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Content Nation

by John Blossom

Find out how social media communications is changing the content provider industry in Content Nation: Surviving and Thriving as Social Media Technology Changes Our Lives and Our Future. Developed through a collaborative wiki, this book is a collection of information from social media experts and serves as an example of how social media impacts the way we provide and receive content. You will learn how social media changes the way businesses market products and services, influences how people interact with the government, and dictates how we communicate with one another on a personal level.

Content Reader

by Nancy Marchand-Martella Ronald Martella

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Content Rules

by C. C. Chapman Ann Handley

The guide to creating engaging web content and building a loyal following, revised and updatedBlogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and other platforms are giving everyone a "voice," including organizations and their customers. So how do you create the stories, videos, and blog posts that cultivate fans, arouse passion for your products or services, and ignite your business? Content Rules equips you for online success as a one-stop source on the art and science of developing content that people care about. This coverage is interwoven with case studies of companies successfully spreading their ideas online--and using them to establish credibility and build a loyal customer base.Find an authentic "voice" and craft bold content that will resonate with prospects and buyers and encourage them to share it with othersLeverage social media and social tools to get your content and ideas distributed as widely as possibleUnderstand why you are generating content--getting to the meat of your message in practical, commonsense language, and defining the goals of your content strategyWrite in a way that powerfully communicates your service, product, or message across various Web mediumsBoost your online presence and engage with customers and prospects like never before with Content Rules.

Contentious Curricula: Afrocentrism and Creationism in American Public Schools

by Amy J. Binder

This book compares two challenges made to American public school curricula in the 1980s and 1990s. It identifies striking similarities between proponents of Afrocentrism and creationism, accounts for their differential outcomes, and draws important conclusions for the study of culture, organizations, and social movements.Amy Binder gives a brief history of both movements and then describes how their challenges played out in seven school districts. Despite their very different constituencies--inner-city African American cultural essentialists and predominately white suburban Christian conservatives--Afrocentrists and creationists had much in common. Both made similar arguments about oppression and their children's well-being, both faced skepticism from educators about their factual claims, and both mounted their challenges through bureaucratic channels. In each case, challenged school systems were ultimately able to minimize or reject challengers' demands, but the process varied by case and type of challenge. Binder finds that Afrocentrists were more successful in advancing their cause than were creationists because they appeared to offer a solution to the real problem of urban school failure, met with more administrative sympathy toward their complaints of historic exclusion, sought to alter lower-prestige curricula (history, not science), and faced opponents who lacked a legal remedy comparable to the rule of church-state separation invoked by creationism's opponents.Binder's analysis yields several lessons for social movements research, suggesting that researchers need to pay greater attention to how movements seek to influence bureaucratic decision making, often from within. It also demonstrates the benefits of examining discursive, structural, and institutional factors in concert.

Contentious Republicans: Popular Politics, Race, and Class in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

by James E. Sanders

Contentious Republicans explores the mid-nineteenth-century rise of mass electoral democracy in the southwestern region of Colombia, a country many assume has never had a meaningful democracy of any sort. James E. Sanders describes a surprisingly rich republicanism characterized by legal rights and popular participation, and he explains how this vibrant political culture was created largely by competing subaltern groups seeking to claim their rights as citizens and their place in the political sphere. Moving beyond the many studies of nineteenth-century nation building that focus on one segment of society, Contentious Republicans examines the political activism of three distinct social and racial groups: Afro-Colombians, Indians, and white peasant migrants. Beginning in the late 1840s, subaltern groups entered the political arena to forge alliances, both temporary and enduring, with the elite Liberal and Conservative Parties. In the process, each group formed its own political discourses and reframed republicanism to suit its distinct needs. These popular liberals and popular conservatives bargained for the parties' support and deployed a broad repertoire of political actions, including voting, demonstrations, petitions, strikes, boycotts, and armed struggle. By the 1880s, though, many wealthy Colombians of both parties blamed popular political engagement for social disorder and economic failure, and they successfully restricted lower-class participation in politics. Sanders suggests that these reactionary developments contributed to the violence and unrest afflicting modern Colombia. Yet in illuminating the country's legacy of participatory politics in the nineteenth century, he shows that the current situation is neither inevitable nor eternal.

