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Cultural Law

by James A. R. Nafziger Robert Kirkwood Paterson Alison Dundes Renteln James A. R. Nafziger Robert Kirkwood Paterson

This comprehensive collection of leading articles spans a broad range of international legal issues related to both tangible cultural material - such as archaeological and indigenous objects, fine art, shipwrecks, and cultural sites - and intangible heritage such as traditional knowledge and genetic information. Specific topics include, among others, issues of definition and attribution, on-site protection of objects and sites, illegal trafficking and repatriation of objects, and protection of intangible heritage. Special attention is paid to applicable provisions of UNESCO treaties and other international instruments and to pertinent rules of private international law. A concluding section focuses on the resolution of cultural heritage disputes by litigation and alternative methods. Along with an introduction by Professor Nafziger, this authoritative volume will be immensely valuable to students and professionals alike.

The Cultural life of the Automobile : Roads to Modernity

by Guillermo Giucci

From its invention in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century, the automobile crisscrossed the world, completely took over the cities, and became a feature of daily life. Considered basic to the American lifestyle, the car reflected individualism, pragmatism, comfort, and above all modernity. In Latin America, it served as a symbol of distinction, similar to jewelry or fine clothing. In The Cultural Life of the Automobile, Guillermo Giucci focuses on the automobile as an instrument of social change through its "kinetic modernity" and as an embodiment of the tremendous social impact of technology on cultural life. Material culture-how certain objects generate a wide array of cultural responses-has been the focus of much scholarly discussion in recent years. The automobile wrought major changes and inspired images in language, literature, and popular culture. Focusing primarily on Latin America but also covering the United States, Europe, Asia, and Africa, Giucci examines how the automobile was variously adapted by different cultures and how its use shaped and changed social and economic relationships within them. At the same time, he shows how the "automobilization" of society became an essential support for the development of modern individualism, and the automobile its clearest material manifestation.

Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know

by E. D. Hirsch Jr.

Hirsch argues that children in the U.S. are being deprived of the basic knowledge that would enable them to function in contemporary society.

The Cultural Lives of Capital Punishment

by Austin Sarat

How does the way we think and feel about the world around us affect the existence and administration of the death penalty? What role does capital punishment play in defining our political and cultural identity? After centuries during which capital punishment was a normal and self-evident part of criminal punishment, it has now taken on a life of its own in various arenas far beyond the limits of the penal sphere. In this volume, the authors argue that in order to understand the death penalty, we need to know more about the "cultural lives"--past and present--of the state's ultimate sanction. They undertake this "cultural voyage" comparatively--examining the dynamics of the death penalty in Mexico, the United States, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, China, Singapore, and South Korea--arguing that we need to look beyond the United States to see how capital punishment "lives" or "dies" in the rest of the world, how images of state killing are produced and consumed elsewhere, and how they are reflected, back and forth, in the emerging international judicial and political discourse on the penalty of death and its abolition. Contributors: Sangmin Bae Christian Boulanger Julia Eckert Agata Fijalkowski Evi Girling Virgil K. Y. Ho David T. Johnson Botagoz Kassymbekova Shai Lavi Jurgen Martschukat Alfred Oehlers Judith Randle Judith Mendelsohn Rood Austin Sarat Patrick Timmons Nicole Tarulevicz Louise Tyler

The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins

by Hal Whitehead Luke Rendell

In the songs and bubble feeding of humpback whales; in young killer whales learning to knock a seal from an ice floe in the same way their mother does; and in the use of sea sponges by the dolphins of Shark Bay, Australia, to protect their beaks while foraging for fish, we find clear examples of the transmission of information among cetaceans. Just as human cultures pass on languages and turns of phrase, tastes in food (and in how it is acquired), and modes of dress, could whales and dolphins have developed a culture of their very own? Unequivocally: yes. In The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins, cetacean biologists Hal Whitehead, who has spent much of his life on the ocean trying to understand whales, and Luke Rendell, whose research focuses on the evolution of social learning, open an astounding porthole onto the fascinating culture beneath the waves. As Whitehead and Rendell show, cetacean culture and its transmission are shaped by a blend of adaptations, innate sociality, and the unique environment in which whales and dolphins live: a watery world in which a hundred-and-fifty-ton blue whale can move with utter grace, and where the vertical expanse is as vital, and almost as vast, as the horizontal. Drawing on their own research as well as a scientific literature as immense as the sea--including evolutionary biology, animal behavior, ecology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience--Whitehead and Rendell dive into realms both humbling and enlightening as they seek to define what cetacean culture is, why it exists, and what it means for the future of whales and dolphins. And, ultimately, what it means for our future, as well.

Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture

by Marvin Harris

First published in 1968, Harris's book has been cited in over 1,000 works and is one of the key documents explaining cultural materialism, the theory associated with Harris's work. This updated edition includes the complete 1968 text plus a new introduction by the author, which discusses the impact of the book and highlights some of the major trends in anthropological theory since its original publication. RAT, as it is affectionately known to three decades of graduate students, comprehensively traces the history of anthropology and anthropological theory, culminating in a strong argument for the use of a scientific, behaviorally-based, ethic approach to the understanding of human culture known as cultural materialism

Cultural Memory: Resistance, Faith, and Identity

by Ted Rodríguez Jeanette Fortier

Cultural memories are those transformative historical experiences that define a culture, even as time passes and it adapts to new influences. For oppressed peoples, cultural memory engenders the spirit of resistance; not surprisingly, some of its most powerful incarnations are rooted in religion. In this interdisciplinary examination, Jeanette Rodriguez and Ted Fortier explore how four such forms of cultural memory have preserved the spirit of a particular people.

Cultural Migrants and Optimal Language Acquisition

by Fanny Forsberg Lundell Inge Bartning

This volume investigates cultural migrants: people who, from their own free will, move to another country because of their interest in the target language and culture. Chapters include studies on cultural migrants acquiring French, Italian, Spanish and English and consider linguistic, psycholinguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects of language acquisition. Cultural migrants have social and psychological advantages when acquiring a second language as adults, and the study of their linguistic knowledge and production increases our understanding of the possibilities and limits of L2 ultimate attainment. The work thus fills a gap in our understanding of high-level proficiency and will be of interest to researchers working in the field of SLA, as well as to social scientists studying the relationship between language, culture and integration.

Cultural Misunderstanding: The French-American Experience

by Carol Volk Raymond Carroll

My studies in anthropology had not entirely prepared me. From something theoretical and exciting, anthropology abruptly became something difficult to live.

The Cultural Nature of Human Development

by Barbara Rogoff

People develop as participants in cultural communities, says Ragoff (psychology, U. of California-Santa Cruz), and their development can be understood only in light of the changing cultural practices and circumstances of their communities. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Cultural Oasis: For Arab Children, Collected Works Offer Roads to Tolerance, Critical Thinking

by Jeffrey Martini Gail L. Zellman Laura S. Hamilton Michal Perlman Jennifer L. Steele

Feature stories discuss the promotion of tolerance and critical thinking in the Arab world through children's media, the challenges faced by the United States in an era of fiscal austerity, and promising models for measuring teacher performance. Two other stories highlight the National Science Foundation's role in promoting research in the United States and how RAND is helping several countries to foster technological innovation.

The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition

by Michael Tomasello

Ambitious and elegant, this book builds a bridge between evolutionary theory and cultural psychology. Michael Tomasello is one of the very few people to have done systematic research on the cognitive capacities of both nonhuman primates and human children. The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition identifies what the differences are, and suggests where they might have come from. Tomasello argues that the roots of the human capacity for symbol-based culture, and the kind of psychological development that takes place within it, are based in a cluster of uniquely human cognitive capacities that emerge early in human ontogeny. These include capacities for sharing attention with other persons; for understanding that others have intentions of their own; and for imitating, not just what someone else does, but what someone else has intended to do. In his discussions of language, symbolic representation, and cognitive development, Tomasello describes with authority and ingenuity the "ratchet effect" of these capacities working over evolutionary and historical time to create the kind of cultural artifacts and settings within which each new generation of children develops. He also proposes a novel hypothesis, based on processes of social cognition and cultural evolution, about what makes the cognitive representations of humans different from those of other primates. Lucid, erudite, and passionate, The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition will be essential reading for developmental psychology, animal behavior, and cultural psychology.

