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The Fighting Rabbis

by Albert I. Slomovitz

Rabbi Elkan Voorsanger received the Purple Heart for his actions during the Battle of Argonne. Chaplain Edgar Siskin, serving with the Marines on Pelilu Island, conducted Yom Kippur services in the midst of a barrage of artillery fire. Rabbi Alexander Goode and three fellow chaplains gave their own lifejackets to panicked soldiers aboard a sinking transport torpedoed by a German submarine, and then went down with the ship. American Jews are not usually associated with warfare. Nor, for that matter, are their rabbis. And yet, Jewish chaplains have played a significant and sometimes heroic role in our nation's defense. The Fighting Rabbis presents the compelling history of Jewish military chaplains from their first service during the Civil War to the first female Jewish chaplain and the rabbinic role in Korea, Vietnam, and Desert Storm. Rabbi Slomovitz, himself a Navy chaplain, opens a window onto the fieldwork, religious services, counseling, and dramatic battlefield experiences of Jewish military chaplains throughout our nation's history. From George Washington's early support for a religiously tolerant military to a Seder held in the desert sands of Kuwait, these rabbis have had a profound impact on Jewish life in America. Also striking are original documents which chronicle the ongoing care and concern by the Jewish community over the last 140 years for their follow Jews, including many new immigrants who entered the armed forces. Slomovitz refutes the common belief that the U.S. military itself has been a hostile place for Jews, in the process providing a unique perspective on American religious history.

Fighting The Slave Trade: West African Strategies

by Sylviane A. Diouf

While most studies of the slave trade focus on the volume of captives and on their ethnic origins, the question of how the Africans organized their familial and communal lives to resist and assail it has not received adequate attention. But our picture of the slave trade is incomplete without an examination of the ways in which men and women responded to the threat and reality of enslavement and deportation. <P><P>Fighting the Slave Trade is the first book to explore in a systematic manner the strategies Africans used to protect and defend themselves and their communities from the onslaught of the Atlantic slave trade and how they assaulted it. <P>It challenges widely held myths of African passivity and general complicity in the trade and shows that resistance to enslavement and to involvement in the slave trade was much more pervasive than has been acknowledged by the orthodox interpretation of historical literature. <P>Focused on West Africa, the essays collected here examine in detail the defensive, protective, and offensive strategies of individuals, families, communities, and states. In chapters discussing the manipulation of the environment, resettlement, the redemption of captives, the transformation of social relations, political centralization, marronage, violent assaults on ships and ports, shipboard revolts, and controlled participation in the slave trade as a way to procure the means to attack it, Fighting the Slave Trade presents a much more complete picture of the West African slave trade than has previously been available.

The Fighting Temeraire

by Sam Willis

The extraordinary story of the mighty Temeraire, the ship behind J. M. W. Turner's iconic painting The H.M.S. Temeraire, one of Britains most illustrious fighting ships, is known to millions through J.M.W. Turners masterpiece, The Fighting Temeraire (1839), which portrays the battle-scarred veteran of Britain's wars with Napoleonic France. In this evocative new volume, Sam Willis tells the extraordinary story of the vessel behind the painting. This tale of two ships spans the heyday of the age of sail: the climaxes of both the Seven Years' War (1756-63) and the Napoleonic Wars (1798-1815). Filled with richly evocative detail, and narrated with the pace and gusto of a master storyteller, The Fighting Temeraire is an enthralling and deeply satisfying work of narrative history.

Fighting the Devil in Dixie: How Civil Rights Activists Took on the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama

by Wayne Greenhaw

Examining the growth of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) following the birth of the civil rights movement, this book is filled with tales of the heroic efforts to halt their rise to power. Shortly after the success of the Montgomery bus boycott, the KKK--determined to keep segregation as the way of life in Alabama--staged a resurgence, and the strong-armed leadership of Governor George C. Wallace, who defied the new civil rights laws, empowered the Klan's most violent members. Although Wallace's power grew, not everyone accepted his unjust policies, and blacks such as Martin Luther King Jr., J. L. Chestnut, and Bernard LaFayette began fighting back in the courthouses and schoolhouses, as did young southern lawyers such as Charles "Chuck" Morgan, who became the ACLU's southern director; Morris Dees, who cofounded the Southern Poverty Law Center; and Bill Baxley, Alabama attorney general, who successfully prosecuted the bomber of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church and legally halted some of Governor Wallace's agencies designed to slow down integration. Dozens of exciting, extremely well-told stories demonstrate how blacks defied violence and whites defied public ostracism and indifference in the face of kidnappings, bombings, and murders.

