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Canada in Cities

by Caroline Andrew Katherine A.H. Graham

The federal government and its policies transform Canadian cities in myriad ways. Canada in Cities examines this relationship to better understand the interplay among changing demographics, how local governments and citizens frame their arguments for federal action, and the ways in which the national government uses its power and resources to shape urban Canada. Most studies of local governance in Canada focus on politics and policy within cities. The essays in this collection turn such analysis on its head, by examining federal programs, rather than municipal ones, and observing how they influence local policies and work with regional authorities and civil societies. Through a series of case studies - ranging from federal policy concerning Aboriginal people in cities, to the introduction of the federal gas tax transfer to municipalities, to the impact of Canada's emergency management policies on cities - the contributors provide insights about how federal politics influence the local political arena. Analyzing federal actions in diverse policy fields, the authors uncover meaningful patterns of federal action and outcome in Canadian cities. A timely contribution, Canada in Cities offers a comprehensive study of diverse areas of municipal public policy that have emerged in Canada in recent years.

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014

by Gwynne Dyer

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014 is a serious contemplation of what it means to engage in major world conflicts, and the price we pay when we do. The First World War was Canada's baptism of fire, or at least the only one that people now remember. (Montrealers in 1776 or Torontonians in 1814 would have taken a different view.) From 1914 to 1918, after a century of peace, Canadians were plunged back into the old world of great power rivalries and great wars. So was everybody else, but Canadians were volunteers. We didn't have to fight, but we chose to, out of loyalty to ideas and institutions that today many of us no longer believe in. And we have been doing the same thing ever since, although we haven't quite given up on the latest set of ideas and institutions yet.In Canada in the Great Power Game, Gwynne Dyer moves back and forth between the seminal event, the First World War, and all the later conflicts that Canada chose to fight in. He draws parallels between these conflicts, with the same idealism among the young soldiers, and the same deeply conflicted emotions among the survivors, surfacing time and again in every war right down to Afghanistan. And in each case, the same arguments pro and con arise--mostly from people who are a long, safe way from the killing grounds--for every one of those "wars of choice."Echoing throughout the book are the voices of the people who lived through the wars: the veterans, the politicians, the historians, the eyewitnesses. And Dyer takes a number of so-called excursions from his historical account, in which he revisits the events and puts them in context, pausing to ask such questions as "What if we hadn't fought Hitler?" and "Is war written in our genes?" This entertaining and provocative book casts an unsparing eye over what happens when Canada and the great powers get in the war business, illuminating much about how we see ourselves on the world stage.From the Hardcover edition.

Canada Since 1945

by John English Robert Bothwell Ian Drummond

From the preface:"A visitor seeing Canada for the first time since 1939 might well conclude that Canada, even more than nations devastated by war, has become another country. On the surface so much remains the same: the Liberals prevail in Ottawa; the provinces quarrel with Ottawa and among themselves; and we worry about Americans in our future. But most of the pieces have been rearranged, and the effect of the picture is quite different...This is a book about our own times, and as such it expresses definite views. No reader will agree with everything we say. We have not tried to end debate; we have tried to clarify and broaden. We trust that our readers will be encouraged to seek for themselves a better understanding of where Canadians have been and what they have become." Disclaimer: Images removed at the request of the rights holder

