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Showing 97,726 through 97,750 of 100,177 results

Who Stole Feminism, How Women Betrayed Women

by Christina Hoff-Sommers

Author believes the feminist movement was betrayed and subverted by some of its female leaders.

Who Stole the American Dream?

by Hedrick Smith

Pulitzer Prize winner Hedrick Smith's new book is an extraordinary achievement, an eye-opening account of how, over the past four decades, the American Dream has been dismantled and we became two Americas. In his bestselling The Russians, Smith took millions of readers inside the Soviet Union. In The Power Game, he took us inside Washington's corridors of power. Now Smith takes us across America to show how seismic changes, sparked by a sequence of landmark political and economic decisions, have transformed America. As only a veteran reporter can, Smith fits the puzzle together, starting with Lewis Powell's provocative memo that triggered a political rebellion that dramatically altered the landscape of power from then until today. This is a book full of surprises and revelations--the accidental beginnings of the 401(k) plan, with disastrous economic consequences for many; the major policy changes that began under Jimmy Carter; how the New Economy disrupted America's engine of shared prosperity, the "virtuous circle" of growth, and how America lost the title of "Land of Opportunity." Smith documents the transfer of $6 trillion in middle-class wealth from homeowners to banks even before the housing boom went bust, and how the U.S. policy tilt favoring the rich is stunting America's economic growth. This book is essential reading for all of us who want to understand America today, or why average Americans are struggling to keep afloat. Smith reveals how pivotal laws and policies were altered while the public wasn't looking, how Congress often ignores public opinion, why moderate politicians got shoved to the sidelines, and how Wall Street often wins politically by hiring over 1,400 former government officials as lobbyists. Smith talks to a wide range of people, telling the stories of Americans high and low. From political leaders such as Bill Clinton, Newt Gingrich, and Martin Luther King, Jr., to CEOs such as Al Dunlap, Bob Galvin, and Andy Grove, to heartland Middle Americans such as airline mechanic Pat O'Neill, software systems manager Kristine Serrano, small businessman John Terboss, and subcontractor Eliseo Guardado, Smith puts a human face on how middle-class America and the American Dream have been undermined. This magnificent work of history and reportage is filled with the penetrating insights, provocative discoveries, and the great empathy of a master journalist. Finally, Smith offers ideas for restoring America's great promise and reclaiming the American Dream. "Hedrick Smith has done it again! Who Stole the American Dream? provides a readable and comprehensive account of how Americans have been robbed of our dream of a broad middle class over the past forty years. It is essential reading."--Jay W. Lorsch, the Louis E. Kirstein Professor of Human Relations, Harvard Business School

Who Stole the Wizard of Oz?

by Avi

The mystery revolves around a rare edition of The Wizard of Oz missing from the local library. When Becky is accused of stealing it, she and her twin brother Toby set out to catch the real thief and prove her innocence. Clues cleverly hidden in four other books lead to a hidden treasure--and a gripping adventure.

Who Told You That You Were Naked?

by Victor Schlatter

Victor Schlatter brings fresh biblical insight on the history of the Church and Israel. He starts with Adam and ends with the Anti-Christ. Be prepared to have your views challenged.

Who Took The Farmer's Hat?

by Joan L. Nodset

The farmer was very fond of his old brown hat. But then the wind came and blew the hat away. As fast as the farmer ran, the wind carried the hat even faster. Would the farmer ever find it?

Who Votes Now?

by Jonathan Nagler Jan E. Leighley

Who Votes Now? compares the demographic characteristics and political views of voters and nonvoters in American presidential elections since 1972 and examines how electoral reforms and the choices offered by candidates influence voter turnout. Drawing on a wealth of data from the U.S. Census Bureau's Current Population Survey and the American National Election Studies, Jan Leighley and Jonathan Nagler demonstrate that the rich have consistently voted more than the poor for the past four decades, and that voters are substantially more conservative in their economic views than nonvoters. They find that women are now more likely to vote than men, that the gap in voting rates between blacks and whites has largely disappeared, and that older Americans continue to vote more than younger Americans. Leighley and Nagler also show how electoral reforms such as Election Day voter registration and absentee voting have boosted voter turnout, and how turnout would also rise if parties offered more distinct choices. Providing the most systematic analysis available of modern voter turnout, Who Votes Now? reveals that persistent class bias in turnout has enduring political consequences, and that it really does matter who votes and who doesn't.