Fighting the Great War at Sea: Strategy, Tactic and Technology

by Norman Friedman

The overriding image of the First World War is the bloody stalemate of the Western Front, but although much of the action did occur on land, the overall shape of the war even the inevitability of British participation arose out of its maritime character. It was essentially a struggle about access to worldwide resources, most clearly seen in the desperate German attempts to deal with the American industrial threat, which ultimately levered the United States into the war, and thus a consequence of British sea control.rn This radical new book concentrates on the way in which each side tried to use or deny the sea to the other, and in so doing it describes rapid wartime changes not only in ship and weapon technology but also in the way naval warfare was envisaged and fought. Combat produced many surprises: some, like the impact of the mine and torpedo, are familiar, but this book also brings to light many previously unexplored subjects, like creative new tactical practices and improved command and control.rn The contrast between expectation and reality had enormous consequences not only for the course of the war but also for the way navies developed afterwards. This book melds strategic, technical, and tactical aspects to reveal the First World War from a fresh perspective, but also demonstrates how its perceived lessons dominated the way navies prepared for the Second.

Fighting the Mafia & Renewing Sicilian Culture

by Leoluca Orlando

Growing up in an aristocratic family that seems almost to have stepped out of the pages of The Leopard, Leoluca Orlando entered law and politics in the late 1970s as one of the young idealists identified with the Catholic Church who were challenging the Mafia's control of Sicilian life. At about the same moment, life in Sicily was becoming more perilous. As if the "old" Mafia had not been bad enough, a new and particularly vicious Mafia sect based in the town of Corleone was murdering its way to power. Fueled by profits from the international heroin trade, this mafia gansteristica made Sicily into an Italian Lebanon and filled the international press with pictures of bloody bodies-those of Mafia rivals as well as police and government law enforcement officials.One of the figures most prominently identified with Italy's offensive against the Mafia, Orlando has endured repeated assassination attempts and even today travels with a bodyguard. Fighting the Mafia is his dramatic tale of witness and survival, of his effort to expose Mafia infiltration into the highest levels of Italian life and politics, and of the movements he helped to build-in schools and churches and at the ballot box-to recapture Sicilian culture and inspire a renaissance of democracy.

Fighting the Mau Mau

by Huw Bennett

British Army counterinsurgency campaigns were supposedly waged within the bounds of international law, overcoming insurgents with the minimum force necessary. This revealing study questions what this meant for the civilian population during the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya in the 1950s, one of Britain's most violent decolonisation wars. For the first time Huw Bennett examines the conduct of soldiers in detail, uncovering the uneasy relationship between notions of minimum force and the colonial tradition of exemplary force where harsh repression was frequently employed as a valid means of quickly crushing rebellion. Although a range of restrained policies such as special forces methods, restrictive rules of engagement and surrender schemes prevented the campaign from degenerating into genocide, the army simultaneously coerced the population to drop their support for the rebels, imposing collective fines, mass detentions and frequent interrogations, often tolerating rape, indiscriminate killing and torture to terrorise the population into submission.

Fighting the Odds: One Kid's Battle to Save His Friend

by Adrienne Mand

When Alden was 15, his good friend Michael Penon was dying of cancer. Alden did everything to help his friend. He had even been willing to have a painful operation to help Michael. In the end, Alden couldn't save his friend. Michael Penon died at age 16. But before Michael died, Alden promised to continue a fight that the boys had begun together. Alden would fight for a law that would let other kids help save sick friends. A READ 180® book.

Fighting the People's War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War (Armies of the Second World War)

by Jonathan Fennell

Fighting the People's War is an unprecedented, panoramic history of the 'citizen armies' of the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand and South Africa, the core of the British and Commonwealth armies in the Second World War. Drawing on new sources to reveal the true wartime experience of the ordinary rank and file, Jonathan Fennell fundamentally challenges our understanding of the War and of the relationship between conflict and socio-political change. He uncovers how fractures on the home front had profound implications for the performance of the British and Commonwealth armies and he traces how soldiers' political beliefs, many of which emerged as a consequence of their combat experience, proved instrumental to the socio-political changes of the postwar era. Fighting the People's War transforms our understanding of how the great battles were won and lost as well as how the postwar societies were forged.

