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Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs: A Historical Guide

by Ann Durkin Keating

"Which neighborhood?" It's one of the first questions you're asked when you move to Chicago. And the answer you give--be it Bucktown, Bronzeville, or Bridgeport--can give your inquisitor a good idea of who you are, especially in a metropolis with 230 very different neighborhoods and suburbs to choose from. Many of us, in fact, know little of the neighborhoods beyond those where we work, play, and live. This is especially true in Chicagoland, a region that spans over 4,400 square miles and is home to more than 9. 5 million residents. In Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs, historian Ann Durkin Keating sheds new light on twenty-first-century Chicago by providing a captivating yet compact guide to the Midwest's largest city. Keating charts Chicago's evolution with comprehensive, cross-referenced entries on all seventy-seven community areas, along with many suburbs and neighborhoods both extant and long forgotten, from Albany Park to Zion. Thoughtful interpretive essays by urban historians Michael Ebner, Henry Binford, Janice Reiff, Susan Hirsch, and Robert Bruegmann explore how the city's communities have changed and grown throughout the years, and sixty historic and contemporary photographs and additional maps add depth to each entry. From the South Side to the West Side to the North Side, just about every local knows how distinctive Chicago's neighborhoods are. Few of us, however, know exactly how they came to be. Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs brings the city--its inimitable neighborhoods, industries, and individuals--to life, making it the perfect guidebook for anyone with an interest in Chicago and its history.

Chicago Noir

by Neal Pollack

"Chicago Noir is a legitimate heir to the noble literary tradition of the greatest city in America. Nelson Algren and James Farrell would be proud." --Stephen Elliott, author of Happy Baby"If ever a city was made to be the home of noir, it's Chicago. These writers go straight to Chicago's noir heart." --Aleksandar Hemon, author of Nowhere ManBrand new stories by: Neal Pollack, Achy Obejas, Alexai Galaviz-Budziszewski, Adam Langer, Joe Meno, Peter Orner, Kevin Guilfoile, Bayo Ojikutu, Jeff Allen, Luciano Guerriero, Claire Zulkey, Andrew Ervin, M.K. Meyers, Todd Dills, C.J. Sullivan, Daniel Buckman, Amy Sayre-Roberts, and Jim Arndorfer.The city of Chicago has spent much time and money over the last decade marketing itself as a tourist-friendly place for the whole family. It's got a shiny new Millennium Park, a spaceship in the middle of Soldier Field, and thousands of identical faux-brick condo buildings that seem to spring from the ground overnight. Chicago's rough-and-tumble tough-guy reputation has been replaced by a postcard with a lake view.But that city's not gone. The hard-bitten streets once represented by James Farrell and Nelson Algren may have shifted locales, and they may be populated by different ethnicities, but Chicago is still a place where people struggle to survive and where, for many, crime is the only means for their survival. The stories in Chicago Noir reclaim that territory.Chicago Noir is populated by hired killers and jazzmen, drunks and dreamers, corrupt cops and ticket scalpers and junkies. It's the Chicago that the Department of Tourism doesn't want you to see, a place where hard cases face their sad fates, and pay for their sins in blood. These are stories about blocks that visitors are afraid to walk. They tell of a Chicago beyond Oprah, Michael Jordan, and deep-dish pizza. This isn't someone's dream of Chicago. It's not even a nightmare. It's just the real city, unfiltered. Chicago Noir.