Contents May Have Shifted: A Novel

by Pam Houston

"A tale so vivid, intricate, and intimate that it puts high-def TV to shame."--Elle Pam Houston's latest takes us from one breathtaking precipice to the next as we unravel the story of Pam (a character not unlike the author), a fearless traveler aiming to leave her metaphorical baggage behind as she seeks a comfort zone in the air. With the help of a loyal cast of friends, body workers, and a new partner who inspires her to appreciate home, she finally finds something like ground under her feet.

A Contest for Supremacy: China, America, and the Struggle for Mastery in Asia

by Aaron L. Friedberg

"Sober and well-informed. . . . A careful and compelling examination of the U.S.-Chinese relationship from a number of angles."--Financial Times There may be no denying China's growing economic strength, but its impact on the global balance of power remains hotly contested. Political scientist Aaron L. Friedberg argues that our nation's leaders are failing to act expeditiously enough to counter China's growing strength. He explains how the United States and China define their goals and reveals the strategies each is now employing to achieve its ends. Friedberg demonstrates in this provocative book that the ultimate aim of Chinese policymakers is to "win without fighting," displacing the United States as the leading power in Asia while avoiding direct confrontation. The United States, on the other hand, sends misleading signals about our commitments and resolve, putting us at risk for a war that might otherwise have been avoided. A much-needed wake-up call to U.S. leaders and policymakers, A Contest for Supremacy is a compelling interpretation of a rivalry that will go far to determine the shape of the twenty-first century.

Contested Democracy: Freedom, Race, and Power in American History

by Sinha Manisha Penny Von Eschen

With essays on U.S. history ranging from the American Revolution to the dawn of the twenty-first century, Contested Democracy illuminates struggles waged over freedom and citizenship throughout the American past. Guided by a commitment to democratic citizenship and responsible scholarship, the contributors to this volume insist that rigorous engagement with history is essential to a vital democracy, particularly amid the current erosion of human rights and civil liberties within the United States and abroad. Emphasizing the contradictory ways in which freedom has developed within the United States and in the exercise of American power abroad, these essays probe challenges to American democracy through conflicts shaped by race, slavery, gender, citizenship, political economy, immigration, law, empire, and the idea of the nation state. In this volume, writers demonstrate how opposition to the expansion of democracy has shaped the American tradition as much as movements for social and political change. By foregrounding those who have been marginalized in U.S society as well as the powerful, these historians and scholars argue for an alternative vision of American freedom that confronts the limitations, failings, and contradictions of U.S. power. Their work provides crucial insight into the role of the United States in this latest age of American empire and the importance of different and oppositional visions of American democracy and freedom. At a time of intense disillusionment with U.S. politics and of increasing awareness of the costs of empire, these contributors argue that responsible historical scholarship can challenge the blatant manipulation of discourses on freedom. They call for careful and conscientious scholarship not only to illuminate contemporary problems but also to act as a bulwark against mythmaking in the service of cynical political ends.

The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers and the Rush to Colorado

by Elliott West

Deftly retracing a pivotal chapter in one of America's most dramatic stories, Elliott West chronicles the struggles, triumphs, and defeats of both Indians and whites as they pursued their clashing dreams of greatness in the heart of the continent. The Contested Plains recounts the rise of the Native American horse culture, white Americans' discovery and pursuit of gold in the Rocky Mountains, and the wrenching changes and bitter conflicts that ensued. After centuries of many peoples fashioning many cultures on the plains, the Cheyennes and other tribes found in the horse the power to create a heroic way of life that dominated one of the world's great grasslands. Then the discovery of gold challenged that way of life and led finally to the infamous massacre at Sand Creek and the Indian Wars of the late 1860s. Illuminating both the ancient and more recent history of the plains and eastern Rocky Mountains, West weaves together a brilliant tapestry interlaced with environmental, social, and military history. He treats the "frontier" not as a morally loaded term-either in the traditional celebratory sense or the more recent critical sense-but as a powerfully unsettling process that shattered an old world. He shows how Indians, goldseekers, haulers, merchants, ranchers, and farmers all contributed to and in turn were consumed by this process, even as the plains themselves were utterly transformed by the clash of cultures and competing visions. Exciting and enormously engaging, The Contested Plains is the first book to examine the Colorado gold rush as the key event in the modern transformation of the central great plains. It also exemplifies a kind of history that respects more fully our rich and ambiguous past-a past in which there are many actors but no simple lessons.

Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

by James Shapiro

For more than two hundred years after William Shakespeare's death, no one doubted that he had written his plays. Since then, however, dozens of candidates have been proposed for the authorship of what is generally agreed to be the finest body of work by a writer in the English language. In this remarkable book, Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro explains when and why so many people began to question whether Shakespeare wrote his plays. Among the doubters have been such writers and thinkers as Sigmund Freud, Henry James, Mark Twain, and Helen Keller. It is a fascinating story, replete with forgeries, deception, false claimants, ciphers and codes, conspiracy theories--and a stunning failure to grasp the power of the imagination. As Contested Will makes clear, much more than proper attribution of Shakespeare's plays is at stake in this authorship controversy. Underlying the arguments over whether Christopher Marlowe, Francis Bacon, or the Earl of Oxford wrote Shakespeare's plays are fundamental questions about literary genius, specifically about the relationship of life and art. Are the plays (and poems) of Shakespeare a sort of hidden autobiography? Do Hamlet, Macbeth, and the other great plays somehow reveal who wrote them? Shapiro is the first Shakespeare scholar to examine the authorship controversy and its history in this way, explaining what it means, why it matters, and how it has persisted despite abundant evidence that William Shakespeare of Stratford wrote the plays attributed to him. This is a brilliant historical investigation that will delight anyone interested in Shakespeare and the literary imagination.

Contesting Illness

by Pamela Moss Kathy Teghtsoonian

The relationship between power and illness is the subject of limited discussion despite it being one of the most important issues in health-related policies and services. In an effort to correct this, Contesting Illness engages critically with processes through which the meanings and effects of illness shape and are shaped by specific sets of practices. Featuring original contributions by researchers working in a number of disciplines, this collection examines intersections of power, contestation, and illness with the aid of various critical theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches.The contributors explore experiences of illness, diagnosis, and treatment, and analyse wider discursive and policy contexts within which people become ill and engage with health care systems. Though each essay is unique in its approach, they are linked together by a shared focus on contestation as a conceptual tool in considering the relationship between power and illness. Rather than focus on a single example, the contributors address different contested illnesses (chronic fatigue syndrome and environmental illness, for instance) as well as the contested dimensions of illnesses that are accepted as legitimate such as cancer and autism. Contesting Illness offers valuable insights into the assumptions, practices, and interactions that shape illness in the twenty-first century.Contributors Jan AngusPia H. Bülow Peter ConradJoyce DavidsonHelen GremillionMaren KlawiterJoshua KelleySteve Kroll-SmithKatherine LippelPamela MossMichael OrsiniMichael J. PrinceAnnie PottsMary Ellen PurkisSharon Dale StoneCheryl StultsKatherine TeghtsoonianJane M. Ussher Catherine van Mossel

Contesting Nietzsche

by Christa Davis Acampora

In this groundbreaking work, Christa Davis Acampora offers a profound rethinking of Friedrich NietzscheOCOs crucial notion of the "agon. " Analyzing an impressive array of primary and secondary sources and synthesizing decades of Nietzsche scholarship, she shows how the agon, or contest, organized core areas of NietzscheOCOs philosophy, providing a new appreciation of the subtleties of his notorious views about power. By focusing so intensely on this particular guiding interest, she offers an exciting, original vantage from which to view this iconic thinker: "Contesting Nietzsche. "aThough existenceOCoviewed through the lens of NietzscheOCOs agonOCois fraught with struggle, Acampora illuminates what Nietzsche recognized as the agonOCOs generative benefits. It imbues the human experience with significance, meaning, and value. Analyzing NietzscheOCOs elaborations of agonismOCohis remarks on types of contests, qualities of contestants, and the conditions in which either may thrive or deteriorateOCoshe demonstrates how much the agon shaped his philosophical projects and critical assessments of others. The agon led him from one set of concerns to the next, from aesthetics to metaphysics to ethics to psychology, via Homer, Socrates, Saint Paul, and Wagner. In showing how one obsession catalyzed so many diverse interests, "Contesting Nietzsche" sheds fundamentally new light on some of this philosopherOCOs most difficult and paradoxical ideas.