Fighting the US Youth Sex Trade: Gender, Race, and Politics

by Carrie N. Baker

Campaigns against prostitution of young people in the United States have surged and ebbed multiple times over the last fifty years. Fighting the US Youth Sex Trade: Gender, Race, and Politics examines how politically and ideologically diverse activists joined together to change perceptions and public policies on youth involvement in the sex trade over time, reframing 'juvenile prostitution' of the 1970s as 'commercial sexual exploitation of children' in the 1990s, and then as 'domestic minor sex trafficking' in the 2000s. Based on organizational archives and interviews with activists, Baker shows that these campaigns were fundamentally shaped by the politics of gender, race and class, and global anti-trafficking campaigns. The author argues that the very frames that have made these movements so successful in achieving new laws and programs for youth have limited their ability to achieve systematic reforms that could decrease youth vulnerability to involvement in the sex trade.

Fighting to Be Free

by Kirsty Moseley

6 MILLION READS ONLINE!FIGHTING TO BE FREEAll his life, people have told Jamie Cole that he was born bad. Maybe it's true, maybe it's not. But that doesn't matter now. Because after a lifetime of demons, Jamie has finally found an angel.Ellie Pearce learned the hard way that boys can't be trusted. But the night she meets Jamie, something shifts. He's different: brooding, a bit dark, determined to change. The connection they share is intense, compelling. Ellie tries to resist, but with each breathtaking kiss, she can't help falling deeper.Things between Ellie and Jamie are perfect-and perfection can't last. When fate goes horribly wrong, Jamie's only hope of saving his family is to strike a deal with the devil. Most of all, Jamie wants to prove he's the person Ellie believes him to be. But if she learns just how much he's been hiding, Ellie won't be able to believe anything Jamie has ever told her . . . The original Wattpad sensation - fully revised and with brand new content

Fighting With Popski’s Private Army

by Park Yunnie

This is the story of Popskis famous fighting unit, in the words of his second-in-command.Captain Bob Yunnie, MC, aka Park Yunnie, became the first recruit to the special unit founded in Cairo by Major Vladimir Peniakoff (Popski). As the Eighth Army advances towards Tripoli, PPA sets out in jeeps across the desert to mount raids behind the Mareth Line. Yunnie relives the ensuing action at Gafsa and Kasserine, and vividly depicts the sorties which took the men straight across the German Line of Command.As Tunis falls to the Allies on 7 May 1943, PPA train for raids on the Italian mainland. They are dropped by RAF gliders in central Italy, where they set about blowing up strategic targets while waiting for the Allied landings. Yunnie is given his own patrol, and in the narrative that follows, colorful characters flit in and out of the front-line action in the mountains of Southern Italy.Yunnies account is an honest, extremely personal, expos of the thrills and occasional pitfalls of life with Popski and his men.

Fighting with the Screaming Eagles: With the 101st Airborne from Normandy to Bastogne

by Robert Bowen

Robert Bowen was drafted into Company C, 401st Glider Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, as World War II broke out, and soon afterwards found himself storming ashore amid the chaos on Utah Beach, through unfamiliar terrain littered with minefields and hidden snipers. He was wounded during the Normandy campaign but went on to fight in Holland and the Ardennes where he was captured and his "trip through hell" truly began.In each of Bowen’s campaigns, the 101st “Screaming Eagles” spearheaded the Allied effort against ferocious German resistance or, as at Bastogne, stood nearly alone against the onslaught of enemy panzers and grenadiers. His insights into life behind German lines, after his capture, provide as much fascination as his exploits on the battlefield. An introduction by the world’s foremost historian of the 101st Airborne, George Koskimaki, further enhances this classic work.Written shortly after the war, Bowen's narrative is immediate, direct and compelling. His account, one of the few by a member of a glider regiment, provides a brutal insight into the battlefields of World War II and a vivid recreation of just what life was like in an elite unit. From the horror of D-Day and the despair of captivity, to the taste of C Rations and the fear of soldiers under fire, this memoir tells the full story of one man's total war.

Fighting Words

by John Renard

One of the critical issues in interreligious relations today is the connection, both actual and perceived, between sacred sources and the justification of violent acts as divinely mandated. Fighting Words makes solid text-based scholarship accessible to the general public, beginning with the premise that a balanced approach to religious pluralism in our world must build on a measured, well-informed response to the increasingly publicized and sensationalized association of terrorism and large-scale violence with religion. In his introduction, Renard provides background on the major scriptures of seven religious traditions--Jewish, Christian (including both the Old and New Testaments), Islamic, Baha'i, Zoroastrian, Hindu, and Sikh. Eight chapters then explore the interpretation of select facets of these scriptures, focusing on those texts so often claimed, both historically and more recently, as inspiration and justification for every kind of violence, from individual assassination to mass murder. With its nuanced consideration of a complex topic, this book is not merely about the religious sanctioning of violence but also about diverse ways of reading sacred textual sources.

