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Divine Art, Infernal Machine: The Reception of Printing in the West from First Impressions to the Sense of an Ending

by Elizabeth L. Eisenstein

The author has written a magisterial and highly readable account of five centuries of ambivalent attitudes toward printing and printers. Once again, she makes a compelling case for the ways in which technological developments and cultural shifts are intimately related.

Divine Beginnings (Divine #0)

by P. C. Cast

Go back in time, fifty years before the events of New York Times bestselling author P. C. Cast's Partholon books. . . Something isn't right at Guardian Castle, and Aine can't figure out what. As Healer, she's supposed to be making things better, but there's a darkness that can't be brightened. And then Aine finds an injured Fomorian--winged, dark, blood-thirsty and inherently evil. Or is he? Because there's something about Tegan that Aine can't resist. . . and once they've shared blood, Aine realizes that everything she's always believed is going to be cast aside. . . .

Divine Blood

by Martinez Hewlett

It is an astonishing discovery: a bloodstained burial shroud entombed in the crumbling walls of a historic French Monastery. Carbon dating concludes the fabric is from the time of Christ. A molecular biologist conducts a daring experiment: the cloning of genetic material recovered from the cloth. Now two men--Father Laurent Carriere and scientist Josh Francis--are plunged into the center of a worldwide religious and political power struggle. But even as Washington and the Vatican vie for control of the relic, members of a secret society take steps to reclaim the holy artifact they have sworn to protect--by any means necessary. Selected by the Literary Guild® and the Doubleday Book Club®.

Divine by Blood (Divine #3)

by P. C. Cast

Conceived in a lie and trapped in a tree throughout her gestation, Morrigan's birth was truly magical. After that start, she spent the next eighteen years raised as a normal girl in Oklahoma. Upon discovering the truth of her heritage, her rage and grief take on a power of their own, carrying her back to the world of Partholon. Yet, instead of being respected as the daughter of the Goddess Incarnate, Morrigan feels like a shunned outsider. In her desperation to belong to Partholon, she confronts forces she can't fully understand or control. And soon a strange darkness draws closer. . . .

Divine by Choice (Divine #2)

by P. C. Cast

Shannon Parker has finally come to terms with life in the mythical world of Partholon. She loves her centaur husband, her connection to the goddess Epona and the pampering that comes with both! She's almost forgotten her old life on Earth--especially when she discovers she's pregnant. . . . Then a sudden burst of power sends her back to Oklahoma. Without magic, Shannon can't return to Partholon--and so she needs to find help. Trouble is, it might take the form of a man as tempting as her husband. And along the way she'll discover that being divine by mistake is a lot easier than being divine by choice. . . .

Divine by Mistake (Divine #1)

by P. C. Cast

The only excitement Shannon Parker expects while on summer vacation is a little shopping. But when an antique vase calls to her, she finds herself transported to Partholon, where she's treated like a goddess. A very temperamental goddess. . . Somehow Shannon has stepped into another's role as the Goddess Incarnate of Epona. And while there's an upside--what woman doesn't like lots of pampering?--it also comes with a ritual marriage to a centaur and threats against her new people. Oh, and everyone disliking her because they think she's her double. Somehow Shannon needs to figure out how to get back to Oklahoma without being killed, married to a horse or losing her mind. . . .

Divine Callings

by Richard N. Pitt

One of the unique aspects of the religious profession is the high percentage of those who claim to be "called by God" to do their work. This call is particularly important within African American Christian traditions. Divine Callings offers a rare sociological examination of this markedly understudied phenomenon within black ministry. Richard N. Pitt draws on over 100 in-depth interviews with Black Pentecostal ministers in the Church of God in Christ--both those ordained and licensed and those aspiring--to examine how these men and women experience and pursue "the call." Viewing divine calling as much as a social process as it is a spiritual one, Pitt delves into the personal stories of these individuals to explore their work as active agents in the process of fulfilling their calling. In some cases, those called cannot find pastoral work due to gender discrimination, lack of clergy positions, and educational deficiencies. Pitt looks specifically at how those who have not obtained clergy positions understand their call, exploring the influences of psychological experience, the congregational acceptance of their call, and their response to the training process. He emphasizes how those called reconceptualize clericalism in terms of who can be called, how that call has to be certified, and what those called are meant to do, offering insight into how social actors adjust to structural constraints.

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri Clive James

"Under James's uncanny touch, seven long centuries drop away, and the great poem is startlingly fresh and new."--Stephen Greenblatt The Divine Comedy is the precursor of modern literature, and Clive James's translation--decades in the making--gives us the entire epic as a single, coherent, and compulsively readable lyric poem. For the first time ever in an English translation, James makes the bold choice of switching from the terza rima composition of the original Italian--a measure that strains in English--to the quatrain. The result is "rhymed English stanzas that convey the music of Dante's triple rhymes" (Edward Mendelson). James's translation reproduces the same wonderful momentum of the original Italian that propels the reader along the pilgrim's path from Hell to Heaven, from despair to revelation.

The Divine Comedy

by Dante

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP The first volume of The Divine Comedy--Dante begins his downward journey through the seven circles of Hell. EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES: A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Dante's famous poem as translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri

Dante's Divine Comedy relates the allegorical tale of the poet's journey through the three realms of the dead. Accompanied through the Inferno and Purgatory by Virgil--author of the Roman epic the Aeniad--Dante encounters mythical, historical, and contemporaneous figures in their respective afterlives. Relying on classical (pagan) mythology and Christian imagery and theology, Dante imagines diverse vivid and inventive punishments for the various sinners he encounters, which have become part of the Western imagination. Upon their approach to Paradise, which as a pagan, no matter how worthy, the Latin poet cannot enter, Virgil relinquishes his role as guide to Beatrice. Dante's chaste beloved then accompanies him along the ascent, as they encounter the blessed and the holy, and Dante arrives at a vision of the heavenly paradise.