Who Walk in Darkness

by Chandler Brossard

Considered by many to be the first Beat novel, this underground classic follows a clique of young bohemians from dive bar to dance hall in 1940s New York Recently fired from his job and not yet ready to find a new one, aspiring author Blake Williams begins his evenings at the Sporting Club Bar in Greenwich Village, where he knows he will find Henry Porter. An ambitious and manipulative writer rumored to be "passing" for white, Henry has a cold-hearted charisma that is both irresistible and infuriating to his friends. While sipping beers delivered by the bar's surly Italian waiter, Henry and Blake discuss their plans for the night: a trip uptown to dance to the strains of a Puerto Rican orchestra, perhaps, or a prize fight at Madison Square Garden, or maybe a party in a dim and crowded apartment on Prince Street, reefer smoke clouding the air. The possibilities are endless--until the money runs out. Originally published in 1952, Who Walk in Darkness was one of the most controversial novels of midcentury America. Its cast of hip young men and women--from the unforgettable antihero Henry Porter to Harry Lee, a talented but heavy-drinking novelist going through a period of grave self-doubt--were based on well-known figures of the era. Their existential crises are portrayed with an honesty that shocked the publishing establishment and helped give rise to one of the most significant literary movements in American history. As relevant today as it was more than half a century ago, Who Walk in Darkness is the masterwork of an author far ahead of his time and a captivating character study whose influence can be felt in novels as wide-ranging as Jack Kerouac's On the Road and Philip Roth's The Human Stain.

Who Wants a Ride?

by Robin Bernard

All kinds of animal babies rest on their mothers.

Who Wants Pizza? The Kids’ Guide to the History, Science and Culture of Food

by Jan Thornhill

Using one of the most common foods that kids eat -- pizza -- as a jumping off point, and, using a bold, graphic approach, Thornhill take an extraordinary and comprehensive look at some of the following topics: Why we eat and why we eat what we eat, how we moved from eating the raw flesh of animals to becoming sophisticated consumers of food, how food is produced for an ever-growing population, and more.

Who Was Abigail Adams?

by True Kelley John O'Brien

Abigail Adams was a strong woman far ahead of her time. She urged her husband, President John Adams, to "remember the ladies" and despite having no formal education herself, she later advocated for equal education in public schools for both boys and girls. She was also the first First Lady to live in the White House! This biography tells the story of Abigail Adams and her role in America's Revolutionary War period.

Who Was Abigail Adams?

by True Kelley John O'Brien

Abigail Adams was a strong woman far ahead of her time. She urged her husband, President John Adams, to "remember the ladies" and despite having no formal education herself, she later advocated for equal education in public schools for both boys and girls. She was also the first First Lady to live in the White House! This biography tells the story of Abigail Adams and her role in America's Revolutionary War period.

Who Was Abraham Lincoln?

by Janet B. Pascal

As the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln guided the nation through the Civil War and saw the abolition of slavery. But Lincoln was tragically the first President to be assassinated.

Who Was Alfred Hitchcock?

by Meg Belviso Nancy Harrison Pamela D. Pollack Jonathan Moore

Known as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time, Alfred Hitchcock's unique vision in movies like Psycho and The Birds sent shivers down our spines and shockwaves through the film industry. His innovative camera techniques have been studied for decades and his gift for storytelling cemented his place in history. Many directors make great movies, but the genius of Hitchcock helped make movies great. Learn how a chubby boy from London became the "Master of Suspense."

Who Was Amelia Earhart?

by Kate Boehm Jerome Nancy Harrison David Cain

Amelia Earhart was a woman of many "firsts." In 1932, she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. In 1935, she also became the first woman to fly across the Pacific. From her early years to her mysterious 1937 disappearance while attempting a flight around the world, readers will find Amelia Earhart's life a fascinating story.

Who Was Annie Oakley?

by Stephanie Spinner

You want girl power? Meet Annie Oakley! Born in 1860, she became one of the best-loved and most famous women of her generation. She amazed audiences all over the world with her sharpshooting, horse-riding, action-packed performances. In an age when most women stayed home, she traveled the world and forged a new image for American women.

Who Was Ben Franklin?

by Dennis Brindell Fradin John O'Brien Nancy Harrison

Ben Franklin was the scientist who, with the help of a kite, discovered that lightning is electricity. He was also a statesman, an inventor, a printer, and an author-a man of such amazingly varied talents that some people claimed he had magical powers! Full of all the details kids will want to know, the true story of Benjamin Franklin is by turns sad and funny, but always honest and awe-inspiring.