The Canada Trip

by Charles Gordon

"We are back from three months on the highways of Canada, driving 24,863 kilometres, which is 15,539 miles to you old-timers. " Clearly, after this beginning,The Canada Tripis not going to be a conventional travel guide. Nor is it a journalistic dissection of the mood of the land, because "the country has been analysed to death. " Instead, Charles Gordon keeps what he calls Inner Journalist in check to give us a record of how a typical traveller sees the country, moseying along in the family car. This makes the book not so much a "Whither Canada?" as a "Whither the washroom?" book, and we are all grateful for it. It started out as a simple idea. Gordon and his wife, Nancy (also known, to her slight irritation, as the Business Manager), the drive across Canada. Starting from Ottawa they drove east through Quebec ("Lac St-Jean is where everybody votes separatist and nobody speaks English and we are making good time and what is this trip about but being spontaneous, right? - so left we go"), through New Brunswick, P. E. I. , Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland, where they learned about "soap for the moose. " From St. John's they headed west on a different route through the Maritimes to Montreal, Toronto, and Lake of the Woods (scene of the famous cottage inAt the Cottage). Then it was west along what used to be called the CPR route (with memorable side trips to places like Sharon Butala's Saskatchewan ranch, immortalised inThe Perfection of Morning) all the way to Vancouver and Victoria. Then, via Prince Rupert, they followed the Yellowhead Trail back through Edmonton and Saskatoon, hitting Flin Flon and Northern Ontario on the way home. They had a wonderful time, rambling around without an agenda, arguing whether today's view (the Gaspé coast, or the Cabot Trail, or Lake Superior, or Banff, or Long Beach) deserved a place on their Top Ten list. Another list soon developed - the small towns they somehow managed to get lost in - and because Charles Gordon is male and thus unable to stop and ask for directions, many interesting miles were added in this way. Further sacrifices were made by Nancy "for the book," including a visit to a Regina casino, but she drew the line at the West Edmonton Mall submarine. As well as these family dynamics we meet many Gordon friends and relatives, while memories of Charles Gordon's namesake and grandfather, the writer known as Ralph Connor, lend special meaning to encounters in Glengarry County, Winnipeg, and Canmore. If you insist on looking for conventional travel guide advice ("Eat here. Stay there") this book has some interesting twists. In downtown Fraser Lake, B. C. , for instance, Nancy gets carried away and asks about the house white wine. ... "'It doesn't really have a name,' the waitress replies. 'It comes in a big white box. Everybody likes it. ' Nancy tastes it and she likes it too. Wait'll the big-shot wine stewards in T. O. hear this. " Besides learning to look for wine in a big white box the alert reader will find where to ask for a Denver as opposed to a Western sandwich, and learn about the Thunder Bay delicacy known to one and all as a Persian. Ranging from moose to chipmunks, from a cool jazz festival to even cooler icebergs, and from the Prestige Motel to the Chateau Lake Louise, this book is a highly personal look at a country well worth visiting, witty and affectionate, a fact that its own citizens tend to overlook. As Charles Gordon, the perfect companion, puts it in his final paragraph, "What does Canada need, you ask, to enter the twenty-first century? More passing lanes. More ferries. Reading la

Canada's Jews

by Gerald Tulchinsky

The history of the Jewish community in Canada says as much about the development of the nation as it does about the Jewish people. Spurred on by upheavals in Eastern Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, many Jews emigrated to the Dominion of Canada, which was then considered little more than a British satellite state. Over the ensuing decades, as the Canadian Jewish identity was forged, Canada itself underwent the transformative experience of separating itself from Britain and distinguishing itself from the United States. In this light, the Canadian Jewish identity was formulated within the parameters of the emerging Canadian national personality. Canada's Jews is an account of this remarkable story as told by one of the leading authors and historians on the Jewish legacy in Canada. Drawing on his previous work on the subject, Gerald Tulchinsky illuminates the struggle against anti-Semitism and the search for a livelihood amongst the Jewish community. He demonstrates that, far from being a fragment of the Old World, the Canadian Jewry grew from a tiny group of transplanted Europeans to a fully articulated, diversified, and dynamic national group that defined itself as Canadian while expressing itself in the varied political and social contexts of the Dominion. Canada's Jews covers the 240-year period from the beginnings of the Jewish community in the 1760s to the present day, illuminating the golden chain of Jewish tradition, religion, language, economy, and history as established and renewed in the northern lands. With important points about labour, immigration, and anti-Semitism, it is a timely book that offers sober observations about the Jewish experience and its relation to Canadian history.

