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The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939

by Rosalyn Terborg-Penn Robert L. Harris Jr.

Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, Robert L. Harris Jr. and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods. They consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in American society and discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g., "Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American." An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 is a multifaceted map of a crucial historical period.

The Columbia Guide to American Environmental History

by Carolyn Merchant

Merchant provides a context-setting overview of American environmental history from the beginning of the millennium; an encyclopedia of important concepts, people, agencies, and laws; a chronology of major events; and an extensive bibliography including films, videos, CD-ROMs, and websites.

The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast

by Kathleen J. Bragdon

An overview of the cultures and histories of Northeastern Indian people that surveys the key scholarly debates that shape this field and offers an alphabetical listing of important individuals and places of significant cultural or historic meaning.

The Columbia Guide to Contemporary African American Fiction

by Darryl Dickson-Carr

This new reference volume offers an accessible and authoritative guide to the major authors, texts, movements, and ideas that have shaped contemporary African American fiction. In more than 160 concise entries, arranged alphabetically, Dickson-Carr provides a wealth of factual and interpretative information. He discusses the careers, works, and critical receptions of Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Jamaica Kincaid, Charles Johnson, Leon Forrest, and other prominent and lesser known authors. Each entry presents ways of reading the authors' works, identifies key themes and influences, assesses the writers' overarching significance, and includes sources for further research. Dickson-Carr also considers the impact and development of a variety of literary movements, critical theories, and publishers of African American work. The Columbia Guide includes an overview that situates African American fiction in the social, political, and cultural contexts of post-Civil Rights era America. In addition to examining debates regarding the role of literature in African American life, Dickson-Carr considers the influence of hip-hop, the blues, and jazz on African American novelists. The volume concludes with an extensive annotated bibliography of African American fiction and criticism.

The Columbia Guide to Online Style: Second Edition

by Janice R. Walker Todd Taylor

The Columbia Guide to Online Style is the standard resource for citing electronic and electronically accessed sources. It is also a critical style guide for creating documents electronically for submission for print or electronic publication. Updated and expanded, this guide now explains how to cite technologies such as Web logs and pod casts; provides more guidance on translating the elements of Columbia Online Style (COS) citations for use with existing print-based formats (such as MLA, APA, and Chicago); and features additional guidelines for producing online and print documents based on new standards of markup language and publication technologies. This edition also includes new bibliographic styles for humanities and scientific projects; examples of footnotes and endnotes for Chicago-style papers; greater detail regarding in-text and parenthetic reference and footnote styles; an added chapter on how to locate and evaluate sources for research in the electronic age; and new examples for citing full-text or full-image articles from online library databases, along with information on how to credit the source of graphics and multimedia files. Staying ahead of rapidly evolving technologies, The Columbia Guide to Online Style continues to be a vital tool for online researchers.

The Columbia Guide to Social Work Writing

by Warren Green Barbara Levy Simon

Social work practitioners write for a variety of publications, and they are expected to show fluency in a number of related fields. Whether the target is a course instructor, scholarly journal, fellowship organization, or general news outlet, social workers must be clear, persuasive, and comprehensive in their writing, especially on provocative subjects. This first-of-its-kind guide features top scholars and educators providing a much-needed introduction to social work writing and scholarship. Foregrounding the process of social work writing, the coeditors particularly emphasize how to think about and approach one's subject in a productive manner. The guide begins with an overview of social work writing from the 1880s to the present, and then follows with ideal strategies for academic paper writing, social work journal writing, and social work research writing. A section on applied professional writing addresses student composition in field education, writing for and about clinical practice, the effective communication of policy information to diverse audiences, program and proposal development, advocacy, and administrative writing. The concluding section focuses on specific fields of practice, including writing on child and family welfare, contemporary social issues, aging, and intervention in global contexts. Grounding their essays in systematic observations, induction and deduction, and a wealth of real-world examples, the contributors describe the conceptualization, development, and presentation of social work writing in ways that better secure its power and relevance.

The Columbia Guide to Standard American English

by Kenneth G. Wilson

A reliable and entertaining guide to effective writing and speaking for Americans, with some 6,500 concise, alphabetical entries that answer questions about word choice, meanings, pronunciations, spellings, grammatical forms and structures, and idiomatic expressions. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

The Columbia Guide to the Cold War

by Michael Kort

The Cold War was the longest conflict in American history, and the defining event of the second half of the twentieth century. Since its recent and abrupt cessation, we have only begun to measure the effects of the Cold War on American, Soviet, post-Soviet, and international military strategy, economics, domestic policy, and popular culture. The Columbia Guide to the Cold War is the first in a series of guides to American history and culture that will offer a wealth of interpretive information in different formats to students, scholars, and general readers alike. This reference contains narrative essays on key events and issues, and also features an A-to-Z encyclopedia, a concise chronology, and an annotated resource section listing books, articles, films, novels, web sites, and CD-ROMs on Cold War themes.

