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Historical Romance 2-Book Bundle

by Julia London

New York Times bestselling author Julia London has thrilled readers of historical romance for more than a decade. Now, together for the first time as an ebook bundle, here are the novels that launched her captivating career. THE DEVIL'S LOVEAbigail Carrington sails to England to marry the man she has loved since childhood. At the altar, Michael Ingram, Marquis of Darfield, seems a dark, brooding stranger. With scandal shadowing his past, the Devil of Darfield has agreed to the marriage only to save his ancestral home. But Abigail's charm bedevils him--just as the passion of Michael's kiss gives her hope that theirs can be more than a marriage of convenience. WICKED ANGELShe may be the talk of the ton, but Alexander Christian, Duke of Sutherland, recognizes the ravishing Bavarian countess for who she really is: Lauren Hill, the widowed country girl who captured his heart--despite his pledge to another woman. Lauren needs to see the man who haunts her dreams. Alexander wants one night with his blue-eyed enchantress. They'll soon discover that forbidden love is always a scandalous choice.

Historical Social Psychology (Psychology Revivals)

by Kenneth J. Gergen Mary M. Gergen

The vast majority of research in social psychology focuses on momentary events: an attitude is changed, dissonance is reduced, a cognition is primed, and so on. Little attention is a paid to the unfolding of events over time, to social life as an ongoing process in which events are related in various ways as life unfolds. Originally published in 1984, Historical Social Psychology opens a space for theory and research in which temporal process is central. Contributors to this broad-ranging work provide a rich range of perspectives, from the theoretical to the methodological, from micro-sequences to the life-span, and from contemporary history to the long durée. Together, these authors set the stage for a major shift in the focus of social psychological inquiry.

Historical Style: Fashion and the New Mode of History, 1740-1830 (Material Texts)

by Timothy Campbell

Historical Style connects the birth of eighteenth-century British consumer society to the rise of historical self-consciousness. Prior to the eighteenth century, British style was slow to change and followed the cultural and economic imperatives of monarchical regimes. By the 1750s, however, a growing fashion press extolled, in writing and illustration, the new phenomenon of periodized fashion trends. As fashion fads came in and out of style, and as fashion texts circulated and obsolesced, Britons were forced to confront the material persistence of out-of-date fashions. Timothy Campbell argues that these fashion texts and objects shaped British perception of time and history by producing new curiosity about the very recent past, as well as a new self-consciousness about the means by which the past could be understood.In a panoptic sweep, Historical Style brings together art history, philosophy, and literary history to portray an era increasingly aware of itself. Burgeoning consumer society, Campbell contends, highlighted the distinction between the past and the present, created an expectation of continual change, and forged a sense of history as something that could be tracked through material objects. Campbell assembles a wide range of writings, images, and objects to render this eighteenth-century landscape: commercial dress displays and David Hume's ideas of novelty as historical form; popular illustrations of recent fashion trends and Sir Joshua Reynolds's aesthetic precepts; fashion periodicals and Sir Walter Scott's costume-saturated historical fiction. In foregrounding fashion to trace eighteenth-century historicism, Historical Style draws upon the interdisciplinary, multimedia archival impressions that fashionable dress has left behind, as well as the historical and conceptual resources within the field of fashion studies that literary and cultural historians of eighteenth-century and Romantic Britain have often neglected.

Historical Theology: An Introduction to Christian Doctrine

by Gregg Allison

Most historical theology texts follow Christian beliefs chronologically, discussing notable doctrinal developments for all areas of theology according to their historical appearance. And while this may be good history, it can make for confusing theology, with the classic theological loci scattered throughout various time periods, movements, and controversies. In Historical Theology, Gregg Allison offers students the opportunity to study the historical development of theology according to a topical-chronological arrangement, setting out the history of Christian doctrine one theological element at a time. Such an approach allows readers to concentrate on one tenet of Christianity and its formulation in the early church, through the Middle Ages, Reformation, and post-Reformation era, and into the modern period. The text includes a generous mix of primary source material as well, citing the words of Cyprian, Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Barth, and others. Allison references the most accessible editions of these notable theologians’ work so that readers can continue their study of historical theology through Christian history’s most important contributors. Historical Theology is a superb resource for those familiar with Wayne Grudem’s Systematic Theology or interested in understanding the development of Christian theology.

A Historical Theology of the Hebrew Bible

by Konrad Schmid

In this meticulously researched study, Konrad Schmid offers a historical clarification of the concept of “theology.” He then examines the theologies of the three constituent parts of the Hebrew Bible—the Torah, the Prophets, and the Writings— before tracing how these theological concepts developed throughout the history of ancient Israel and early Judaism.Schmid not only explores the theology of the biblical books in isolation, but he also offers unifying principles and links between the distinct units that make up the Hebrew Bible. By focusing on both the theology of the whole Hebrew Bible as well as its individual pieces, A Historical Theology of the Hebrew Bible provides a comprehensive discussion of theological work within the Hebrew Bible.

Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past

by Sam Wineburg

Since ancient times, the pundits have lamented young people's lack of historical knowledge and warned that ignorance of the past surely condemns humanity to repeating its mistakes. In the contemporary United States, this dire outlook drives a contentious debate about what key events, nations, and people are essential for history students. Sam Wineburg says that we are asking the wrong questions. This book demolishes the conventional notion that there is one true history and one best way to teach it. Although most of us think of history-and learn it-as a conglomeration of facts, dates, and key figures, for professional historians it is a way of knowing, a method for developing an understanding about the relationships of peoples and events in the past. A cognitive psychologist, Wineburg has been engaged in studying what is intrinsic to historical thinking, how it might be taught, and why most students still adhere to the "one damned thing after another" concept of history. Whether he is comparing how students and historians interpret documentary evidence or analyzing children's drawings, Wineburg's essays offer "rough maps of how ordinary people think about the past and use it to understand the present. " Arguing that we all absorb lessons about history in many settings-in kitchen table conversations, at the movies, or on the world-wide web, for instance-these essays acknowledge the role of collective memory in filtering what we learn in school and shaping our historical thinking. Author note: Sam Wineburg is Professor of Education at Stanford University and formerly Professor of Cognitive Studies in Education and Adjunct Professor of History at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Historicising Heritage and Emotions: The Affective Histories of Blood, Stone and Land

by Alicia Marchant

Historicising Heritage and Emotions examines how heritage is connected to and between people and places through emotion, both in the past and today. Discussion is focused on the overlapping categories of blood (families and bloodlines), stone (monuments and memorials) and land (landscape and places imbued with memories), with the contributing authors exploring the ways in which emotions invest heritage with affective power, and the transformative effects of this power in individual, community and cultural contexts. The 13 chapters that make up the volume take examples from the premodern and modern eras, and from two connected geographical regions, the United Kingdom, and Australia and the Pacific. Each chapter seeks to identify, historicise and contextualise the processes of heritage and the emotional regimes at play, locating the processes within longer historical and transnational genealogies and critically appraising them as part of broader cultural currents. Theoretically grounded in new approaches to the history of emotions and critical heritage studies, the analysis challenges the traditional scholarly focus on heritage in its modern forms, offering multifaceted premodern and modern case studies that demonstrate heritage and emotion to have complex and vibrant histories. Offering transhistorical and multidisciplinary discussion around the ways in which we can talk about, discuss, categorise and theorise heritage and emotion in different historical contexts, Historicising Heritage and Emotions is a valuable resource for students and scholars interested in heritage, emotions and history.

Histories and Stories from Chiapas: Border Identities in Southern Mexico

by R. Aída Hernández Castillo

The 1994 Zapatista uprising of Chiapas' Maya peoples against the Mexican government shattered the state myth that indigenous groups have been successfully assimilated into the nation. In this wide-ranging study of identity formation in Chiapas, Aída Hernández delves into the experience of a Maya group, the Mam, to analyze how Chiapas' indigenous peoples have in fact rejected, accepted, or negotiated the official discourse on "being Mexican" and participating in the construction of a Mexican national identity.<P><P> Hernández traces the complex relations between the Mam and the national government from 1934 to the Zapatista rebellion. She investigates the many policies and modernization projects through which the state has attempted to impose a Mexican identity on the Mam and shows how this Maya group has resisted or accommodated these efforts. In particular, she explores how changing religious affiliation, women's and ecological movements, economic globalization, state policies, and the Zapatista movement have all given rise to various ways of "being Mam" and considers what these indigenous identities may mean for the future of the Mexican nation. The Spanish version of this book won the 1997 Fray Bernardino de Sahagún national prize for the best social anthropology research in Mexico.

The Histories Book 1: Clio

by Herodotus

Herodotus was an ancient Greek historian who lived in the fifth century BC (c.484 - 425 BC). He has been called the "Father of History", and was the first historian known to collect his materials systematically, test their accuracy to a certain extent and arrange them in a well-constructed and vivid narrative. The Histories-his masterpiece and the only work he is known to have produced-is a record of his "inquiry", being an investigation of the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars and including a wealth of geographical and ethnographical information. The Histories, were divided into nine books, named after the nine Muses: the "Muse of History", Clio, representing the first book, then Euterpe, Thaleia, Melpomene, Terpsichore, Erato, Polymnia, Ourania and Calliope for books 2 to 9, respectively.