Canada's Residential Schools: Missing Children and Unmarked Burials

by Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to "civilize and Christianize" Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools' former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission's final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada's Residential Schools: Missing Children and Unmarked Burials is the first systematic effort to record and analyze deaths at the schools, and the presence and condition of student cemeteries, within the regulatory context in which the schools were intended to operate. As part of its work the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada established a National Residential School Student Death Register. Due to gaps in the available data, the register is far from complete. Although the actual number of deaths is believed to be far higher, 3,200 residential school victims have been identified. The analysis also demonstrates that residential school death rates were significantly higher than those for the general Canadian school-aged population. The failure to establish and enforce adequate standards of care, coupled with the failure to adequately fund the schools, resulted in unnecessarily high death rates at residential schools. Senior government and church officials were well aware of the schools' ongoing failure to provide adequate levels of custodial care. Children who died at the schools were rarely sent back to their home community. They were usually buried in school or nearby mission cemeteries. As the schools and missions closed, these cemeteries were abandoned. While in a number of instances Aboriginal communities, churches, and former staff have taken steps to rehabilitate cemeteries and commemorate the individuals buried there, most of these cemeteries are now disused and vulnerable to accidental disturbance. In the face of this abandonment, the TRC is proposing the development of a national strategy for the documentation, maintenance, commemoration, and protection of residential school cemeteries.

Canada's Residential Schools: Reconciliation

by Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Between 1867 and 2000, the Canadian government sent over 150,000 Aboriginal children to residential schools across the country. Government officials and missionaries agreed that in order to "civilize and Christianize" Aboriginal children, it was necessary to separate them from their parents and their home communities. For children, life in these schools was lonely and alien. Discipline was harsh, and daily life was highly regimented. Aboriginal languages and cultures were denigrated and suppressed. Education and technical training too often gave way to the drudgery of doing the chores necessary to make the schools self-sustaining. Child neglect was institutionalized, and the lack of supervision created situations where students were prey to sexual and physical abusers. Legal action by the schools' former students led to the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada in 2008. The product of over six years of research, the Commission's final report outlines the history and legacy of the schools, and charts a pathway towards reconciliation. Canada's Residential Schools: Reconciliation documents the complexities, challenges, and possibilities of reconciliation by presenting the findings of public testimonies from residential school Survivors and others who participated in the TRC's national events and community hearings. For many Aboriginal people, reconciliation is foremost about healing families and communities, and revitalizing Indigenous cultures, languages, spirituality, laws, and governance systems. For governments, building a respectful relationship involves dismantling a centuries-old political and bureaucratic culture in which, all too often, policies and programs are still based on failed notions of assimilation. For churches, demonstrating long-term commitment to reconciliation requires atoning for harmful actions in the residential schools, respecting Indigenous spirituality, and supporting Indigenous peoples' struggles for justice and equity. Schools must teach Canadian history in ways that foster mutual respect, empathy, and engagement. All Canadian children and youth deserve to know what happened in the residential schools and to appreciate the rich history and collective knowledge of Indigenous peoples. This volume also emphasizes the important role of public memory in the reconciliation process, as well as the role of Canadian society, including the corporate and non-profit sectors, the media, and the sports community in reconciliation. The Commission urges Canada to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation. While Aboriginal peoples are victims of violence and discrimination, they are also holders of Treaty, Aboriginal, and human rights and have a critical role to play in reconciliation. All Canadians must understand how traditional First Nations, Inuit, and Métis approaches to resolving conflict, repairing harm, and restoring relationships can inform the reconciliation process. The TRC's calls to action identify the concrete steps that must be taken to ensure that our children and grandchildren can live together in dignity, peace, and prosperity on these lands we now share.