The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust

by Niewyk Donald L. Francis R. Nicosia

This invaluable resource provides a multidimensional survey of the Holocaust, essentially integrating five separate books into one comprehensive reference tool: a historical overview; a guide to Holocaust controversies; an A-to-Z encyclopedia of people, places, and terms; a chronology; and a comprehensive resource guide. Whether used separately for their individual merits or approached as an integrated whole, the five sections of this informative volume constitute an indispensable contribution to the study of the Holocaust.

The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust

by Francis R. Nicosia Donald L. Niewyk

Offering a multidimensional approach to one of the most important episodes of the twentieth century, The Columbia Guide to the Holocaust offers readers and researchers a general history of the Holocaust while delving into the core issues and debates in the study of the Holocaust today.Each of the book's five distinct parts stands on its own as valuable research aids; together, they constitute an integrated whole. Part I provides a narrative overview of the Holocaust, placing it within the larger context of Nazi Germany and World War II. Part II examines eight critical issues or controversies in the study of the Holocaust, including the following questions: Were the Jews the sole targets of Nazi genocide, or must other groups, such as homosexuals, the handicapped, Gypsies, and political dissenters, also be included? What are the historical roots of the Holocaust? How and why did the "Final Solution" come about? Why did bystanders extend or withhold aid?Part III consists of a concise chronology of major events and developments that took place surrounding the Holocaust, including the armistice ending World War I, the opening of the first major concentration camp at Dachau, Germany's invasion of Poland, the failed assassination attempt against Hitler, and the formation of Israel.Part IV contains short descriptive articles on more than two hundred key people, places, terms, and institutions central to a thorough understanding of the Holocaust. Entries include Adolf Eichmann, Anne Frank, the Warsaw Ghetto, Aryanization, the SS, Kristallnacht, and the Catholic Church. Part V presents an annotated guide to the best print, video, electronic, and institutional resources in English for further study.Armed with the tools contained in this volume, students or researchers investigating this vast and complicated topic will gain an informed understanding of one of the greatest tragedies in world history.

The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945

by Raymond. Williams

In this expertly crafted, richly detailed guide, Raymond Leslie Williams explores the cultural, political, and historical events that have shaped the Latin American and Caribbean novel since the end of World War II. In addition to works originally composed in English, Williams covers novels written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and Haitian Creole, and traces the profound influence of modernization, revolution, and democratization on the writing of this era. Beginning in 1945, Williams introduces major trends by region, including the Caribbean and U.S. Latino novel, the Mexican and Central American novel, the Andean novel, the Southern Cone novel, and the novel of Brazil. He discusses the rise of the modernist novel in the 1940s, led by Jorge Luis Borges's reaffirmation of the right of invention, and covers the advent of the postmodern generation of the 1990s in Brazil, the Generation of the "Crack" in Mexico, and the McOndo generation in other parts of Latin America. An alphabetical guide offers biographies of authors, coverage of major topics, and brief introductions to individual novels. It also addresses such areas as women's writing, Afro-Latin American writing, and magic realism. The guide's final section includes an annotated bibliography of introductory studies on the Latin American and Caribbean novel, national literary traditions, and the work of individual authors. From early attempts to synthesize postcolonial concerns with modernist aesthetics to the current focus on urban violence and globalization, The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945 presents a comprehensive, accessible portrait of a thoroughly diverse and complex branch of world literature.

The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War

by David Anderson

The Vietnam War remains a major point of reference in discussions of U.S. foreign policy and national character. The lessons and legacies of the most divisive event in U.S. history in the twentieth century are hotly debated to this day. Written by a renowned scholar of the conflict, The Columbia Guide to the Vietnam War provides students and researchers with the materials to think seriously about the conflict's many paradoxes and ramifications.

