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Can You Sue Your Parents for Malpractice

by Paula Danziger

Can You Sue Your Parents for Malpractice? A novel by Paula Danz~~er Who said growing up was fair? Or easy? Certainly not Lauren Allen. At fourteen, her life is the pits. Bobby Tayler's just jilted her. Her ninth-grade teachers are demerit-crazy. And she has to share her bedroom with a messy younger sister who wants to be a stand-up comic, while her older sister seems to get everything she wants. Between her parents, her two sisters, and school, Lauren feels she's got no rights at all. But then Lauren takes a course in "Law for Children and Young People," and meets Zack, an eighth grader who's "nice and attractive and bright and funny." Suddenly Lauren realizes that there are solutions to her problems. She can protest unfair policies at school. She can stand up to the kids who call her a cradle robber for going out with Zack. And she can sue her parents for malpractice ...can't she?

Can You Survive the Zombie Apocalypse?

by Max Brallier

Inside these pages lies unspeakable horror. Bloodsplattering, brain-impaling, flesh-devouring horror. You've probably read your fair share of zombie stories. But this time it's different. No longer can you sit idle as a bunch of fools make all the wrong moves. All hell is about to break loose--and YOU have a say in humanity's survival. You have choices to make. Moral dilemmas. Strategic decisions. Weapons. Vehicles. Will you be a hero? Or will you cover your own ass at all costs? Can you withstand the coming hours, days, weeks, and months? Or will you die amidst the chaos and violence of a zombie uprising? Or, worst of all, will you become one of them?

Can You Trust a Tomato in January? The Hidden Life of Groceries and Other Secrets of the Supermarket Revealed at Last

by Vince Staten

From the Book jacket: Here is America's music drenched, fluorescent-lit, coupon-clipped glory. In this fascinating expedition through the world of polished linoleum-tiled aisles, find out why peanut butter doesn't stick to the roof of your mouth anymore, discover the lost connection between graham crackers and sex, and learn what's really in the mysterious white stuff they call Cool Whip. Join author Vince Staten in his humorous and revealing journey through the secret life of our favorite supermarket items, as he uncovers the hidden histories and fascinating folklore behind the foods we take for granted. The results are truly amazing and reveal the answers to such questions as: Which has more lemon in it, Lemon Pledge or Country Time Lemonade? What is Spam-and why is it so darn popular? What happened to the vanilla in Nabisco Nilla Wafers? Who thought of putting American cheese in an aerosol can, and is it really cheese, anyway? "Absolutely fascinating proof that food isn't food like we used to know it. -Ann DeFrange, The Sunday Oklahoman "There are thousands of bite-sized factoids in this book, and if you're someone who occasionally looks at what's on your plate, chances are you'll be interested, too Delicious." -Geoffrey Stokes, The Boston Sunday Globe VINCE STATEN, author of Ol' Diz, Unauthorized America, and Real Barbecue, lives in Prospect, Kentucky, and hits the local Winn-Dixie supermarket 3.4 times per week.

Canaan Dog

by Joy Levine

Dating back to Biblical times, the Canaan Dog enjoys the distinction of being the world's oldest new dog breed! The national dog of Israel, the Canaan Dog's ancestors once served as herding dogs for the Israelites' flocks. Author Joy Levine has written excellent introductory chapters on the breed's history in Israel, England, and the United States as well as the breed's characteristics as a companion and working dog. The chapter on the breed standard, illustrated by Patricia Peters, offers a clear picture of the desired physical conformation of this unique Herding breed, useful for both newcomers and experienced breeders.New owners will welcome the well-prepared chapter on finding a reputable breeder and selecting a healthy, sound puppy. Chapters on puppy-proofing the home and yard, purchasing the right supplies for the puppy as well as house-training, feeding, and grooming are illustrated with photographs of handsome adults and puppies. In all, there are over 135 full-color photographs in this useful and reliable volume. The author's advice on obedience training will help the reader better mold and train into the most well-mannered dog in the neighborhood. The extensive and lavishly illustrated chapter on healthcare provides up-to-date detailed information on selecting a qualified veterinarian, vaccinations, preventing and dealing with parasites, infectious diseases, and more. Sidebars throughout the text offer helpful hints, covering topics as diverse as historical dogs, breeders, or kennels, toxic plants, first aid, crate training, carsickness, fussy eaters, and parasite control. Fully indexed.