Canadian Climate of Mind: Passages from Fur to Energy and Beyond

by Timothy B. Leduc

The twenty-first century is a period of great environmental and social transformation as climate change increasingly marks lives at levels that are personal, familial, communal, national, and global. A Canadian Climate of Mind presents stories that emerge from the waters, lands, and climate of Canada, and which have the potential to renew a compassionate energy for changing human relations with each other and with our world. The turbulent effects of climate change are popularly discussed in the modern language of scientific knowledge, political policies, economic mechanisms, and technological innovation. While there is much to be learned from these views, Timothy Leduc suggests a more profound call for change by returning to past understandings of the land and climate. He argues that the world is initiating us into a broader and humbler sense of what it is to be human in an interconnected reality. The world is doing this by responding to unsustainable practices such as our devastating reliance on fossil fuels. Weaving together voices from numerous backgrounds and time periods with Indigenous views on present and past environmental challenges, A Canadian Climate of Mind illuminates a world that is being shaken to its core while we hesitate to act.

Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century

by Ada L. Sinacore Freda Ginsberg

Canadian counsellors and counselling psychologists have made significant advances in mental health services and the broader field of applied psychology, but much of the counselling and counselling psychology scholarship has been published outside of Canada, rendering it difficult to identify as distinctly Canadian. This path-breaking book highlights the work of Canadian counsellors and counselling psychologists and focuses on issues pertinent to practising in Canada. Key topics such as scientific issues, health, wellness, prevention, career psychology, assessment, training and supervision, and social justice and multiculturalism are explored in detail. Using a strength-based framework, each chapter attends to societal factors, diversity of methodological frameworks, and an analysis of the challenges and future directions for the disciplines. Providing a common voice for a diverse group of students and professionals, Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century will be of interest to counsellor educators, faculty in counsellor and counselling psychology training programs, and counsellors interested in advancing their understanding of the current state of the field. Contributors include Kevin G. Alderson (University of Calgary), Nancy Arthur (University of Calgary), Bill Borgen (University of British Columbia), Marla Buchanan (University of British Columbia), Erin Buhr (Trinity Western University), Lee Butterfield (Adler School of Professional Psychology), Sharon Cairns (University of Calgary), Sandra Collins (Athabasca University), Jose Domene (University of New Brunswick), Marilyn Fitzpatrick (McGill University), Nick Gazzola (University of Ottawa), Freda Ginsberg (SUNY Plattsburgh), Liette Goyer (Universite Laval), Bryan Hiebert (University of Victoria), George Hurley (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Anusha Kassan (University of British Columbia), Patricia Keats (Simon Frazer University), Audrey Kinzel (University of Saskatoon), Vivian Lalande (University of Calgary, Sasha Lerner (McGill University), Anne Marshall (University of Victoria), Marv McDonald (Trinity Western University), Louise Overington (McGill University), Jane M. Oxenbury (Independent Practice), Sharon Robertson (University of Calgary), Ada L. Sinacore (McGill University), Suzanne L. Stewart (OISE, University of Toronto), and Jessica Van Vliet (University of Alberta).

Canadian Crisis

by Don Pendleton

With the help of a Canadian operative, the Executioner defends Montreal In a grimy bistro on the north side of Buffalo, a few American mobsters are dining with a Canadian contact when death bursts through the door. His eyes icy, his clothes pitch black, Mack Bolan takes out every American at the table but lets the Canadian live. Andre Chebleu is an undercover operative who has come across the border to infiltrate the American syndicate, and Mack Bolan will need his help if he is going to save Canada from the mob. His endless war against the forces of the Mafia have made most of America unsafe for organized crime, so Bolan's enemies have set their sights on Quebec, where radical separatists have destabilized the local government. Only Bolan and Chebleu can rescue Montreal from chaos and save the Great White North from becoming a living hell.

Canadian Drama and the Critics

by L. W. Conolly

The editor of this lively, updated assortment of reviews, interviews and other critical deliberations on contemporary Canadian drama has gathered material from books, theatre and scholarly journals; from major daily newspapers in Canada and abroad; from critics, academics, journalists and playwrights. This new expanded and updated edition of Canadian Drama and the Critics now includes commentary on forty-three English-language plays written during the last fifty years. | |Canadian Drama and the Critics is an enjoyable read that offers an intelligent, wide-ranging overview of modern Canadian plays and playwrights. An ideal companion text to Talonbooks' Modern Canadian Plays Volumes I and II and other anthologies of Canadian drama, Canadian Drama and the Critics also includes detailed production information for the premiere of each play and a comprehensive index.

