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Showing 87,051 through 87,075 of 146,232 results

The Human Pain System

by Frederick A. Lenz Kenneth L. Casey Edward G. Jones William D. Willis

Pain is a subject of increasing scientific and clinical interest. Studies of non-primate animal models have contributed greatly to our knowledge of pain. Nonetheless, investigators often refer to basic neuroscientific and behavioral studies of humans and non-human pain. Likewise, the interpretation of human pain studies and clinical observations relies upon understanding the relevant anatomy and physiology as gleaned from animal, and especially primate, research. Here, Lenz, Casey, Jones, and pain in humans, to provide a firm basis for understanding the mechanisms of normal and pathological human pain. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in pain research. Book jacket.

Human Papillomavirus

by Alberto Rosenblatt Homero Gustavo Campos Guidi

This book is a practical and comprehensive guide to the diagnosis and treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related diseases from a urological perspective. It reviews new diagnostic methods for virus detection and typing, management of penile and urethral lesions, new treatment modalities including an overview of the use of lasers, the link between HPV and cancer, and new prevention methods with an update on HPV vaccines.

The Human Past: World Prehistory and the Development of Human Societies

by Chris Scarre

Textbook on humans, from 6 million years ago to early civilizations.

The Human Person

by Brian J. Bransfield

In the 20th Century three social revolutions--the industrial, sexual, and technological revolutions--challenged the religious convictions of many. John Paul II's teaching on the theology of the body was his response to the resulting societal shifts. Fr. Bransfield explores John Paul II's response to the challenges raised by these revolutions. In this context Bransfield then explores how Theology of the Body leads us to live the fullness of the Christian life.

Human Recognition at a Distance in Video

by Bir Bhanu Ju Han

Most biometric systems employed for human recognition require physical contact with, or close proximity to, a cooperative subject. Far more challenging is the ability to reliably recognize individuals at a distance, when viewed from an arbitrary angle under real-world environmental conditions. Gait and face data are the two biometrics that can be most easily captured from a distance using a video camera. This comprehensive and logically organized text/reference addresses the fundamental problems associated with gait and face-based human recognition, from color and infrared video data that are acquired from a distance. It examines both model-free and model-based approaches to gait-based human recognition, including newly developed techniques where the both the model and the data (obtained from multiple cameras) are in 3D. In addition, the work considers new video-based techniques for face profile recognition, and for the super-resolution of facial imagery obtained at different angles. Finally, the book investigates integrated systems that detect and fuse both gait and face biometrics from video data. Topics and features: discusses a framework for human gait analysis based on Gait Energy Image, a spatio-temporal gait representation; evaluates the discriminating power of model-based gait features using Bayesian statistical analysis; examines methods for human recognition using 3D gait biometrics, and for moving-human detection using both color and thermal image sequences; describes approaches for the integration face profile and gait biometrics, and for super-resolution of frontal and side-view face images; introduces an objective non-reference quality evaluation algorithm for super-resolved images; presents performance comparisons between different biometrics and different fusion methods for integrating gait and super-resolved face from video. This unique and authoritative text is an invaluable resource for researchers and graduate students of computer vision, pattern recognition and biometrics. The book will also be of great interest to professional engineers of biometric systems.

The Human Record: Sources of Global History, Volume II: Since 1500

by Alfred J. Andrea James H. Overfield

Now in its Sixth Edition, The Human Record continues to be the leading primary source reader for the World History course. Each volume contains a blend of visual and textual sources; these sources are often paired or grouped together for comparison. A prologue entitled, "Primary Sources and How to Read Them," appears in each volume and serves as a valuable pedagogical tool. Unlike many world history texts that center on the West, The Human Record provides balanced coverage of the global past. Approximately one-third of the sources in the Sixth Edition are new, and these documents continue to reflect the myriad experiences of the peoples of the world.

Human Relations

by Laura Portolese Dias

Human Relations by Laura Portolese-Dias addresses all of the critical topics to obtain career success as they relate to professional relationships. Knowing how to get along with others, resolve workplace conflict, manage relationships, communicate well, and make good decisions are all critical skills all students need to succeed in career and in life. Human Relations book isn't an organizational behavior text, but it provides a good baseline of issues students will deal with in their careers on a day-to-day basis. This book is also not a professional communications book, business English, or professionalism book, as the focus is much broader--on general career success and how to effectively maneuver in the workplace.

Human Relations: Strategies for Success

by Lowell H. Lamberton Leslie Minor-Evans

We believe strongly in the importance of understanding the relationship between self-esteem and human relations.

