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The Making of a Nurse

by Tilda Shalof

The bestselling author of A Nurse's Story is back with more insider stories.Tilda Shalof has been a caregiver all her life -- at home for her family, at work for strangers -- but her skills didn't come easily. From when she was a child taking care of her sick parents to her current position on an ICU team in one of Canada's largest hospitals, there have always been daunting challenges and worthy rewards for her work. With her trademark humour, unflinching honesty, and skilled storytelling, Shalof describes her experiences becoming the capable nurse she is today. After graduation from nurse's college, finding no jobs in Toronto, Shalof travelled to Tel Aviv, Israel, to work in a hospital for the first time, finding adventure and young love in the process. A summer stint as a camp nurse came with requests for condoms, strange allergies ("Misty has reactions, but we don't know to what"), and overly protective parents (also known as "helicopter parents" for their tendency to hover over their children). The Making of a Nurse contains these stories and much more, and they are comforting, entertaining, shocking, funny, heart-warming and heart-wrenching. From hospitals to home care, they will give readers a glimpse into the life of a nurse and the hidden medical world.From the Hardcover edition.

The Making of a Philosopher

by Colin Mcginn

Part memoir, part study, The Making of a Philosopher is the self-portrait of a deeply intelligent mind as it develops over a life on both sides of the Atlantic. The Making of a Philosopher follows Colin McGinn from his early years in England reading Descartes and Anselm, to his years in the states, first in Los Angeles, then New York. McGinn presents a contemporary academic take on the great philosophical figures of the twentieth century, including Bertrand Russell, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Noam Chomsky, alongside stories of the teachers who informed his ideas and often became friends and mentors, especially the colorful A.J. Ayer at Oxford. McGinn's prose is always elegant and probing; students of contemporary philosophy and the general reader alike will absorb every page.

The Making of a Radical

by Scott Nearing

Scott Nearing lived one hundred years, from 1883 to 1983--a life spanning most of the twentieth century. In his early years, Nearing made his name as a formidable opponent of child labour and military imperialism. Having been fired from university jobs for his independence of mind, Nearing became a freelance lecturer and writer, traveling widely through Depression-era and post-war America to speak with eager audiences. Five-time Socialist candidate for president Eugene V. Debs said, "Scott Nearing! He is the greatest teacher in the United States. " Concluding that it would be better to be poor in the country than in New York City, Scott and Helen Nearing moved north to Vermont in 1932 and commenced the experiment in self-reliant living that would extend their fame far and wide. They began to grow most of their own food, and devised their famous scheme for allocating the day's hours: one third for "bread work" (livelihood), one third for "head work" (intellectual endeavors), and one third for "service to the world community. " Scott (who'd grown up partly on his grandfather's Pennsylvania farm) taught Helen (who was raised in suburbia, groomed for a career as a classical violinist) the practical skills they would need: working with tools, cultivating a garden and managing a woodlot, and building stone and masonry walls. For the rest of their lives, the Nearings chronicled in detail their "good life," first in Vermont and ultimately on the coast of Maine, in a group of wonderful books--many of which are now being returned to print by Chelsea Green in cooperation with the Good Life Center, an educational trust established at the Nearings' Forest Farm in Harborside, Maine, to promote their ongoing legacy. With a new foreword by activist historian Staughton Lynd, The Making of a Radical is freshly republished-Scott Nearing's own story, told as only he could tell it.

The Making of a Royal Romance: William, Kate, and Harry--A Look Behind the Palace Walls (A revised and expanded edition of William and Harry: Behind the Palace Walls)

by Katie Nicholl

Katie Nicholl, Royal Correspondent for the Mail on Sunday, has been at the centre of royal reporting since she joined the newspaper in 2001. There is no one who is more intimately acquainted with the lives and loves of Princes William and Harry. Katie has spoken to a wealth of contacts close to William and Catherine Middleton and reveals how their love affair really started at St Andrews, the hurdles the pair overcame and the challenges they still face. Originally published to great acclaim in 2010 as William and Harry, Katie Nicholl has updated and added to her original account of the princes' lives and recounts the definitive story of William's royal romance with the young woman destined to become Queen Catherine.

The Making of a Surgeon

by William A. Nolen

Dr. Nolen takes us through the surgical residency and introduces us to the very real world where he was intern and chief resident for five years: New York's Bellevue State Hospital. Funny, compassionate, sometimes tragic, Nolen provides an intimate view of life in the wards, labs and operating rooms of a great hospital.