Chicago Noir: The Classics

by Joe Meno

"In this superior entry in Akashic's noir series, Meno offers nearly a century of Chicago crime fiction....Familiar bylines abound: Max Allan Collins, Richard Wright, Nelson Algren, Sherwood Anderson, Fredric Brown, Patricia Highsmith (with an excerpt from her novel The Price of Salt), Stewart M. Kaminsky, Sara Paretsky. Others may be less familiar to mystery specialists, but all turn in impressive performances."--Publishers Weekly, Starred review"Richard Wright, Nelson Algren, and Sandra Cisneros are not crime-fiction writers, and yet their Chicago certainly embodies the individual-crushing ethos endemic to noir. Meno also includes stories from writers who could easily have been overlooked (Percy Spurlark Parker, Hugh Holton) to ensure that diverse voices, and neighborhoods, are represented. Add in smart and essential choices from Fredric Brown, Sara Paretsky, and Stuart Kaminsky, and you have not an anthology not for crime-fiction purists, perhaps, but a thought-provoking document all the same."--BooklistAlthough Los Angeles may be considered the most quintessentially "noir" American city, this volume reveals that pound-for-pound, Chicago has historically been able to stand up to any other metropolis in the noir arena.Classic reprints from: Harry Stephen Keeler, Sherwood Anderson, Max Allan Collins, Richard Wright, Nelson Algren, Fredric Brown, Patricia Highsmith, Barry Gifford, Stuart M. Kaminsky, Libby Fischer Hellmann, Sara Paretsky, Percy Spurlark Parker, Sandra Cisneros, Hugh Holton, and Stuart Dybek.From the introduction by Joe Meno:"More corrupt than New York, less glamorous than LA, Chicago has more murders per capita than any other city its size. With its sleek skyscrapers bisecting the fading sky like an unspoken threat, Chicago is the closest metropolis to the mythical city of shadows as first described in the work of Chandler, Hammett, and Cain. Only in Chicago do instituted color lines offer generation after generation of poverty and violence, only in Chicago do the majority of governors do prison time, only in Chicago do the dead actually vote twice."Chicago--more than the metropolis that gave the world Al Capone, the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre, the death of John Dillinger, the crimes of Leopold and Loeb, the horrors of John Wayne Gacy, the unprecedented institutional corruption of so many recent public officials, more than the birthplace of Raymond Chandler--is a city of darkness. This darkness is not an act of over-imagination. It's the unadulterated truth. It's a pointed though necessary reminder of the grave tragedies of the past and the failed possibilities of the present. Fifty years in the future, I hope these stories are read only as fiction, as somewhat distant fantasy. Here's hoping for some light."

Chicago Race Riots

by Carl Sandburg

The Chicago Race Riots, July, 1919 With a preface by Ralph McGill and introductory note by Walter Lippmann

Chicago Red

by R. M. Meluch

From the book jacket: America had been free, a democracy. But now Edward III was king, and America was a land with a small, wealthy elite and a vast body of peasants eking out their meager living in the countryside or preying upon one another in dangerous city slums. Edward's soldiers and especially his executioner. Brigadier General Tow, would see that this was exactly how life in America remained. Only one man ever had the courage to speak out against the tyrant's rule--a man driven by the dream of restoring democracy to the land, only to become the martyr ignominiously hanged on Boot Hill. But from this death a new leader was born, a visionary young man not quite of this world, Chicago Red. His words would take action and be the spark to set the land ablaze with a new kind of revolution....

Chicago Review Press NCLEX-PN Practice Test and Review

by Linda Waide Berta Roland

Fully revised to conform to the 2003 NCLEX Test Plan, this study guide and test includes "hot spot," fill-in-the-blank, and check-the-box questions to reflect the new test format with 10 written practice tests covering all the body systems, plus two additional practice tests on mental health and miscellaneous topics. Altogether, more than 500 practice test items are provided. Each practice test includes a system overview and complete rationales and explanations for both correct and incorrect answers. Also offered are explanations of how the computerized licensure exam is administered and advice on preparing for the exam and mastering the test format. In addition to the written tests, a 100-item interactive-software CD in the NCLEX format is also included to allow students to become comfortable with the on-screen exam.

The Chicago Review Press NCLEX-RN Practice Test and Review

by Linda Waide Berta Roland

Fully revised to conform to the 2004 NCLEX Test Plan, this study guide and test includes "hot spot," fill-in-the-blank, and select-all-that-apply questions to reflect the new test format. Ten written practice tests cover all the body systems and two additional practice tests cover mental health and miscellaneous topics. Each practice test includes a system overview and complete explanations for both correct and incorrect answers. In addition to the written tests, a 100-item interactive software CD in the NCLEX format is included to allow students to become comfortable with the on-screen exam.