Human Remains

by Elizabeth Haynes

New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Haynes returns with a disturbing and powerful tale that preys on our darkest fears. Police analyst Annabel wouldnt describe herself as lonely. Her work and the needs of her aging mother keep her busy. But Annabel is shocked when she discovers her neighbors decomposing body in the house next door, and she is appalled to think that no one, including herself, noticed the womans absence. Annabel sets out to investigate, despite her colleagues lack of interest, and discovers that such cases are frighteningly common in her hometown. A chilling thriller and a hymn to all the lonely people whose individual voices haunt its pages, Human Remains shows how vulnerable we are when we live alone, and how easily ordinary lives can fall apart when no one is watching.

Human Resource Management (13th Edition)

by Robert L. Mathis John H. Jackson

Trust the authoritative resource for human resource management to offer the most current look at HR and its impact on today's organizations with both new and thoroughly updated cases and today's most recent examples--90 percent of which are from 2006 and beyond. Mathis/Jackson's HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, Thirteenth Edition, is the most trusted resource and best-selling HR solution for preparing future or currently practicing HR professionals. Updated, strong academic coverage, including the latest 2009 HRCI outline, ensures this edition addresses all major topics for professional examinations (PHR, SPHR) given by the Human Resource Certification Institute (SHRM). The latest HR research and a wealth of new and proven learning features in every chapter demonstrate how HR impacts organizational strategy. Reorganized and streamlined topics examine emerging trends in technology, globalization, and HR Metrics, as well as other developments impacting the practice of HR today. A complete package of teaching and learning resources, including new CourseMate online learning tools, helps today's aspiring professionals prepare for career and future HR success.

Human Resources

by Rachel Zolf

Winner of the 2008 Trillium Book Award for Poetry!Write for buyers. Write for bosses. Think hyper. Think branding. Tell your visitor where to go.Poetry and 'plain language' collide in the writing machine that is Human Resources. Here at the intersection of creation and repackaging, we experience the visceral and psychic cost of selling things with depleted words. Pilfered rhetorics fed into the machine are spit out as bungled associations among money, shit, culture, work and communication. With the help of online engines that numericize language, Human Resources explores writing as a process of encryption. Deeply inflected by the polyvocality and encoded rhetorics of the screen, Human Resources is perched at the limits of language, irreverently making and breaking meaning. Navigating the crumbling boundaries among page, screen, reader, engine, writer and database, Human Resources investigates wasting words and words as waste and the creative potential of salvage. 'In this bad-mouthing and incandescent burlesque, Rachel Zolf transforms a necessary social anger into the pure fuel that takes us to "the beautiful excess of the unshackled referent." We learn something new about guts, and about how dictions slip across one another, entwining, shimmering, wisecracking. For Zolf, political invention takes precedent, works the search engine.' - Lisa Robertson

Human Rights

by Makau Mutua

In 1948 the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and with it a profusion of norms, processes, and institutions to define, promote, and protect human rights. Today virtually every cause seeks to cloak itself in the righteous language of rights. But even so, this universal reliance on the rights idiom has not succeeded in creating common ground and deep agreement as to the scope, content, and philosophical bases for human rights.Makau Mutua argues that the human rights enterprise inappropriately presents itself as a guarantor of eternal truths without which human civilization is impossible. Mutua contends that in fact the human rights corpus, though well meaning, is a Eurocentric construct for the reconstitution of non-Western societies and peoples with a set of culturally biased norms and practices.Mutua maintains that if the human rights movement is to succeed, it must move away from Eurocentrism as a civilizing crusade and attack on non-European peoples. Only a genuine multicultural approach to human rights can make it truly universal. Indigenous, non-European traditions of Asia, Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas must be deployed to deconstruct--and to reconstruct--a universal bundle of rights that all human societies can claim as theirs.

Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating International Law into Local Justice

by Sally Engle Merry

In this study that investigates the tensions between global law and local justice, Sally Engle Merry offers an insider's perspective on how human rights law holds authorities accountable for the protection of citizens even while reinforcing and expanding state power.

Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization

by Daniel E. Lee Elizabeth J. Lee

Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization provides a balanced, thoughtful discussion of the globalization of the economy and the ethical considerations inherent in the many changes it has prompted. The book's introduction maps out the philosophical foundations for constructing an ethic of globalization, taking into account both traditional and contemporary sources. These ideals are applied to four specific test cases: the ethics of investing in China, the case study of the Firestone company's presence in Liberia, free-trade and fair-trade issues pertaining to the coffee trade with Ethiopia, and the use low-wage factories in Mexico to serve the U. S. market. The book concludes with a comprehensive discussion of how to enforce global compliance with basic human rights standards, with particular attention to stopping abuses by multinational corporations through litigation under the Alien Tort Claims Act.