The Columbia History of American Television

by Gary Edgerton

Television is a form of media without equal. It has revolutionized the way we learn about and communicate with the world and has reinvented the way we experience ourselves and others. More than just cheap entertainment, TV is an undeniable component of our culture and contains many clues to who we are, what we value, and where we might be headed in the future. Media historian Gary R. Edgerton follows the technological developments and increasing cultural relevance of TV from its prehistory (before 1947) to the Network Era (1948-1975) and the Cable Era (1976-1994). He begins with the laying of the first telegraph line in 1844, which gave rise to the idea that images and sounds could be transmitted over long distances. He then considers the remodeling of television's look and purpose during World War II; the gender, racial, and ethnic components of its early broadcasts and audiences; its transformation of postwar America; and its function in the political life of the country. He talks of the birth of prime time and cable, the influence of innovators like Sylvester "Pat" Weaver, Roone Arledge, and Ted Turner, as well as television's entrance into the international market, describing the ascent of such programs as Dallas and The Cosby Show, and the impact these exports have had on transmitting American culture abroad. Edgerton concludes with a discerning look at our current Digital Era (1995-present) and the new forms of instantaneous communication that continue to change America's social, political, and economic landscape. Richly researched and engaging, Edgerton's history tracks television's growth into a convergent technology, a global industry, a social catalyst, a viable art form, and a complex and dynamic reflection of the American mind and character. It took only ten years for television to penetrate thirty-five million households, and by 1983, the average home kept their set on for more than seven hours a day. The Columbia History of American Television illuminates our complex relationship with this singular medium and provides historical and critical knowledge for understanding TV as a technology, an industry, an art form, and an institutional force.

The Columbia History of Chinese Literature

by Victor H. Mair

The Columbia History of Chinese Literatureis a comprehensive yet portable guide to China's vast literary traditions. Stretching from earliest times to the present, the text features original contributions by leading specialists working in all genres and periods. Chapters cover poetry, prose, fiction, and drama, and consider such contextual subjects as popular culture, the impact of religion, the role of women, and China's relationship with non-Sinitic languages and peoples. Opening with a major section on the linguistic and intellectual foundations of Chinese literature, the anthology traces the development of forms and movements over time, along with critical trends, and pays particular attention to the premodern canon.

The Columbia History of Western Philosophy

by Richard H. Popkin

Richard Popkin has assembled sixty-three leading scholars to forge a highly approachable chronological account of the development of Western philosophical traditions. From Plato to Wittgenstein and from Aquinas to Heidegger, this volume provides lively, in-depth, and up-to-date historical analysis of all the key figures, schools, and movements of Western philosophy. Each chapter includes an introductory essay, and Popkin provides notes that draw connections among the separate articles. The rich bibliographic information the and the indexes of names and terms make the volume a valuable resource.

The Columbia Sourcebook of Mormons in the United States

by Reid L. Neilson Terryl L. Givens

This anthology provides rare access to key original documents illuminating Mormon history, theology, and culture in the United States from the nineteenth century to today. Brief introductions describe the theological significance of each text and its reflection of the practices, issues, and challenges that have defined and continue to define the Mormon community. These documents balance mainstream and peripheral thought and religious experience, institutional and personal perspective, and theoretical and practical interpretation, representing pivotal moments in LDS history and correcting decades of misinformation and stereotype.The authors of these documents, male and female, not only celebrate but speak critically and question mainline LDS teachings on sexuality, politics, gender, race, polygamy, and other issues. Selections largely focus on the Salt Lake--based LDS tradition, with a section on the post--Joseph Smith splintering and its creation of a variety of similar yet different Mormon groups. The documents are arranged chronologically within specific categories to capture both the historical and doctrinal development of Mormonism in the United States.

The Columbian Exchange:Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492, 30th Anniversary Edition

by Alfred W. Crosby

A closer look at the first contacts between European and American peoples and the long-term cultural effects of that encounter in both Native American and Old World European societies.

Columbus

by Laurence Bergreen

Into the Dark

Columbus and Beyond: Views from Native Americans

by Randolph Jorgen

A collection of essays by Native American writers: Linda Hogan, Paula Gunn Allen, Simon Ortiz, Carter Revard, Lee Francis, and Ray A. Young Bear, who discuss their perspectives on the European conquest of the Americas.

Columbus and Beyond (Views from Native Americans)

by Linda Hogan Ray A. Young Bear Simon J. Ortiz Paula Gunn Allen Carter C. Revard

How shall people of conscience knowing our history live today? This is the awkward practical question implicit in this volume of thoughtful essays by six highly respected Native American writers. As they address the European occupation of America a recurrent theme emerges: a sadness for opportunities lost -- a personal sadness for the loss of their cultures and people and a broader sadness for opportunities lost to entire nations in that failed chance for partnership. They also affirm those lost opportunities that can still be regained, those that await our diligent efforts to create work and a more society.