The Canadian Establishment

by Peter C. Newman

At the end of the Second World War, a survivor of Auschwitz makes her way home to Hungary. Of all her family, only she and one sister have survived the camps; her young officer husband disappeared into Russia years before. Believing herself a widow, Shoshanna falls under the protection of an older man who, like her, lost everything in the Holocaust. She gives birth to this man's child by the time her beloved soldier returns, and she has to make a choice that will cloud her life - and her daughter's - ever after. Elaine Kalman Naves is the daughter whose earliest memories are of growing up with the consequences of that decision. Shoshanna raised Elaine with a torrent of family lore and all-too-vivid memories: the glamorous and eccentric aunts; handsome suitors and faithless husbands; death by order of the state and murder at the hand of a lover.Shoshanna's stories, haunting and vivid, were both a gift and a burden to her daughter. This is a lush and exotic family memoir set against momentous events yet timeless in its truth-telling lessons.

Canadian Founding

by Janet Ajzenstat

Convinced that rights are inalienable and that legitimate government requires the consent of the governed, the Fathers of Confederation - whether liberal or conservative - looked to the European enlightenment and John Locke. Janet Ajzenstat analyzes the legislative debates in the colonial parliaments and the Constitution Act (1867) in a provocative reinterpretation of Canadian political history from 1864 to 1873. Ajzenstat contends that the debt to Locke is most evident in the debates on the making of Canada's Parliament: though the anti-confederates maintained that the existing provincial parliaments offered superior protection for individual rights, the confederates insisted that the union's general legislature, the Parliament of Canada, would prove equal to the task and that the promise of "life and liberty" would bring the scattered populations of British North America together as a free nation.

The Canadian Fur Trade in the Industrial Age

by Arthur Ray

Throughout much of the nineteenth century the Hudson's Bay Company had a virtual monopoly on the core area of the fur trade in Canada. Its products were the object of intense competition among merchants on two continents - in Leipzig, New York, London, Winnipeg, St Louis, and Montreal. But in 1870 things began to change, and by the end of the Second World War the company's share had dropped to about a quarter of the trade. Arthur Ray explores the decades of transition, the economic and technological changes that shaped them, and their impact on the Canadian north and its people.Among the developments that affected the fur trade during this period were innovations in transportation and communication; increased government involvement in business, conservation, and native economic welfare; and the effects of two severe depressions (1873-95 and 1929-38) and two world wars.The Hudson's Bay Company, confronting the first of these changes as early as 1871, embarked on a diversification program that was intended to capitalize on new economic opportunities in land development, retailing, and resource ventures. Meanwhile it continued to participate in its traditional sphere of operations. But the company's directors had difficulty keeping pace with the rapid changes that were taking place in the fur trade, and the company began to lose ground.Ray's study is the first to make extensive use of the Hudson's Bay Company archives dealing with the period between 1870 and 1945. These and other documents reveal a great deal about the decline of the company, and thus about a key element in the history of the modern Canadian fur trade.

Canadian History: Pre-Colonization to 1867 Essentials

by Terry Crowley

REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Canadian History: Pre-Colonization to 1867 covers the history of Canada up to the Confederation. Topics include: aboriginal peoples, evangelical missions, colonization, royal government, mercantilism, imperialism and Colonial Wars, the early British regime, reform and rebellions, forming a union, colonial societies, and Confederation.

