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Showing 87,051 through 87,075 of 146,253 results

Human Learning and Memory

by David A. Lieberman

This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key theories and issues are looked at in detail; descriptions of experiments include why they were done and how examining the method can help evaluate competing viewpoints. By looking at underlying cognitive processes, students come away with a sense of learning and memory being interrelated actions taken by the same human being, rather than two separate activities. Lively and engaging writing is supported by lots of examples of practical applications that show the relevance of lab-based research to everyday life. Examples include treatments for phobias and autism, ways to improve eyewitness testimony, and methods of enhancing study techniques.

Human Medical Research

by Oliver Rauprich Jochen Vollmann Jan Schildmann Verena Sandow

Medical research involving human subjects has contributed to considerable advancements in our knowledge, and to medical benefits. At the same time the development of new technologies as well as further globalisation of medical research raises questions that require the attention of researchers from a range of disciplines. This book gathers the contributions of researchers from nine different countries, who analyse recent developments in medical research from ethical, historical, legal and socio-cultural perspectives. In addition to reflections on innovations in science such as genetic databases and the concept of "targeted therapy" the book also includes analyses regarding the ethico-legal regulation of new technologies such as human tissue banking or the handling of genetic information potentially relevant for participants in medical research. Country and culture-specific aspects that are relevant to human medical research from a global perspective also play a part. The value of multi- and interdisciplinary analysis that includes the perspectives of scholars from normative and empirical disciplines is a shared premise of each contribution.

The Human Microbiome, Diet, and Health

by Institute of Medicine Food Forum Food and Nutrition Board Leslie Pray Emily Tomayko Laura Pillsbury

The Food Forum convened a public workshop on February 22-23, 2012, to explore current and emerging knowledge of the human microbiome, its role in human health, its interaction with the diet, and the translation of new research findings into tools and products that improve the nutritional quality of the food supply. The Human Microbiome, Diet, and Health: Workshop Summary summarizes the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop. Over the two day workshop, several themes covered included: The microbiome is integral to human physiology, health, and disease. The microbiome is arguably the most intimate connection that humans have with their external environment, mostly through diet. Given the emerging nature of research on the microbiome, some important methodology issues might still have to be resolved with respect to undersampling and a lack of causal and mechanistic studies. Dietary interventions intended to have an impact on host biology via their impact on the microbiome are being developed, and the market for these products is seeing tremendous success. However, the current regulatory framework poses challenges to industry interest and investment.

The Human Mosaic

by Mona Domosh Roderick P. Neumann Patricia L. Price Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov

Carrying forward the legacy of original author Terry Jordan-Bychkov, coauthors Mona Domosh, Roderick Neumann and Patricia Price have again provided a thoroughly up-to-date new edition of the classic text,The Human Mosaic. The new edition offers a compelling guided tour of contemporary geography that updates the original's unique Five Theme approach while captivating students with the ways today's geographers interpret our ever more globalized, interdependent world.

Human Nature and Conduct

by John Dewey

In Human Nature and Conduct, the philosopher John Dewey looks at the connection between human nature and morality. While some people believe that we are naturally good, others believe that we are naturally evil. Likewise, while some people believe that morality is all relative, others believe that moral laws are as universal as laws of nature. In these twenty-six succinct chapters Dewey argues that morality is not so simple. He claims that morality depends on both individual people and societies, on both nature and nurture, and on a complex interaction between biological impulses, social customs, and human intelligence. He argues against those who believe morality depends on the will of the majority, those who believe it depends on the will of God and, most of all, those who believe the purpose of morality is to protect us from our own instincts. In Human Nature and Conduct Dewey gives us a new perspective on morality.

The Human Nature of Birds: A Scientific Discovery with Startling Implications

by Theodore X. Barber

A provocative new study of birds, humans, and the deepest prejudices of Western science--developed from six years of independent research by a behavioral scientist. In the spirit of the New York Times bestseller The Hidden Life of Dogs. Color photos.