Canaan: A Novel

by Donald Mccaig

"A bred-in-the-bones storyteller."--Geraldine Brooks Canaan fills a vast canvas. Its points of reference are Richmond in the throes of Reconstruction; the trading floors of Wall Street, where men makes fortunes speculating on the war's consequences; a Virginia plantation, where the ruin of the South is written in wrenching detail; and the Great Plains, where the splendidly arrogant George Custer rides to his fate against Sitting Bull's warriors. This is the story of America over twenty years of its most turbulent history. The characters are black, white, red, ex-Union, and ex-Confederate; and the principal narrator is a Santee woman, She Goes Before, who marries an ex-slave. Through her eyes we witness the hanging of her father by whites in the mass execution of 1863, Red Cloud's banquet with President Grant, and that final confrontation on the bluffs above the Little Bighorn. "McCaig's extensive research is revealed in the book's rich historical detail and revisionist perspective. Black life in Reconstruction-era Virginia is portrayed particularly well."--Library Journal

Canada

by Elaine Landau

Ideal for today's young investigative reader, each A True Book includes lively sidebars, a glossary and index, plus a comprehensive "To Find Out More" section listing books, organizations, and Internet sites. A staple of library collections since the 1950s, the new A True Book series is the definitive nonfiction series for elementary school readers.

Canada

by Richard Ford

"First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later." Then fifteen-year-old Dell Parsons' parents rob a bank, his sense of normal life is forever altered. In an instant, this private cataclysm drives his life into before and after, a threshold that can never be uncrossed. His parents' arrest and imprisonment mean a threatening and uncertain future for Dell and his twin sister, Berner. Willful and burning with resentment, Berner flees their home in Montana, abandoning her brother and her life. But Dell is not completely alone. A family friend intervenes, spiriting him across the Canadian border, in hopes of delivering him to a better life. There, afloat on the prairie of Saskatchewan, Dell is taken in by Arthur Remlinger, an enigmatic and charismatic American whose cool reserve masks a dark and violent nature. Undone by the calamity of his parents' robbery and arrest, Dell struggles under the vast prairie sky to remake himself and define the adults he thought he knew. But his search for grace and peace only moves him nearer to a harrowing and murderous collision with Remlinger, an elemental force of darkness. A true masterwork of haunting and spectacular vision from one of our greatest writers, Canada is a profound novel of boundaries traversed, innocence lost and reconciled, and the mysterious and consoling bonds of family. Told in spare, elegant prose, both resonant and luminous, it is destined to become a classic.

Canada and Aboriginal Canada Today - Le Canada et le Canada autochtone aujourd’hui