The Canadian Oral History Reader

by Alexander Freund Nolan Reilly Kristina R. Llewellyn

Despite a long and rich tradition of oral history research, few are aware of the innovative and groundbreaking work of oral historians in Canada. For this first primer on the practices within the discipline, the editors of The Canadian Oral History Reader have gathered some of the best contributions from a diverse field. Essays survey and explore fundamental and often thorny aspects in oral history methodology, interpretation, preservation and presentation, and advocacy. In plain language, they explain how to conduct research with indigenous communities, navigate difficult relationships with informants, and negotiate issues of copyright, slander, and libel. The authors ask how people's memories and stories can be used as historical evidence - and whether it is ethical to use them at all. Their detailed and compelling case studies draw readers into the thrills and predicaments of recording people's most intimate experiences, and refashioning them in transcripts and academic analyses. They also consider how to best present and preserve this invaluable archive of Canadian memories. The Canadian Oral History Reader provides a rich resource for community and university researchers, undergraduate and graduate students, and independent scholars and documentarians, and serves as a springboard and reference point for global discussions about Canadian contributions to the international practice of oral history. Contributors include Brian Calliou (independent scholar), Elise Chenier (Simon Fraser University), Julie Cruikshank (University of British Columbia), Alexander Freund (University of Winnipeg), Steven High (Concordia University), Nancy Janovicek (University of Calgary), Jill Jarvis-Tonus (independent scholar), Kristina R. Llewellyn (Renison University College, University of Waterloo), Bronwen Low (McGill University), Claudia Malacrida (University of Lethbridge), Joy Parr (Western University), Joan Sangster (Trent University), Emmanuelle Sonntag (Université du Québec à Montréal), Pamela Sugiman (Ryerson University), Winona Wheeler (University of Saskatchewan), and Stacey Zembrzycki (Concordia University).

Canadian Poetry 1920 to 1960

by Brian Trehearne

The best in four decades of exceptional Canadian poetry, now in a limited hardcover edition.The poets in this anthology, all of whom matured creatively between 1920 and 1960, considered it one of their primary obligations to modernize Canadian writing, to bring the country's poetry out of late Romantic stasis after the Great War into a fertile and combative response to the cultural, political, technological, philosophical, religious, and economic conditions of the modern era. In their common reaction against Romanticism, and in their commitments to modern poetry's possibilities of profound newness, the poets in this volume make up one great movement in Canada's cultural history. The anthology includes:* 250 poems by 44 poets* Regionally diverse voices from Newfoundland, the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario, the Prairies, and B.C.* Extensive selections of the work of major poets* An afterword and biographical headnotes provide important historical and literary contextThe poets included in Canadian Poetry from 1920 to 1960 are:Frank Oliver Call; Louise Morey Bowman; Raymond Knister; Joe Wallace; E.J. Pratt; W.W. E. Ross; F.R. Scott; A.J.M. Smith; Charles Bruce; Earle Birney; A.M. Klein; Dorothy Livesay; Leo Kennedy; Audrey Alexandra Brown; Kenneth Leslie; Robert Finch; Floris Clark McLaren; L.A. Mackay; Anne Marriott; Bertram Warr; Patrick Anderson; P.K. Page; Kay Smith; Miriam Waddington; Margaret Avison; A.G. Bailey; Louis Dudek; John Glassco; Ralph Gustafson; Raymond Souster; Irving Layton; Roy Daniells; Douglas LePan; George Whalley; James Reaney; Elizabeth Brewster; George Johnston; Goodridge MacDonald; Jay MacPherson; Anne Wilkinson; Phyllis Webb; Wilfred Watson; R.A.D. Ford; Eldon Grier.From the Hardcover edition.

The Canadian Polity

by Ronald G. Landes

Ever wanted a course on Canadian politics? This book provides a terrific introduction to the subject.

Canadian Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy: The Innovation Economy and Society Nexus

by David Castle G. Bruce Doern Peter W.B. Phillips

Canadian Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy presents new critical analysis about related developments in the field such as significantly changed concepts of peer review, merit review, the emergence of big data in the digital age, and the rise of an economy and society dominated by the internet and information. The authors scrutinize the different ways in which federal and provincial policies have impacted both levels of government, including how such policies impact on Canada's natural resources. They also study key government departments and agencies involved with science, technology, and innovation to show how these organizations function increasingly in networks and partnerships, as Canada seeks to keep up and lead in a highly competitive global system. The book also looks at numerous realms of technology across Canada in universities, business, and government and various efforts to analyze biotechnology, genomics, and the Internet, as well as earlier technologies such as nuclear reactors, and satellite technology. The authors assess whether a science-and-technology-centred innovation economy and society has been established in Canada - one that achieves a balance between commercial and social objectives, including the delivery of public goods and supporting values related to redistribution, fairness, and community and citizen empowerment. . Probing the nature of science advice across prime ministerial eras, including recent concerns over the Harper government's claimed muzzling of scientists in an age of attack politics, Canadian Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy provides essential information for academics and practitioners in business and government in this crucial and complex field.

