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The Cultured Handmaiden: A Novel

by Catherine Cookson

Jinny Brownlow was labelled by her exboyfriend as 'a cultured handmaiden'- someone so agreeable, so polite, so eager to please, she let people wipe their boots on her. Working with a marked lack of job satisfaction in the typing pool of a large Tyneside engineering firm, Jenny's only outside interest was amateur dramatics. The label was appropriate until the day she was suddenly called upon to stand hi as secretary for the firm's formidable boss, and later the same day the leading light from the Fellburn Players invited her to Sunday lunch. Both these older men had demands to make of her, and each would prove a catalyst in the reshaping of Jinny's future pattern of life.

Cultures in Contact: World Migrations in the Second Millennium

by Dirk Hoerder

A landmark work on human migration around the globe, Cultures in Contact provides a history of the world told through the movements of its people. It is a broad, pioneering interpretation of the scope, patterns, and consequences of human migrations over the past ten centuries. In this magnum opus thirty years in the making, Dirk Hoerder reconceptualizes the history of migration and immigration, establishing that societal transformation cannot be understood without taking into account the impact of migrations and, indeed, that mobility is more characteristic of human behavior than is stasis. Signaling a major paradigm shift, Cultures in Contact creates an English-language map of human movement that is not Atlantic Ocean-based. Hoerder describes the origins, causes, and extent of migrations around the globe and analyzes the cultural interactions they have triggered. He pays particular attention to the consequences of immigration within the receiving countries. His work sweeps from the eleventh century forward through the end of the twentieth, when migration patterns shifted to include transpacific migration, return migrations from former colonies, refugee migrations, and distinct regional labor migrations in the developing world. Hoerder demonstrates that as we enter the third millennium, regional and intercontinental migration patterns no longer resemble those of previous centuries. They have been transformed by new communications systems and other forces of globalization and transnationalism.

Cultures in Motion

by Daniel T. Rodgers Helmut Reimitz Bhavani Raman

In the wide-ranging and innovative essays of Cultures in Motion, a dozen distinguished historians offer new conceptual vocabularies for understanding how cultures have trespassed across geography and social space. From the transformations of the meanings and practices of charity during late antiquity and the transit of medical knowledge between early modern China and Europe, to the fusion of Irish and African dance forms in early nineteenth-century New York, these essays follow a wide array of cultural practices through the lens of motion, translation, itinerancy, and exchange, extending the insights of transnational and translocal history. Cultures in Motion challenges the premise of fixed, stable cultural systems by showing that cultural practices have always been moving, crossing borders and locations with often surprising effect. The essays offer striking examples from early to modern times of intrusion, translation, resistance, and adaptation. These are histories where nothing--dance rhythms, alchemical formulas, musical practices, feminist aspirations, sewing machines, streamlined metals, or labor networks--remains stationary. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Celia Applegate, Peter Brown, Harold Cook, April Masten, Mae Ngai, Jocelyn Olcott, Mimi Sheller, Pamela Smith, and Nira Wickramasinghe.

Cultures of Milk

by Andrea S. Wiley

Milk is the only food mammals produce naturally to feed their offspring. The human species is the only one that takes milk from other animals and consumes it beyond weaning age. Cultures of Milk contrasts the practices of the world's two leading milk producers, India and the United States. In both countries, milk is considered to have special qualities. Drawing on ethnographic and scientific studies, popular media, and government reports, Andrea Wiley reveals that the cultural significance of milk goes well beyond its nutritive value. Shifting socioeconomic and political factors influence how people perceive the importance of milk and how much they consume. In India, where milk is out of reach for many, consumption is rising rapidly among the urban middle class. But milk drinking is declining in America, despite the strength of the dairy industry. Milk is bound up in discussions of food scarcity in India and food abundance in the United States. Promotion of milk as a means to enhance child growth boosted consumption in twentieth-century America and is currently doing the same in India, where average height is low. Wiley considers how variation among populations in the ability to digest lactose and ideas about how milk affects digestion influence the type of milk and milk products consumed. In India, most milk comes from buffalo, but cows have sacred status for Hindus. In the United States, cow's milk has long been a privileged food, but is now facing competition from plant-based milk.

Cultures of Solidarity: Consciousness, Action, and Contemporary American Workers

by Rick Fantasia

A commonplace assumption about American workers is that they lack class consciousness. This perception has baffled social scientists, demoralized activists, and generated a significant literature on American exceptionalism. In this provocative book, a young sociologist takes the prevailing assumptions to task and sheds new light upon this very important issue. In three vivid case studies Fantasia explores the complicated, multi-faceted dynamics of American working-class consciousness and collective action.