by The Right Honourable Paul Martin/Le très honorable Paul Martin Paul Martin

Dans la conférence prononcée comme récipiendaire de la médaille Symons en 2013, le très honorable Paul Martin, vingt-et-unième premier ministre du Canada, s'appuie sur tout le savoir et le vécu de sa remarquable carrière publique, afin d'expliquer le défi d'obtenir justice pour les peuples autochtones du Canada. Se penchant sur les racines historiques des enjeux actuels ainsi que les priorités contemporaines, monsieur Martin affirme que le progrès futur des peuples autochtones du Canada dépend de l'atteinte d'une forme de gouvernement autochtone autonome, accompagné d'un financement adéquat. Mais par-dessus tout, il lance un appel éloquent et urgent à l'action : les Canadiens et les Canadiennes doivent faire aujourd'hui preuve du même type d'imagination, de générosité et de courage qu'ont démontré les Pères de la Confédération lors de la Conférence de Charlottetown en 1864.<P> Le Canada et le Canada Autochtone aujourd'hui. Changer le cours de l'histoire est une contribution vitale au débat canadien sur le rôle des peuples autochtones au Canada d'aujourd'hui et de demain. C'est une lecture incontournable pour tous ceux et celles qui veulent mieux connaître les racines historiques des défis actuels et réfléchir sur les questions de justice et d'égalité pour les Autochtones du Canada aujourd'hui. L'une des distinctions les plus prestigieuses au Canada, la médaille Symons est présentée chaque année par le Centre des arts de la Confédération, l'institution commémorative nationale établie en l'honneur des Pères de la Confédération, à un lauréat ayant contribué de façon exceptionnelle à la société canadienne.<P> ------------<P> In his 2013 Symons Medal lecture, the Right Honourable Paul Martin, the twenty-first prime minister of Canada, brings to bear all the knowledge and experience of his remarkable public career to explain the challenge of achieving justice for the Aboriginal peoples of Canada. Exploring both historic roots and current priorities, Mr. Martin argues self-government is an essential condition for Canada's Aboriginal peoples, but must be accompanied by adequate funding. Above all, he issues an urgent, eloquent and deeply informed call to action, calling on Canadians to exercise, today, the same kind of imagination, generosity and courage that the Fathers of Confederation showed, when they met at Charlottetown, in 1864.<P> Canada and Aboriginal Canada Today: Changing the Course of History is a vitally important contribution to the ongoing debate about the role of Canada's aboriginal peoples in the Canada of today and tomorrow. It is essential reading for all Canadians who want to learn about the historic roots of current challenges, and to reflect upon the issues of justice and equality for Canada's Aboriginal peoples today. The Symons Medal, one of Canada's most prestigious honours, is presented annually by the Confederation Centre of the Arts, Canada's national memorial to the Fathers of Confederation, to honour persons who have made an exceptional and outstanding contribution to Canadian life.

Canada and Other Matters of Opinion

by Rex Murphy

A cornucopia of comment from Canada's most opinionated man -- a man seen, read, and listened to by millions of Canadians each week.Canada's most distinctive commentator presents his fearless and thought-provoking views on a head-spinning range of subjects, from Dr. Johnson's greatness to Bono's gratingness, from doubts about Obama to utter belief in Don Cherry, from Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's outstanding oeuvre to -- well, Pamela Anderson.The topics are as eclectic and wide ranging as the intelligence that put them together. The perspective is thoroughly Canadian, and so are many of the recurring topics and themes: of our domestic politics and our military involvements abroad, of our national identity, of human rights and human decency. You'll find assessments of the reputations of Paul Martin, Conrad Black, Adrienne Clarkson, and Tim Hortons; tough but affectionate views of Newfoundland -- of course -- but also from Rex Murphy's constant travels across Canada.But all the world is here, in all its glory and folly. The hard-hitting attacks on politicians, celebrities, those who would ban smoking, and anyone who uses the expression "global warming denial" will have you cheering or tearing your hair out, depending. You will be informed, infuriated perhaps, but always fascinated.From the Hardcover edition.

Canada between Vichy and Free France, 1940-1945

by Oliver Courteaux

The relationship between Canada and France has always been complicated by the Canadian federal government's relations with Quebec. In this first study of Franco-Canadian relations during the Second World War, Olivier Courteaux demonstrates how Canada's wartime foreign policy was shaped by the country's internal divides.As Courteaux shows, Quebec's vocal nationalist minority came to openly support France's fascist Vichy regime and resented Canada's involvement in a 'British' war, while English Canada was largely sympathetic to de Gaulle's Free French movement and accepted its duty to aid embattled Mother Britain. Meanwhile, on the world stage, Canada deftly juggled ties with both French factions to appease Great Britain and the United States before eventually giving full support to the Free French movement.Courteaux concludes this extensively detailed study by illustrating Canada's vital role in helping France reassert its position on the global stage after 1944. Filled with international intrigue and larger-than-life characters, Canada between Vichy and Free France adds greatly to our comprehension of Canada's foreign relations and political history.