The Chicago School Diaspora

by Gary Bowden Jacqueline Low

When the University of Chicago was founded in 1892 it established the first sociology department in the United States. The department grew rapidly in reputation and influence and by the 1920s graduates of its program were heading newly formed sociology programs across the country and determining the direction of the discipline and its future research. Their way of thinking about social relations revolutionized the social sciences by emphasizing an empirical approach to research, instead of the more philosophical "armchair" perspective that previously prevailed in American sociology. The Chicago School Diaspora presents work by Canadian and international scholars who identify with what they understand as the "Chicago School tradition." Broadly speaking, many of the scholars affiliated with sociology at Chicago understood human behaviour to be determined by social structures and environmental factors, rather than personal and biological characteristics. Contributors highlight key thinkers and epistemological issues associated with the Chicago School, as well as contemporary empirical research. Offering innovative theoretical explanations for the diversity and breadth of its scholarly traditions, The Chicago School Diaspora offers a fresh approach to ideas, topics, and approaches associated with the origins of North American sociology. Contributors include Michael Adorjan (University of Hong Kong, China), Gary Bowden (University of New Brunswick), Jeffrey Brown (University of New Brunswick), Tony Christensen (Wilfrid Laurier University), Luis Cisneros (postdoctoral scholar, University of Arizona), Gary A. Cook (Beloit College), Mary Jo Deegan (University of Nebraska-Lincoln), Scott Grills (Brandon University), Mervyn Horgan (Acadia University), Mark Hutter (Rowan University), Benjamin Kelly (Nipissing University), Rolf Lindner (Humboldt University & HafenCity University, Germany), Jacqueline Low (University of New Brunswick), Mourad Mjahed (Peace Corps, Rabat, Morocco), DeMond S. Miller (Rowan University), Edward Nell (New School for Social Research), David A. Nock (Lakehead University), Defne Över (PhD candidate, Cornell University), George Park (Memorial University), Thomas K. Park (University of Arizona), Dorothy Pawluch (McMaster University), Robert Prus (University of Waterloo), Antony J. Puddephatt (Lakehead University), Isher-Paul Sahni (Concordia University), Roger A. Salerno (Pace University), William Shaffir (McMaster University), Greg Smith (University of Salford, UK), Robert A. Stebbins (University of Calgary), Izabela Wagner (Warsaw University, Poland and CEMS EHESS - School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences, France), and Yves Winkin (ENS Lyon, France).

The Chicago Tribune Guide to Chicago

by Chicago Tribune Staff

The Chicago Tribune Guide to Chicago is a quick and easy travel guide for the Chicago area, with recommendations from knowledgeable insiders at the Chicago Tribune. Featuring the extensive expertise of the city's most prominent newspaper, this guide is perfect for tourists and locals alike. Whether readers are planning a weekend getaway or an afternoon on the town, this book will reveal the best Chicago has to offer in dining, entertainment, museums, lodging, and more.This convenient digital guide is ideal for the 21st-century traveler. Beyond top-notch pointers on what to do, where to go, and how to get there, this ebook can be read on any smartphone or electronic reader. Instead of lugging around clunky guide books or cumbersome maps, travelers can download this book and have the city at their fingertips.Brief descriptions and details follow every recommended destination, including an address, phone number, and website link. Toggle straight from ebook to phone as everything you need is in the palm of your hand. Let the Chicago Tribune help get you started on exploring the city and surrounding suburbs.

