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Showing 84,726 through 84,750 of 146,296 results

A History of Modern Experimental Psychology: From James and Wundt to Cognitive Science

by George Mandler

Mandler traces the evolution of modern experimental and theoretical psychology from these beginnings to the cognitive revolution of the late 20th century. He emphasizes the social and cultural context, showing how different theoretical developments reflect the values of the society.

A History of Modern Indonesia

by Adrian Vickers

Although Indonesia has the fourth largest population in the world, its history is still relatively unfamiliar and understudied. Guided by the life and writings of the country's most famous author, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Adrian Vickers takes the reader on a journey across the social and political landscape of twentieth-century Indonesia in this innovative and timely account. He begins by explaining the country's origins under the Dutch in the early part of that century, the subsequent anti-colonial struggle and revolution which led to independence in 1949. Thereafter the spotlight is on the 1950s, a crucial period in the formation of Indonesia as a new nation, which was followed by the Sukarno years, and the anti-communist massacres of the 1960s when General Suharto took over as president. The concluding chapters chart the fall of Suharto's New Order after thirty two years in power, and the subsequent political and religious turmoil which culminated in the Bali bombings in 2002. Drawing on insights from literature, art and anthropology, Adrian Vickers portrays a complex and resilient people borne out of a troubled past.

A History of Modern Iran

by Ervand Abrahamian

In a reappraisal of Iran's modern history, Ervand Abrahamian traces its traumatic journey across the twentieth century, through the discovery of oil, imperial interventions, the rule of the Pahlavis and, in 1979, revolution and the birth of the Islamic Republic. In the intervening years, the country has experienced a bitter war with Iraq, the transformation of society under the clergy and, more recently, the expansion of the state and the struggle for power between the old elites, the intelligentsia and the commercial middle class. The author is a compassionate expositor. While he adroitly negotiates the twists and turns of the country's regional and international politics, at the heart of his 2008 book are the people of Iran. It is to them and their resilience that this book is dedicated, as Iran emerges at the beginning of the twenty-first century as one of the most powerful states in the Middle East.

A History of Modern Morocco

by Susan Gilson Miller

Morocco is notable for its stable and durable monarchy, its close ties with the West, its vibrant cultural life and its centrality to regional politics. This book, by distinguished historian Susan Gilson Miller, offers a richly documented survey of modern Moroccan history. Arguing that pragmatism rather than ideology has shaped the monarchy's response to crisis, the book begins with the French invasion of Algeria in 1830 and Morocco's abortive efforts at reform, the duel with colonial powers and the loss of independence in 1912, the burdens and benefits of France's forty-four year dominion and the stunning success of the nationalist movement leading to independence in 1956. In the post-independence era, the book traces the monarchy's gradual monopolization of power and the resulting political paralysis, with a postscript bringing events up to 2012. This concise, readable book will inform and enthral students and all those searching for the background to present-day events in the region.

A History of Modern Palestine

by Ilan Pappe

Ilan Pappe writes the story of Palestine, a land inhabited by two peoples. It begins with the Ottomans in the early 1800s and traces a path through the arrival of the early Zionists at the end of that century, through the British mandate at the beginning of the twentieth century, the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948, and the subsequent wars and conflicts which culminated in the intifadas of 1987 and 2000. While these events provide the background to the narrative and explain the construction of Zionist and Palestinian nationalism, at centre stage are those who lived through these times, men, women and children, Jews and Arabs. It is a story of coexistence, as well as oppression, occupation, and exile. Ilan Pappe is well-known as a revisionist historian of Israel. Lucid and typically forthright, his account is a unique contribution to the history of this troubled land.

A History of Modern Russia: From Tsarism to the Twenty-First Century

by Robert Service

Russia had an extraordinary twentieth century, undergoing upheaval and transformation. Updating his acclaimed History of Modern Russia, Robert Service provides a panoramic perspective on a country whose Soviet past encompassed revolution, civil war, mass terror, and two world wars. He shows how seven decades of communist rule, which penetrated every aspect of Soviet life, continue to influence Russia today. This new edition takes the story from 2002 through the entire presidency of Vladimir Putin to the election of his successor, Dmitri Medvedev.