The Histories Book 2: Euterpe

by Herodotus

Herodotus was an ancient Greek historian who lived in the fifth century BC (c.484 - 425 BC). He has been called the "Father of History", and was the first historian known to collect his materials systematically, test their accuracy to a certain extent and arrange them in a well-constructed and vivid narrative. The Histories-his masterpiece and the only work he is known to have produced-is a record of his "inquiry", being an investigation of the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars and including a wealth of geographical and ethnographical information. The Histories, were divided into nine books, named after the nine Muses: the "Muse of History", Clio, representing the first book, then Euterpe, Thaleia, Melpomene, Terpsichore, Erato, Polymnia, Ourania and Calliope for books 2 to 9, respectively.

Histories of Bioinvasions in the Mediterranean (Environmental History Ser. #8)

by Simon Pooley Ana Isabel Queiroz

Bioinvasions is a current top research subject for natural sciences, social sciences and humanities and a major concern for conservationists, land managers and planners. In the last decades, new findings, perspectives and practices have revealed the multifaceted challenges of preventing new introductions and dealing with those invasive species that harm natural ecosystems, economy and human welfare. This book brings together environmental historians and natural scientists to share their studies and experiences on the human dimensions of biological invasions from the ancient past to the current challenges. The collection of papers focuses on the Mediterranean region and deals with aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems on the mainland and islands, ranging from marine and freshwater environments to coastal marshlands and forests. A wide diversity of animals and plants are featured, from marine fishes to marine and freshwater crustaceans, invertebrates, reptiles and amphibians, birds and mammals, to grasses, shrubs and trees. This book is a contribution to the scientific debate on how to deal with the historical dimensions of biological invasions, fostering dialogue between cultural and ecological explanations of environmental change, to inform environmental policy and management. It has been organized in three sections: the first is the editors’ introduction, in which they review the existing literature and highlight relevant concepts and ideas; the second is about alien species in the Mediterranean region; the third includes cases from other Mediterranean-type regions.

Histories of Sexuality: Antiquity to Sexual Revolution

by Stephen Garton

"First Published in 2004, Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company."

Histories of Suicide

by David Wright John Weaver

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, with more than one million fatalities each year. During the post-war period, the rate of completed suicides has risen dramatically, especially among young men and Aboriginal peoples living in the Western world. While this has naturally led to growing concern amongst health care practitioners and policy experts, relatively little is known about the history of attempted and completed suicide. Histories of Suicide is the first book to examine the history of suicide in diverse national contexts, including Japan, Scotland, Australia, Soviet Russia, Peru, United States, France, South Africa, and Canada, to reveal the different social, political, economic, and cultural factors that inform our understanding of suicide. This interdisciplinary collection of essays assembles historians, health economists, anthropologists, and sociologists, who examine the history of suicide from a variety of approaches to provide crucial insight into how suicide differs across nations, cultures, and time periods. Focusing on developments from the eighteenth century to the present, the contributors examine vitally important topics such as the medicalization of suicide, representations of mental illness, psychiatric disputes, and the frequency of suicide amongst soldiers. An illuminating volume of studies, Histories of Suicide is a fascinating examination of the phenomenon of self-destruction throughout different historical periods and nations.

Histories of the Jews of Egypt: An Imagined Bourgeoisie, 1880s-1950s (Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern History)

by Dario Miccoli

Up until the advent of Nasser and the 1956 War, a thriving and diverse Jewry lived in Egypt – mainly in the two cities of Alexandria and Cairo, heavily influencing the social and cultural history of the country. Histories of the Jews of Egypt argues that this Jewish diaspora should be viewed as "an imagined bourgeoisie". It demonstrates how, from the late nineteenth century up to the 1950s, a resilient bourgeois imaginary developed and influenced the lives of Egyptian Jews both in the public arena, in institutions such as the school, and in the home. From the schools of the Alliance Israélite Universelle and the Cairo lycée français to Alexandrian marriage contracts and interwar Zionist newspapers – this book explains how this imaginary was characterised by a great capacity to adapt to the evolutions of late nineteenth and early twentieth century Egypt, but later deteriorated alongside increasingly strong Arab nationalism and the political upheavals that the country experienced from the 1940s onwards. Offering a novel perspective on the history of modern Egypt and its Jews, and unravelling too often forgotten episodes and personalities which contributed to the making of an incredibly diverse and lively Jewish diaspora at the crossroads of Europe and the Middle East, this book is of interest to scholars of Modern Egypt, Jewish History and of Mediterranean History.