The Making of a Surgeon (Harvard Medical School Guide)

by John Hanc Stanley Ashley

Ever wonder what it takes to be a surgeon? Step inside The Brigham and find out. Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital is not only one of the oldest and most prestigious medical centers in America; it's also Harvard Medical School's main teaching hospital. Here, many of the country's best surgeons learn their live-saving skills. In this gripping narrative, you'll meet the young men and women in their surgical training; and follow in their footsteps through the hospital wards, the classroom and right into the operating rooms of The Brigham. You'll learn how these residents are educated--and how that training has changed. Co-authored by Dr. Stan Ashley, long-time director of surgical education at The Brigham, and Newsday writer John Hanc--author of two award-winning memoirs--this is a rare glimpse into a Harvard Medical School facility; and an inspiring and fascinating story about the young people who make the grade in one of the world's toughest and most important professions. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Stanley Ashley, MD is Chief Medical Officer and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs at Brigham and Women's Hospital as well as the Frank Sawyer Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. A graduate of Oberlin College and Cornell University Medical College, he completed a residency in General Surgery and joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis. He subsequently spent 7 years at the University of California at Los Angeles until 1997 where he assumed the position of Vice Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Program Director of the General Surgery Residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital as well as his current position at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Ashley is a gastrointestinal surgeon whose primary interests are diseases of the pancreas and inflammatory bowel disease. His research, which has been funded by both the Department of Veterans Affairs and the National Institute of Health, has examined the pathophysiology of the small bowel and pancreas. His focus recently is on practical aspects of measurement of surgical quality and how these can be applied to improve outcomes, particularly for the individual caregivers. Closely related to this, he has an interest in physician education, both at the graduate and postgraduate (MOC) levels, and its integration into a certification/recertification process that ensures quality of care. He is the author of more than 300 publications. He serves on numerous editorial boards, including the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Current Problems in Surgery, and ACS Surgery. He is a former Chair of the American Board of Surgery and currently Secretary of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract and serves on the Board of Directors of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). John Hanc is the author of ten books, including two award-winning memoirs, The Coolest Race on Earth (Chicago Review Press, 2009) about his experience running the Antarctica Marathon and Not Dead Yet (Thomas Dunne/St. Martin's Press) written with bike racer Phil Southerland, founder of Team Type 1. A long-time contributor to Newsday in New York, and a contributing editor to Runner's World magazine, John Hanc's work also appears in The New York Times, Family Circle, Smithsonian and Yoga Journal. Previous books include Jones Beach: An Illustrated History (Globe Pequot Press, 2007) with a cover blurb from Donald Trump, who called it a book that "any New Yorker would be proud to have in their collection"; Racing For Recovery: From Addict to Ironman co-authored with Todd Crandell (Breakaway Books, 2006), Running for Dummies (co-authored with the late Florence Griffith Joyner, IDG Books, 1999) and the best-selling running primer, The Essential Runner, (Lyons & Burford, 1994). Hanc has lectured extensively on his books about Jones Beach--the iconic Long Island, New York oceanfront park--and his experience in the Antarctica Marathon. He has appeared in both large chain and independent bookstores, where his talks have...

The Making of a Therapist: A Practical Guide for the Inner Journey

by Louis Cozolino

To help fellow psychotherapists stay sane by covering what wasn't taught in school, Cozolino (Pepperdine U., CA) offers advice based on his extensive clinical experience. Emphasizing the personal and emotional aspects of the profession rather than its theoretical orientations (though he does advise training in at least two), he presents survival strategies, principles, and suggested readings. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Making of a Writer

by Joan Lowery Nixon

The author recalls events from her childhood that contributed to her development as a writer.

The Making of an Ink-stained Wretch: Half a Century Pounding the Political Beat

by Jules Witcover

The jovial Witcover, one of the original "boys on the bus," traces his path across 56 years or political reporting and analysis. His insider memoir looks at the changing role and style of reporters, commentators, and other shapers of public opinion and gives a personal gloss to public events spanning administrations from Eisenhower to George W. Bush. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Making of English National Identity

by Krishan Kumar

Why is English national identity so enigmatic and so elusive? Why, unlike the Scots, Welsh, Irish and most of continental Europe, do the English find it so difficult to say who they are? The Making of English National Identity, first published in 2003, is a fascinating exploration of Englishness and what it means to be English. Drawing on historical, sociological and literary theory, Krishan Kumar examines the rise of English nationalism and issues of race and ethnicity from earliest times to the present day. He argues that the long history of the English as an imperial people has, as with other imperial people like the Russians and the Austrians, developed a sense of missionary nationalism which in the interests of unity and empire has necessitated the repression of ordinary expressions of nationalism. Professor Kumar's lively and provocative approach challenges readers to reconsider their pre-conceptions about national identity and who the English really are.