The Context of Military Environments: An Agenda for Basic Research on Social and Organizational Factors Relevant to Small Units

by Committee on the Context of Military Environments: Social Organization Factors

The United States Army faces a variety of challenges to maintain a ready and capable force into the future. Missions are increasingly diverse, ranging from combat and counterinsurgency to negotiation, reconstruction, and stability operations, and require a variety of personnel and skill sets to execute. Missions often demand rapid decision-making and coordination with others in novel ways, so that personnel are not simply following a specific set of tactical orders but rather need to understand broader strategic goals and choose among courses of action. Like any workforce, the Army is diverse in terms of demographic characteristics such as gender and race, with increasing pressure to ensure equal opportunities across all demographic parties. With these challenges comes the urgent need to better understand how contextual factors influence soldier and small unit behavior and mission performance. Recognizing the need to develop a portfolio of research to better understand the influence of social and organizational factors on the behavior of individuals and small units, the U. S. Army Research Institute (ARI) requested the National Research Council's Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences to outline a productive and innovative collection of future basic science research projects to improve Amy mission performance for immediate implementation and lasting over the next 10-20 years. This report presents recommendations for a program of basic scientific research on the roles of social and organizational contextual factors, such as organizational institutions, culture, and norms, as determinants and moderators of the performance of individual soldiers and small units. "The Context of Military Environments: Basic Research Opportunities on Social and Organizational Factors" synthesizes and assesses basic research opportunities in the behavioral and social sciences related to social and organizational factors that comprise the context of individual and small unit behavior in military environments. This report focuses on tactical operations of small units and their leaders, to include the full spectrum of unique military environments including: major combat operations, stability/support operations, peacekeeping, and military observer missions, as well as headquarters support units. This report identifies key contextual factors that shape individual and small unit behavior and assesses the state of the science regarding these factors. "The Context of Military Environments" recommends an agenda for ARI's future research in order to maximize the effectiveness of U. S. Army personnel policies and practices of selection, recruitment, and assignment as well as career development in training and leadership. The report also specifies the basic research funding level needed to implement the recommended agenda for future ARI research.

The Continent of Lies

by James Morrow

In a Philip K. Dick-like dystopian future, a new form of mass entertainment turns toxic, plunging unsuspecting consumers into an abyss of terrorCutting-edge virtual reality has emerged as a popular, albeit controversial, source of amusement. Devouring a cephapple or "dreambean" allows the eater to become the primary player in a preprogrammed narrative: love story, historical spectacle, horror thriller--this medium encompasses all genres. Our protagonist, Quinjin, is a professional dreambean critic, rating the hallucinogenic adventures hidden within these remarkable fruits.But something has gone terribly wrong. An anonymous "dreamweaver" has created a cephapple that, by transporting its users to the core of an inescapable nightmare, drives them stark raving mad--just the sort of ammunition the anti-dreambean movement needs to get the technology banned. Quinjin is hired to find the source of the poison and eradicate it. But the reviewer's heroic quest becomes highly personal when the person he most cares about--his teenage daughter--eats the forbidden fruit and lapses into a coma.Dark and satiric, The Continent of Lies is a bravura demonstration of the bold originality that has won James Morrow two Nebula Awards, two World Fantasy Awards, and the Prix Utopia.

Continental Contract

by Don Pendleton

France becomes a battleground when the Executioner's war goes international While staking out Mafia activity at Dulles airport, the one-man army known as Mack Bolan gets caught in an ambush. He shoots his way past the first wave of mob guards, escaping onto the tarmac. As a cordon of police close in on the most wanted man in America, he is forced to fly or die. He chooses the former--hopping a ride on an airliner headed for France, where he will do battle with the most savage villains the Old World has to offer. On the flight he encounters a celebrity who could be his double--and who is kidnapped by the Paris mob as soon as he steps off the plane. To rescue this unsuspecting innocent, Bolan will bring the Paris underworld to its knees. He may not speak French, but he is fluent in the universal language of the gun.