Canada - Culture Smart!: The Essential Guide to Customs & Culture

by Diane Lemieux

Culture Smart! provides essential information on attitudes, beliefs and behavior in different countries, ensuring that you arrive at your destination aware of basic manners, common courtesies, and sensitive issues. These concise guides tell you what to expect, how to behave, and how to establish a rapport with your hosts. This inside knowledge will enable you to steer clear of embarrassing gaffes and mistakes, feel confident in unfamiliar situations, and develop trust, friendships, and successful business relationships. Culture Smart! offers illuminating insights into the culture and society of a particular country. It will help you to turn your visit-whether on business or for pleasure-into a memorable and enriching experience. Contents include: * customs, values, and traditions * historical, religious, and political background * life at home * leisure, social, and cultural life * eating and drinking * do's, don'ts, and taboos * business practices * communication, spoken and unspoken "Culture Smart has come to the rescue of hapless travellers." Sunday Times Travel "... the perfect introduction to the weird, wonderful and downright odd quirks and customs of various countries." Global Travel "...full of fascinating-as well as common-sense-tips to help you avoid embarrassing faux pas." Observer "...as useful as they are entertaining." Easyjet Magazine "...offer glimpses into the psyche of a faraway world." New York Times

The Canada Geese Quilt

by Natalie Kinsey-Warnock

Ariel is expecting a new baby sister! To welcome the baby, Ariel and her grandmother decide to make a beautiful quilt. When Ariel's grandmother gets sick Ariel must finish the quilt all by herself.

Canada Goose (Nature's Children)

by Judy Ross

How fast can a Canada goose fly? What do geese eat? What are baby geese called? Find the answers to these questions, and learn much more about the physical characteristics, behavior, habitat, and lives of Canada geese.

Canada in Cities

by Caroline Andrew Katherine A.H. Graham

The federal government and its policies transform Canadian cities in myriad ways. Canada in Cities examines this relationship to better understand the interplay among changing demographics, how local governments and citizens frame their arguments for federal action, and the ways in which the national government uses its power and resources to shape urban Canada. Most studies of local governance in Canada focus on politics and policy within cities. The essays in this collection turn such analysis on its head, by examining federal programs, rather than municipal ones, and observing how they influence local policies and work with regional authorities and civil societies. Through a series of case studies - ranging from federal policy concerning Aboriginal people in cities, to the introduction of the federal gas tax transfer to municipalities, to the impact of Canada's emergency management policies on cities - the contributors provide insights about how federal politics influence the local political arena. Analyzing federal actions in diverse policy fields, the authors uncover meaningful patterns of federal action and outcome in Canadian cities. A timely contribution, Canada in Cities offers a comprehensive study of diverse areas of municipal public policy that have emerged in Canada in recent years.

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014

by Gwynne Dyer

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014 is a serious contemplation of what it means to engage in major world conflicts, and the price we pay when we do. The First World War was Canada's baptism of fire, or at least the only one that people now remember. (Montrealers in 1776 or Torontonians in 1814 would have taken a different view.) From 1914 to 1918, after a century of peace, Canadians were plunged back into the old world of great power rivalries and great wars. So was everybody else, but Canadians were volunteers. We didn't have to fight, but we chose to, out of loyalty to ideas and institutions that today many of us no longer believe in. And we have been doing the same thing ever since, although we haven't quite given up on the latest set of ideas and institutions yet.In Canada in the Great Power Game, Gwynne Dyer moves back and forth between the seminal event, the First World War, and all the later conflicts that Canada chose to fight in. He draws parallels between these conflicts, with the same idealism among the young soldiers, and the same deeply conflicted emotions among the survivors, surfacing time and again in every war right down to Afghanistan. And in each case, the same arguments pro and con arise--mostly from people who are a long, safe way from the killing grounds--for every one of those "wars of choice."Echoing throughout the book are the voices of the people who lived through the wars: the veterans, the politicians, the historians, the eyewitnesses. And Dyer takes a number of so-called excursions from his historical account, in which he revisits the events and puts them in context, pausing to ask such questions as "What if we hadn't fought Hitler?" and "Is war written in our genes?" This entertaining and provocative book casts an unsparing eye over what happens when Canada and the great powers get in the war business, illuminating much about how we see ourselves on the world stage.From the Hardcover edition.