The Making of Fornication: Eros, Ethics, and Political Reform in Greek Philosophy and Early Christianity

by Kathy L. Gaca

Sexual mores and practices, and the uses of sex in the properly regulated society, according to Greek philosophical schools and to some important early Christians. Gaca shows that the Christian thinkers did not form their ideas about sex from a basis in the Greek tradition, as Foucault thought and almost everybody else thinks.

The Making of Ireland: From Ancient Times to the Present

by James Lydon

A complete, one-volume survey of the history of Ireland that will serve scholars and general readers alike.

The Making of John Ledyard: Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler

by Edward G. Gray

During the course of his short but extraordinary life, John Ledyard (1751-1789) came in contact with some of the most remarkable figures of his era: the British explorer Captain James Cook, American financier Robert Morris, Revolutionary naval commander John Paul Jones, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and others. Ledyard lived and traveled in remarkable places as well, journeying from the New England backcountry to Tahiti, Hawaii, the American Northwest coast, Alaska, and the Russian Far East. In this engaging biography, the historian Edward Gray offers not only a full account of Ledyard's eventful life but also an illuminating view of the late eighteenth-century world in which he lived. Ledyard was both a product of empire and an agent in its creation, Gray shows, and through this adventurer's life it is possible to discern the many ways empire shaped the lives of nations, peoples, and individuals in the era of the American Revolution, the world's first modern revolt against empire.

The Making of Life of Pi

by Jean-Christophe Castelli

This graphically compelling, diversely illustrated volume is a behind-the-scenes look at Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee's most ambitious film to date, Life of Pi, an adaptation of Yann Martel's international bestseller and Man Booker Prize-winning novel. The book includes a foreword by Martel and an introduction by Lee. This 3-D film is released on December 21, 2012.

The Making of Northeast Asia

by Kent E. Calder Min Ye

Northeast Asia, where the interests of three major nuclear powers and the world's two largest economies, converge around the unstable pivot of the Korean peninsula, is a region rife with political-economic paradox. It ranks today among the most dangerous areas on earth, plagued by security problems of global importance, including nuclear and missile proliferation. Yet, despite its insecurity, the region has continued to be the most rapidly growing on earth for over five decades--and it is emerging as an identifiable economic, political, and strategic region in its own right. As the locus of both economic growth and political-military uncertainty in Asia has moved further to the Northeast, a need has developed for a book that focuses analytically on prospects for Northeast Asian cooperation within the context of both Asia and the Asia-Pacific regional relationship. This book does exactly that, while also offering a more general theory for Asian institution building.

The Making of Rehabilitation: A Political Economy of Medical Specialization, 1890-1980

by Glenn Gritzer Arnold Arluke

Focusing on the history of one medical field--rehabilitation medicine, this book provides the first systematic analysis of the underlying forces that shape medical specialization, challenging traditional explanations of occupational specialization.

The Making Of Southeast Asia

by Amitav Acharya

Developing a framework to study "what makes a region," Amitav Acharya investigates the origins and evolution of Southeast Asian regionalism and international relations. He views the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) "from the bottom up"-as not only a U. S. -inspired ally in the Cold War struggle against communism but also an organization that reflects indigenous traditions. Although Acharya deploys the notion of "imagined community" to examine the changes, especially since the Cold War, in the significance of ASEAN dealings for a regional identity, he insists that "imagination" is itself not a neutral but rather a culturally variable concept. The regional imagination in Southeast Asia imagines a community of nations different from NAFTA or NATO, the OAU, or the European Union. In this new edition of a book first published as The Quest for Identity in 2000, Acharya updates developments in the region through the first decade of the new century: the aftermath of the financial crisis of 1997, security affairs after September 2001, the long-term impact of the 2004 tsunami, and the substantial changes wrought by the rise of China as a regional and global actor. Acharya argues in this important book for the crucial importance of regionalism in a different part of the world.

The Making of Strategy

by Williamson Murray Macgregor Knox Alvin Bernstein

Most writing about strategy has focused on individual strategic theorists or great military leaders. This book focuses instead on the messy processes by which rulers and states have framed strategy in the past - a subject of vital practical importance to strategists, and of great interest to students of strategy and statecraft. It consists of 17 case studies that range from fifth-century Athens and Ming China to Hitler's Germany, Israel, and the post-1945 United States. The studies analyse, within a common interpretive framework, precisely how rulers and states have made strategy. The introduction emphasises the constants in the rapidly shifting world of the strategist; the concluding essay tries to understand the forces that have driven the transformation of strategy since 400 BC and seem likely to continue to transform it in the future.