Continental Contract (The Executioner #5)

by Don Pendleton

The largest private gun squad in history follows Bolan to France, only to find the war has started without them, and 20 dead Frenchmen are mute testimony to the proficiency of the Executioner.

Continental Crossroads: Remapping U.S.-Mexico Borderlands History

by Samuel Truett Elliott Young

Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University. The U. S. -Mexico borderlands have long supported a web of relationships that transcend the U. S. and Mexican nations. Yet national histories usually overlook these complex connections. Continental Crossroads rediscovers this forgotten terrain, laying the foundations for a new borderlands history at the crossroads of Chicano/a, Latin American, and U. S. history. Drawing on the historiographies and archives of both the U. S. and Mexico, the authors chronicle the transnational processes that bound both nations together between the early nineteenth century and the 1940s, the formative era of borderlands history. A new generation of borderlands historians examines a wide range of topics in frontier and post-frontier contexts. The contributors explore how ethnic, racial, and gender relations shifted as a former frontier became the borderlands. They look at the rise of new imagined communities and border literary traditions through the eyes of Mexicans, Anglo-Americans, and Indians, and recover transnational border narratives and experiences of African Americans, Chinese, and Europeans. They also show how surveillance and resistance in the borderlands inflected the "body politics" of gender, race, and nation. Native heroine Brbara Gandiaga, Mexican traveler Ignacio Martnez, Kiowa warrior Sloping Hair, African American colonist William H. Ellis, Chinese merchant Lee Sing, and a diverse cast of politicos and subalterns, gendarmes and patrolmen, and insurrectos and exiles add transnational drama to the formerly divided worlds of Mexican and U. S. history. Contributors. Grace Pea Delgado, Karl Jacoby, Benjamin Johnson, Louise Pubols, Ral Ramos, Andrs Resndez, Brbara O. Reyes, Alexandra Minna Stern, Samuel Truett, Elliott Young

Continental Drift

by Russell Banks

Now available for the first time in e-book format, a powerful literary classic from one of contemporary fiction's most acclaimed and important writers, Russell Banks's Continental Drift is a masterful novel of hope lost and gained, and a gripping, indelible story of fragile lives uprooted and transformed by injustice, disappointment, and the seductions and realities of the American dream.

Continental Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

by Simon Critchley

In this enlightening new Very Short Introduction, Simon Critchley shows us that Continental philosophy encompasses a distinct set of philosophical traditions and practices, with a compelling range of problems all too often ignored by the analytic tradition. He discusses the ideas and approaches of philosophers such as Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Habermas, Foucault, and Derrida. He also introduces key concepts such as existentialism, nihilism, and phenomenology, by explaining their place in the Continental tradition. The perfect guide for anyone interested in the great philosophers, this volume explains in lucid, straightforward language the split between Continental and Anglo-American philosophy and the importance of acknowledging Continental philosophy.

A Continental Plate Boundary

by David Okaya Tim Stern Fred Davey

Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series, Volume 175. A Continental Plate Boundary offers in one place the most comprehensive, up-to-date knowledge for researchers and students to learn about the tectonics and plate dynamics of the Pacific-Australian continental plate boundary in South Island and about the application of modern geological and geophysical methods. It examines what happens when convergence and translation occur at a plate boundary by Describing the geological and geophysical signature of a continental transform fault; Identifying the diverse vertical and lateral patterns of deformation at the plate boundary; Assessing an apparent seismicity gap on the plate boundary fault and fast-moving plate motions; Comparing this plate boundary to other global convergent continental strike-slip plate boundaries; Documenting the utility of the double-sided, onshore-offshore seismic method for exploration of a narrow continental island; and Providing additional papers presenting previously unpublished results. This volume will prove invaluable for seismologists, tectonophysicists, geodesists and potential-field geophysicists, geologists, geodynamicists, and students of the deformation of tectonic plates.