A History of Modern Tibet, Volume 2: The Calm Before the Storm, 1951-1955

by Melvyn C. Goldstein

It is not possible to fully understand contemporary politics between China and the Dalai Lama without understanding what happened--and why--during the 1950s. In a book that continues the story of Tibet's history that he began in his acclaimed "A History of Modern Tibet, 1913-1951: The Demise of the Lamaist State," Melvyn C. Goldstein critically revises our understanding of that key period in midcentury. This authoritative account utilizes new archival material, including never before seen documents, and extensive interviews with Tibetans, including the Dalai Lama, and with Chinese officials. Goldstein furnishes fascinating and sometimes surprising portraits of these major players as he deftly unravels the fateful intertwining of Tibetan and Chinese politics against the backdrop of the Korean War, the tenuous Sino-Soviet alliance, and American cold war policy.

A History of Modern Trinidad 1783 to 1962

by Bridget Brereton

Trinidad is one of the more interesting countries to study. It began as a place where arawak indians lived. It was a Spanish colony till near the end of the eighteenth century. When it became a British colony, at that time, most of its inhabitants were French, Spanish and, of course, slaves from Africa. When slavery ended, Trinidad still needed a labor force for its sugar industry and indentured workers were brought in from India. For these and other reasons, Trinidad is one of the most cosmopolitan societies in the world and presents some fascinating opportunities for the social historian. This is a well-written, balanced history with enough analysis to make it very interesting.

The History of My Shoes and the Evolution of Darwin's Theory

by Kenny Fries

In The History of My Shoes, Kenny Fries narrates two stories: the development of the theory of "survival of the fittest," as articulated by Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace; and the history of his ever-changing, made-to-order, orthopedic shoes. The famously important first story, as told by Kenny Fries, is a condensed and colorful account of the race between Darwin and Wallace to formulate their groundbreaking theories. At the same time, Fries, a gay and disabled man, tells a deeply personal story of the evolving consciousness of his own "adaptations," represented by his shoes. As a child, Fries was abused by both his father and brother, and emerged into adulthood swaddled in ambiguities of self and memory. These he has explored in his brutally frank memoir, Body, Remember. In this poetic, introspective book, Kenny Fries imaginatively illustrates how his identities intersect. He writes, "Much of my own work the past fifteen years has been concerned with the body, as both subject and metaphor; as the place where the personal becomes the universal; as the site of memory, language, and desire." Although only the "fittest" may survive, Fries learns that adaptation and variation are critical to survival. What is deemed normal, or even perfect, are passing phases of the ever-changing embodiment of nature in our world. In the end, Darwin and Wallace's discoveries resonate with Fries's own story in The History of My Shoes.

A History of New Mexico Since Statehood

by Sandra K. Mathews Richard Melzer Robert J. Torrez

For the first time, there is now a textbook that addresses state standards for the teaching of New Mexico history at the high school level. In this thoughtful work, the authors delineate New Mexico's role in the shaping of the United States by carefully analyzing how the rich histories of the many cultures of the region affected and in turn were affected by influxes of newcomers seeking health benefits, minerals, farms, relaxation, and new beginnings. Supplementing this richly illustrated and accessible textbook is the optional Teacher Guide Book on CD for use with A History of New Mexico Since Statehood, which will help in structuring lessons, tests, and student activities. The Teacher Guide Book is included free with the purchase of twenty-five classroom copies.

A History of Our Time: Readings on Postwar America (Third Edition)

by William H. Chafe Harvard Sitkoff

This comprehensive, widely-read anthology presents cogent and provocative articles from differing political perspectives on major issues in post-World War II America. The third edition is considerably expanded to include new sections on the origins of the Cold War, the struggle of African-Americans for equality, the feminist movement, and Vietnam. The final section has been completely revised, offering articles on current topics such as the urban underclass, the "greenhouse effect," nuclear arms control, and changing relations with the Soviet Union. In addition to articles by leading historians the editors have chosen first-person accounts by participants in each of the issues under discussion, from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to Mikhail Gorbechev's historic 1988 speech to the United Nations. With lively introductions to each section providing a context for the articles, this text helps students make sense of the tumultuous world of our time.

