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Java Swing, 2nd Edition

by James Elliott Robert Eckstein Marc Loy Dave Wood Brian Cole

<div><p>This second edition of <i>Java Swing</i> thoroughly covers all the features available in Java 2 SDK 1.3 and 1.4. More than simply a reference, this new edition takes a practical approach. It is a book by developers for developers, with hundreds of useful examples, from beginning level to advanced, covering every component available in Swing.</p>\n<p>Whether you're a seasoned Java developer or just trying to find out what Java can do, you'll find <i>Java Swing</i>, 2nd edition an indispensable guide.</p></div>

Java Threads, 2nd Edition

by Scott Oaks Henry Wong

Revised and expanded to cover Java 2, Java Threads shows you how to take full advantage of Java's thread facilities: where to use threads to increase efficiency, how to use them effectively, and how to avoid common mistakes. It thoroughly covers the Thread and ThreadGroup classes, the Runnable interface, and the language's synchronized operator. The book pays special attention to threading issues with Swing, as well as problems like deadlock, race condition, and starvation to help you write code without hid

Java Threads, Third Edition

by Scott Oaks Henry Wong

Threads are essential to Java programming, but learning to use them effectively is a nontrivial task. This new edition of the classic Java Threads shows you how to take full advantage of Java's threading facilities and brings you up-to-date with the watershed changes in Java 2 Standard Edition version 5.0 (J2SE 5.0). It provides a thorough, step-by-step approach to threads programming.

Java Web Services

by David A. Chappell Tyler Jewell

For many Java developers, web services appeared to come out of nowhere. Its advantages are clear: web services are platform-independent (like Java itself), language-agnostic (a clear advantage over Java RMI), can easily be tunneled through firewalls (an obvious benefit to anyone who has dealt with modern enterprise networks), object-oriented (we all know about that), and tends to be loosely coupled (allowing more flexible application development). But these advantages have been obscured by a cloud of hype and a proliferation of jargon that are difficult to penetrate. What are SOAP, UDDI, WSDL, and JAXM? To say nothing of JAXR, tModels, category bags, WSFL, and other friends? And assuming that you understand what they are, how do you do anything with them? Do they live up to their promises? Are they really the future of network computing, or a dead end? Java Web Services gives the experienced Java developer a way into the Web Services world. It helps you to understand what's going on, what the technologies mean and how they relate, and shows Java developers how to put them to use to solve real problems. You'll learn what's real and what isn't; what the technologies are really supposed to do, and how they do it. Java Web Services shows you how to use SOAP to perform remote method calls and message passing; how to use WSDL to describe the interface to a web service or understand the interface of someone else's service; and how to use UDDI to advertise (publish) and look up services in each local or global registry. Java Web Services also discusses security issues, interoperability issues, integration with other Java enterprise technologies like EJB; the work being done on the JAXM and JAX-RPC packages, and integration with Microsoft's .NET services. The web services picture is still taking shape; there are many platforms and APIs to consider, and many conflicting claims from different marketing groups. And although web services are inherently language-independent, the fit between the fundamental principles on which Java and web services are based means that Java will almost certainly be the predominant language for web services development. If you're a Java developer and want to climb on the web services bandwagon, or if you only want to "kick the tires" and find out what web services has to offer, you will find this book indispensable.

Java Web Services: Up and Running

by Martin Kalin

This example-driven book offers a thorough introduction to Java's APIs for XML Web Services (JAX-WS) and RESTful Web Services (JAX-RS). Java Web Services: Up and Running takes a clear, pragmatic approach to these technologies by providing a mix of architectural overview, complete working code examples, and short yet precise instructions for compiling, deploying, and executing an application. You'll learn how to write web services from scratch and integrate existing services into your Java applications. With Java Web Services: Up and Running, you will: Understand the distinction between SOAP-based and REST-style services Write, deploy, and consume SOAP-based services in core Java Understand the Web Service Definition Language (WSDL) service contract Recognize the structure of a SOAP message Learn how to deliver Java-based RESTful web services and consume commercial RESTful services Know security requirements for SOAP- and REST-based web services Learn how to implement JAX-WS in various application servers Ideal for students as well as experienced programmers, Java Web Services: Up and Running is the concise guide you need to start working with these technologies right away.