Human Origins: What Bones and Genomes Tell Us About Ourselves

by Rob Desalle Ian Tattersall

Ever since the recognition of the Neanderthals as an archaic form of human in the mid-nineteenth century, the fossilized bones of extinct humans have been used by paleoanthropologists to explore human origins. These bones tell the story of how the earliest humans first emerged in Africa some 6 to 7 million years ago. The bones also reveal that as humans became anatomically and behaviorally more modern, they swept out of Africa in waves into Asia, Europe, and finally into the New World. Even as paleoanthropologists continued to make important discoveries, experts in genetics were looking at the human species from a very different angle. In 1953 James Watson and Francis Crick first envisioned the double helix structure of DNA, the basic building block of all life. In the 1970s it was shown that humans share 98.7 percent of their genes with the great apes--that in fact genetically we are more closely related to chimpanzees than chimpanzees are to gorillas. And most recently the entire human genome has been mapped--we now know where each of the genes are located on the DNA strands that make up our chromosomes. In Human Origins: What Bones and Genomes Tell Us about Ourselves, two of the worlds foremost scientists, geneticist Rob DeSalle and paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall, show how research into the human genome confirms what fossil bones have told us about human origins. This unprecedented integration of the fossil and genomic records provides the most complete understanding possible of humanity's place in nature, its emergence from the rest of the living world, and the evolutionary processes that have molded human populations to be what they are today.

The Human Pain System

by Frederick A. Lenz Kenneth L. Casey Edward G. Jones William D. Willis

Pain is a subject of increasing scientific and clinical interest. Studies of non-primate animal models have contributed greatly to our knowledge of pain. Nonetheless, investigators often refer to basic neuroscientific and behavioral studies of humans and non-human pain. Likewise, the interpretation of human pain studies and clinical observations relies upon understanding the relevant anatomy and physiology as gleaned from animal, and especially primate, research. Here, Lenz, Casey, Jones, and pain in humans, to provide a firm basis for understanding the mechanisms of normal and pathological human pain. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in pain research. Book jacket.

Human Papillomavirus

by Alberto Rosenblatt Homero Gustavo Campos Guidi

This book is a practical and comprehensive guide to the diagnosis and treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related diseases from a urological perspective. It reviews new diagnostic methods for virus detection and typing, management of penile and urethral lesions, new treatment modalities including an overview of the use of lasers, the link between HPV and cancer, and new prevention methods with an update on HPV vaccines.

The Human Past: World Prehistory and the Development of Human Societies

by Chris Scarre

Textbook on humans, from 6 million years ago to early civilizations.

The Human Person

by Brian J. Bransfield

In the 20th Century three social revolutions--the industrial, sexual, and technological revolutions--challenged the religious convictions of many. John Paul II's teaching on the theology of the body was his response to the resulting societal shifts. Fr. Bransfield explores John Paul II's response to the challenges raised by these revolutions. In this context Bransfield then explores how Theology of the Body leads us to live the fullness of the Christian life.

Human Recognition at a Distance in Video

by Bir Bhanu Ju Han

Most biometric systems employed for human recognition require physical contact with, or close proximity to, a cooperative subject. Far more challenging is the ability to reliably recognize individuals at a distance, when viewed from an arbitrary angle under real-world environmental conditions. Gait and face data are the two biometrics that can be most easily captured from a distance using a video camera. This comprehensive and logically organized text/reference addresses the fundamental problems associated with gait and face-based human recognition, from color and infrared video data that are acquired from a distance. It examines both model-free and model-based approaches to gait-based human recognition, including newly developed techniques where the both the model and the data (obtained from multiple cameras) are in 3D. In addition, the work considers new video-based techniques for face profile recognition, and for the super-resolution of facial imagery obtained at different angles. Finally, the book investigates integrated systems that detect and fuse both gait and face biometrics from video data. Topics and features: discusses a framework for human gait analysis based on Gait Energy Image, a spatio-temporal gait representation; evaluates the discriminating power of model-based gait features using Bayesian statistical analysis; examines methods for human recognition using 3D gait biometrics, and for moving-human detection using both color and thermal image sequences; describes approaches for the integration face profile and gait biometrics, and for super-resolution of frontal and side-view face images; introduces an objective non-reference quality evaluation algorithm for super-resolved images; presents performance comparisons between different biometrics and different fusion methods for integrating gait and super-resolved face from video. This unique and authoritative text is an invaluable resource for researchers and graduate students of computer vision, pattern recognition and biometrics. The book will also be of great interest to professional engineers of biometric systems.

The Human Record: Sources of Global History, Volume II: Since 1500

by Alfred J. Andrea James H. Overfield

Now in its Sixth Edition, The Human Record continues to be the leading primary source reader for the World History course. Each volume contains a blend of visual and textual sources; these sources are often paired or grouped together for comparison. A prologue entitled, "Primary Sources and How to Read Them," appears in each volume and serves as a valuable pedagogical tool. Unlike many world history texts that center on the West, The Human Record provides balanced coverage of the global past. Approximately one-third of the sources in the Sixth Edition are new, and these documents continue to reflect the myriad experiences of the peoples of the world.