History of Our World


NIMAC-sourced textbook

History of Our World: Early Ages


NIMAC-sourced textbook

A History of Pain

by Michael Berry

The portrayal of historical atrocity in fiction, film, and popular culture can reveal much about the function of individual memory and the shifting status of national identity. In the context of Chinese culture, films such as Hou Hsiao-hsien's City of Sadness and Lou Ye's Summer Palace and novels such as Ye Zhaoyan's Nanjing 1937: A Love Story and Wang Xiaobo's The Golden Age collectively reimagine past horrors and give rise to new historical narratives.Michael Berry takes an innovative look at the representation of six specific historical traumas in modern Chinese history: the Musha Incident (1930); the Rape of Nanjing (1937-38); the February 28 Incident (1947); the Cultural Revolution (1966-76); Tiananmen Square (1989); and the Handover of Hong Kong (1997). He identifies two primary modes of restaging historical violence: centripetal trauma, or violence inflicted from the outside that inspires a reexamination of the Chinese nation, and centrifugal trauma, which, originating from within, inspires traumatic narratives that are projected out onto a transnational vision of global dreams and, sometimes, nightmares.These modes allow Berry to connect portrayals of mass violence to ideas of modernity and the nation. He also illuminates the relationship between historical atrocity on a national scale and the pain experienced by the individual; the function of film and literature as historical testimony; the intersection between politics and art, history and memory; and the particular advantages of modern media, which have found new means of narrating the burden of historical violence.As Chinese artists began to probe previously taboo aspects of their nation's history in the final decades of the twentieth century, they created texts that prefigured, echoed, or subverted social, political, and cultural trends. A History of Pain acknowledges the far-reaching influence of this art and addresses its profound role in shaping the public imagination and conception-as well as misconception-of modern Chinese history.

A History of Personality Psychology: Theory, Science, and Research from Hellenism to the Twenty-first Century

by Frank Dumont

Frank Dumont presents current personality psychology with a fresh description of its current status as well as its prospects. Play, sex, cuisine, creativity, altruism, pets, grieving rituals, and other oft-neglected topics broaden the scope of this fascinating study. This tract is imbued with historical perspectives that reveal the continuity in the evolving science and research of this discipline over the past century. The author places classic schemas and constructs, as well as current principles, in the context of their socio-political catalysts. He further relates this study of the person to life-span developmental issues and to cultural, gender-specific, trait-based, genetic/epigenetic, and evolutionary research findings. Personality psychology has recently reconciled itself to more modest paradigms for describing, explaining, and predicting human behaviour than it generated in the 19th and 20th centuries. This book documents that transformation, providing valuable information for health-service professionals as well as to teachers, researchers, and scientists.

A History of Philosophical Systems

by Vergilius Ferm

Editor Vergilius Ferm brings together the theories of over forty-one prominent philosophers in this well-organized and thoughtful overview of philosophical systems. You'll find compelling entries from each school of thought including Buddhist and Christian philosophies, Positivism, Phenomenology, Evolution, and more. This text, which includes the work of philosophers from ancient Greece all the way up to twentieth-century thinkers, is the perfect companion to any serious student of philosophy. Vergilius Ferm is the author of several reference titles in philosophy, including Dictionary of Pastoral Psychology and A History of Philosophical Systems. He taught at the College of Wooster, where he served as the head of the Department of Philosophy.

History of Political Philosophy (Third Edition)

by Leo Strauss Joseph Cropsey

Written by specialists on the various philosophers, this third edition has been expanded significantly to include both new and revised essays.

A History of Popular Culture: More of Everything, Faster, and Brighter

by Raymond F. Betts

This lively and informative survey provides a thematic global history of popular culture focusing on the period since the end of the Second World War. Raymond Betts considers the rapid diffusion and "hybridization" of popular culture as the result of three conditions of the world since the end of World War Two: instantaneous communications, widespread consumption in a market-based economy and the visualization of reality. Betts considers the dominance of American entertainment media and habits of consumption, assessing adaptation and negative reactions to this influence. The author surveys a wide range of topics, including the effects of global conflict, the effects of urbanization and the growth of sport as a commercial enterprise.