Canada Since 1945

by John English Robert Bothwell Ian Drummond

From the preface:"A visitor seeing Canada for the first time since 1939 might well conclude that Canada, even more than nations devastated by war, has become another country. On the surface so much remains the same: the Liberals prevail in Ottawa; the provinces quarrel with Ottawa and among themselves; and we worry about Americans in our future. But most of the pieces have been rearranged, and the effect of the picture is quite different...This is a book about our own times, and as such it expresses definite views. No reader will agree with everything we say. We have not tried to end debate; we have tried to clarify and broaden. We trust that our readers will be encouraged to seek for themselves a better understanding of where Canadians have been and what they have become." Disclaimer: Images removed at the request of the rights holder

The Canada Trip

by Charles Gordon

"We are back from three months on the highways of Canada, driving 24,863 kilometres, which is 15,539 miles to you old-timers. " Clearly, after this beginning,The Canada Tripis not going to be a conventional travel guide. Nor is it a journalistic dissection of the mood of the land, because "the country has been analysed to death. " Instead, Charles Gordon keeps what he calls Inner Journalist in check to give us a record of how a typical traveller sees the country, moseying along in the family car. This makes the book not so much a "Whither Canada?" as a "Whither the washroom?" book, and we are all grateful for it. It started out as a simple idea. Gordon and his wife, Nancy (also known, to her slight irritation, as the Business Manager), the drive across Canada. Starting from Ottawa they drove east through Quebec ("Lac St-Jean is where everybody votes separatist and nobody speaks English and we are making good time and what is this trip about but being spontaneous, right? - so left we go"), through New Brunswick, P. E. I. , Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland, where they learned about "soap for the moose. " From St. John's they headed west on a different route through the Maritimes to Montreal, Toronto, and Lake of the Woods (scene of the famous cottage inAt the Cottage). Then it was west along what used to be called the CPR route (with memorable side trips to places like Sharon Butala's Saskatchewan ranch, immortalised inThe Perfection of Morning) all the way to Vancouver and Victoria. Then, via Prince Rupert, they followed the Yellowhead Trail back through Edmonton and Saskatoon, hitting Flin Flon and Northern Ontario on the way home. They had a wonderful time, rambling around without an agenda, arguing whether today's view (the Gaspé coast, or the Cabot Trail, or Lake Superior, or Banff, or Long Beach) deserved a place on their Top Ten list. Another list soon developed - the small towns they somehow managed to get lost in - and because Charles Gordon is male and thus unable to stop and ask for directions, many interesting miles were added in this way. Further sacrifices were made by Nancy "for the book," including a visit to a Regina casino, but she drew the line at the West Edmonton Mall submarine. As well as these family dynamics we meet many Gordon friends and relatives, while memories of Charles Gordon's namesake and grandfather, the writer known as Ralph Connor, lend special meaning to encounters in Glengarry County, Winnipeg, and Canmore. If you insist on looking for conventional travel guide advice ("Eat here. Stay there") this book has some interesting twists. In downtown Fraser Lake, B. C. , for instance, Nancy gets carried away and asks about the house white wine. ... "'It doesn't really have a name,' the waitress replies. 'It comes in a big white box. Everybody likes it. ' Nancy tastes it and she likes it too. Wait'll the big-shot wine stewards in T. O. hear this. " Besides learning to look for wine in a big white box the alert reader will find where to ask for a Denver as opposed to a Western sandwich, and learn about the Thunder Bay delicacy known to one and all as a Persian. Ranging from moose to chipmunks, from a cool jazz festival to even cooler icebergs, and from the Prestige Motel to the Chateau Lake Louise, this book is a highly personal look at a country well worth visiting, witty and affectionate, a fact that its own citizens tend to overlook. As Charles Gordon, the perfect companion, puts it in his final paragraph, "What does Canada need, you ask, to enter the twenty-first century? More passing lanes. More ferries. Reading la

