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Cultivating Science, Harvesting Power: Science and Industrial Agriculture in California

by Christopher R. Henke

Henke explores the ways that science helped build the Salinas Valley and California's broader farm industry. He focuses on the case of University of California, scientists stationed in counties throughout the state who have stepped forward to help growers deal with crises.

Cultivating the Mind of Love

by Thich Nhat Hanh Natalie Goldberg

Korea's premier poet, the former Buddhist monk Ko Un, presents 108 Zen poems. Ko Un, who is affectionately called "the great mountain peak" by his friends, is a traveler on the Way. Throughout his eventful life as monk, poet, novelist, political dissident, husband and father, Ko Un has dashed like a galloping horse, always moving and searching.When this volume first appeared in 1997 with the title Beyond Self, Ko Un and the translators were not very happy with it. In addition to now receiving a title which more accurately reflects the the original Korean, the translations have been slightly revised to bring them closer to the originals. Also added were eleven original brush painting by the author.It is a joy to re-introduce Ko Un, a compassionate poet, who said that "A poet should cry many days before becoming a poet. A poet must have cried for others when he was three or four years old." The poems in this volume offer 108 glimpses of Ko Un. His poems are also 108 ways to look at ourselves.Forewords by Thich Nhat Hanh and Allen Ginsberg. 11 new brush-painting illustrations by the author.

Cultivating the Nile: The Everyday Politics of Water in Egypt

by Jessica Barnes

The waters of the Nile are fundamental to life in Egypt. In this compelling ethnography, Jessica Barnes explores the everyday politics of water: a politics anchored in the mundane yet vital acts of blocking, releasing, channeling, and diverting water. She examines the quotidian practices of farmers, government engineers, and international donors as they interact with the waters of the Nile flowing into and through Egypt. Situating these local practices in relation to broader processes that affect Nile waters, Barnes moves back and forth from farmer to government ministry, from irrigation canal to international water conference. By showing how the waters of the Nile are constantly made and remade as a resource by people in and outside Egypt, she demonstrates the range of political dynamics, social relations, and technological interventions that must be incorporated into understandings of water and its management.

The Cultivation of Hatred: The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud (The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud)

by Peter Gay

With the same sweep, authority, and originality that marked his best-selling Freud: A Life for Our Time, Peter Gay here takes us on a remarkable journey through middle-class Victorian culture. Gay's search through middle-class Victorian culture, illuminated by lively portraits of such daunting figures as Bismarck, Darwin and his acolytes, George Eliot, and the great satirists Daumier and Wilhelm Busch, covers a vast terrain: the relations between men and women, wit, demagoguery, and much more. We discover the multiple ways in which the nineteenth century at once restrained aggressive behavior and licensed it. Aggression split the social universe into insiders and outsiders. "By gathering up communities of insiders," Professor Gay writes, the Victorians "discovered--only too often invented--a world of strangers beyond the pale, of individuals and classes, races and nations it was perfectly proper to debate, patronize, ridicule, bully, exploit, or exterminate." The aggressions so channeled or bottled could not be contained forever. Ultimately, they exploded in the First World War.

Cults and Rites in Ancient Greece

by Paul Cartledge Michael H. Jameson Allaire B. Stallsmith Michael H. Jameson Allaire B. Stallsmith

This volume assembles fourteen highly influential articles written by Michael H. Jameson over a period of nearly fifty years, edited and updated by the author himself. They represent both the scope and the signature style of Jameson's engagement with the subject of ancient Greek religion. The collection complements the original publications in two ways: firstly, it makes the articles more accessible; and secondly, the volume offers readers a unique opportunity to observe that over almost five decades of scholarship Jameson developed a distinctive method, a signature style, a particular perspective, a way of looking that could perhaps be fittingly called a 'Jamesonian approach' to the study of Greek religion. This approach, recognizable in each article individually, becomes unmistakable through the concentration of papers collected here. The particulars of the Jamesonian approach are insightfully discussed in the five introductory essays written for this volume by leading world authorities on polis religion.

Cults: Faith, Healing, and Coercion

by Marc Galanter

Using material gleaned from 25 years of direct encounters with cults and their detractors, Galanter offers the most extensive psychological analysis of these organizations available. 32 halftones.