Figs, Dates, Laurel, and Myrrh: Plants of the Bible and the Quran

by Garrison Keillor Lytton John Musselman

This book celebrates the plants of the Old Testament and New Testament, including the Apocrypha, and of the Quran. From acacia, the wood of the tabernacle, to wormwood, whose bitter leaves cured intestinal worms, 81 fascinating chapters—covering every plant that has a true botanical counterpart—tell the stories of the fruits and grains, grasses and trees, flowers and fragrances of ancient lore. The descriptions include the plants' botanical characteristics, habitat, uses, and literary context. With evocative quotations and revelatory interpretations, this information is all the more critical today as the traditional agrarian societies that knew the plants intimately become urbanized.The unusually broad geographic range of this volume extends beyond Israel to encompass the Holy Land's biblical neighbors from southern Turkey to central Sudan and from Cyprus to the Iraq border.Richly illustrated with extensive color photography and with a foreword by the incomparable Garrison Keillor, this delightful ecumenical botany offers the welcome tonic of a deep look into an enduring, shared natural heritage.

Figure Drawing: A Complete Guide

by Richard G. Hatton

One of the few available guidebooks of its kind, this manual approaches figure drawing from the draftsman's point of view. With a clear focus on surface lines and prominences, step-by-step instructions and over 300 illustrations guide artists in accurately sketching all aspects of the human form in lively action and repose.Beginning with method and proportion, the author discusses the drawing of lines, contours, planes, masses, and rounded forms. Moving on to the individual parts of the body, simple principles of anatomy are applied to demonstrate techniques for sketching the head and neck, the trunk, the upper and lower limbs, and the digits. Expertly rendered figures are shown in various positions and movements, and from all angles, for the most thorough, concise instruction. Brimming with the basic elements necessary for creating quality works of art, Figure Drawing also includes guidance for drawing drapery, revealing the main points of support on the body and the proper way to sketch the folds and forms of garments. Immensely practical and highly readable, it is a manual that artists of every level will turn to again and again.

Figure Drawing: A Complete Guide (Dover Anatomy for Artists)

by Richard G. Hatton

While there are any number of anatomy texts and handbooks for artists, this is one of the few available studies that approach the art of figure drawing from the point of view of the draftsman. Though it does provide a fund of information on all important anatomical features and functions, the book stresses how the figure-sketcher should handle his subject, how he should actually put down surface lines and prominences on paper. It is an immensely practical guide for the student. The text covers all aspects of drawing the human form. An important introductory section deals with methods of drawing and the proper proportioning of the body. Then the author treats the various parts of the body in full detail: head and neck (over 100 pages on facial features, etc.), the trunk (chest, abdomen, vertebral column, breast, pelvis, shoulders, etc.) and the upper and lower limbs and digits. A final discussion takes up the topic of drapery, the main points of support on the body, and various styles of representing the folds and forms of garments. Three hundred seventy-seven figures, mostly sketches by the author, but including some examples from classical times and famous artists, illustrate the text. These figures show undraped men and women of all ages and types in various positions and movements and from all angles (full front view, profile, three-quarter view, rear view, etc.) so that the coverage is as thorough as possible for the student. Other drawings show and identify muscles and elements of the skeletal system and indicate their relation to surface contours. A clear and readable account with many helpful suggestions on sketching technique, the book offers a nontechnical, inexpensive home-study course or supplementary text for the beginning artist. Those art students who derive little or no benefit from anatomy courses would do well to study this volume. Unabridged, unaltered republication of original edition.

Figure Drawing and Portraiture: In Pencil, Chalk and Charcoal

by Borough Johnson

From an award-winning English artist and teacher whose work was exhibited at the esteemed Paris Salon and London's Royal Academy comes a beautifully designed guide to drawing the face and figure. The author of such artistic references as "The Technique of Pencil Drawing" and "The Art of the Pencil," Borough Johnson also illustrated many famous poems and novels, including Longfellow's "Evangeline" and Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles."Art cannot be taught. Drawing, like science, can." With those opening words, Borough Johnson takes a creative step forward, demonstrating how to draw the human figure with shading and texture, using pencil, chalk, and charcoal. In easy-to-follow terms, he explores the most important aspects of drawing the human form: anatomy, proportion, composition, motion, drawing from memory, and capturing emotion with an economy of line. He also offers eighty-two of his own compositions in black-and-white--subjects that include a ballerina, fencer, gypsies, violinist, children playing, and more--to illustrate his lessons. Eight color plates (red chalk drawings) are also included. Perfect for intermediate and advanced students who want to improve their skills, Figure Drawing and Portraiture is a valuable guide for every artist's reference shelf.