JavaScript and HTML5 Now

by Kyle Simpson

A decade ago, Ajax took the Web out of childhood, and now HTML5 and JavaScript are moving the Web into full adulthood. This insightful overview provides striking examples of how these technologies have teamed up to give the Web a truly open platform. Author Kyle Simpson (HTML5 Cookbook) shows you how JavaScript unlocks the power of all of the new functionality in HTML5, giving web applications the capabilities developers have wanted for years. These technologies now provide the raw tools you need in the presentation layer to replace everything you used to do with Flash. You'll discover how: HTML5 builds natively into the web platform things we find most commonly useful, such as audio, video, and drawing The Canvas element is changing graphic animations, games, audio visualization, charting, and video effects Geolocation has spawned "geofencing" and augmented reality Web Workers allows calculations to be performed in the background, rather than compete with the UI Web Sockets is enabling realtime communication for chat, live tech support, multi-user collaboration, and gaming Mobile device APIs will give web apps direct access the phone's camera, vibration, and other capabilities

JavaScript Application Cookbook

by Jerry Bradenbaugh

JavaScript Application Cookbook literally hands the Webmaster a set of ready-to-go, client-side JavaScript applications with thorough documentation to help them understand and extend the applications. By providing such a set of applications, JavaScript Application Cookbook allows Webmasters to immediately add extra functionality to their Web sites.

JavaScript Application Cookbook

by Jerry Bradenbaugh

There is a serious information gap for Webmasters learning client-side JavaScript skills and trying to solve common Web-related problems. Knowing the syntax is one thing, being able to build a useful application is another. And while there are dozens of "how- to" JavaScript books available, few literally hand the Webmaster a set of ready-to-go, client-side JavaScript applications with thorough documentation that enable the reader to fully understand and extend those applications. By providing such a set of applications, JavaScript Application Cookbook allows Webmasters to immediately add extra functionality to their Web sites. This book targets readers with two different skill sets. The primary target is JavaScript-knowledgeable Webmasters and designers who can immediately begin constructing their own versions of the applications. The secondary target is those with little or no JavaScript experience. The included applications are ready for immediate use and require little customization. This book explores both the code and the techniques that are centered around core JavaScript functionality, a functionality that will not become incompatible or obsolete. The source file design of most applications and libraries will help modularize reader Web sites and facilitate easier site management and coding practices. Chapters are organized by application. Among the included applications are: A client-side search engine that will show coders how to build their own search engine and get excellent results, all with a client-side tool A drag-and-drop greeting application that lets users custom build and send DHTML email greetings A GUI image rollover tool that generates cross-browser image rollover code for all versions of JavaScript A robust client-side shopping cart application that lets shoppers browse and shop, while the application keeps a tab of the shopper's selections and a running bill, including tax and shipping An online test application that auto-administers, grades, and displays answers to online exams or surveys An additional value to this book is an online resource (http://www.serve.com/hotsyte/) that discusses the applications and points to other resources. With its focus on providing practical real-world solutions for Webmasters, JavaScript Application Cookbook is destined to become a staple for every JavaScript developer, regardless of experience.

JavaScript Cookbook

by Shelley Powers

Why reinvent the wheel every time you run into a problem with JavaScript? This cookbook is chock-full of code recipes that address common programming tasks, as well as techniques for building web apps that work in any browser. Just copy and paste the code samples into your project -- you'll get the job done faster and learn more about JavaScript in the process. You'll also learn how to take advantage of the latest features in ECMAScript 5 and HTML5, including the new cross-domain widget communication technique, HTML5's video and audio elements, and the drawing canvas. You'll find recipes for using these features with JavaScript to build high-quality application interfaces. Create interactive web and desktop applications Work with JavaScript objects, such as String, Array, Number, and Math Use JavaScript with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and the canvas element Store data in various ways, from the simple to the complex Program the new HTML5 audio and video elements Implement concurrent programming with Web Workers Use and create jQuery plug-ins Use ARIA and JavaScript to create fully accessible rich internet applications

JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, 5th Edition

by David Flanagan

This Fifth Edition is completely revised and expanded to cover JavaScript as it is used in today's Web 2.0 applications. This book is both an example-driven programmer's guide and a keep-on-your-desk reference, with new chapters that explain everything you need to know to get the most out of JavaScript, including: * Scripted HTTP and Ajax * XML processing * Client-side graphics using the canvas tag * Namespaces in JavaScript--essential when writing complex programs * Classes, closures, persistence, Flash, and JavaScript embedded in Java applications Part I explains the core JavaScript language in detail. If you are new to JavaScript, it will teach you the language. If you are already a JavaScript programmer, Part I will sharpen your skills and deepen your understanding of the language. Part II explains the scripting environment provided by web browsers, with a focus on DOM scripting with unobtrusive JavaScript. The broad and deep coverage of client-side JavaScript is illustrated with many sophisticated examples that demonstrate how to: * Generate a table of contents for an HTML document * Display DHTML animations * Automate form validation * Draw dynamic pie charts * Make HTML elements draggable * Define keyboard shortcuts for web applications * Create Ajax-enabled tool tips * Use XPath and XSLT on XML documents loaded with Ajax * And much more Part III is a complete reference for core JavaScript. It documents every class, object, constructor, method, function, property, and constant defined by JavaScript 1.5 and ECMAScript Version 3. Part IV is a reference for client-side JavaScript, covering legacy web browser APIs, the standard Level 2 DOM API, and emerging standards such as the XMLHttpRequest object and the canvas tag. More than 300,000 JavaScript programmers around the world have made this their indispensable reference book for building JavaScript applications.

JavaScript & DHTML Cookbook

by Danny Goodman

In today's Web 2.0 world, JavaScript and Dynamic HTML are at the center of the hot new approach to designing highly interactive pages on the client side. With this environment in mind, the new edition of this book offers bite-sized solutions to very specific scripting problems that web developers commonly face. Each recipe includes a focused piece of code that you can insert right into your application. Why is JavaScript & DHTML Cookbook so popular? After reading thousands of forum threads over the years, author and scripting pioneer Danny Goodman has compiled a list of problems that frequently vex scripters of various experience levels. For every problem he addresses, Goodman not only offers code, but a discussion of how and why the solution works. Recipes range from simple tasks, such as manipulating strings and validating dates in JavaScript, to entire libraries that demonstrate complex tasks, such as cross-browser positioning of HTML elements, sorting tables, and implementing Ajax features on the client. Ideal for novices as well as experienced scripters, this book contains more than 150 recipes for: Working with interactive forms and style sheets Presenting user-friendly page navigation Creating dynamic content via Document Object Model scripting Producing visual effects for stationary content Positioning HTML elements Working with XML data in the browser Recipes in this Cookbook are compatible with the latest W3C standards and browsers, including Internet Explorer 7, Firefox 2, Safari, and Opera 9. Several new recipes provide client-side Ajax solutions, and many recipes from the previous edition have been revised to help you build extensible user interfaces for Web 2.0 applications. If you want to write your own scripts and understand how they work, rather than rely on a commercial web development framework, the JavaScript & DHTML Cookbook is a must.

JavaScript & jQuery: The Missing Manual

by David Sawyer Mcfarland

JavaScript lets you supercharge your HTML with animation, interactivity, and visual effects--but many web designers find the language hard to learn. This jargon-free guide covers JavaScript basics and shows you how to save time and effort with the jQuery library of prewritten JavaScript code. You'll soon be building web pages that feel and act like desktop programs, without having to do much programming. The important stuff you need to know: Make your pages interactive. Create JavaScript events that react to visitor actions. Use animations and effects. Build drop-down navigation menus, pop-ups, automated slideshows, and more. Improve your user interface. Learn how the pros make websites fun and easy to use. Collect data with web forms. Create easy-to-use forms that ensure more accurate visitor responses. Add a dash of Ajax. Enable your web pages to communicate with a web server without a page reload. Practice with living examples. Get step-by-step tutorials for web projects you can build yourself.