Cultural Adaptation of CBT for Serious Mental Illness

by David Kingdon Douglas Turkington Peter Phiri Narsimha Pinninti Shanaya Rathod

A comprehensive guide designed to enable CBT practitioners to effectively engage people from diverse cultural backgrounds by applying culturally-sensitive therapeutic techniques Adapts core CBT techniques including reattribution, normalization, explanation development, formulating, reality testing, inference chaining and resetting expectations High profile author team includes specialists in culturally-sensitive CBT along with world-renowned pioneers in the application of CBT to serious mental illness Contains the most up-to-date research on CBT in ethnic minority groups available

Cultural Agency in the Americas

by Doris Sommer

"Cultural agency" refers to a range of creative activities that contribute to society, including pedagogy, research, activism, and the arts. Focusing on the connections between creativity and social change in the Americas, this collection encourages scholars to become cultural agents by reflecting on exemplary cases and thereby making them available as inspirations for more constructive theory and more innovative practice. Creativity supports democracy because artistic, administrative, and interpretive experiments need margins of freedom that defy monolithic or authoritarian regimes. The ingenious ways in which people pry open dead-ends of even apparently intractable structures suggest that cultural studies as we know it has too often gotten stuck in critique. Intellectual responsibility can get beyond denunciation by acknowledging and nurturing the resourcefulness of common and uncommon agents. Based in North and South America, scholars from fields including anthropology, performance studies, history, literature, and communications studies explore specific variations of cultural agency across Latin America. Contributors reflect, for example, on the paradoxical programming and reception of a state-controlled Cuban radio station that connects listeners at home and abroad; on the intricacies of indigenous protests in Brazil; and the formulation of cultural policies in cosmopolitan Mexico City. One contributor notes that trauma theory targets individual victims when it should address collective memory as it is worked through in performance and ritual; another examines how Mapuche leaders in Argentina perceived the pitfalls of ethnic essentialism and developed new ways to intervene in local government. Whether suggesting modes of cultural agency, tracking exemplary instances of it, or cautioning against potential missteps, the essays in this book encourage attentiveness to, and the multiplication of, the many extraordinary instantiations of cultural resourcefulness and creativity throughout Latin America and beyond. Contributors. Arturo Arias, Claudia Briones, Nstor Garca Canclini, Denise Corte, Juan Carlos Godenzzi, Charles R. Hale, Ariana Hernndez-Reguant, Claudio Lomnitz, Jess Martn Barbero, J. Lorand Matory, Rosamel Millamn, Diane M. Nelson, Mary Louise Pratt, Alcida Rita Ramos, Doris Sommer, Diana Taylor, Santiago Villaveces

Cultural Amnesia: Necessary Memories from History and the Arts

by Clive James

"I can't remember when I've learned as much from something I've read--or laughed as much while doing it."--Jacob Weisberg, Slate Finally in paperback after six hardcover printings, this international bestseller is an encyclopedic A-Z masterpiece--the perfect introduction to the very core of Western humanism. Clive James rescues, or occasionally destroys, the careers of many of the greatest thinkers, humanists, musicians, artists, and philosophers of the twentieth century. Soaring to Montaigne-like heights, Cultural Amnesia is precisely the book to burnish these memories of a Western civilization that James fears is nearly lost.

Cultural Analysis in an Age of Globalization

by Benjamin Lee

Cultural Analysis in an Age of Globalization draws upon contemporary work in anthropology, philosophy, linguistics, and literary theory to analyze the rise of "speculative capital" and its role in a global shift from production-centered to circulation-centered capitalism.

The Cultural Analysis of Texts

by Mikko Lehtonen

Drawing upon a range of perspectives from textual and cultural studies, this book synthesizes textual, contextual and audience analysis into an overall picture of meaning making. Using examples ranging from Balzac to blonde jokes, modernist poetry to pop lyrics, the book discusses the factors that contribute to the fomation of meaning: language, media, texts, contexts and readers. In the cultural study of texts - texts, contexts and practices - are equally important, the author argues. Meaning making takes place in the articulation between these different elements. But how can one examine all three areas at the same time? In The Cultural Analysis of Texts, Mikko Lehtonen develops a model to enable just such an approach.

Cultural and Contextual Perspectives on Developmental Risk and Well-Being

by Jacob A. Burack Louis A. Schmidt

Developmental risk refers to conditions, characteristics, experiences, or situations with potentially deleterious effects that lead to outcomes later in life that do not meet societal expectations. While risk is typically framed as the statistical probability of a problematic outcome in relation to the general population, the converse notion of well-being is considered in relation to the level of functioning at a given developmental stage. The contributors to this volume provide insight into developmental well-being by examining the ways that culture and context affect outcomes associated with various types of risk, such as those related to oppression, academic performance, family background, life history, physical health, and psychiatric conditions. Even though certain outcomes may seem inevitable in cases involving harmful environments, diseases, and disorders, they are virtually all influenced by complex interactions among individuals, their families, communities, and societies.

