau

This lazy little town in the Louisiana bayou country was never going to be the same--at least, not if local bad boy Johnny Bernard had anything to do with it. He'd come back to turn up the heat on some of the town's most upstanding citizens--the ones who'd sent him to prison for a crime he hadn't committed.... But he hadn't counted on Nicole Chapman--and another kind of heat altogether. The beautiful blonde with the shadowed past awoke a desire that flashed through him like summer lightning. But could their passion survive the secrets of the past--secrets that could set this town on fire...?

The Long Hunt

by Cameron Judd

When Deborah Bledsoe's father hears that his daughter may still be alive after being abducted by Cherokee raiders, he hires Crawford Flynn to find her, not knowing that Flynn's tracking skills have been exaggerated. The better bet is Flynn's son Simeon, who actually has the ability to track Deborah through the wilds of the vast, untamed West. . . .

Long Island Noir

by Kaylie Jones

"The Shiny Car in the Night" by Nick Mamatas has been selected for inclusion in The Best American Mystery Stories 2013, edited by Otto Penzler and Lisa Scottoline"There is plenty of mayhem for fans of dark fiction in the pages of Long Island Noir: shootings, killings, all manner of brutality...Suburbia may be even meaner than the big city."--The New York Times"Akashic's Long Island volume in its regional noir series offers an eclectic and effective mix of seasoned pros (Reed Farrel Coleman, Tim McLoughlin, Sarah Weinman) and new voices (Qanta Ahmed, JZ Holden, Amani Scipio). The 17 contributors portray a wonderful diversity of people driven to extremes . . ."--Publishers WeeklyOriginal stories by: Jules Feiffer, Matthew McGevna, Nick Mamatas, Kaylie Jones, Qanta Ahmed, Charles Salzberg, Reed Farrel Coleman, Tim McLoughlin, Sarah Weinman, JZ Holden, Richie Narvaez, Sheila Kohler, Jane Ciabattari, Steven Wishnia, Kenneth Wishnia, Amani Scipio, and Tim Tomlinson.Kaylie Jones moved to Sagaponack, New York, in 1975, where her family continued to live for more than thirty years. She is the author of five novels, including A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries and the memoir Lies My Mother Never Told Me. She teaches in the MFA program at Stony Brook Southampton and in the Wilkes University low-residency MFA program in professional writing.

Showing 75,251 through 75,275 of 110,900 results

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