Human Rights and the Negotiation of American Power

by Glenn Mitoma

The American attitude toward human rights is deemed inconsistent, even hypocritical: while the United States is characterized (or self-characterized) as a global leader in promoting human rights, the nation has consistently restrained broader interpretations of human rights and held international enforcement mechanisms at arm's length. Human Rights and the Negotiation of American Power examines the causes, consequences, and tensions of America's growth as the leading world power after World War II alongside the flowering of the human rights movement. Through careful archival research, Glenn Mitoma reveals how the U.S. government, key civil society groups, Cold War politics, and specific individuals contributed to America's emergence as an ambivalent yet central player in establishing an international rights ethic.Mitoma focuses on the work of three American civil society organizations: the Commission to Study the Organization of Peace, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and the American Bar Association--and their influence on U.S. human rights policy from the late 1930s through the 1950s. He demonstrates that the burgeoning transnational language of human rights provided two prominent United Nations diplomats and charter members of the Commission on Human Rights--Charles Malik and Carlos Romulo--with fresh and essential opportunities for influencing the position of the United States, most particularly with respect to developing nations. Looking at the critical contributions made by these two men, Mitoma uncovers the unique causes, tensions, and consequences of American exceptionalism.

Human Rights and Their Limits

by Wiktor Osiatyński

Human Rights and Their Limits shows that the concept of human rights has developed in waves: each call for rights served the purpose of social groups that tried to stop further proliferation of rights once their own goals were reached. While defending the universality of human rights as norms of behavior, Osiatyński admits that the philosophy on human rights does not need to be universal. Instead he suggests that the enjoyment of social rights should be contingent upon the recipient's contribution to society. He calls for a "soft universalism" that will not impose rights on others but will share the experience of freedom and help the victims of violations. Although a state of unlimited democracy threatens rights, the excess of rights can limit resources indispensable for democracy. This book argues that although rights are a prerequisite of freedom, they should be balanced with other values that are indispensable for social harmony and personal happiness.

Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry

by Kwame Anthony Appiah Amy Gutmann Michael Ignatieff Thomas W. Laqueur David A. Hollinger Diane F. Orentlicher

Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Since the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, this revolution has brought the world moral progress and broken the nation-state's monopoly on the conduct of international affairs. But it has also faced challenges. Ignatieff argues that human rights activists have rightly drawn criticism from Asia, the Islamic world, and within the West itself for being overambitious and unwilling to accept limits. It is now time, he writes, for activists to embrace a more modest agenda and to reestablish the balance between the rights of states and the rights of citizens.Ignatieff begins by examining the politics of human rights, assessing when it is appropriate to use the fact of human rights abuse to justify intervention in other countries. He then explores the ideas that underpin human rights, warning that human rights must not become an idolatry. In the spirit of Isaiah Berlin, he argues that human rights can command universal assent only if they are designed to protect and enhance the capacity of individuals to lead the lives they wish. By embracing this approach and recognizing that state sovereignty is the best guarantee against chaos, Ignatieff concludes, Western nations will have a better chance of extending the real progress of the past fifty years. Throughout, Ignatieff balances idealism with a sure sense of practical reality earned from his years of travel in zones of war and political turmoil around the globe.Based on the Tanner Lectures that Ignatieff delivered at Princeton University's Center for Human Values in 2000, the book includes two chapters by Ignatieff, an introduction by Amy Gutmann, comments by four leading scholars--K. Anthony Appiah, David A. Hollinger, Thomas W. Laqueur, and Diane F. Orentlicher--and a response by Ignatieff.

Human Rights: Concepts, Contests, Contingencies

by Austin Sarat Thomas R. Kearns

Today the language of human rights, if not human rights themselves, is nearly universal. Human Rights brings together essays that attend to both the allure and criticism of human rights. They examine contestation and contingency in today's human rights politics and help us rethink some of the basic concepts of human rights. Questions addressed in Human Rights include: Can national self-determination be reconciled with human rights? Can human rights be advanced without thwarting efforts to develop indigenous legal traditions? How are the forces of modernization associated with globalization transforming our understanding of human dignity and personal autonomy? What does it mean to talk about culture and cultural choice? Is the protection of culture and cultural choice an important value in human rights discourse? How do human rights figure in local political contests and how are those contests, in turn, shaped by the spread of capitalism and market values? What contingencies shape the implementation of human rights in societies without a strong tradition of adherence to the rule of law? What are the conditions under which human rights claims are advanced and under which nations respond to their appeal?