A History of Prejudice

by Gyanendra Pandey

This is a book about prejudice and democracy, and the prejudice of democracy. In comparing the historical struggles of two geographically disparate populations - Indian Dalits (once known as Untouchables) and African Americans - Gyanendra Pandey, the leading subaltern historian, examines the multiple dimensions of prejudice in two of the world's leading democracies. The juxtaposition of two very different locations and histories, and within each of them of varying public and private narratives of struggle, allows for an uncommon analysis of the limits of citizenship in modern societies and states. Pandey, with his characteristic delicacy, probes the histories of his protagonists to uncover a shadowy world where intolerance and discrimination are part of both public and private lives. This unusual and sobering book is revelatory in its exploration of the contradictory history of promise and denial that is common to the official narratives of nations such as India and the United States and the ideologies of many opposition movements.

A History of Private Life, Volume I: From Pagan Rome to Byzantium

by Arthur Goldhammer Paul Veyne

Describes public and private life during Roman times through the Middle Ages. What we consider public and private now was quite different throughout history.

History of Psychology in Autobiography

by Leendert P. Mos

Since the 17th century, autobiography has an honorable place in the study of history. In 1930, the preeminent historian of psychology, Edwin Boring, writes that a science separated from its history lacks direction and promises a future of uncertain importance. To understand what psychology is and what it is becoming, the autobiographies of famous psychologists is history at it best. Here we find model inquirers of the science who offer a personalized account of themselves and their vocation in the context of the history of the science. What is characteristic of many of those who have contributed to an alternate vision of psychological science is that they never considered themselves, or were considered by others, as belonging to the mainstream of the discipline. In considering an alternative history of psychology in autobiography, the editor invited contributors whose research and writings have pushed the discipline in other directions, pushed its limits, and whose scholarship finds its philosophical framework outside the discipline altogether. If these contributors may not be model inquirers, their scholarship is very much a matter of consequence for those who wish to understand psychology. Among the outliers included here are those who devoted themselves to the writing of psychology, examining its history, theories, research and professional practices, and who enthusiastically embraced, over the course of their lives, the discipline as a human science. Their influence has been subtle as has been their appeal to many students who affection for the discipline finds its promise in a discerning self-awareness and a critical understanding of others and their worlds. This volume is not simply a collection of personal chronologies which might inspire or lend appreciation to a younger generation. Our contributors write from their personal and professional experience, of course, but they write of their thinking and understanding of the psyche as an aspect of human life, of psychology as an academic form of human sciences' inquiry, and so bring to bear their scientific and philosophical imagination to their personal challenges in their chosen vocation as psychologists. Our contributors cover a broad swath of the second half of the 20th century, the century of psychology. Nurturing the discipline from within various philosophical, social-political, and cultural roots, their autobiographies exemplify marginality, if not alienation, from the mainstream, even as their professional and personal lives give expression to engaged scholarship, commitment to vocation and, straightforwardly and reflectively, a love of the heart. From Germany, Carl Graumann, from France, Erika Apfelbaum, from Canada, David Bakan and Kurt Danziger, and from the United States, Amedeo Giorgi, Robert Rieber, and Joseph Rychlak, relate their lives to the larger contexts of our times. Their personal stories are an integral part of the historiography of our discipline. Indeed, a contribution to historiography of our discipline is constituted in their autobiographical self-presentations, for their writings attest as much to their lives as model inquirers as they do to the possibility of psychology as a human science.

A History of Race in Muslim West Africa, 1600–1960

by Bruce S. Hall

The mobilization of local ideas about racial difference has been important in generating, and intensifying, civil wars that have occurred since the end of colonial rule in all of the countries that straddle the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. From Sudan to Mauritania, the racial categories deployed in contemporary conflicts often hearken back to an older history in which blackness could be equated with slavery and non-blackness with predatory and uncivilized banditry. This book traces the development of arguments about race over a period of more than 350 years in one important place along the southern edge of the Sahara Desert: the Niger Bend in northern Mali. Using Arabic documents held in Timbuktu, as well as local colonial sources in French and oral interviews, Bruce S. Hall reconstructs an African intellectual history of race that long predated colonial conquest, and which has continued to orient inter-African relations ever since.

A History Of Reading

by Alberto Manguel

From clay tablets to CD-ROM, from book thieves to book burners, bibliophiles, book fools and saints, noted essayist Alberto Manguel follows the quirky and passionate 4,000-year-old history of the written work whose true hero is the reader. Photos & line drawings.

Showing 84,726 through 84,750 of 146,296 results

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