The Chicago Way

by Michael Harvey

From the co-creator and executive producer of the television show Cold Case Files, a fast-paced, stylish murder mystery featuring a tough-talking Irish cop turned private investigator who does for the city of Chicago what Elmore Leonard did for Detroit and Raymond Chandler did for Los Angeles. Chicago private investigator Michael Kelly is hired by his former partner, John Gibbons, to help solve an eight-year-old rape and battery case, a case it turns out his old friend was once ordered to forget. When Gibbons turns up dead on Navy Pier, Kelly enlists a team of his savviest colleagues to connect the dots between the recent murder and the cold case it revived: Diane Lindsay, a television reporter whose relationship with Kelly is not strictly professional; his best friend from childhood, Nicole Andrews, a forensic DNA expert; Nicole's boyfriend, Vince Rodriguez, a detective with a special interest in rape cases; and Bennett Davis from the DA's office, a friend since Kelly's days on the force. To close the case, Kelly will have to face the mob, a serial killer, his own double-crossing friends, and the mean streets of the city he loves. Ferociously plotted and crackling with wit, The Chicago Way is first-rate suspense steeped in the glorious, gritty atmosphere of a great city: a marvelous debut.

Chicago Wipeout

by Don Pendleton

To save the country, the Executioner infiltrates the capital of crime When he began his one-man assault on the Mafia, ex-army sniper Mack Bolan imagined it as a war of attrition. Kill enough button men and underbosses, made guys and capos, and the international crime syndicate would finally collapse. But when he learned that the Mafia was planning a full-scale takeover of the US government, the Executioner realized attrition would not be enough. The Mafia must be destroyed, and the place to do it is Chicago. The battle for Chicago starts with a single shot when Bolan pulls the trigger and ends the life of underboss Louis Aurielli. In a city where every politician, businessman, and cop is on the mob payroll, he will have nowhere to hide. But that's okay with Bolan--sometimes it's better to fight in the open.

Chicago's Bridges

by Nathan Holth

Stretching more than 150 miles and cutting through the city that bears its name, the Chicago River divides the Second City into the North Side and the South Side. In 1832, the first bridge across the river was constructed. In 1834, the first moveable bridge was erected. Today, Chicago is home to nearly 40 moveable bridges and some 60 bridges in all, making it the most bridge-rich city in the world. The River and its bridges have done much to shape the history of Chicago, which has grown from a rough-and-tumble trading outpost to a world-class city known for its architecture. Chicago's Bridges traces the evolution of the city's bridges, from the origins of the unique bascule bridges that punctuate the Chicago River to the splendidly designed bridges that lend Chicago its reputation as one of the great architectural destinations of the world.

Chicago's Horse Racing Venues

by Kimberly A. Rinker

The popularity of horse racing in Chicago has yet to be rivaled in any other metropolitan area. Since the 1800s, the Windy City's enthusiasm for both harness and Thoroughbred racing led to 10 major racetracks being built in the Chicago area. Four of those raceways--Balmoral, Maywood, Hawthorne, and Arlington--are still racing and thriving today. From Washington Park, Lincoln Fields, and Worth Raceway on the city's South Side, to the Near West Side venues of Hawthorne Race Course and Sportsman's Park, to Arlington Park's northwest locale and Aurora Downs to the west, Chicago's racing community has enjoyed a long and sometimes scandalous history. Chicago's Horse Racing Venues provides insight into Chicago's rich racing history and a behind-the-scenes look at the people and horses involved.

Chicago's Loop

by Heather Olivia Belcher Janice A. Knox

Chicago's famed "Loop" is said to have gotten its name from the route of a cable car that looped the central business district in 1882. Since then, much has changed. This book captures the evolving urban landscape of the Chicago Loop, with a collection of over 100 vintage images, each coupled with its contemporary counterpart. Few cities are as renowned for their architecture as is Chicago. The impressive skyscrapers in and around the Loop give Chicago a skyline second to none. And with more than three dozen historic landmarks, the Loop is home to many of the city's most recognized structures. From a 19th century trading post to the great financial, business, and entertainment districts of the 21st century, Chicago's Loop: Then and Now documents the growth and changes of the Windy City's downtown.