Cultural Psychology (2nd Edition)

by Steven J. Heine

Steven Heine is one of the leading figures in the field of cultural psychology. In addition to presenting the importance of culture to the study of behavior, Cultural Psychology, Second Edition, has a strong emphasis on research methodology, which comes out of in-depth discussions of select topics and studies in each chapter--encouraging students to understand common behaviors in different cultures. Heine builds the text around the most enduring questions in the field of psychology and shows how cultural psychology is providing insights into our understanding of them.

The Cultural Revolution at the Margins

by Yiching Wu

Mao Zedong envisioned a great struggle to "wreak havoc under the heaven" when he launched the Cultural Revolution in 1966. But as radicalized Chinese youth rose up against Party officials, events quickly slipped from the government's grasp, and rebellion took on a life of its own. Turmoil became a reality in a way the Great Leader had not foreseen. The Cultural Revolution at the Margins recaptures these formative moments from the perspective of the disenfranchised and disobedient rebels Mao unleashed and later betrayed. The Cultural Revolution began as a "revolution from above," and Mao had only a tenuous relationship with the Red Guard students and workers who responded to his call. Yet it was these young rebels at the grassroots who advanced the Cultural Revolution's more radical possibilities, Yiching Wu argues, and who not only acted for themselves but also transgressed Maoism by critically reflecting on broader issues concerning Chinese socialism. As China's state machinery broke down and the institutional foundations of the PRC were threatened, Mao resolved to suppress the crisis. Leaving out in the cold the very activists who had taken its transformative promise seriously, the Cultural Revolution devoured its children and exhausted its political energy. The mass demobilizations of 1968-69, Wu shows, were the starting point of a series of crisis-coping maneuvers to contain and neutralize dissent, producing immense changes in Chinese society a decade later.

Cultural Studies

by Dr Chris Barker

Chris Barker's best-selling Cultural Studies has established itself as the leading undergraduate introduction to Cultural Studies. It takes the student through all they need to know: the theoretical foundations and developments of Cultural Studies and the questions that occupy the field today, from the multiple meanings of 'culture' itself to ideology, language, subjectivity, sex, space, race, media, the urban, youth and resistance. With its concise, accessible definitions, stimulating activities, checked 'key points', chapter summaries, and an expanded glossary, it is an indispensable tool for students and lecturers alike. This third edition is fully updated with: * a new chapter on electronic media and 'digital culture'; * major additions of material on the creative industries, culture jamming, new feminism and 'raunch culture' and globalization; * all-new photographs presented with pedagogic activities; * biographical snapshots of key figures in cultural studies. This book is now even more the best-value one-stop shop for Cultural Studies. Chris Barker is Associate Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Wollongong, and author of The SAGE Dictionary of Cultural Studies.

Cultural Studies

by Jeff Lewis

Praise for the first edition: "This is a great introduction and contribution to the subject. It is unusually wide-ranging, covering the historical development of cultural theory and deftly highlighting key problems that just won't go away." - Matthew Hills, Cardiff University "To say that the scope of the book's coverage is wide-ranging would be an under-statement. Few texts come to mind that have attempted such a thorough overview of the central tenets of cultural studies." - Stuart Allan, Bournemouth University This fully revised edition of the best selling introduction to cultural studies offers students an authoritative, comprehensive guide to cultural studies. Clearly written and accessibly organized the book provides a major resource for lecturers and students. Each chapter has been extensively revised and new material covers globalization, the post 9/11 world and the new language wars. The emphasis upon demonstrating the philosophical and sociological roots of cultural studies has been retained along with boxed entries on key concepts and issues. Particular attention is paid to demonstrating how cultural studies clarifies issues in media and communication studies, and there are chapters on the global mediasphere and new media cultures. This is a tried and tested book which has been widely used wherever cultural studies is taught. It is an indispensable undergraduate text and one that will appeal to postgraduates seeking a 'refresher' which they can dip into.

Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction

by John Storey

In this 7th edition of his award-winning Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction, John Storey has extensively revised the text throughout. As before, the book presents a clear and critical survey of competing theories of and various approaches to popular culture. Its breadth and theoretical unity, exemplified through popular culture, means that it can be flexibly and relevantly applied across a number of disciplines. Also retaining the accessible approach of previous editions, and using appropriate examples from the texts and practices of popular culture, this new edition remains a key introduction to the area.

The Cultural Turn in Late Ancient Studies: Gender, Asceticism, and Historiography

by Dale B. Martin Patricia Cox Miller

The essays in this provocative collection exemplify the innovations that have characterized the relatively new field of late ancient studies. Focused on civilizations clustered mainly around the Mediterranean and covering the period between roughly 100 and 700 CE, scholars in this field have brought history and cultural studies to bear on theology and religious studies. They have adopted the methods of the social sciences and humanities--particularly those of sociology, cultural anthropology, and literary criticism. By emphasizing cultural and social history and considerations of gender and sexuality, scholars of late antiquity have revealed the late ancient world as far more varied than had previously been imagined. The contributors investigate three key concerns of late ancient studies: gender, asceticism, and historiography. They consider Macrina's scar, Mary's voice, and the harlot's body as well as Augustine, Jovinian, Gregory of Nazianzus, Julian, and Ephrem the Syrian. Whether examining how animal bodies figured as a means for understanding human passion and sexuality in the monastic communities of Egypt and Palestine or meditating on the almost modern epistemological crisis faced by Theodoret in attempting to overcome the barriers between the self and the wider world, these essays highlight emerging theoretical and critical developments in the field. Contributors. Daniel Boyarin, David Brakke, Virginia Burrus, Averil Cameron, Susanna Elm, James E. Goehring, Susan Ashbrook Harvey, David G. Hunter, Blake Leyerle, Dale B. Martin, Patricia Cox Miller, Philip Rousseau, Teresa M. Shaw, Maureen A. Tilley, Dennis E. Trout, Mark Vessey

The Cultural Turn in U.S. History

by James W. Cook Michael O'Malley Lawrence B. Glickman

A definitive account of one of the most dominant trends in recent historical writing, The Cultural Turn in U. S. History takes stock of the field at the same time as it showcases exemplars of its practice. The first of this volume's three distinct sections offers a comprehensive genealogy of American cultural history, tracing its multifaceted origins, defining debates, and intersections with adjacent fields. The second section comprises previously unpublished essays by a distinguished roster of contributors who illuminate the discipline's rich potential by plumbing topics that range from nineteenth-century anxieties about greenback dollars to confidence games in 1920s Harlem, from Shirley Temple's career to the story of a Chicano community in San Diego that created a public park under a local freeway. Featuring an equally wide ranging selection of pieces that meditate on the future of the field, the final section explores such subjects as the different strains of cultural history, its relationships with arenas from mass entertainment to public policy, and the ways it has been shaped by catastrophe. Taken together, these essays represent a watershed moment in the life of a discipline, harnessing its vitality to offer a glimpse of the shape it will take in years to come.

Cultural Universals and Particulars: An African Perspective

by Kwasi Wiredu

Masolo Ghanaian philosopher Kwasi Wiredu confronts the paradox that while Western cultures recoil from claims of universality, previously colonized peoples, seeking to redefine their identities, insist on cultural particularities. Wiredu asserts that universals, rightly conceived on the basis of our common biological identity, are not incompatible with cultural particularities and, in fact, are what make intercultural communication possible. Drawing on aspects of Akan thought that appear to diverge from Western conceptions in the areas of ethics and metaphysics, Wiredu calls for a just reappraisal of these disparities, free of thought patterns corrupted by a colonial mentality. Wiredu's exposition of the principles of African traditional philosophy is not purely theoretical; he shows how certain aspects of African political thought may be applied to the practical resolution of some of Africa's most pressing problems.