JavaScript Pocket Reference

by David Flanagan

JavaScript is the ubiquitous programming language of the Web, and for more than 15 years, JavaScript: The Definitive Guide has been the bible of JavaScript programmers around the world. This book is an all-new excerpt of The Definitive Guide, collecting the essential parts of that hefty volume into this slim yet dense pocket reference. The first 9 chapters document the latest version (ECMAScript 5) of the core JavaScript language, covering: Types, values, and variables Operators, expressions, and statements Objects and arrays Functions and classes The next 5 chapters document the fundamental APIs for using JavaScript with HTML5 and explain how to: Interact with web browser windows Script HTML documents and document elements Modify and apply CSS styles and classes Respond to user input events Communicate with web servers Store data locally on the user's computer This book is a perfect companion to jQuery Pocket Reference.

JavaScript Pocket Reference, 2nd Edition

by David Flanagan

The JavaScript Pocket Reference, 2nd Edition provides a complete overview of the core JavaScript language and client-side scripting environment, as well as quick-reference material on core and client-side objects, methods, and properties. The new edition has been revised to cover JavaScript 1.5, and is particularly useful for developers working with the latest standards-compliant web browsers, such as Internet Explorer 6, Netscape 7, and Mozilla.

JavaScript Step by Step

by Steve Suehring

Get the hands-on, step-by-step guide to learning JavaScript for Web development. Even with no programming experience, you can teach yourself the essentials of working with the JavaScript programming language--one step at a time. With STEP BY STEP, you work at your own pace through hands-on, learn-by-doing exercises. Whether you're building skills for your career or just want to customize your personal Web site, you'll learn the core capabilities and fundamental techniques for working with JavaScript--and begin creating professional-looking Web sites. Includes a companion CD with practice exercises, code samples, data sets, and a fully searchable eBook. A Note Regarding the CD or DVD The print version of this book ships with a CD or DVD. For those customers purchasing one of the digital formats in which this book is available, we are pleased to offer the CD/DVD content as a free download via O'Reilly Media's Digital Distribution services. To download this content, please visit O'Reilly's web site, search for the title of this book to find its catalog page, and click on the link below the cover image (Examples, Companion Content, or Practice Files). Note that while we provide as much of the media content as we are able via free download, we are sometimes limited by licensing restrictions. Please direct any questions or concerns to booktech@oreilly.com.

JavaServer Faces

by Hans Bergsten

JavaServer Faces, or JSF, brings a component-based model to web application development that's similar to the model that's been used in standalone GUI applications for years. The technology builds on the experience gained from Java Servlets, JavaServer Pages, and numerous commercial and open source web application frameworks that simplify the development process. In JavaServer Faces, developers learn how to use this new framework to build real-world web applications. The book contains everything you'll need: how to construct the HTML on the front end; how to create the user interface components that connect the front end to your business objects; how to write a back-end that's JSF-friendly; and how to create the deployment descriptors that tie everything together. JavaServer Faces pays particular attention to simple tasks that are easily ignored, but crucial to any real application: working with tablular data, for example, or enabling and disabling buttons. And this book doesn't hide from the trickier issues, like creating custom components or creating renderers for different presentation layers. Whether you're experienced with JSF or a just starting out, you'll find everything you need to know about this technology in this book. Topics covered include:The JSF environment Creating and rendering components Validating input Handling user-generated events Controlling page navigation Working with tabular data Internationalization Integration between JSF and Struts Developing custom renderers and custom componentsJavaServer Faces is a complete guide to the crucial new JSF technology. If you develop web applications, JSF belongs in your toolkit, and this book belongs in your library.