Chicago's New Negroes

by Davarian L. Baldwin

As early-twentieth-century Chicago swelled with an influx of at least 250,000 new black urban migrants, the city became a center of consumer capitalism, flourishing with professional sports, beauty shops, film production companies, recording studios, and other black cultural and communal institutions. Davarian Baldwin argues that this mass consumer marketplace generated a vibrant intellectual life and planted seeds of political dissent against the dehumanizing effects of white capitalism. Pushing the traditional boundaries of the Harlem Renaissance to new frontiers, Baldwin identifies a fresh model of urban culture rich with politics, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship.Baldwin explores an abundant archive of cultural formations where an array of white observers, black cultural producers, critics, activists, reformers, and black migrant consumers converged in what he terms a "marketplace intellectual life." Here the thoughts and lives of Madam C. J. Walker, Oscar Micheaux, Andrew "Rube" Foster, Elder Lucy Smith, Jack Johnson, and Thomas Dorsey emerge as individual expressions of a much wider spectrum of black political and intellectual possibilities. By placing consumer-based amusements alongside the more formal arenas of church and academe, Baldwin suggests important new directions for both the historical study and the constructive future of ideas and politics in American life.

Chicago's Wrigley Field

by Paul Michael Peterson

Wrigley Field is the second oldest ballpark currently in use in the major leagues, but it ranks first in the hearts of Cubs fans. Rooting for the home team from the corner of Clark and Addison to small towns and city streets across the country, generations of Cubs' fans have made that summer pilgrimage to the home of Gabby Hartnett's "Homer in the gloamin'" that clinched the 1938 pennant, Hack Wilson's record 190 RBI season, Ernie Banks' 500th career home run, Sammy Sosa's 60 plus home run seasons, and Kerry Wood's 20-strikeout masterpiece. It was originally built as Wheeghman Park in 1914 to host the Chicago Whales of the upstart Federal League. The Cubs moved in two years later, and, with an 11-inning 7-6 victory over the rival Cincinnati Reds, one of the greatest traditions in all of American sports was established: National League baseball at Chicago's picturesque north side ballpark. Renamed Cubs Park in 1920 and finally Wrigley Field in 1926, the hallmark bricks and ivy, hand operated scoreboard, and high flying "W" (or, regrettably, "L") flag over Wrigley have become longstanding symbols of summertime in the city.

Chicana and Chicano Art

by Carlos Francisco Jackson

This is the first book solely dedicated to the history, development, and present-day flowering of Chicana and Chicano visual arts. It offers readers an opportunity to understand and appreciate Chicana/o art from its beginnings in the 1960s.

Chicana Falsa: And Other Stories of Death, Identity, and Oxnard

by Michele Serros

From the white boy who transforms himself into a full-fledged Chicano, to the self-assured woman who effortlessly terrorizes her Anglo boss, to the junior-high friend who berated her "sloppy Spanish" and accused her of being a "Chicana Falsa," the people and places that Michele Serros brings to vivid life in this collection of poems and stories introduce a unique new viewpoint to the American literary landscape. Witty, tender, irreverent, and emotionally honest, her words speak to the painful and hilarious identity crises particular to the coming of age of an adolescent caught between two cultures.

Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader

by Patricia Zavella Gabriela F. Arredondo Aída Hurtado Norma Klahn Olga Nájera-Ramírez

Chicana Feminisms presents new essays on Chicana feminist thought by scholars, creative writers, and artists. This volume moves the field of Chicana feminist theory forward by examining feminist creative expression, the politics of representation, and the realities of Chicana life. Drawing on anthropology, folklore, history, literature, and psychology, the distinguished contributors combine scholarly analysis, personal observations, interviews, letters, visual art, and poetry. The collection is structured as a series of dynamic dialogues: each of the main pieces is followed by an essay responding to or elaborating on its claims. The broad range of perspectives included here highlights the diversity of Chicana experience, particularly the ways it is made more complex by differences in class, age, sexual orientation, language, and region. Together the essayists enact the contentious, passionate conversations that define Chicana feminisms. The contributors contemplate a number of facets of Chicana experience: life on the Mexico-U. S. border, bilingualism, the problems posed by a culture of repressive sexuality, the ranchera song, and domesticana artistic production. They also look at Chicana feminism in the 1960s and 1970s, the history of Chicanas in the larger Chicano movement, autobiographical writing, and the interplay between gender and ethnicity in the movie Lone Star. Some of the essays are expansive; others--such as Norma Cant's discussion of the writing of her fictionalized memoir Cancula--are intimate. All are committed to the transformative powers of critical inquiry and feminist theory. Contributors. Norma Alarcn, Gabriela F. Arredondo, Ruth Behar, Maylei Blackwell, Norma E. Cant, Sergio de la Mora, Ann duCille, Michelle Fine, Rosa Linda Fregoso, Rebecca M. Gmez, Jennifer Gonzlez, Ellie Hernndez, Ada Hurtado, Claire Joysmith, Norma Klahn, Amalia Mesa-Bains, Olga Njera-Ramrez, Anna Nieto Gomez, Renato Rosaldo, Elba Rosario Snchez, Marcia Stephenson, Jose Manuel Valenzuela, Patricia Zavella