Contingencies of Value: Alternative Perspectives for Critical Theory

by Barbara Herrnstein Smith

Polemical without being rancorous, Contingencies of Value mounts a powerful critique of traditional conceptions of value, taste, judgment, and justification. Through incisive discussions of works by, among others, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Northrop Frye, Georges Bataille, Jacques Derrida, Richard Rorty, and Jürgen Habermas, Smith develops an illuminating alternative framework for the explanation of these topics. All value, she argues, is radically contingent. Neither an objective property of things nor merely a subjective response to them, it is the variable effect of numerous interacting economies that is, systems of apportionment and circulation of "goods." Aesthetic value, moral value, and the truth-value of judgments are no exceptions, though traditional critical theory, ethics, and philosophy of language have always tried to prove otherwise. Smith deals in an original way with a wide variety of contemporary issues--from the relation between popular and high culture to the conflicting conception of human motives and actions in economic theory and classical humanism. In an important final chapter, she addresses directly the crucial problem of relativism and explains why a denial of the objectivity of value does not--as commonly feared and charged--produce either a fatuous egalitarianism or moral and political paralysis.

Contingency, irony, and solidarity

by Richard Rorty

In this book, major American philosopher Richard Rorty argues that thinkers such as Nietzsche, Freud, and Wittgenstein have enabled societies to see themselves as historical contingencies, rather than as expressions of underlying, ahistorical human nature, or as realizations of suprahistorical goals. This ironic perspective on the human condition is valuable but it cannot advance Liberalism's social and political goals. In fact, Rorty believes that it is literature and not philosophy that can do this, by promoting a genuine sense of human solidarity. Specifically, it is novelists such as Orwell and Nabokov who succeed in awakening us to the cruelty of particular social practices and individual attitudes. Thus, a truly liberal culture would fuse the private, individual freedom of the ironic, philosophical perspective with the public project of human solidarity as it is engendered through the insights and sensibilities of great writers. Rorty uses a wide range of references--from philosophy to social theory to literary criticism--to elucidate his beliefs.

Continuous Enterprise Development in Java

by Andrew Lee Rubinger Aslak Knutsen

Learn a use-case approach for developing Java enterprise applications in a continuously test-driven fashion. With this hands-on guide, authors and JBoss project leaders Andrew Lee Rubinger and Aslak Knutsen show you how to build high-level components, from persistent storage to the user interface, using the Arquillian testing platform and several other JBoss projects and tools.Through the course of the book, you'll build a production-ready software conference tracker called GeekSeek, using source code from GitHub. Rubinger and Knutsen demonstrate why testing is the very foundation of development--essential for ensuring that code is consumable, complete, and correct.Bootstrap an elementary Java EE project from start to finish before diving into the full-example application, GeekSeekUse both relational and NoSQL storage models to build and test GeekSeek's data persistence layersTackle testable business logic development and asynchronous messaging with an SMTP serviceExpose enterprise services as a RESTful interface, using Java EE's JAX-RS frameworkImplement OAuth authentication with JBoss's PicketLink identity management serviceValidate the UI by automating interaction in the browser and reading the rendered pagePerform full-scale integration testing on the final deployable archive

A Continuous Harmony

by Wendell Berry

The title of this book is taken from an account by Thomas F. Hornbein on his travels in the Himalayas. "It seemed to me," Horenbein wrote, "that here man lived in continuous harmony with the land, as much as briefly a part of it as all its other occupants." Wendell Berry's second collection of essays, A Continuous Harmony was first published in 1972, and includes the seminal "Think Little," which was printed in The Last Whole Earth Catalogue and reprinted around the globe, and the splendid centerpiece, "Discipline and Hope," an insightful and articulate essay making a case for what he calls "a new middle."

Continuous Processing in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

by Ganapathy Subramanian

With contributions from biotechnologists and bioengineers, this ready reference describes the state of the art in industrial biopharmaceutical production, with a strong focus on continuous processes. Recent advances in single-use technology as well as application guidelines for all types of biopharmaceutical products, from vaccines to antibodies, and from bacterial to insect to mammalian cells are covered. The efficiency, robustness, and quality control of continuous production processes for biopharmaceuticals are reviewed and compared to traditional batch processes for a range of different production systems.

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