The Cultural and Intercultural Dimensions of English as a Lingua Franca

by Fred Dervin Prue Holmes

This book investigates the cultural and intercultural aspects of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). Authors discuss how 'culture' and the 'intercultural' can be understood, theorised and operationalised in ELF, and how the concepts can be integrated into formats of ELF-oriented learning and teaching. The various cultural connotations are also discussed (ideological, political, religious and historical) and whether it is possible to use and/or teach a lingua franca as if it were culturally neutral. The chapters consider the communication and pedagogical implications of the cultural and intercultural dimensions of ELF and offer suggestions for new directions in ELF research, pedagogy and curriculum development.

Cultural and Language Diversity and the Deaf Experience

by Ila Parasnis

This edited volume provides a comprehensive analysis of deaf people as a culturally and linguistically distinct minority group within American society. Many educators, linguists, and researchers now favor this position, as opposed to that which states that a deaf person simply has an audiological disability. Contributors to this book include members of the deaf community, as well as prominent deaf and hearing educators and researchers. The text contains three sections, covering research on bilingualism and biculturalism, the impact of cultural and language diversity on the deaf experience, and first-hand accounts from deaf community members that highlight the emotional impact of living in the deaf and hearing worlds.

Cultural and Social Justice Counseling

by Farah A. Ibrahim Jianna R. Heuer

This timely volume gives readers a robust framework and innovative tools for incorporating clients' unique cultural variables in counseling and therapy. Its chapters identify cultural, societal, and worldview-based contexts for understanding clients, from the relatively familiar (ethnicity, gender, age) to the less explored (migration status, social privilege, geographic environment). Diverse cases illustrate how cultural assessments contribute to building the therapeutic relationship and developing interventions that respect client individuality as well as group identity. In these pages, clinicians are offered effective strategies for conducting more relevant and meaningful therapy, resulting in better outcomes for client populations that have traditionally been marginalized and underserved. The appendices include the Scale to Assess Worldview© (Ibrahim & Kahn, 1984), The Acculturation Index© (Ibrahim, 2008), and the Cultural Identity Check List-Revised© (Ibrahim, 2007). Among the topics covered: Cultural identity: components and assessment. Worldview: implications for culturally responsive and ethical practice. Understanding acculturation and its use in counseling and psychotherapy. Social justice variables critical for conducting counseling and psychotherapy. Immigrants: identity development and counseling issues. Designing interventions using the social justice and cultural responsiveness model. Cultural and Social Justice Counseling is a profound source of knowledge for clinicians and students in mental health fields (counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, social workers) who are working with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds, including those working in international settings, with clients across cultures, and with sojourners to the US.

Cultural Anthropology

by Carol R. Ember Melvin R. Ember

Cultural Anthropology,provides both a comprehensive and scientific introduction to cultural anthropology. It helps the reader understand how humans vary culturally and why they got to be that way. This new edition also highlights migration and immigration in the context of globalization.

Cultural Anthropology: A Global Perspective

by Raymond Scupin

This text engages readers in the varied intellectual activities underlying the anthropological approach by delving into both classic and recent research.

Cultural Anthropology: A Problem-Based Approach

by Richard H. Robbins

Learn anthropology within a strong active learning environment when you open Robbins' unique sixth edition. In a first of-of-its-kind problem-based format, this brief, cost-effective text presents a variety of questions focused on the most important issues anthropologists study. You'll find yourself thinking critically about today's world as you read engaging Chapter Openers, complete integrated exercises, and review unique Case Studies in Doing Anthropology at the end of each chapter, now with new locator maps for your convenience. In a unique problem-based format, Robbins' text presents a variety of questions focused on the most important issues anthropologists study. Within the book's engaging narrative, you'll learn how to analyze your own culture as a basis for understanding the cultures of others. Presentations are organized around problems rather than topics, creating a natural discussion of traditional concerns such as kinship, caste, gender roles, and religion. Meaningful questions integrated throughout further guide you in exploring these subjects.

A Cultural Approach to Interpersonal Communication

by Leila Frances Monaghan Jane E. Goodman

This reader connects interpersonal communication and culture, primarily but not exclusively through an anthropological, ethnographic lens. Monaghan (interpersonal communication, Indiana U.) and Goodman (communication and culture, Indiana U.) have chosen 42 pieces that generally share a performance-based approach to communication and culture that emphasizes the dynamic and creative role language plays in the construction of social reality. Combining theoretical discussions and ethnographic case studies, the contributions have been organized into three sections that first provide an introduction to cultural, ethnographic, and performance-based approaches to personal communication; explore the use of linguistic meaning, form, and function for social purposes and link language to social identity; place questions of interpersonal communication into the context of social groups; and discuss how interpersonal interactions shape and are shaped by institutional settings. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Cultural Atlas of Mesopotamia and the Ancient Near East

by Michael Roaf

Almost all the present knowledge of the ancient Near East has been resurrected by archeologists over the last century and a half. The early chapters of the book cover the periods before the invention of writing, when the material remains left by the early inhabitants of the Near East provide the basic evidence. In later periods, more abundant textual sources have been recovered and the scope of the investigation extends to historical events and personalities.