Figure Drawing Master Class: Lessons in Life Drawing

by Dan Gheno

With Figure Drawing Master Class, you will discover the secrets to creating masterful figure drawings through examples of Old Master drawings, as well as Dan Gheno's own beautiful drawings, demonstrations and diagrams.This take-home course covers everything you need to put yourself on the fast-track to successful figure drawing.Inside you'll find:The basics of training your hand to drawGesture drawing lessonsHow to draw heads and handsHow to accurately compose your figuresKeys to replicating the subtle details in the posture of the head to suggest emotionThe basics of human proportionsWith tips, tricks and historical references, the drawing instruction inside will help you with all the critical skills you need to travel your own journey through successful figure drawing and improve your drawings for years to come.Learn to draw all aspects of the human figure with diagrams, demonstrations and Old Master drawingsMore than 120 drawings by Old Master artists including Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael and RembrandtIncludes 5 step-by-step demonstrations to reinforce the key concepts of figure drawing

The Figure in Composition (Dover Art Instruction Ser.)

by Paul G. Braun

Students and professionals alike will benefit from this focus on the figure in the overall composition of a sketch or drawing. Its solid instruction and many fine examples make it a particularly valuable tool for intermediate artists.Author Paul G. Braun examines the concept of arrangement with single and multiple figures and within a border. Additional topics include the distribution of light and shade, draped figures and folds, the depiction of movement, and many other aspects of figure drawing. The final chapter offers pointers on how to illustrate a story, and numerous helpful sketches complement this guide's teachings.

Figure It Out

by J. V. Speyer

A one-night stand with a guy in an open relationship introduces a whole new world to lonely college student Luke. When the pressures that left him isolated threaten to destroy his newfound happiness, can brilliant but damaged Nick and compassionate, insecure Evan keep him safe?Luke's parents, clouded by grief, isolated him and his siblings. Fortunately he's gotten away and has found intellectual fulfillment and a promising future in college. When he gets lonely, he can find an outlet for his physical needs in hookup apps. One of those hookups -- with gorgeous, kind graduate student Evan -- opens Luke's eyes to a world he hadn't been sure existed.Evan is in an open relationship with law professor, political strategist, and professional pundit Nick. They love each other, but each is drawn to Luke for his own reasons. Luke agrees to try something new, aglow with the possibility of finding both success and happiness.Not everyone is thrilled with Luke's choices. Some people from Luke's past don't like the thought of him being in a polyamorous relationship. They don't trust either of Luke's boyfriends, who come from very different backgrounds than Luke. And no one, not even they, know how far they'll go to get Luke back on track.Can Luke, Evan, and Nick find their happily ever after together?

The Figure of the Animal in Modern and Contemporary Poetry (Palgrave Studies in Animals and Literature)

by Michael Malay

This book argues that there are deep connections between ‘poetic’ thinking and the sensitive recognition of creaturely others. It explores this proposition in relation to four poets: Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Ted Hughes, and Les Murray. Through a series of close readings, and by paying close attention to issues of sound, rhythm, simile, metaphor, and image, it explores how poetry cultivates a special openness towards animal others. The thinking behind this book is inspired by J. M. Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals. In particular, it takes up that book’s suggestion that poetry invites us to relate to animals in an open-ended and sympathetic manner. Poets, according to Elizabeth Costello, the book’s protagonist, ‘return the living, electric being to language’, and, doing so, compel us to open our hearts towards animals and the claims they make upon us. There are special affinities, for her, between the music of poetry and the recognition of others. But what might it mean to say that poets to return life to language? And why might this have any bearing on our relationship with animals? Beyond offering many suggestive starting points, Elizabeth Costello says very little about the nature of poetry’s special relationship with the animal; one aim of this study, then, is to ask of what this relationship consists, not least by examining the various ways poets have bodied forth animals in language.

Figure Sketching for Beginners

by Len A. Doust

If a drawing "is not alive, it is a failure," declares Len A. Doust. With his practical help and encouraging guidance, even novice sketchers can learn how to capture the vitality and character of their models.Clear instructions and 23 step-by-step illustrations highlight everything students need to know. Featured topics include:* Perspective and proportions* Heads, faces, and hands* Hats, shoes, and clothing* Age and character* Expressions* Athletes and dancersConcise and informative, this manual offers sketchers the perfect way to get started.

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