Cultures of the Death Drive: Melanie Klein and Modernist Melancholia

by Esther Sánchez Pardo

Cultures of the Death Drive is a comprehensive guide to the work of pioneering psychoanalyst Melanie Klein (1882-1960) and to developments in Kleinian theory to date. It is also an analysis and a demonstration of the distinctive usefulness of Klein's thought for understanding modernist literature and visual art. Esther Snchez-Pardo examines the issues that the seminal discourses of psychoanalysis and artistic modernism brought to the fore in the early twentieth century and points toward the uses of Kleinian thinking for reconceptualizing the complexities of identity and social relations today. Snchez-Pardo argues that the troubled political atmosphere leading to both world wars created a melancholia fueled by "cultures of the death drive" and the related specters of object loss--loss of coherent and autonomous selves, of social orders where stability reigned, of metaphysical guarantees, and, in some cases, loss and fragmentation of empire. This melancholia permeated, and even propelled, modernist artistic discourses. Snchez-Pardo shows how the work of Melanie Klein, the theorist of melancholia par excellence, uniquely illuminates modernist texts, particularly their representations of gender and sexualities. She offers a number of readings--of works by Virginia Woolf, Ren Magritte, Lytton Strachey, Djuna Barnes, and Countee Cullen--that reveal the problems melancholia posed for verbal and visual communication and the narrative and rhetorical strategies modernist artists derived to either express or overcome them. In her afterword, Snchez-Pardo explicates the connections between modernist and contemporary melancholia. A valuable contribution to psychoanalytic theory, gender and sexuality studies, and the study of representation in literature and the visual arts, Cultures of the Death Drive is a necessary resource for those interested in the work of Melanie Klein.

Cultures of the Jews: A New History

by David Biale

Who are "the Jews"? Scattered over much of the world throughout most of their three-thousand-year-old history, are they one people or many? How do they resemble and how do they differ from Jews in other places and times? What have their relationships been to the cultures of their neighbors? To address these and similar questions, twenty-three of the finest scholars of our day--archaeologists, cultural historians, literary critics, art historians , folklorists, and historians of relation, all affiliated with major academic institutions in the United States, Israel, and France--have contributed their insight to Cultures of the Jews. The premise of their endeavor is that although Jews have always had their own autonomous traditions, Jewish identity cannot be considered immutable, the fixed product of either ancient ethnic or religious origins. Rather, it has shifted and assumed new forms in response to the cultural environment in which the Jews have lived. Building their essays on specific cultural artifacts--a poem, a letter, a traveler's account, a physical object of everyday or ritual use--that were made in the period and locale they study, the contributors describe the cultural interactions among different Jews--from rabbis and scholars to non-elite groups, including women--as well as between Jews and the surrounding non-Jewish world. Part One, "Mediterranean Origins," describes the concept of the "People" or "Nation" of Israel that emerges in the Hebrew Bible and the culture of the Israelites in relation to that of the Canaanite groups. It goes on to discuss Jewish cultures in the Greco-Roman world, Palestine during the Byzantine period, Babylonia, and Arabia during the formative years of Islam. Part Two, "Diversities of Diaspora," illuminates Judeo-Arabic culture in the Golden Age of Islam, Sephardic culture as it bloomed first if the Iberian Peninsula and later in Amsterdam, the Jewish-Christian symbiosis in Ashkenazic Europe and in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the culture of the Italian Jews of the Renaissance period, and the many strands of folklore, magic, and material culture that run through diaspora Jewish history. Part Three, "Modern Encounters," examines communities, ways of life, and both high and fold culture in Western, Central, and Eastern Europe, the Ladino Diaspora, North Africa and the Middle East, Ethiopia, Zionist Palestine and the State of Israel, and, finally, the United States. Cultures of the Jews is a landmark, representing the fruits of the present generation of scholars in Jewish studies and offering a new foundation upon which all future research into Jewish history will be based. Its unprecedented interdisciplinary approach will resonate widely among general readers and the scholarly community, both Jewish and non-Jewish, and it will change the terms of the never-ending debate over what constitutes Jewish identity.