The Chicana/o Cultural Studies Forum

by Angie Chabram-Dernersesian

The Chicana/o Cultural Studies Forum brings together a diverse group of scholars whose work spans the interdisciplinary fields of Chicana/o studies and cultural studies. Editor Angie Chabram-Dernersesian provides an overview of current debates, locating Chicana/o cultural criticism at the intersections of these fields. She then acts as moderator of a virtual roundtable of critics, including Frances Aparicio, Lisa Lowe, George Lipsitz, Wahneema Lubiano, Renato Rosaldo, José David Saldívar, and Sonia Saldívar-Hull. This highly collaborative and deeply interdisciplinary project addresses the questions: What is the relationship between Chicana/o studies and cultural studies? How do we do cultural studies from within Chicana/o cultural studies? How do Chicana/o cultural studies formations (hemispheric, borderland, and feminist) intermingle? The lively conversations documented here attest to the vitality and spirit of Chicana/o cultural studies today and track the movements between disciplines that share an interest in the study of culture, power relations, identity, and representation. This book offers a unique resource for understanding not just the development of Chicana/o cultural studies, but how new social movements and epistemologies travel and affiliate with progressive forms of social inquiry in the global era.

Chicano

by Richard Vasquez

A bestseller when it was published in 1970 at the height of the Mexican-American civil rights movement, Chicano unfolds the fates and fortunes of the Sandoval family, who flee the chaos and poverty of the Mexican Revolution and begin life anew in the United States. Patriarch Hector Sandoval works the fields and struggles to provide for his family even as he faces discrimination and injustice. Of his children, only Pete Sandoval is able to create a brighter existence, at least for a time. But when Pete's daughter Mariana falls in love with David, an Anglo student, it sets in motion a clash of cultures. David refuses to marry Mariana, fearing the reaction of his family and friends. Mariana, pregnant with David's child, is trapped between two worlds and shunned by both because of the man she loves. The complications of their relationship speak volumes -- even today -- about the shifting sands of racial politics in America. In his foreword, award-winning author Rubén Martínez reflects on the historical significance of Chicano's initial publication and explores how cultural perceptions have changed since the story of the Sandoval family first appeared in print.

The Chicano Generation

by Mario T. García

In The Chicano Generation, veteran Chicano civil rights scholar Mario T. García provides a rare look inside the struggles of the 1960s and 1970s as they unfolded in Los Angeles. Based on in-depth interviews conducted with three key activists, this book illuminates the lives of Raul Ruiz, Gloria Arellanes, and Rosalio Muñoz--their family histories and widely divergent backgrounds; the events surrounding their growing consciousness as Chicanos; the sexism encountered by Arellanes; and the aftermath of their political histories. In his substantial introduction, García situates the Chicano movement in Los Angeles and contextualizes activism within the largest civil rights and empowerment struggle by Mexican Americans in US history--a struggle that featured César Chávez and the farm workers, the student movement highlighted by the 1968 LA school blowouts, the Chicano antiwar movement, the organization of La Raza Unida Party, the Chicana feminist movement, the organizing of undocumented workers, and the Chicano Renaissance. Weaving this revolution against a backdrop of historic Mexican American activism from the 1930s to the 1960s and the contemporary black power and black civil rights movements, García gives readers the best representations of the Chicano generation in Los Angeles.