Who Was Betsy Ross?

by John O'Brien Nancy Harrison James Buckley

Born the eighth of seventeen children in Philadelphia, Betsy Ross lived in a time when the American colonies were yearning for independence from British rule. Ross worked as a seamstress and was eager to contribute to the cause, making tents and repairing uniforms when the colonies declared war. By 1779 she was filling cartridges for the Continental Army. Did she sew the first flag? That's up for debate, but Who Was Betsy Ross? tells the story of a fierce patriot who certainly helped create the flag of a new nation.

Who Was Charles Darwin?

by Deborah Hopkinson

As a young boy, Charles Darwin hated school and was often scolded for conducting "useless" experiments. Yet his passion for the natural world was so strong that he suffered through terrible seasickness during his five-year voyage aboard The Beagle. Darwin collected new creatures from the coasts of Africa, South America and the Galapagos Islands, and expanded his groundbreaking ideas that would change people's understanding of the natural world.

Who Was Dr. Seuss?

by Nancy Pascal Janet Harrison

Ted Geisel loved to doodle from the time he was a kid. He had an offbeat, fun-loving personality. He often threw dinner parties where guests wore outrageous hats! And he donned quirky hats when thinking up ideas for books-?like his classic The Cat in the Hat. This biography, with black-and-white illustrations throughout, brings an amazingly gifted author/illustrator to life. .

Who Was Eleanor Roosevelt?

by Gare Thompson Nancy Harrison

For a long time, the main role of First Ladies was to act as hostesses of the White House...until Eleanor Roosevelt. Born in 1884, Eleanor was not satisfied to just be a glorified hostess for her husband, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Eleanor had a voice, and she used it to speak up against poverty and racism. She had experience and knowledge of many issues, and fought for laws to help the less fortunate. She had passion, energy, and a way of speaking that made people listen, and she used these gifts to campaign for her husband and get him elected president-four times! A fascinating historical figure in her own right, Eleanor Roosevelt changed the role of First Lady forever.

Who Was Ernest Shackleton?

by James Buckley Max Hergenrother

As a boy he preferred reading sea stories to doing homework and, at age 16, became an apprentice seaman. Subsequently, Ernest Shackleton's incredible journeys to the South Pole in the early 1900s made him one of the most famous explorers of modern times. His courage in the face of dangerous conditions and unforeseeable tragedies reveal the great leader that he was. His historic 1914 journey aboard the Endurance has all the drama of an action movie.

Who Was Gandhi?

by Nancy Harrison Dana Meachen Rau Jerry Hoare

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born in 1869 in British-occupied India. Though he studied law in London and spent his early adulthood in South Africa, he remained devoted to his homeland and spent the later part of his life working to make India an independent nation. Calling for non-violent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights around the world. Gandhi is recognized internationally as a symbol of hope, peace, and freedom.

Who Was Harry Houdini?

by Tui Sutherland John A. O'Brien

Who Was Harry Houdini? a) A magician who could escape from any handcuffs, chains, jail cells, or locks ever invented, b) The first pilot to fly a plane in Australia, c) A famous movie star who was recognized around the world, d) All of the above! Find out more about the real Harry Houdini in this fun and exciting illustrated biography.

Who Was Helen Keller?

by Gare Thompson

At age two, Helen Keller became deaf and blind. She lived in a world of silence and darkness and she spent the rest of her life struggling to break through it. But with the help of teacher Annie Sullivan, Helen learned to read, write, and do many amazing things.

Who was Jesus?

by George Albert Wells

What do we know about the historical origins of Christianity? How reliable are the 27 books of the New testament? Is Jesus a historical or a legendary figure?In the last 150 years, scholars have established many facts about the New testament, facts still largely unknown to the general public or to most church members. They have shown that the letters of Paul are earlier than the gospels and that many of the gospel stories about Jesus were unknown to Paul, that the earliest New Testament gospel is Mark and that the other gospels draw upon Mark and a now-lost gospel scholars call "Q", that none of the gospels is the work of an eye-witness, and that all the gospel writers were out of touch with events in Palestine.In Who Was Jesus?, G.A. Wells presents a survey of critical scholarly findings on the New Testament, in each case explaining the reasons for the scholars' conclusions, and describing those issues where scholars still disagree. By lucidly recounting the principles on which New testament criticism is based, this book enables readers to make up their own minds, while gently pointing to Wells' radical conclusion that the totality of the evidence supports the hypothesis of an entirely legendary Jesus. In the author's opinion, the analyses of most critics have been inhibited by their theological preconceptions, so that they have failed to draw the disturbing conclusions warranted by their findings.

Showing 97,726 through 97,750 of 100,177 results

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