Canadian Small Business Kit For Dummies

by Margaret Kerr Joann Kurtz

Canadian Small Business Kit For Dummies is the bestselling Canadian guide to starting and running a successful small business. This guide covers every aspect of starting, building, staffing, and running a small business, offering information for entrepreneurs starting from scratch, people buying a business, or new franchise owners. With updated information about the HST and its impact on small businesses, insight into how small business can take advantage of social media such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, and new resources, including information about new sources of government funding for small businesses, this book is an essential guide to small business success.Note: CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file.

Canadian Studies in the New Millennium

by Patrick James Mark J. Kasoff

The field of Canadian Studies is a growing discipline, particularly in the United States. This introductory text offers a thorough and accessible approach to Canadian Studies through comparative analyses of Canada and the United States, their histories, geographies, political systems, economies, and cultures. Among the topics addressed are ways in which Canadian national development has been influenced by the U.S., the role of geography in shaping the country's evolution, and the persistent question of Canada's French-speaking minority, which has been an important and divisive issue since the 1500s.Canadian Studies in the New Millennium is an excellent introduction to Canadian Studies, with chapters written by leading scholars and educators in the field. At a time in which there is a growing mutual dependence between the U.S. and Canada for security, trade, and investment, this text is an ideal tool for understanding the close relationship between the two countries, their shared experiences, and their differing views.Canadian Studies in the New Millennium will be of significant value to students, educators, and practitioners.

Canadian Wolf

by Linda O. Johnston

He's the one man she can never trust... Sergeant Major Owen Dewirter lives every day with the guilt of having let a shifter hurt one of his own. Now he's being forced to work beside Alpha Force newcomer Selena to train a new covert unit of shifters for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and stop a rash of serial kidnappings. Can Owen ignore his prejudices-and his fantasies-about his sexy new partner and do his job? When their passion ignites in the remote Canadian woods, the tension between Owen and Selena puts the joint mission in jeopardy. Can they learn to trust each other while tracking the enemy? Or will a cunning foe lure them into a dark and deadly endgame?

The Canal Builders

by Julie Greene

A groundbreaking history of the Panama Canal offers a revelatory workers-eye view of the momentous undertaking and shows how it launched the American century

Canal House Cooking Volume N° 6

by Christopher Hirsheimer Melissa Hamilton

CANAL HOUSE COOKING, VOLUME N° 6, THE GROCERY STORE is a collection of our favorite recipes, the ones we cook for ourselves, our friends, and our families, using the best that grocery stores have to offer. It is filled with recipes that will make you want to run straight to the grocery store to stock up and start cooking.We are home cooks writing about home cooking for other home cooks. Our recipes are easy to prepare and completely doable for the novice and experienced cook alike. Good cooking relies on good shopping, so we buy smoked fish to make a delicious creamy stew, and plump organic chickens to roast right on the oven rack over potatoes and vegetables. Bunches of fat local asparagus go into our shopping cart--we cook them simply and bathe them in a luscious lemon-butter sauce. We choose hearty escarole and tender young spinach and stock up on bags of frozen peas and fava beans to use in so many ways. We buy succulent rhubarb for an early spring tonic or for an Easter dessert, roasted and spooned over crisp meringues. Canal House Cooking, Volume N° 6, The Grocery Store, is the sixth book of our award-winning series of seasonal recipes. We publish three volumes per year: Summer, Fall & Holiday, and Winter & Spring, each filled with delicious recipes for you from us. Cook all year long with Canal House Cooking!95 delicious triple-tested recipes

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