Human Rights: Fact or Fancy?

by Henry B. Veatch

Henry B. Veatch finds the basis for human rights in natural law. He builds his argument step by step, carefully laying the foundation for his central assertion that our basic rights are discoverable directly in the facts of nature.

Human Rights in the Constitutional Law of the United States

by Michael J. Perry

In the period since the end of the Second World War, there has emerged what never before existed: a truly global morality. Some of that morality - the morality of human rights - has become entrenched in the constitutional law of the United States. This book explicates the morality of human rights and elaborates three internationally recognized human rights that are embedded in U. S. constitutional law: the right not to be subjected to cruel, inhuman, or degrading punishment; the right to moral equality; and the right to religious and moral freedom. The implications of one or more of these rights for three great constitutional controversies - capital punishment, same-sex marriage, and abortion - are discussed in-depth. Along the way, Michael J. Perry addresses the question of the proper role of the Supreme Court of the United States in adjudicating these controversies.

Human Rights in the Twentieth Century

by Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann

Has there always been an inalienable "right to have rights" as part of the human condition, as Hannah Arendt famously argued? The contributions to this volume examine how human rights came to define the bounds of universal morality in the course of the political crises and conflicts of the twentieth century. Although human rights are often viewed as a self-evident outcome of this history, the essays collected here make clear that human rights are a relatively recent invention that emerged in contingent and contradictory ways. Focusing on specific instances of their assertion or violation during the past century, this volume analyzes the place of human rights in various arenas of global politics, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented. In doing so, this volume captures the state of the art in a field that historians have only recently begun to explore.

Human Rights Obligations of Business

by Surya Deva David Bilchitz

In recent years, the UN Human Rights Council has approved the 'Respect, Protect, and Remedy' Framework and endorsed the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. These developments have been welcomed widely, but do they adequately address the challenges concerning the human rights obligations of business? This volume of essays engages critically with these important developments. The chapters revolve around four key issues: the process and methodology adopted in arriving at these documents; the source and justification of corporate human rights obligations; the nature and extent of such obligations; and the implementation and enforcement thereof. In addition to highlighting several critical deficits in these documents, the contributing authors also outline a vision for the twenty-first century in which companies have obligations to society that go beyond the responsibility to respect human rights.

Human Rights, State Compliance, and Social Change

by Thomas Pegram Ryan Goodman

National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) - human rights commissions and ombudsmen - have gained recognition as a possible missing link in the transmission and implementation of international human rights norms at the domestic level. They are also increasingly accepted as important participants in global and regional forums where international norms are produced. By collecting innovative work from experts spanning international law, political science, sociology and human rights practice, this book critically examines the significance of this relatively new class of organizations. It focuses, in particular, on the prospects of these institutions to effectuate state compliance and social change. Consideration is given to the role of NHRIs in delegitimizing - though sometimes legitimizing - governments' poor human rights records and in mobilizing - though sometimes demobilizing - civil society actors. The volume underscores the broader implications of such cross-cutting research for scholarship and practice in the fields of human rights and global affairs in general.

Human Rights under State-Enforced Religious Family Laws in Israel, Egypt and India

by Yüksel Sezgin

About one-third of the world's population currently lives under pluri-legal systems where governments hold individuals subject to the purview of ethno-religious rather than national norms in respect to family law. How does the state-enforcement of these religious family laws impact fundamental rights and liberties? What resistance strategies do people employ in order to overcome the disabilities and limitations these religious laws impose upon their rights? Based on archival research, court observations and interviews with individuals from three countries, Yüksel Sezgin shows that governments have often intervened in order to impress a particular image of subjectivity upon a society, while people have constantly challenged the interpretive monopoly of courts and state-sanctioned religious institutions, re-negotiated their rights and duties under the law, and changed the system from within. He also identifies key lessons and best practices for the integration of universal human rights principles into religious legal systems.

Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction

by Andrew Clapham

From the controversial incarceration of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, to the brutal ethnic cleansing being practiced in Darfur, to the widespread denial of equal rights to women in many areas of the world, human rights violations are a constant presence in the news and in our lives. Taking an international perspective, and focusing on highly topical issues such as torture, arbitrary detention, privacy, health, and discrimination, this Very Short Introduction will help readers to understand for themselves the controversies and complexities behind this vitally relevant issue. Looking at the philosophical justification for rights, the historical origins of human rights and how they are formed in law, Andrew Clapham explains what our human rights actually are, what they might be, and where the human rights movement is heading.

Showing 87,051 through 87,075 of 146,232 results

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