Chicano Poetry: A Response to Chaos

by Bruce-Novoa

Alurista. Gary Soto. Bernice Zamora. José Montoya. These names, luminous to some, remain unknown to those who have not yet discovered the rich variety of late twentieth century Chicano poetry. With the flowering of the Chicano Movement in the mid-1960s came not only increased political awareness for many Mexican Americans but also a body of fine creative writing. Now the major voices of Chicano literature have begun to reach the wider audience they deserve. Bruce-Novoa's Chicano Poetry: A Response to Chaos-the first booklength critical study of Chicano poetry-examines the most significant works of a body of literature that has grown dramatically in size and importance in less than two decades. Here are insightful new readings of the major writings of Abelardo Delgado, Sergio Elizondo, Rodolfo Gonzales, Miguel Méndez, J. L. Navarro, Raúl Salinas, Ricardo Sánchez, and Tino Villanueva, as well as Alurista, Soto, Zamora, and Montoya. Close textual analyses of such important works as I Am Joaquín, Restless Serpents, and Floricanto en Aztlán enrich and deepen our understanding of their imagery, themes, structure, and meaning. Bruce-Novoa argues that Chicano poetry responds to the threat of loss, whether of hero, barrio, family, or tradition. Thus José Montoya elegizes a dead Pachuco in "El Louie," and Raúl Salinas laments the disappearance of a barrio in "A Trip through the Mind Jail. " But this elegy at the heart of Chicano poetry is both lament and celebration, for it expresses the group's continuing vitality and strength. Common to twentieth-century poetry is the preoccupation with time, death, and alienation, and the work of Chicano poets-sometimes seen as outside the traditions of world literature-shares these concerns. Bruce-Novoa brilliantly defines both the unique and the universal in Chicano poetry.

Chicano Politics and Society in the Late Twentieth Century

by David Montejano

The various protest movements that together constituted the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and 1970s urged a "politics of inclusion" to bring Mexican Americans into the mainstream of United States political and social life. This volume of ten specially commissioned essays assesses the post-movement years, asking "what went wrong? what went right? and where are we now?" Collectively, the essays offer a wide-ranging portrayal of the complex situation of Mexican Americans as the twenty-first century begins. The essays are grouped into community, institutional, and general studies, with an introduction by editor Montejano. Geographically, they point to the importance of "Hispanic" politics in the Southwest, as well as in Chicago wards and in the U. S. Congress, with ramifications in Mexico and Central America. Thematically, they discuss "non-traditional" politics stemming from gender identity, environmental issues, theatre production, labor organizing, university policymaking, along with the more traditional politics revolving around state and city government, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, and various advocacy organizations.

Chicano Rap

by Pancho Mcfarland

Powered by a driving beat, clever lyrics, and assertive attitudes, rap music and hip hop culture have engrossed American youth since the mid-1980s. Although the first rappers were African Americans, rap and hip hop culture quickly spread to other ethnic groups who have added their own cultural elements to the music. Chicano Rap offers the first in-depth look at how Chicano/a youth have adopted and adapted rap music and hip hop culture to express their views on gender and violence, as well as on how Chicano/a youth fit into a globalizing world. Pancho McFarland examines over five hundred songs and seventy rap artists from all the major Chicano rap regions--San Diego, San Francisco and Northern California, Texas, and Chicago and the Midwest. He discusses the cultural, political, historical, and economic contexts in which Chicano rap has emerged and how these have shaped the violence and misogyny often expressed in Chicano rap and hip hop. In particular, he argues that the misogyny and violence of Chicano rap are direct outcomes of the "patriarchal dominance paradigm" that governs human relations in the United States. McFarland also explains how globalization, economic restructuring, and the conservative shift in national politics have affected Chicano/a youth and Chicano rap. He concludes with a look at how Xicana feminists, some Chicano rappers, and other cultural workers are striving to reach Chicano/a youth with a democratic, peaceful, empowering, and liberating message.

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