Histories of the Transgender Child

by Julian Gill-Peterson

A groundbreaking twentieth-century history of transgender children With transgender rights front and center in American politics, media, and culture, the pervasive myth still exists that today’s transgender children are a brand new generation—pioneers in a field of new obstacles and hurdles. Histories of the Transgender Child shatters this myth, uncovering a previously unknown twentieth-century history when transgender children not only existed but preexisted the term transgender and its predecessors, playing a central role in the medicalization of trans people, and all sex and gender.Beginning with the early 1900s when children with “ambiguous” sex first sought medical attention, to the 1930s when transgender people began to seek out doctors involved in altering children’s sex, to the invention of the category gender, and finally the 1960s and ’70s when, as the field institutionalized, transgender children began to take hormones, change their names, and even access gender confirmation, Julian Gill-Peterson reconstructs the medicalization and racialization of children’s bodies. Throughout, they foreground the racial history of medicine that excludes black and trans of color children through the concept of gender’s plasticity, placing race at the center of their analysis and at the center of transgender studies.Until now, little has been known about early transgender history and life and its relevance to children. Using a wealth of archival research from hospitals and clinics, including incredible personal letters from children to doctors, as well as scientific and medical literature, this book reaches back to the first half of the twentieth century—a time when the category transgender was not available but surely existed, in the lives of children and parents.

Histories of Transnational Crime

by Gerben Bruinsma

Histories of Transnational Crime provides a broad, historical framework for understanding the developments in research of transnational crime over the centuries. This volume provides examples of transnational crime, and places them in a broad historical context, which has so far been missing from this field of study. The contributions to this comprehensive volume explore the causes and historical precursors of six main types of transnational crime: -piracy -human smuggling -arms trafficking -drug trafficking -art and antique trafficking -corporate crime. The historical contributions demonstrate that transnational crime is not a novel phenomenon of recent globalization and that, beyond organized crime groups, powerful individuals, governments and business corporations have been heavily involved. Through a systematic historical and contextual analysis of these types of transnational crime, the contributions to this volume provide a fundamental understanding of why and how various forms of transnational crime are still present in the contemporary world. In the past two decades, the study of transnational crime has developed from a subset of the study of organized crime to its own recognized field of study, covering distinct societal threats and requiring a particular approach.

History: From the Dawn of Civilization to the Present Day

by Adam Hart-Davis

History tells the story of mankind from prehistory to the present day using a unique visual approach, filled with timelines, images of artifacts, photography, graphics, and more. Now in its third edition, this much-loved classic has been revised and updated to bring today's current events into wider context and includes all new material on the global recession, green technologies, and the Internet and social media. <p><p> This fully revised and updated third edition of History includes:<p> • Inventions, discoveries, and ideas that have shaped world history. <br> • A look at human achievement through artifacts, painting, sculpture, and architecture <br> • An examination of humankind in context as part of the natural world. <br> • Eyewitness accounts and biographies of key figures. <br> • A comprehensive timeline chronicling the key events of the countries of the world.<br> • Key contemporary issues, political developments, changes in leadership, and more. <p> Homo sapiens have remained the same species, largely unchanged in genetic makeup and anatomy since the Cro-Magnon era. By contrast, the cultural, social, and technological changes since then have been nothing less than extraordinary. History is a thought-provoking journey, revealing the common threads and forces that have shaped human history.

History: A Very Short Introduction

by John H. Arnold

Starting with an examination of how historians work, this "Very Short Introduction" aims to explore history in a general, pithy, and accessible manner, rather than to delve into specific periods.

History 11th Standard - Tamilnadu Board

by Training State Council of Educational Research

History Textbook for the 11th Standard Students, preparing for Tamil Nadu State Board Exam.

History Alive: Pursuing American Ideals

by Teachers' Curriculum Institute

After studying History Alive Pursuing American Ideals, a student will be able to know what kind of people and nation America is.

History Alive! The United States Through Industrialism, Interactive Student Notebook

by Teachers' Curriculum Institute

NIMAC-sourced textbook

The History and Description of Africa and of the Notable Things therein contained: Written by Al-Hassan Ibn-Mohammed Al-Wezaz Al-Fasi, a Moor, baptised as Giovanni Leone, but better known as Leo Africanus. Done into English in the Year 1600, by John Pory

by Robert Brown

Containing Book I of the original, edited, with an introduction and notes. This and the following two volumes (First Series 93 and 94) have continuous pagination. This is a new print-on-demand hardback edition of the volume first published in 1896.

History and Geography (Grade #4)

by E. D. Hirsch Jr.

The History and Politics of Exhumation: Royal Bodies and Lesser Mortals

by Michael L. Nash

This book argues that a serious, scholarly study on exhumation is long overdue. Examining more well-known cases, such as that of Richard III, the Romanovs, and Tutankhamen, alongside the more obscure, Michael Nash explores the motivations beyond exhumation, from retribution to repatriation. Along the way, he explores the influence of Gothic fiction in the eighteenth century, the notoriety of the Ressurection Men in the nineteenth century, and the archeological heyday of the twentieth century.

The History and Practice of Humanitarian Intervention and Aid in Africa

by Bronwen Everill Josiah Kaplan

The history of humanitarian intervention has often overlooked Africa. This book brings together perspectives from history, cultural studies, international relations, policy, and non-governmental organizations to analyze the themes, continuities and discontinuities in Western humanitarian engagement with Africa.

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