Cultural Capital

by Robert Hewison

Britain began the twenty-first century convinced of its creativity. Throughout the New Labour era, the visual and performing arts, museums and galleries, were ceaselessly promoted as a stimulus to national economic revival, a post-industrial revolution where spending on culture would solve everything, from national decline to crime. Tony Blair heralded it a "golden age." Yet despite huge investment, the audience for the arts remained a privileged minority. So what went wrong?In Cultural Capital, leading historian Robert Hewison gives an in-depth account of how creative Britain lost its way. From Cool Britannia and the Millennium Dome to the Olympics and beyond, he shows how culture became a commodity, and how target-obsessed managerialism stifled creativity. In response to the failures of New Labour and the austerity measures of the Coalition government, Hewison argues for a new relationship between politics and the arts.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Cultural Capital of Asian American Studies

by Mark Chiang

Originating in the 1968 student-led strike at San Francisco State University, Asian American Studies was founded as a result of student and community protests that sought to make education more accessible and relevant. While members of the Asian American communities initially served on the departmental advisory boards, planning and developing areas of the curriculum, university pressures eventually dictated their expulsion. At that moment in history, the intellectual work of the field was split off from its relation to the community at large, giving rise to the entire problematic of representation in the academic sphere.Even as the original objectives of the field have remained elusive, Asian American studies has nevertheless managed to establish itself in the university. Mark Chiang argues that the fundamental precondition of institutionalization within the university is the production of cultural capital, and that in the case of Asian American Studies (as well as other fields of minority studies), the accumulation of cultural capital has come primarily from the conversion of political capital. In this way, the definition of cultural capital becomes the primary terrain of political struggle in the university, and outlines the very conditions of possibility for political work within the academy. Beginning with the theoretical debates over identity politics and cultural nationalism, and working through the origins of ethnic studies in the Third World Strike, the formation of the Asian American literary field, and the Blu's Hanging controversy, The Cultural Capital of Asian American Studies articulates a new and innovative model of cultural and academic politics, illuminating the position of ethnic studies within the American university.

Cultural Capital: The Problem of Literary Canon Formation

by John Guillory

John Guillory challenges the most fundamental premises of the canon debate by resituating the problem of canon formation in an entirely new theoretical framework. The result is a book that promises to recast not only the debate about the literary curriculum but also the controversy over "multiculturalism" and the current "crisis of the humanities. " Employing concepts drawn from Pierre Bourdieu's sociology, Guillory argues that canon formation must be understood less as a question of the representation of social groups than as a question of the distribution of "cultural capital" in the schools, which regulate access to literacy, to the practices of reading and writing.

Cultural Cohesion: The Essential Essays

by Clive James

Clive James presents the "prequel" to his celebrated Cultural Amnesia--forty-nine essays that form a cultural education in one brilliant volume. Six years after the much-heralded publication of Cultural Amnesia, Clive James presents his "prequel"--forty-nine essays that he has selected as the best of his half-century career. Originally appearing as As of This Writing, Cultural Cohesion examines the twisted cultural terrain of the twentieth century in one of the most accessible and cohesive volumes available. Divided into four sections--"Poetry," "Fiction and Literature," "Culture and Criticism," and "Visual Images"--James comments on poets like W. H. Auden and Phillip Larkin, novelists like D. H. Lawrence and Raymond Chandler (not to mention Judith Krantz!), and filmmakers like Fellini and Bogdanovich. Throughout, James delights his readers with his manic energy and critical aplomb. This volume, featuring a new introduction, is a one-volume cultural education that few recent books can rival.

The Cultural Cold War

by Frances Stonor Saunders

During the Cold War, freedom of expression was vaunted as liberal democracy's most cherished possession--but such freedom was put in service of a hidden agenda. In The Cultural Cold War, Frances Stonor Saunders reveals the extraordinary efforts of a secret campaign in which some of the most vocal exponents of intellectual freedom in the West were working for or subsidized by the CIA--whether they knew it or not.Called "the most comprehensive account yet of the [CIA's] activities between 1947 and 1967" by the New York Times, the book presents shocking evidence of the CIA's undercover program of cultural interventions in Western Europe and at home, drawing together declassified documents and exclusive interviews to expose the CIA's astonishing campaign to deploy the likes of Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, Leonard Bernstein, Robert Lowell, George Orwell, and Jackson Pollock as weapons in the Cold War. Translated into ten languages, this classic work--now with a new preface by the author--is "a real contribution to popular understanding of the postwar period" (The Wall Street Journal), and its story of covert cultural efforts to win hearts and minds continues to be relevant today.

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