Cultures of Transnational Adoption

by Toby Alice Volkman

During the 1990s, the number of children adopted from poorer countries to the more affluent West grew exponentially. Close to 140,000 transnational adoptions occurred in the United States alone. While in an earlier era, adoption across borders was assumed to be straightforward--a child traveled to a new country and stayed there--by the late twentieth century, adoptees were expected to acquaint themselves with the countries of their birth and explore their multiple identities. Listservs, Web sites, and organizations creating international communities of adoptive parents and adoptees proliferated. With contributors including several adoptive parents, this unique collection looks at how transnational adoption creates and transforms cultures. The cultural experiences considered in this volume raise important questions about race and nation; about kinship, biology, and belonging; and about the politics of the sending and receiving nations. Several essayists explore the images and narratives related to transnational adoption. Others examine the recent preoccupation with "roots" and "birth cultures. " They describe a trip during which a group of Chilean adoptees and their Swedish parents traveled "home" to Chile, the "culture camps" attended by thousands of young-adult Korean adoptees whom South Korea is now eager to reclaim as "overseas Koreans," and adopted children from China and their North American parents grappling with the question of what "Chinese" or "Chinese American" identity might mean. Essays on Korean birth mothers, Chinese parents who adopt children within China, and the circulation of children in Brazilian families reveal the complexities surrounding adoption within the so-called sending countries. Together, the contributors trace the new geographies of kinship and belonging created by transnational adoption. Contributors. Lisa Cartwright, Claudia Fonseca, Elizabeth Alice Honig, Kay Johnson, Laurel Kendall, Eleana Kim, Toby Alice Volkman, Barbara Yngvesson

Cumberland's Culloden Army 1745-46

by Gerry Embleton Stuart Reid

In August 1745 Charles Edward Stuart, the 'Young Pretender', landed in Scotland and sparked the Second Jacobite Rising. The Jacobite forces seized Perth, then Edinburgh, where they proclaimed the Young Pretender's father King James VIII; they trounced their Hanoverian opponents at Prestonpans and crossed into England, getting as far south as Derby before withdrawing into Scotland. Far from universally popular north of the border, the Jacobite army bested another Hanoverian army at Falkirk and besieged Stirling, only to be routed by the Duke of Cumberland's army at Culloden in April 1746, a crushing defeat that ended any prospect of a Stuart restoration.Youngest son of Britain's Hanoverian king George II, the victorious general was lauded by his supporters while being reviled by his opponents as 'Butcher' Cumberland. His polyglot army, the subject of this book, included English regular Line infantry, cavalry, artillery, marines, and Scottish infantry (more Scots served on King George's side than followed 'Bonnie Prince Charlie'); English and Scottish 'provincial' infantry and cavalry regiments; and Hanoverian, Hessian, Dutch and Swiss infantry, cavalry and artillery.Featuring full-colour artwork depicting the distinctive uniforms of Cumberland's men, this exhaustively researched study offers a wealth of detail of regimental strengths and casualties and includes an extended chronology that places individual units in specific places throughout the campaign that culminated at Culloden.

Cumbia!: Scenes of a Migrant Latin American Music Genre

by Fernández L'Hoeste Héctor D. Vila Pablo

Cumbia is a musical form that originated in northern Colombia and then spread throughout Latin America and wherever Latin Americans travel and settle. It has become one of the most popular musical genre in the Americas. Its popularity is largely due to its stylistic flexibility. Cumbia absorbs and mixes with the local musical styles it encounters. Known for its appeal to workers, the music takes on different styles and meanings from place to place, and even, as the contributors to this collection show, from person to person. Cumbia is a different music among the working classes of northern Mexico, Latin American immigrants in New York City, Andean migrants to Lima, and upper-class Colombians, who now see the music that they once disdained as a source of national prestige. The contributors to this collection look at particular manifestations of cumbia through their disciplinary lenses of musicology, sociology, history, anthropology, linguistics, and literary criticism. Taken together, their essays highlight how intersecting forms of identity--such as nation, region, class, race, ethnicity, and gender--are negotiated through interaction with the music. Contributors. Cristian Alarcón, Jorge Arévalo Mateus, Leonardo D'Amico, Héctor Fernández L'Hoeste, Alejandro L. Madrid, Kathryn Metz, José Juan Olvera Gudiño, Cathy Ragland, Pablo Semán, Joshua Tucker, Matthew J. Van Hoose, Pablo Vila

Cumulative Environmental Effects Of Oil And Gas Activities On Alaska's North Slope

by Committee on Cumulative Environmental Effects of Oil Gas Activities on Alaska's North Slope

This book identifies accumulated environmental, social and economic effects of oil and gas leasing, exploration, and production on Alaska's North Slope. Economic benefits to the region have been accompanied by effects of the roads, infrastructure and activies of oil and gas production on the terrain, plants, animals and peoples of the North Slope. While attempts by the oil industry and regulatory agencies have reduced many of the environmental effects, they have not been eliminated. The book makes recommendations for further environmental research related to environmental effects.