JavaTM and SOAP

by Robert Englander

Java and SOAP provides Java developers with an in-depth look at SOAP (the Simple Object Access Protocol). Of course, it covers the basics: what SOAP is, why it's soared to a spot on the Buzzwords' Top Ten list, and what its features and capabilities are. And it shows you how to work with some of the more common Java APIs in the SOAP world: Apache SOAP and GLUE. Java and SOAP also discusses interoperability between the major SOAP platforms, including Microsoft's .NET, SOAP messaging, SOAP attachments, messag

JavaTM and XML, 2nd Edition

by Brett Mclaughlin

New chapters on Advanced SAX, Advanced DOM, SOAP, and data binding, as well as new examples throughout, bring the second edition of Java and XML thoroughly up to date. Except for a concise introduction to XML basics, the book focuses entirely on using XML from Java applications. It's a worthy companion for Java developers working with XML or involved in messaging, web services, or the new peer-to-peer movement.

JavaTM and XML Data Binding

by Brett Mclaughlin

This new title provides an in-depth technical look at XML Data Binding. The book offers complete documentation of all features in both the Sun Microsystems JAXB API and popular open source alternative implementations (Enhydra Zeus, Exolabs Castor and Quick). It also gets into significant detail about when data binding is appropriate to use, and provides numerous practical examples of using data binding in applications.

JavaTM and XSLT

by Eric M. Burke

Learn how to use XSL transformations in Java programs ranging from stand-alone applications to servlets. Java and XSLT introduces XSLT and then shows you how to apply transformations in real-world situations, such as developing a discussion forum, transforming documents from one form to another, and generating content for wireless devices.

JavaTM Enterprise Best Practices

by The O'Reilly Java Authors

Until Java Enterprise Best Practices, advanced Java developers relied on the advice of a loose-knit community of fellow developers, time-consuming online searches for examples or suggestions for the immediate problem they faced, and tedious trial-and-error. But Java has grown to include a huge number of APIs, classes, and methods. Now it is simply too large for even the most intrepid developer to know it all. The need for a written compendium of J2EE Best Practices has never been greater. Java Enterprise Be

JavaTM Enterprise in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition

by Jim Farley David Flanagan William Crawford

Completely revised and updated for the new 2.0 version of Sun Microsystems Java Enterprise Edition software, Java Enterprise in a Nutshell covers all of the J2EE APIs, including RMI, Java IDL, JDBC, JNDI, Java Servlet, and Enterprise JavaBeans, with a fast-paced tutorial and compact reference on each technology. Then Java Enterprise in a Nutshell goes even further, providing a classic O'Reilly-style quick reference for all of the classes in the various packages that comprise the Enterprise APIs - covering t

JavaTM Extreme Programming Cookbook

by Eric M. Burke Brian M. Coyner

Brimming with over 100 "recipes" for getting down to business and actually doing XP, the Java Extreme Programming Cookbookdoesn't try to "sell" you on XP; it succinctly documents the most important features of popular open source tools for XP in Java-- including Ant, Junit, HttpUnit, Cactus, Tomcat, XDoclet-- and then digs right in, providing recipes for implementing the tools in real-world environments.

JavaTM Management Extensions

by J. Steven Perry

Java Management Extensions is a practical, hands-on guide to using the JMX APIs, Sun Microsystem's new Java-based tool for managing enterprise applications. This one-of-a kind book is a complete treatment of the JMX architecture (both the instrumentation level and the agent level), and it's loaded with real-world examples for implementing Management Extensions. It also contains useful information at the higher level about JMX (the "big picture") to help technical managers and architects who are evaluating v

JavaTM NIO

by Ron Hitchens

Java NIO explores the new I/O capabilities of version 1.4 in detail and shows you how to put these features to work to greatly improve the efficiency of the Java code you write. This compact volume examines the typical challenges that Java programmers face with I/O and shows you how to take advantage of the capabilities of the new I/O features. You'll learn how to put these tools to work using examples of common, real-world I/O problems and see how the new features have a direct impact on responsiveness, sc

Showing 91,176 through 91,200 of 146,521 results

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