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri John Ciardi

Dante Alighieri's poetic masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, is a moving human drama, an unforgettable visionary journey through the infinite torment of Hell, up the arduous slopes of Purgatory, and on to the glorious realm of Paradise--the sphere of universal harmony and eternal salvation. 10 illustrations

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books. com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CANTO II Dante prepares for his journey. The Muses are invoked. Dante is haunted vrith misgivings. Vergil rebukes his cowardice, and relates how Beatrice visited him in Limbo, and sent him to Dante's aid. Dante declares himself encouraged and ready to set out. Day was departing, and the dusky air Releasing from their toils the animals Which are on earth; and I, all, all alone, Prepared myself to undergo the stress Both of the journey and the suffering, Which memory that errs not shall portray. Now Muses, aid me Lofty genius, aid 0 Memory, who hast written what I saw, Here shall thy nobleness be manifest. 10 I thus began: Poet, who guidest me, Consider well my power if it suffice, Ere thou commit me to the arduous road. Thou sayest Silvius' father, mortal still, Went to the world immortal, and was there Bodily-wise. If gracious then to him The Adversary of all evil was, ? Considering the great result, from him Destined to issue, and the who and what, ? This, to a man of understanding, seems 20 Not unbefitting; for of sacred Rome And of her empire, he, in highest Heaven, Was chosen to be father; both of which, To say the truth, were for the holy place Decreed, where he who the successor is Of greater Peter, sits. Things which the cause Were of his triumph and the papal robe, He learned upon that journey, for the which Thou dost extol him. Thither, afterward, The 'chosen vessel' went, to bring back thence 30 A confirmation to that faith wherein Salvation's way begins. But as to me, Why go I thither, or who suffers it? Aeneas I am not, nor am I Paul: Worthy of this nor I nor others deem me. And therefore, if I yield myself to go, I fear my going may be folly. Thou Art wise, and kn.

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri Paul Gustave Dore

Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso -- the three fates of the deceased become the three pillars of an epic poem. The Divine Comedy, written by Italian poet Dante Alighieri in the fourteenth century, is considered the foremost work in Italian literature. The journey begins with Dante's descent into the depths of Hell where he witnesses those eternally separated from God. Then he climbs the mountain of Purgatory where Christian souls undergo final purification, before finally touring the celestial circles of Heaven where he is filled with the image of God. An allegorical work, the comedy is representative of the soul's journey towards God.Influential for seven centuries, this classic is a must have for lovers of great literature, and the luxurious leather-bound edition from Canterbury Classics will make a stunning addition to any library.

The Divine Comedy

by Dante Alighieri

Dante's Divine Comedy relates the allegorical tale of the poet's journey through the three realms of the dead. Accompanied through the Inferno and Purgatory by Virgil--author of the Roman epic the Aeniad--Dante encounters mythical, historical, and contemporaneous figures in their respective afterlives. Relying on classical (pagan) mythology and Christian imagery and theology, Dante imagines diverse vivid and inventive punishments for the various sinners he encounters, which have become part of the Western imagination. Upon their approach to Paradise, which as a pagan, no matter how worthy, the Latin poet cannot enter, Virgil relinquishes his role as guide to Beatrice. Dante's chaste beloved then accompanies him along the ascent, as they encounter the blessed and the holy, and Dante arrives at a vision of the heavenly paradise.

The Divine Comedy - Hell

by Dante Alighieri Translator Dorothy L. Sayers (Introduction by

Guided by the poet Virgil, Dante plunges to the very depths of Hell and embarks on his arduous journey towards God. Together they descend through the nine circles of the underworld and encounter the tormented souls of the damned - from heretics and pagans to gluttons, criminals and seducers - who tell of their sad fates and predict events still to come in Dante's life. In this first part of his Divine Comedy, Dante fused satire and humour with intellect and soaring passion to create an immortal Christian allegory of mankind's search for self-knowledge and spiritual enlightenment.

Divine Comedy: Journeys Through a Regional Geography: Three New Works

by John Kinsella

"One of the most original and poignantly authentic poets writing in English."--Harold Bloom A three-part, epic work challenging our notions about the environment by Australia's preeminent poet of the natural world. Consisting of Purgatorio: Up Close, Paradiso: Rupture, and Inferno: Leisure Centre, John Kinsella's "distractions" on Dante's Divine Comedy journey through time and space. Set in a wheat-belt Western Australia, these poems are a phantasmagoria of the real and imagined, depicting nature in its full regalia, resisting forces of environmental damage and human indifference.

The Divine Comedy, Paradise

by Dante Alighieri H. F. Cary

Poet's classic vision of Paradise

The Divine Comedy: Paradise

by Dante Alighieri

In Paradise, having plunged to the uttermost depths of Hell and climbed the Mount of Purgatory, Dante ascends to Heaven, continuing his soul's search for God, guided by his beloved Beatrice. As he progresses through the spheres of Paradise he grows in understanding, until he finally experiences divine love in the radiant presence of the deity. Examining eternal questions of faith, desire and enlightenment, Dante exercised all his learning and wit, wrath and tenderness in his creation of one of the greatest of all Christian allegories. Translation is by Dorothy L. Sayers, completed and introduced by Barbara Reynolds.

Showing 94,726 through 94,750 of 230,025 results

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