Cunegonde's Kidnapping

by Benjamin J. Kaplan

In a remote village on the Dutch-German border, a young Catholic woman named Cunegonde tries to kidnap a baby to prevent it from being baptized in a Protestant church. When she is arrested, fellow Catholics stage an armed raid to free her from detention. These dramatic events of 1762 triggered a cycle of violence, starting a kind of religious war in the village and its surrounding region. Contradicting our current understanding, this war erupted at the height of the Age of Enlightenment, famous for its religious toleration. Cunegonde's Kidnapping tells in vivid detail the story of this hitherto unknown conflict. Drawing characters, scenes, and dialogue straight from a body of exceptional primary sources, it is the first microhistorical study of religious conflict and toleration in early modern Europe. In it, Benjamin J. Kaplan explores the dilemmas of interfaith marriage and the special character of religious life in a borderland, where religious dissenters enjoy unique freedoms. He also challenges assumptions about the impact of Enlightenment thought and suggests that, on a popular level, some parts of eighteenth-century Europe may not have witnessed a #147;rise of toleration. "

Cunning

by Don Herzog

Want to be cunning? You might wish you were more clever, more flexible, able to cut a few corners without getting caught, to dive now and again into iniquity and surface clutching a prize. You might want to roll your eyes at those slaves of duty who play by the rules. Or you might think there's something sleazy about that stance, even if it does seem to pay off. Does that make you a chump? With pointedly mischievous prose, Don Herzog explores what's alluring and what's revolting in cunning. He draws on a colorful range of sources: tales of Odysseus; texts from Machiavelli; pamphlets from early modern England; salesmen's newsletters; Christian apologetics; plays; sermons; philosophical treatises; detective novels; famous, infamous, and obscure historical cases; and more. The book is in three parts, bookended by two murderous churchmen. "Dilemmas" explores some canonical moments of cunning and introduces the distinction between knaves and fools as a "time-honored but radically deficient scheme." "Appearances" assails conventional approaches to unmasking. Surveying ignorance and self-deception, "Despair?" deepens the case that we ought to be cunning--and then sees what we might say in response. Throughout this beguiling book, Herzog refines our sense of what's troubling in this terrain. He shows that rationality, social roles, and morality are tangled together--and trickier than we thought.

The Cunning of Recognition: Indigenous Alterities and the Making of Australian Multiculturalism

by Elizabeth A Povinelli

The Cunning of Recognition is an exploration of liberal multiculturalism from the perspective of Australian indigenous social life. Elizabeth A. Povinelli argues that the multicultural legacy of colonialism perpetuates unequal systems of power, not by demanding that colonized subjects identify with their colonizers but by demanding that they identify with an impossible standard of authentic traditional culture. Povinelli draws on seventeen years of ethnographic research among northwest coast indigenous people and her own experience participating in land claims, as well as on public records, legal debates, and anthropological archives to examine how multicultural forms of recognition work to reinforce liberal regimes rather than to open them up to a true cultural democracy. The Cunning of Recognition argues that the inequity of liberal forms of multiculturalism arises not from its weak ethical commitment to difference but from its strongest vision of a new national cohesion. In the end, Australia is revealed as an exemplary site for studying the social effects of the liberal multicultural imaginary: much earlier than the United States and in response to very different geopolitical conditions, Australian nationalism renounced the ideal of a unitary European tradition and embraced cultural and social diversity. While addressing larger theoretical debates in critical anthropology, political theory, cultural studies, and liberal theory, The Cunning of Recognition demonstrates that the impact of the globalization of liberal forms of government can only be truly understood by examining its concrete--and not just philosophical--effects on the world.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic

by Scott Cunningham

Learn how to find and cleanse stones and use them in divinations, spells, and tarot readings. Discover how to determine the energies and stories contained within each stone,and the symbolic meaning of a stone's color and shape. Also included in this classic guide are: Birthstone and jewelry magic lore; Tables listing both planetary and elementary rulers of stones, magical intentions, and magical substitutions. Scott Cunningham authored more than thirty books, both fiction and nonfiction.

Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs (second edition)

by Scott Cunningham

Nature has provided a veritable magical pantry in the plants which grow all over our planet. Since ancient times these plants have been used in magic- the practice of causing change by natural (albeit little-understood) powers. Though the medicinal properties of plants are fairly well-known-many of the most widely prescribed drugs are synthesized versions of substances originally derived from plants-their occult powers are less accessible. Much of their magic still lies in the shadow of secrecy. Our ancestors knew that plants had mysterious, magical powers. Although the magic in herbs has been forgotten by many, it has never disappeared. Return to the days when nature spirits dwelled in sacred groves and fairies danced in flower gardens. Inside this book you'll find magical uses for hundreds of plants: String a garland of marigolds above your door to keep evil from entering your home. Bury vervain around your house and in your house plants-wealth will flow and the plants will thrive. Carry a bag of orris root to attract love. Drink rosebud tea before bed to induce prophetic dreams. - Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs is a treasury of herb wisdom and lore from the Old and New Worlds. This comprehensive guidebook has all the information you need to practice magical herbalism. Tap into the power of plants and watch your magic blossom!

The Cup and the Crown

by Diane Stanley

Night after night, Molly has visions of a beautiful goblet: one of her grandfather's loving cups, which he filled with magic that bound people together. So it hardly surprises Molly when handsome King Alaric asks her to find a loving cup to help him win the heart of the beautiful Princess of Cortova. As Molly and her friends Winifred and Tobias journey in search of a loving cup, a mysterious raven joins their quest and appears to guide them all the way to the hidden city of Harrowsgode. There, Molly discovers secrets about her own family as well as the magic of the loving cup. But Harrowsgode is hidden for a reason, and leaving is more difficult than Molly imagined. Will she be able to escape, let alone bring a loving cup to King Alaric?

Cup Of Blood: A Medieval Noir (Crispin Guest Novel Prequel)

by Jeri Westerson

When a corpse turns up at his favorite tavern, Crispin Guest-disgraced knight turned detective--begins an inquiry, but the dead man turns out to be a Templar knight, an order thought to be extinct for 75 years, charged with protecting a certain religious relic which is now missing. Before he can begin to investigate, Crispin is abducted by shadowy men who are said to be minions of the French anti-pope. Further complicating matters are two women: one from court with an enticing proposition, and another from Crispin's past, dredging up long-forgotten emotions he would rather have left behind. And as if all that weren't enough, a cunning young cutpurse by the name of Jack Tucker has insinuated himself into Crispin's already difficult life. The deeper Crispin probes into the murder, the more it looks like the handiwork of an old friend turned adversary. With enemies from all sides, Crispin has his hands full in more than murder in this intriguing prequel to the acclaimed series.

A Cup of Christmas Tea

by Tom Hegg

A nephew's visit to an elderly great aunt at Christmastime brings him memories of past holidays and the realization of how the human spirit can triumph over adversity.

A Cup of Comfort Classic Edition: Timeless Stories That Warm Your Heart, Lift Your Spirit, and Enrich Your Life

by Colleen Sell

Whether you are a new Cup of Comfort reader or an avid follower of the series, you will truly enjoy this updated version of the book that started it all. A Cup of Comfort Classic Edition revisits the stories that have warmed millions of hearts. Graced with several new moving stories, this book can inspire you as it has these and many more readers:

A Cup of Comfort Cookbook: Favorite Comfort Foods to Warm Your Heart and Lift Your Spirit

by Colleen Sell Jay Weinstein

Nearly 200 recipes fill the pages of this companion cookbook to the popular "A Cup of Comfort" series of books. Readers are sure to delight in discovering the rich stories, histories, and traditions surrounding such delicious dishes as Apple Brown Betty and Grandma Vee's Meatballs and Gravy.

A Cup of Comfort Devotional for Mothers and Daughters

by Susan B. Townsend James Stuart Bell

Few bonds are more blessed than that of mother and daughter. Encompassing all of life itself, this special relationship colors every woman's past, present, and future. This moving new collection shows how God's love and compassion for mothers and daughters is at work in their lives every day of the year. Featuring a touching essay for each month, biblical passages, and real-life accounts of mother/daughter miracles large and small, this devotional is a daily dose of grace and goodness for Christians everywhere.

A Cup of Comfort Devotional for Mothers: Daily Inspirations for Christian Moms

by James S. Bell Jeanette Gardner Littleton

In this special addition to the bestselling a Cup of Comfort series, you'll find touching, biblical-themed stories written by devoted mothers who have welcomed the Lord into their daily lives.

A Cup of Comfort Devotional for Women: A Daily Reminder of Faith for Christian Women by Christian Women

by Carol Mclean Wilde James Stuart Bell

In this special addition to the bestselling a Cup of Comfort series, more than 100 contributors extend a sisterly hand to help you stay on the path of Christian love and devotion every day of the year.

A Cup of Comfort® Devotional Stories

by Adams Media

Celebrating God's love and mercy

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