Human Relations

by Laura Portolese Dias

Human Relations by Laura Portolese-Dias addresses all of the critical topics to obtain career success as they relate to professional relationships. Knowing how to get along with others, resolve workplace conflict, manage relationships, communicate well, and make good decisions are all critical skills all students need to succeed in career and in life. Human Relations book isn't an organizational behavior text, but it provides a good baseline of issues students will deal with in their careers on a day-to-day basis. This book is also not a professional communications book, business English, or professionalism book, as the focus is much broader--on general career success and how to effectively maneuver in the workplace.

Human Relations: Strategies for Success

by Lowell H. Lamberton Leslie Minor-Evans

We believe strongly in the importance of understanding the relationship between self-esteem and human relations.

Human Remains

by Elizabeth Haynes

New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Haynes returns with a disturbing and powerful tale that preys on our darkest fears. Police analyst Annabel wouldnt describe herself as lonely. Her work and the needs of her aging mother keep her busy. But Annabel is shocked when she discovers her neighbors decomposing body in the house next door, and she is appalled to think that no one, including herself, noticed the womans absence. Annabel sets out to investigate, despite her colleagues lack of interest, and discovers that such cases are frighteningly common in her hometown. A chilling thriller and a hymn to all the lonely people whose individual voices haunt its pages, Human Remains shows how vulnerable we are when we live alone, and how easily ordinary lives can fall apart when no one is watching.

Human Resource Management (13th Edition)

by Robert L. Mathis John H. Jackson

Trust the authoritative resource for human resource management to offer the most current look at HR and its impact on today's organizations with both new and thoroughly updated cases and today's most recent examples--90 percent of which are from 2006 and beyond. Mathis/Jackson's HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, Thirteenth Edition, is the most trusted resource and best-selling HR solution for preparing future or currently practicing HR professionals. Updated, strong academic coverage, including the latest 2009 HRCI outline, ensures this edition addresses all major topics for professional examinations (PHR, SPHR) given by the Human Resource Certification Institute (SHRM). The latest HR research and a wealth of new and proven learning features in every chapter demonstrate how HR impacts organizational strategy. Reorganized and streamlined topics examine emerging trends in technology, globalization, and HR Metrics, as well as other developments impacting the practice of HR today. A complete package of teaching and learning resources, including new CourseMate online learning tools, helps today's aspiring professionals prepare for career and future HR success.

Human Resources

by Rachel Zolf

Winner of the 2008 Trillium Book Award for Poetry!Write for buyers. Write for bosses. Think hyper. Think branding. Tell your visitor where to go.Poetry and 'plain language' collide in the writing machine that is Human Resources. Here at the intersection of creation and repackaging, we experience the visceral and psychic cost of selling things with depleted words. Pilfered rhetorics fed into the machine are spit out as bungled associations among money, shit, culture, work and communication. With the help of online engines that numericize language, Human Resources explores writing as a process of encryption. Deeply inflected by the polyvocality and encoded rhetorics of the screen, Human Resources is perched at the limits of language, irreverently making and breaking meaning. Navigating the crumbling boundaries among page, screen, reader, engine, writer and database, Human Resources investigates wasting words and words as waste and the creative potential of salvage. 'In this bad-mouthing and incandescent burlesque, Rachel Zolf transforms a necessary social anger into the pure fuel that takes us to "the beautiful excess of the unshackled referent." We learn something new about guts, and about how dictions slip across one another, entwining, shimmering, wisecracking. For Zolf, political invention takes precedent, works the search engine.' - Lisa Robertson

Human Rights

by Makau Mutua

In 1948 the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and with it a profusion of norms, processes, and institutions to define, promote, and protect human rights. Today virtually every cause seeks to cloak itself in the righteous language of rights. But even so, this universal reliance on the rights idiom has not succeeded in creating common ground and deep agreement as to the scope, content, and philosophical bases for human rights.Makau Mutua argues that the human rights enterprise inappropriately presents itself as a guarantor of eternal truths without which human civilization is impossible. Mutua contends that in fact the human rights corpus, though well meaning, is a Eurocentric construct for the reconstitution of non-Western societies and peoples with a set of culturally biased norms and practices.Mutua maintains that if the human rights movement is to succeed, it must move away from Eurocentrism as a civilizing crusade and attack on non-European peoples. Only a genuine multicultural approach to human rights can make it truly universal. Indigenous, non-European traditions of Asia, Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas must be deployed to deconstruct--and to reconstruct--a universal bundle of rights that all human societies can claim as theirs.

Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating International Law into Local Justice

by Sally Engle Merry

In this study that investigates the tensions between global law and local justice, Sally Engle Merry offers an insider's perspective on how human rights law holds authorities accountable for the protection of citizens even while reinforcing and expanding state power.

Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization

by Daniel E. Lee Elizabeth J. Lee

Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization provides a balanced, thoughtful discussion of the globalization of the economy and the ethical considerations inherent in the many changes it has prompted. The book's introduction maps out the philosophical foundations for constructing an ethic of globalization, taking into account both traditional and contemporary sources. These ideals are applied to four specific test cases: the ethics of investing in China, the case study of the Firestone company's presence in Liberia, free-trade and fair-trade issues pertaining to the coffee trade with Ethiopia, and the use low-wage factories in Mexico to serve the U. S. market. The book concludes with a comprehensive discussion of how to enforce global compliance with basic human rights standards, with particular attention to stopping abuses by multinational corporations through litigation under the Alien Tort Claims Act.

Human Rights and the Negotiation of American Power

by Glenn Mitoma

The American attitude toward human rights is deemed inconsistent, even hypocritical: while the United States is characterized (or self-characterized) as a global leader in promoting human rights, the nation has consistently restrained broader interpretations of human rights and held international enforcement mechanisms at arm's length. Human Rights and the Negotiation of American Power examines the causes, consequences, and tensions of America's growth as the leading world power after World War II alongside the flowering of the human rights movement. Through careful archival research, Glenn Mitoma reveals how the U.S. government, key civil society groups, Cold War politics, and specific individuals contributed to America's emergence as an ambivalent yet central player in establishing an international rights ethic.Mitoma focuses on the work of three American civil society organizations: the Commission to Study the Organization of Peace, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and the American Bar Association--and their influence on U.S. human rights policy from the late 1930s through the 1950s. He demonstrates that the burgeoning transnational language of human rights provided two prominent United Nations diplomats and charter members of the Commission on Human Rights--Charles Malik and Carlos Romulo--with fresh and essential opportunities for influencing the position of the United States, most particularly with respect to developing nations. Looking at the critical contributions made by these two men, Mitoma uncovers the unique causes, tensions, and consequences of American exceptionalism.

Human Rights and Their Limits

by Wiktor Osiatyński

Human Rights and Their Limits shows that the concept of human rights has developed in waves: each call for rights served the purpose of social groups that tried to stop further proliferation of rights once their own goals were reached. While defending the universality of human rights as norms of behavior, Osiatyński admits that the philosophy on human rights does not need to be universal. Instead he suggests that the enjoyment of social rights should be contingent upon the recipient's contribution to society. He calls for a "soft universalism" that will not impose rights on others but will share the experience of freedom and help the victims of violations. Although a state of unlimited democracy threatens rights, the excess of rights can limit resources indispensable for democracy. This book argues that although rights are a prerequisite of freedom, they should be balanced with other values that are indispensable for social harmony and personal happiness.

Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry

by Kwame Anthony Appiah Amy Gutmann Michael Ignatieff Thomas W. Laqueur David A. Hollinger Diane F. Orentlicher

Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Since the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, this revolution has brought the world moral progress and broken the nation-state's monopoly on the conduct of international affairs. But it has also faced challenges. Ignatieff argues that human rights activists have rightly drawn criticism from Asia, the Islamic world, and within the West itself for being overambitious and unwilling to accept limits. It is now time, he writes, for activists to embrace a more modest agenda and to reestablish the balance between the rights of states and the rights of citizens.Ignatieff begins by examining the politics of human rights, assessing when it is appropriate to use the fact of human rights abuse to justify intervention in other countries. He then explores the ideas that underpin human rights, warning that human rights must not become an idolatry. In the spirit of Isaiah Berlin, he argues that human rights can command universal assent only if they are designed to protect and enhance the capacity of individuals to lead the lives they wish. By embracing this approach and recognizing that state sovereignty is the best guarantee against chaos, Ignatieff concludes, Western nations will have a better chance of extending the real progress of the past fifty years. Throughout, Ignatieff balances idealism with a sure sense of practical reality earned from his years of travel in zones of war and political turmoil around the globe.Based on the Tanner Lectures that Ignatieff delivered at Princeton University's Center for Human Values in 2000, the book includes two chapters by Ignatieff, an introduction by Amy Gutmann, comments by four leading scholars--K. Anthony Appiah, David A. Hollinger, Thomas W. Laqueur, and Diane F. Orentlicher--and a response by Ignatieff.

Showing 87,051 through 87,075 of 146,253 results

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