Columbus and Other Cannibals: The Wetiko Disease of Exploitation, Imperialism, and Terrorism (revised edition)

by Jack D. Forbes

In this revised edition of his 1978 classic, Forbes (Native American studies emeritus, U. of California Davis) continues to examine the history of contact between European whites and indigenous peoples, a history riddled with fear, hatred and genocide. Groundbreaking when it was first published, and still compelling reading, this account has inspired some the most influential activists in America for decades. Forbes presents a radical critique of modern civilization, from its central problems of identity to questions about the genesis of the universe and the creation of love, consumption and the cannibal psychosis, the spread of greed as a disease, the structure of materialism, the process of becoming a predator and the process of corruption, fascination with evil, the destruction of Native authentic cultures, the loss of freedom, the perpetuation of aggressive violence, the healing concept that the universe is our holy book, and what Jesus will do when He comes back. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem

by Carol Delaney

FIVE HUNDRED YEARS AFTER HE SET SAIL, the dominant understanding of Christopher Columbus holds him responsible for almost everything that went wrong in the New World. Here, finally, is a book that will radically change our interpretation of the man and his mission. Scholar Carol Delaney claims that the true motivation for Columbus's voyages is very different from what is commonly accepted. She argues that he was inspired to find a western route to the Orient not only to obtain vast sums of gold for the Spanish Crown but primarily to help fund a new crusade to take Jerusalem from the Muslims--a goal that sustained him until the day he died. Rather than an avaricious glory hunter, Delaney reveals Columbus as a man of deep passion, patience, and religious conviction. Delaney sets the stage by describing the tumultuous events that had beset Europe in the years leading up to Columbus's birth--the failure of multiple crusades to keep Jerusalem in Christian hands; the devastation of the Black Plague; and the schisms in the Church. Then, just two years after his birth, the sacking of Constantinople by the Ottomans barred Christians from the trade route to the East and the pilgrimage route to Jerusalem. Columbus's belief that he was destined to play a decisive role in the retaking of Jerusalem was the force that drove him to petition the Spanish monarchy to fund his journey, even in the face of ridicule about his idea of sailing west to reach the East. Columbus and the Quest for Jerusalem is based on extensive archival research, trips to Spain and Italy to visit important sites in Columbus's life story, and a close reading of writings from his day. It recounts the drama of the four voyages, bringing the trials of ocean navigation vividly to life and showing Columbus for the master navigator that he was. Delaney offers not an apologist's take, but a clear-eyed, thought-provoking, and timely reappraisal of the man and his legacy. She depicts him as a thoughtful interpreter of the native cultures that he and his men encountered, and unfolds the tragic story of how his initial attempts to establish good relations with the natives turned badly sour, culminating in his being brought back to Spain as a prisoner in chains. Putting Columbus back into the context of his times, rather than viewing him through the prism of present-day perspectives on colonial conquests, Delaney shows him to have been neither a greedy imperialist nor a quixotic adventurer, as he has lately been depicted, but a man driven by an abiding religious passion.

Columbus: His Enterprise: Exploding the Myth

by Hans Koning

Exploding the myth of the Great Navigator, the author reveals how Columbus accidentally found a continent and systematically pillaged its resources. This controversial book depicts Columbus not only obsessed by gold, but willing to murder for it.

Columbus Slaughters Braves

by Mark Friedman

Joe Columbus is an ordinary man: schoolteacher, husband, father-to-be. His younger brother, CJ, however, is anything but ordinary: the Chicago Cubs' star third baseman, a baseball hero, destined for greatness. In a voice both humorous and plaintive, Joe tells of his brother's remarkable ascent from the sandlots of their southern California childhood to the ivy-walled shrine of Wrigley Field, in an effort to explain not only CJ's apparently charmed life but also his own missteps and failures--his collapsing marriage, his envy and cowardice, and a rift between brothers that is healed only by tragedy.<P> Mark Friedman's first novel is the heartbreaking tale of two brothers whose lives lead to vastly different fates. A richly imagined story that explores both the grand and enduring allure of our national pasttime and the complications of our lives--our longings, losses, and regrets--COLUMBUS SLAUGHTERS BRAVES is for anyone who has had a hero or wanted to be one. Like W. P. Kinsella's SHOELESS JOE and Richard Ford's THE SPORTSWRITER, this is a compassionate but honest novel that introduces readers to a gifted and extraordinarily perceptive writer.

The Columnist

by Jeffrey Frank

It a cocktail party, George H. W. Bush encourages Brandon Sladder, the prominent Washington columnist, to write his memoirs. Sladder has, after all, known just about everyone of importance. He has talked on intimate terms with world leaders, been a witness to enormous change, and expressed weighty opinions on important matters of state. He believes that his own life story could add much more than a footnote to our age. But what is meant to be a look back at his life and our times turns out to be far more revealing. The Columnist is Sladder's attempt to burnish his image for posterity. What emerges is something else: the misadventures of an irresistibly loathsome man -- self-important, social climbing, dangerously oblivious. He seems to be remarkably destructive to those who know him best -- employers, rivals, lovers, and family. In Brandon Sladder, Jeffrey Frank has created one of the most memorable rogues in contemporary fiction. By turns hilarious and dismaying, The Columnist is a dead-on, elegantly written portrait of the media and politics of the second half of the twentieth century.

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