Canada's Jews

by Gerald Tulchinsky

The history of the Jewish community in Canada says as much about the development of the nation as it does about the Jewish people. Spurred on by upheavals in Eastern Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, many Jews emigrated to the Dominion of Canada, which was then considered little more than a British satellite state. Over the ensuing decades, as the Canadian Jewish identity was forged, Canada itself underwent the transformative experience of separating itself from Britain and distinguishing itself from the United States. In this light, the Canadian Jewish identity was formulated within the parameters of the emerging Canadian national personality. Canada's Jews is an account of this remarkable story as told by one of the leading authors and historians on the Jewish legacy in Canada. Drawing on his previous work on the subject, Gerald Tulchinsky illuminates the struggle against anti-Semitism and the search for a livelihood amongst the Jewish community. He demonstrates that, far from being a fragment of the Old World, the Canadian Jewry grew from a tiny group of transplanted Europeans to a fully articulated, diversified, and dynamic national group that defined itself as Canadian while expressing itself in the varied political and social contexts of the Dominion. Canada's Jews covers the 240-year period from the beginnings of the Jewish community in the 1760s to the present day, illuminating the golden chain of Jewish tradition, religion, language, economy, and history as established and renewed in the northern lands. With important points about labour, immigration, and anti-Semitism, it is a timely book that offers sober observations about the Jewish experience and its relation to Canadian history.

Canada's Residential Schools: Missing Children and Unmarked Burials

by Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to "civilize and Christianize" Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools' former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission's final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada's Residential Schools: Missing Children and Unmarked Burials is the first systematic effort to record and analyze deaths at the schools, and the presence and condition of student cemeteries, within the regulatory context in which the schools were intended to operate. As part of its work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada established a National Residential School Student Death Register. Due to gaps in the available data, the register is far from complete. Although the actual number of deaths is believed to be far higher, 3,200 residential school victims have been identified. The analysis also demonstrates that residential school death rates were significantly higher than those for the general Canadian school-aged population. The failure to establish and enforce adequate standards of care, coupled with the failure to adequately fund the schools, resulted in unnecessarily high death rates at residential schools. Senior government and church officials were well aware of the schools' ongoing failure to provide adequate levels of custodial care. Children who died at the schools were rarely sent back to their home community. They were usually buried in school or nearby mission cemeteries. As the schools and missions closed, these cemeteries were abandoned. While in a number of instances Aboriginal communities, churches, and former staff have taken steps to rehabilitate cemeteries and commemorate the individuals buried there, most of these cemeteries are now disused and vulnerable to accidental disturbance. In the face of this abandonment, the TRC is proposing the development of a national strategy for the documentation, maintenance, commemoration, and protection of residential school cemeteries.

Canada's Residential Schools: Reconciliation

by Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to "civilize and Christianize" Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools' former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission's final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada's Residential Schools: Reconciliation documents the complexities, challenges, and possibilities of reconciliation by presenting the findings of public testimonies from residential school Survivors and others who participated in the TRC's national events and community hearings. For many Aboriginal people, reconciliation is foremost about healing families and communities, and revitalizing Indigenous cultures, languages, spirituality, laws, and governance systems. For governments, building a respectful relationship involves dismantling a centuries-old political and bureaucratic culture in which, all too often, policies and programs are still based on failed notions of assimilation. For churches, demonstrating long-term commitment to reconciliation requires atoning for harmful actions in the residential schools, respecting Indigenous spirituality, and supporting Indigenous peoples' struggles for justice and equity. Schools must teach Canadian history in ways that foster mutual respect, empathy, and engagement. All Canadian children and youth deserve to know what happened in the residential schools and to appreciate the rich history and collective knowledge of Indigenous peoples. This volume also emphasizes the important role of public memory in the reconciliation process, as well as the role of Canadian society, including the corporate and non-profit sectors, the media, and the sports community in reconciliation. The Commission urges Canada to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation. While Aboriginal peoples are victims of violence and discrimination, they are also holders of Treaty, Aboriginal, and human rights and have a critical role to play in reconciliation. All Canadians must understand how traditional First Nations, Inuit, and Métis approaches to resolving conflict, repairing harm, and restoring relationships can inform the reconciliation process. The TRC's calls to action identify the concrete steps that must be taken to ensure that our children and grandchildren can live together in dignity, peace, and prosperity on these lands we now share.

Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century

by Ada L. Sinacore Freda Ginsberg

Canadian counsellors and counselling psychologists have made significant advances in mental health services and the broader field of applied psychology, but much of the counselling and counselling psychology scholarship has been published outside of Canada, rendering it difficult to identify as distinctly Canadian. This path-breaking book highlights the work of Canadian counsellors and counselling psychologists and focuses on issues pertinent to practising in Canada. Key topics such as scientific issues, health, wellness, prevention, career psychology, assessment, training and supervision, and social justice and multiculturalism are explored in detail. Using a strength-based framework, each chapter attends to societal factors, diversity of methodological frameworks, and an analysis of the challenges and future directions for the disciplines. Providing a common voice for a diverse group of students and professionals, Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century will be of interest to counsellor educators, faculty in counsellor and counselling psychology training programs, and counsellors interested in advancing their understanding of the current state of the field. Contributors include Kevin G. Alderson (University of Calgary), Nancy Arthur (University of Calgary), Bill Borgen (University of British Columbia), Marla Buchanan (University of British Columbia), Erin Buhr (Trinity Western University), Lee Butterfield (Adler School of Professional Psychology), Sharon Cairns (University of Calgary), Sandra Collins (Athabasca University), Jose Domene (University of New Brunswick), Marilyn Fitzpatrick (McGill University), Nick Gazzola (University of Ottawa), Freda Ginsberg (SUNY Plattsburgh), Liette Goyer (Universite Laval), Bryan Hiebert (University of Victoria), George Hurley (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Anusha Kassan (University of British Columbia), Patricia Keats (Simon Frazer University), Audrey Kinzel (University of Saskatoon), Vivian Lalande (University of Calgary, Sasha Lerner (McGill University), Anne Marshall (University of Victoria), Marv McDonald (Trinity Western University), Louise Overington (McGill University), Jane M. Oxenbury (Independent Practice), Sharon Robertson (University of Calgary), Ada L. Sinacore (McGill University), Suzanne L. Stewart (OISE, University of Toronto), and Jessica Van Vliet (University of Alberta).

Canadian Crisis

by Don Pendleton

With the help of a Canadian operative, the Executioner defends Montreal In a grimy bistro on the north side of Buffalo, a few American mobsters are dining with a Canadian contact when death bursts through the door. His eyes icy, his clothes pitch black, Mack Bolan takes out every American at the table but lets the Canadian live. Andre Chebleu is an undercover operative who has come across the border to infiltrate the American syndicate, and Mack Bolan will need his help if he is going to save Canada from the mob. His endless war against the forces of the Mafia have made most of America unsafe for organized crime, so Bolan's enemies have set their sights on Quebec, where radical separatists have destabilized the local government. Only Bolan and Chebleu can rescue Montreal from chaos and save the Great White North from becoming a living hell.

The Canadian Fur Trade in the Industrial Age

by Arthur Ray

Throughout much of the nineteenth century the Hudson's Bay Company had a virtual monopoly on the core area of the fur trade in Canada. Its products were the object of intense competition among merchants on two continents - in Leipzig, New York, London, Winnipeg, St Louis, and Montreal. But in 1870 things began to change, and by the end of the Second World War the company's share had dropped to about a quarter of the trade. Arthur Ray explores the decades of transition, the economic and technological changes that shaped them, and their impact on the Canadian north and its people.Among the developments that affected the fur trade during this period were innovations in transportation and communication; increased government involvement in business, conservation, and native economic welfare; and the effects of two severe depressions (1873-95 and 1929-38) and two world wars.The Hudson's Bay Company, confronting the first of these changes as early as 1871, embarked on a diversification program that was intended to capitalize on new economic opportunities in land development, retailing, and resource ventures. Meanwhile it continued to participate in its traditional sphere of operations. But the company's directors had difficulty keeping pace with the rapid changes that were taking place in the fur trade, and the company began to lose ground.Ray's study is the first to make extensive use of the Hudson's Bay Company archives dealing with the period between 1870 and 1945. These and other documents reveal a great deal about the decline of the company, and thus about a key element in the history of the modern Canadian fur trade.

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