The Cultural Wealth of Nations

by Nina Bandelj Frederick F. Wherry

Symbolic resources affect social, cultural, and economic development. The value of being "Made in America" or "Made in Italy," for example, depends not only on the material advantages each place offers but also on the symbolic resources embedded in those places of production. Drawing on case studies that range from the vineyards of South Africa and the textiles of Thailand to the Mundo Maya in Latin America and tourist destinations in Tuscany, this volume examines the various forms that cultural wealth takes, the processes involved in its construction, and the ways it is deployed. Leading scholars from a range of disciplinary backgrounds examine how symbolic resources and cultural understandings help firms and regions develop. Through a thoughtful analysis of current- day cases, as well as historical developments,The Cultural Wealth of Nationsoffers an exciting new alternative to standard economic explanations about the wealth and poverty of nations.

Cultural World in Beowulf

by John M Hill

Beowulf is one of the most important poems in Old English and the first major poem in European vernacular language. It dramatizes behavior in a complex social world--a martial, aristocratic world that we often distort by imposing on it our own biases and values. In this cross-disciplinary study, John Hill looks at Beowulf from a comparative ethnological point of view. He provides a thorough examination of the socio-cultural dimensions of the text and compares the social milieu of Beowulf to that of similarly organized cultures. Through examination of historical analogs in northern Europe and France, as well as past and present societies on the Pacific rim in Southeast Asia, a complex and extended society is uncovered and an astonishingly different Beowulf is illuminated.The study is divided into five major essays: on ethnology and social drama, the temporal world, the legal world, the economy of honour, and the psychological world. Hill presents a realm where genealogies incorporate social and political statements: in this world gift giving has subtle and manipulative dimensions, both violent and peaceful exchange form a political economy, acts of revenge can be baleful or have jural force, and kinship is as much a constructible fact as a natural one. Family and kinship relations, revenge themes, heroic poetry, myth, legality, and political discussions all bring the importance of the social institutions in Beowulf to the foreground, allowing for a fuller understanding of the poems and its implications for Anglo-Saxon society.

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Students: Strategies for Teaching and Assessment

by Elizabeth A. Grassi Heidi Bulmahn Barker

Connects theory to practice while presenting foundational teaching and assessment practices for CLDE students. Practical in nature and designed with an eye toward universal design for learning, this text brings together foundational information from special education and ELL/bilingual fields to help teachers address the specific needs of culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional (CLDE) students. Key Features: Case studies from teachers, students, and parents describe the personal challenges of CLDE students. Authentic student language examples illustrate the concepts described and make practical connections to the research discussed Activities for further understanding allow students to review key points and connects theory to classroom practice. Ancillaries available at www. sagepub. com/grassi Password-protected instructor resources include PowerPoint lecture slides, sample syllabi, and Web resources. An open-access student study site provides online video clips of teachers in action, which exemplify different strategies and are accompanied by critical thinking questions from the authors. Students can also access additional case studies and relevant SAGE journal articles from the study site.

Culturally Competent Practice: A Framework for Understanding (Fourth Edition)

by Doman Lum

Culturally Competent Practice: A Framework For Understanding Diverse Groups & Justice Issues will help you become a more informed helping professional through its strong tradition of presenting a model for understanding, measuring, and evaluating cultural competence. Author Doman Lum explains how clients and workers can become culturally competent and proficient by working through culturally based problems together. This text emphasizes cultural competence as a dialogical process and challenges students and professors to continue the conversation to achieve greater mutual understanding and social justice.

Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research and Practice Second Edition

by Geneva Gay

Combining insights from multicultural education theory and research with real-life classroom stories, Gay demonstrates that all students will perform better on multiple measures of achievement when teaching is filtered through their own cultural experiences.

Showing 87,551 through 87,575 of 230,109 results

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