The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict: 1947-1951

by Ilan Pappe

Making use of released documents from the Israeli state archives and the British Public Records Office, Ilan Pappe presents the most serious challenge to the official Zionist and Israeli narrative of the events between 1947-1951. The most important Challenges he presents pertain to the exodus of the Palestinian population from their homeland, and the existential threat the Arab armies posed to Israel. Contrary to the official Israeli narrative, Ilan pappe demonstrated persuasively that the Palestinians neither left voluntarily nor were they encouraged by the Arab leaders to leave their homes, but were rather forced out by the Zionist and Israeli military forces. On the second point, he presented new material demonstrating an Israeli military superiority over the combined arab forces during the wars of 1948-49.

The Making of the Atomic Bomb

by Richard Rhodes

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE, THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD, AND THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD Here for the first time, in rich, human, political, and scientific detail, is the complete story of how the bomb was developed, from the turn-of-the-century discovery of the vast energy locked inside the atom to the dropping of the first bombs on Japan. Few great discoveries have evolved so swiftly-or have been so misunderstood. From the theoretical discussions of nuclear energy to the bright glare of Trinity there was a span of hardly more than twenty-five years. What began as merely an interesting speculative problem in physics grew into the Manhattan Project, and then into the Bomb with frightening rapidity, while scientists known only to their peers-Szilard, Teller, Oppenheimer, Bohr, Meitner, Fermi, Lawrence, and von Neumann-stepped from their ivory towers into the limelight. Richard Rhodes takes us on that journey step by step, minute by minute, and gives us the definitive story of man's most awesome discovery and invention. The Making of the Atomic Bomb has been compared in its sweep and importance to William L. Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. It is at once a narrative tour de force and a document as powerful as its subject. "The comprehensive history of the Bomb-and also a work of literature." A stirring intellectual adventure . . . clear, fast-paced, and indispensable." "A monumental and enthralling history . . . Alive and vibrant in the book are all the scientists . . . and each human being stands vividly revealed as a man of science, of conscience, of doubts or of hubris."

The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making 1805-1927

by C. I. Hamilton

This is an important new history of decision-making and policy-making in the British Admiralty from Trafalgar to the aftermath of Jutland. C. I. Hamilton explores the role of technological change, the global balance of power and, in particular, of finance and the First World War in shaping decision-making and organisational development within the Admiralty. He shows that decision-making was found not so much in the hands of the Board but at first largely in the hands of individuals, then groups or committees, and finally certain permanent bureaucracies. The latter bodies, such as the Naval Staff, were crucial to the development of policy-making as was the civil service Secretariat under the Permanent Secretary. By the 1920s the Admiralty had become not just a proper policy-making organisation, but for the first time a thoroughly civil-military one.

The Making of the President, 1960

by Theodore White

A political reporter tells about the 1960 presidential campaign.

The Making of the President, 1968

by Theodore White

Biographies of the candidates and an explanation of the 1968 presidential campaign.

The Making of the President 1972

by Theodore White

In The Making of the President 1972, the fourth volume of narrative history of American politics in action, Theodore H. White brings his defining quartet of campaign narratives to a surprising and riveting close. The consummate journalist, White chronicles both the Democratic and the Republican parties as they jockeyed for position toward the end of Richard M. Nixon's turbulent first term. He illuminates the cinematic moments that shaped the campaign-the attempt on George Wallace's life, Edmund Muskie crying in the snow in New Hampshire, the swift rise and fall of Tom Eagleton, and the ongoing anguish of Vietnam-leading inexorably to a second chaotic collapse among the Democrats and a landslide victory for Nixon. Yet even as the president's highest ambitions were confirmed, White watches aghast as the "new Nixon" of 1968 is eclipsed by the corrupt Nixon of old-a Shakespearean conclusion to an astonishing political epoch.

The Making of the Second World War

by Anthony P. Adamthwaite

"The Reformation, the French Revolution, the First World War were episodes so explosive and cataclysmic that the discussion of their origins exercises a perennial fascination. The Second World War is in a similar category. There are several reasons for the attraction it exerts: fashionable nostalgia; the background of intense ideological struggle between fascism, communism and democracy; the decisive contribution of the war to the decline of western Europe from the political pre-eminence enjoyed for four hundred years; the mass of public and private papers - never before have historians been able to write so close to events with the benefit of archives; lastly the fact that it was a peoples' war, involving all the machinery and resources of the modern state." -Introduction: Sources and Historiography

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